Page 1

HOLLY SAUNDERS STUDENT NO. 583535

SEMESTER 1/2012 GROUP 7


My Design is based off the process involved in the Petrification of Wood. The Key Elements involved in this process are: Compression, Tetrahedral Environments, Organic Decay, Carbon Deposits and Permineralisation.

Of those concepts around the process, I explored different ideas and came up with different concepts. Many of which were unsuccessful. Permineralisation occurs when timber is felled and exposed to condensation and pressure which builds up mineral deposits as the organic matter decays. What you are left with is a gemmed replica of a tree. In the top right hand corner is an image of a stylised copper wire tree mounted on a piece of petrified wood. The piece was made by Judy Byington, who sells these clever sculptures online. It is titled “Petrified Wood-Juniper� and is available at: http://fineartamerica.com To the left is an image of a cross section of petrified wood. You can actually still make out the tree rings where the sediments have formed over time. This was sourced from: http://www.rainbowpetrifiedwood.com/

MODULE 1 - PETRIFIED WOOD


In exploring compression as a part of the petrification process I realised the concept was a very vast one to grasp. It was a bit of a challenge for me to narrow it down. Nevertheless, I did and it was a precursor to my synergetic outcome.

Above is a quick sketch of a stylized arrow representing two forces moving towards each other to create a sense of compression. Because they are identical it is intended that they equal each other in force. To the right you have circles and spirals complimented by the springs below. I have experimented with circular structures and cylinders to strengthen tensile bonds. I decided that I could elaborate further on this concept and so I developed further ideas to communicate a more abstract notion of compression, in order to symbolise one of the major processes petrified wood undergoes.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION


And so, compression rings were implemented into the project alongside other compressive elements. To the left, we see it being combined with a tetrahedron. Below we see the tetrahedrons as they join together. At this stage they are meant to be an external representation of compression as the pyramids and the concept of compression tie in unanimously.

I thoroughly explored the concept of cylinders, before looking to another design principal for inspiration.

The tetrahedrons were meant to overlap each other and strengthen the exterior, like in the example above. Instead when joining the hollow bits up I would run into some design problems getting them to mesh with each other. It would be later on that I would meld them with another concept explored over petrified wood before I came up with a viable way to tie the compressed tetrahedrons together.

Compression is also something found in tetrahedrons.

Instead of cylinders I made the exterior angular, which allowed me to still implement compression rings on top for extra emphasis and aesthetic appeal. I also revised and considered the possibility of implementing coils modeled off the spring examples I presented on the page prior.

To the right you can see strips coiled around concept models which I was using to explore the concept of compression as my core process.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION

CONTINUED‌


Pressure was another concept I considered when brain-storming over the concept of compression. I found this overly difficult to represent however because most things that represent pressure also represent various other principals as well. Instead I explored it in the specific form of pinching and then opposing that with depression as seen with my tetrahedral concept.

Uysal Mehmet Ali - Pinching Earth Here we see a visual representation where compression is found in natural environment. This statue is clever in how it takes an every day item of artificial design and appears to stretch and distort the ground. This was most useful to me in identifying yet another way to manipulate the project in order to convey the desired traits and principles. It’s a clever yet only semi-abstract way to convey the concept of connecting something together. I do not endeavor to be this obvious in my design. Information acquired from: http://www.saatchionline.com/mehmetaliuysal

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION

CONTINUED‌


Pixilation is a way of representing digital compression. The images below were a good example of pixilation in Sculpture.

The artist responsible for this artwork on the top left is unknown to me, although that doesn’t change the usefulness of this example. Pixels make up a very large portion of imagery in our digital era and so it’s not surprising that people would seek to portray art in this way. These sorts of artworks can be communicated very effectively despite their large components. Source acquired from: http://www.jeanniejeannie.com 2011.

In this sculpture designed by Douglas Coupland that sits outside the Convention Centre in Vancouver, I see digitalization of non abstract elements. This work helps me to explore the concept further and look at implementing sketched options to further implement compression in a more abstract way. Sourced from: http://www.weheart.co.uk/2010/07/28/digitalorca-by-douglas-coupland/

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION

CONTINUED…


To the left is an example of pixilation in architecture. This was designed by MVRDV and is labeled “The Cloud” after the pixilated cloud like expansion that only occurs half way up the towers and connects them. There is a little controversy over their uncanny resemblance to the World Trade Centre towers in New York at the point of impact on 9/11. I believe it’s a very good lesson to learn; that while many concepts are great to implement there needs to be some sensitivity and awareness when it comes to designing something so prominent.

To the right is my attempt to integrate pixilation and aforementioned triangles to answer my Natural Process. The greater aspects of it is in the triangular fixtures that sit in each other and interconnect, and in the ability to expel lots of light from between them. Probably the weaker aspects of it is that it only slightly answers decay and Permineralisation.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION

CONTINUED…


Voussoir Cloud - IwamotoScott Architecture (Right) Arches are another form of compression and provide an aesthetic solution to bearing substantial loads. It was based off the Voussoir Bricks that are traditionally used in compression arches according to http://www.architectmagazine.com/engineering/voussoircloud.aspx?printerfriendly=true

I plan on trying to implement arches as it just about guarantees structural integrity and makes the model look good. It will also help me answer the compression aspect of my model.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING COMPRESSION

CONTINUED‌


Tetrahedrons display compressive qualities and have great structural integrity. They are as important to the process of petrifying wood as much as compression is. To the right is the City Council Building in Tempe, Arizona. It not only adopts the inverted triangular exterior but also has a mass of windows that let a lot of light in, which is something I will explore later. Designed by architects Michael and Kemper Goodwin and completed in 1970/1. Sourced at: http://www.tempe.gov/historicpres/HE-HistoricEligible/CityHall.html To the left is My own development on tetrahedrons. I have thought to implement holes between tiles and create negative space to tie in with my next concept: Permineralisation and decay. The tetrahedrons were going to be overlaid on panneling before I decided it was too intricate and didn’t answer the process properly. In the bottom right hand corner I have included another example of Modern Architecture adopting Inverted Pyramids. This piece is the Victoria & Albert Museum in Scotland which was conceptualised by http://www.rex-ny.com/ This building also admits a lot of light and is designed specifically as a creative hub.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING TETRAHEDRONS


After covering the concepts of Compression and Tetrahedrons, I moved to the concept of exploring the decay and Permineralisation that happens to the wood after it falls. I started to think about all the negative space that I would need to have in order to make an effective lantern and realised that it ties in really well with the concept of decay and the way that light reacts when it hits minerals. Therefore I opted to explore the different ways I could adapt holes in my work to demonstrate this concept. In the top right corner is a model lantern by http://www.etruxes.com/architecture/tapered-circles/ which more or less gives you an idea of how I wanted to incorporate the holes in my paneling. They developed these holes using the picture below.

What resulted from my research into this was a lot of experimentation with the way light plays off models and refracts off gloss and shiny things.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING DECAY & PERMINERALISATION


From left to right I experimented with refraction to see if it was feasible. After colouring in the majority of an A4 page of paper black, I held it under the light but didn’t get the response I was after. I next covered it in craft glue and allowed that to dry with varying textures.

Before it had completely dried though I held it up under the light and was able to get refracted light off the page. This is what helped me establish that I only wanted a small portion of light to escape my lantern. By this stage I realized that I wanted to consider refraction as a property of Permineralisation. Realizing that I wasn’t going to get the effect I was after by refracting light down a long cylinder of paper, I decided to consider how I might overcome this obstacle.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING DECAY & PERMINERALISATION

CONTINUED…


I started to experiment with holes and applying them to paper and plasticine models.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING DECAY & PERMINERALISATION

CONTINUED‌


I started to experiment with different styles to incorporate the concepts together. From Left to Right, the one on the left explores Compression in angles and layers, Organic Matter in the tendrils, Permineralisation and decay in the holes scattered about the model. But I wasn’t impressed with the aesthetics. The middle model explores decay in compressed layers but doesn’t answer the organic decay as there is really nothing organic to decay from.

The model on the right explores Tetrahedrons and Decay/Permineralisation but not so much Compression.

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING DECAY & PERMINERALISATION

CONTINUED…


Just when I thought I was getting somewhere I brought my ideas to class and got valuable feedback. I wasn’t able to establish a sensible working model because I wasn’t considering all of the possibilities that would give me the most complementary form. That answer lay in the Radioisotope of Carbon. I decided to implement the graphed image of the radioactive isotope as shown below. This is what I came up with:

MODULE 1 - EXPLORING THE RADIOISOTOPE OF CARBON


Using the abstractions I was able to come up with from the Radioisotope Graph; I started to model a new lantern. This first image to the left was just the beginning‌

MODULE 1 - DEFINING THE ABSTRACTION OF PETRIFIED WOOD


…I had designed an answer to compression with arches, from which the light of the central shaft shines. I had answered decay with a tongue that represented the tree sap on the most organic section of the model while the tail was amassed in holes of decay. I had answered the question of the radioisotope with the paneling on which those holes sat and I had answered Permineralisation with the negative space and light that speaks of the jewels within…

MODULE 1 - DEFINING THE ABSTRACTION OF PETRIFIED WOOD

CONTINUED…


Module 2


But that wasn’t enough. Petrified wood occurs in the ground and my model was designed to be suspended. I also needed to consider the rate of decay more carefully. I tried to come up with alternatives, models that stemmed from the ground and incorporated sedimentation as well as Permineralisation. I struggled to revise my model and come up with a concept that allowed for earthy sedimentation, as well as the decay. Although the decay was just consistent and in no way reflected the gradual decay or steady process of compression that produced the minerals in the place of the organic matter. I tried thinking about how it would look in paper form and decided I really didn’t like the concepts I came up with.

The image on the right, while answering compression, sedimentation and decay, was too random and hard to replicate in Rhino. It was also not going to easily join together as a paper model. I didn’t see it being successful. Also, the image on the right is too basic. It is a play with light and something that stems from the ground but it was only an attempt to create something that could rise and curve like my former model.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping


I started to explore layering and came across different methods of emphasizing decay and sedimentation through the model. The picture represented on the left is simply layers and sedimentation over decay and Permineralisation, the holes being decay and the light representing the Permineralisation. That wasn’t enough so I decided to elaborate. My concept needed to be something placed on the ground, and represent compression as well as sedimentation, decay and mineral growth. What you can see on the top right is my attempt at placing a compression ring from the sediment that encloses the decay and Permineralisation, while also having the decay and Permineralisation present outside the sedimentation and explore the rate of the decay. I scrapped the idea almost immediately. It didn’t work because it wasn’t layered enough, and didn’t explain itself as sediment. It also didn’t explain compression nearly as aesthetically as I would have liked. This is why I decided not to explore this concept further.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED…


Inner and outer layers were a way of explaining sedimentation and inner decay. I folded a long piece of plasticine over and made it wavy to reflect the sedimentation as shown in the image at the top left. I then created larger holes to incorporate Permineralisation and the idea of making them different sizes was to answer decay. This is seen in the bottom left and right images.

I also decided to make jagged portions to accommodate crystallization however this was not something I wanted to incorporate properly. It was also impractical as the design did not sit but rather, had a pivot point. If I was to expand on this model it would fan out on the sides and support itself in a semi-circle. I felt this was too removed from the process because the semi circle, the jagged portions, the size of the holes and the overall modeling requirements would mean that this model would not sit together and would fall apart under its own weight, therefore making it entirely impractical.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED‌


Attempts at layering my original concept… Frustrated with the thought of not being able to represent my concept properly I continued trying to render my original form. To the right are the images of my first model, attempting to create a basic shape that I would be able to loft and recreate. While playing with these tools I managed to blow-up the organic tongue of my model as seen on the bottom right. I loved this concept of layering. I then attempted to create the top layer and attach it to the model but was unable to do so as I simply lacked the expertise or understanding of rhino at this stage.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED…


Next I decided to play with layers coupled with tetrahedrons. The model needed to be based on the ground so I considered a sidefacing model with the joins allowing for holes in stages. This model was extremely top heavy and was unable to support its own weight when placed down vertically. I decided to tear the model open along one side and while the sediment was portrayed on the outside, I would place a span of decayed and permineralised webbing on the inside. It was too hard to do, as the layers were compressive and the webbing would have to be thin so as to carry the concept and layering and still provide enough light. Already this was impractical. I decided not to pursue it due to material limitations, both in paper and in plasticine.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED‌


I decided to draw up a table and create some boundaries for my design. The form had to rest on the ground but the priority was to determine what would rise from the ground to give it shape. Concept

Solid

Neg. Space

Neg. + Solid

Light

Decay

Black Forms

Holes in Black

Black Inner Cavity w/ Conical Holes

-

Permineralisation

Quadrilaterals

Holes in White

White Outer Cavity and Shadowing with Holes for direct Light

Light Represents Minerals Forming

Sedimentation

Horizontal Levels

-

Layering of Light and Dark on White + Black

Emphasizes Layers

Mineral Deposits

Vertical Levels

-

The abstracted image of water and minerals seeping in towards the decay

Emphasizes Minerals, (must be shaped as a square)

Inner Layer

Arches

-

Black

minerals

Outer Layer

Inverted V’s

-

White

Minerals, Sedimentation and decay

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED…


I adapted my old model with the intention of having it rest on the ground to give a proper representation of where the process occurs. This is what I have based my Rhino models off.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED‌


Developing my skills,

I narrowed down what I needed to start with as a base model. I created a lofted surface with a tunnel through the middle, again working off my original concept, though I was exploring how to rest it on the ground. I then turned it on its side and played with the idea of it sitting on the ground and creating a curved shape from the ground up. It still had the compressive cavities underneath which represented decay and permineralisation on the inside. It also represents layers and sedimentation. The only issue is then creating these contours in paneling tools. I first tried to create the objects and attach them to the model in Rhino but quickly found it impossible. As you can see on the right hand side, Rhino does not recognize the added panels when it comes to paneling a shape. I had to delete them and look for another way around it.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED‌


Experimenting with paneling tools I generated a series of 3D panels to get a feel for the overall function. The image at the top was the first attempt. Strangely the offset grid points fell below the model in two places only. This created a strange effect that I really didn’t mind. The second attempt created a bit of a geode concept. With one side smooth and the other jagged it would nicely represent the

permineralisation if the tops of the triangles were sawn off and light allowed to escape.

The third attempt was again triangles but more sparse. I didn’t like this concept as much if I were to consider representing a geode as part of permineralisation. The triangular angles were still so generic and so with the practice I was getting I was able to consider other options. Among those that I did like for the way it represented the quadrilateral holes as mentioned in my table is the image on the bottom right. A clever render of the image is able to portray a sort of waffle effect, however my model that I was trying to represent was not shaped like this so I left it as another concept to be explored at a later date.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED…


I then practiced with the Variable 3D paneling tools by bringing in my own patterns. On the top left is my first attempt and I have used an ellipse.

Although it does not answer my design at all it still gave me valuable insight into how to panel my model. The next practice attempt allowed me to rib my design. The ribs are concave and circular. I really like the effect but unfortunately, unless I decide to divide my channel of light into varied avenues it will not prove useful. The third practice attempt at variable 3D Paneling was to incorporate the surface texture of my model, however it simply recreated it in a multitude of little shapes that covered the back of my model. This was not what I was after as it is too far removed from my main design to be of use to me.

The final attempt at playing with the variable 3D paneling was to incorporate piping onto the back and underside of my model and play around with adding and removing components. Part of the layer is missing from the underside as I learned to ungroup and steadily delete the unwanted additions.

MODULE 2 – Revising and Reshaping

CONTINUED‌


Reflection My model has gone in a different direction than originally anticipated. Yes it rests on the ground, as opposed to hanging suspended in the air like my original concept Yes it answers the various trait requirements such as permineralisation, sedimentation, decay, compression and layering However, it’s flimsy, it’s hard to model when considering material limitations and I believe there are different ways to present this concept that have not yet been explored. In exploring different alternatives and finding new ways to represent these concepts I will be better able to create a true, but abstract representation of the process of petrified wood. This is why I have not created a paper model as yet. The structure cannot be supported under its own weight according to the current design. I am exploring layering in a new way, considering new layering tactics to allow light out and imply the assimilation of wood to stone through the intake of sediment laden water.

MODULE 2 – Reflection


springs ideas: http://www.masterspring.com/images/compression_springs(bjt042).gif Manganites and Cupite: (researching tetrahedral constructs which gave me an idea for my texture) http://sartbaeva.chem.ox.ac.uk/Research_component.html Inverted pyramids in architecture: http://inhabitat.com/the-victoria-albert-museum-as-a-daylit-inverted-pyramid/va-museum-at-dundee-by-rex-2/?extend=1 also: http://www.rex-ny.com/work/v-a-at-dundee http://www.tempe.gov/historicpres/HE-HistoricEligible/CityHall.html Tension and compression: http://www.mercedes-benzclassic.com/content/classic/mpc/mpc_classic_website/en/mpc_home/mbc/home/museum/impressions.flash.html and http://www.e-architect.co.uk/images/jpgs/stuttgart/mercedes_benz_museum_un131108_3.jpg Coils in structures: http://www.civilengineergroup.com/tension-compression-yin-yang-structural-engineering.html Examples of Petrified Wood: http://www.rainbowpetrifiedwood.com/ For the purposes of emphasizing the negative space in order to show degeneration of organic matter I have opted to introduce holes. These holes harbor the light and allow it to glow through.. this is sort of what I was thinking of. Sort of. http://www.etruxes.com/architecture/tapered-circles/ To explain the radioisotope of Carbon: http://www.yellowtang.org/images/carbon_isotope_b_c_la_784.jpg Pixelation http://www.weheart.co.uk/2010/07/28/digital-orca-by-douglas-coupland/ http://cdnimg.visualizeus.com/thumbs/2b/0d/compression,humour,motivational,poster2b0ded17843e7401263f6276ebbe5a63_i.jpg http://www.jeanniejeannie.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/pixelpour22.jpg http://inhabitat.com/the-cloud-mvrdvs-luxury-twin-towers-joined-by-a-lush-pixelated-cluster-in-seoul/the-cloud-mvrdv1/?extend=1 Carbon-14 Radioisotope http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/images/addgateway_graphccad.gif

REFERENCES

Petrified Wood Module 1&2  

module 1 and 2 of my petrified wood inspired lantern

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you