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“INVOCATIONS OF THE SOUL” MAY 5th - JUNE 11th 2016

HOLLIS TAGGART GALLERIES 521 W 26 th St.|New York


“INVOCATIONS OF THE SOUL” First print run of 2000 catalogs March 2016 Milan, Italy Texts by: Luciano Caprile | Jonathan Goodman | Fundación P.A. | Pietro Dormia Graphic design: Arch. Pietro Dormia Photographs by: Aurelio Amendola | Bruno Cortese | Daniele Cortese | Pietro Dormia | Luiz Tripolli Translation by: Caleidos | SL _Madrid

HOLLIS TAGGART GALLERIES 521 W 26 st. 7th floor | NYC 10001 phone: 2126284000 info@hollistaggart.com


PABLO ATCHUGARRY “INVOCATIONS OF THE SOUL” MAY 5th - JUNE 11th 2016

HOLLIS TAGGART GALLERIES 521 W 26 th St.|New York


CONTENTS 21 25 39

The quarry The hands The making process

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Exhibitions

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Plates

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Biography Selected solo exhibitions Group exhibitions

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Roma, Museo dei fori imperiali - Mercati di Traiano Pablo Atchugarry "Città eterna, eterni marmi" São Paulo Museu Brasileiro da Escultura, A viagem pela matéria, Pablo Atchugarry Pablo in New York Hollis Taggart Galleries: "Lives in stone" New York Palace hotel Times square Exhibition Hollis taggart Galleries: "Heroic activities"

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Monumental sculptures

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Euskadi Life after life Via crucis Movement in the world Movement in the world Nest of dreams Luz del Sur Olimpic spirit I Olimpic spirit II Cosmic embrace Luz y Energía de Punta del Este Light of the south In the way of light Biennale di Venezia "Dreaming of peace"

Untitled Monumento alla Civiltà e Cultura del Lavoro lecchese


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ASCENDING INVOCATIONS: FROM THE ETERNAL MARBLES TO THE METROPOLIS OF ART

A happy coincidence or an extraordinary consequence sometimes enriches events with an unforeseen and magical layer, as if destiny, in its obscure calculations, were trying to favor an unexpected direction, or one that had not been considered by those involved. Even more appealing connections and unexpected layers are created when art comes into play, as is the case on this occasion. An important tribute to Pablo Atchugarry came to an end at the Museo dei Fori Imperiali – Mercati di Traiano in February. This location is one of the mythical places that preserve the relics of memory linked to classical art, and the title of the Capitoline event itself, “Eternal City, eternal marbles”, was a clear engagement with the use of Carrara marble statuary: stretching as far back as Ancient Rome, it has been used by major sculptors as great as Michelangelo, persuasively involved in the Baroque, and come down to us today. By admiring Atchugarry’s works alongside relics of this kind, we have been able to gain an understanding of just how the course of history has found a happy landing place in this artist: in his gesture, the drapery of some of the headless statues find the creative response that allows them to be included in the present, while retaining the inherent

gift of atemporality that is reserved for those who succeed in interpreting their own time through the valuable lesson of the past. His ascending invocations—marked by the plastic evolution of forms that refer to a movement of folds or a recurring breath of emotions that can even be revived tactilely—move across the dual and alluring face of a classical figurative reference and a pure exercise of the mind made real through its changing appearance. Atchugarry uses a similar perceptive ambivalence to investigate material, to discover its constant suggestions, to grasp its essence. He, in fact, allows himself to be guided by the block of stone in search of a thought to combine with the gesture that sometimes anticipates this thought. It surprises him with the complicity of the substance that can suddenly suggest alternative and initially unforeseen tracks, which, for this very reason, become all the more attractive because they have been corroborated by the richness of mystery. At this point, the presence of his sculptures in the Hollis Taggart Galleries in New York takes on a cloak of particular significance: for Atchugarry such an event represents a striking link between the recent exhibition in the heart of the art of the past and his arrival in the city that has been promoting and welcoming contemporary creative offerings for many decades. It is an arrival rich with suggestions. In this exhibition space towered over by skyscrapers, the Carrara marble investigated by our artist fills the gap between that distant time and the present by exhibiting a bridge or memory link with history. The white spirals that move between the volume and emptiness of the conquered space welcome rhythms of columns expanding upwards, dilating gradually and leaving a possible narrative continuation to the evolution of a discourse that with Pablo knows no limits. For him the extre-

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me and unattainable edge of a finishing point is infinite; it behaves like a horizon line with constantly moving perspective. The route taken by his hand, thought and desire can find nourishment and response in places capable of welcoming harmony and beauty through a three-dimensionality that constantly surprises the viewer.

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Thus far we have mentioned white Carrara marble (the symbol of statuary art), but for Atchugarry pink Portuguese marble also plays an important role because its sometimes inherent impurities suggest a route to be taken through the body of the stone to the chisel or drill, rather than being a hindrance or an annoyance. With this in mind, we should at least mention, as a result of a similar process, a current work exhibiting lines that converge upwards to create a soft fabric, a sweet coming-together of breezes, an endearing flight of drapery. Finally, the exhibition also includes a number of bronzes that reveal a color not usually found in the other works, immediately marking them out. These are distinctive in their blue tones, which envelope forms and call to the light, or in a grey-black that brings a severe grace to the modelled substance, or in the intense red and chrome yellow that chase recurring dreams of harmony. However, the hand that has left its mark on the clay has not forgotten the inventive behavior usually reserved for marble when it comes to obtaining a similarly astonishing plastic result. One that will also provide visitors with further visual, perceptive and emotional temptations. Luciano Caprile


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PABLO ATCHUGARRY: THE TRUTH OF STONE A timeless appreciation of stone is found in the work of Uruguayan-born, Italy-based sculptor Pablo Atchugarry, whose career and ongoing energy seem almost mythical in report. His work approaches the classical tradition, but inevitably takes on a contemporary ambience by virtue of its abstraction. What is it about marble that resonates so deeply within us as viewers? Its properties and physical beauty are renowned, as is the long tradition, stretching back to ancient Greece, of excellent sculpture that uses it as a material. There is a sense of weight, of gravitas, that infuses marble not only because of its extraordinary legacy in Western fine art, but also because the substance itself comes from the earth. This combination of nature and culture make it remarkably enduring as a medium, impressive for its innate force and strength as well as its ability to be shaped into both figurative and abstract form. Atchugarry’s unusual ability to find non-objective shapes in raw blocks of stone enables him to build a cultural object from nature, from the earth itself. There is a chthonic aura to the pieces he carves; their elegant, upright forms, like ghostly apparitions, existing seemingly outside of time. Another outstanding aspect of Atchugarry’s work is its craft. In New York, since the days when the East Village was alive with galleries in the 1970s, a rough-and-ready aesthetic has been a point of reference inherent in young people’s work. A sense of craftsmanship is not always available in the art we see today. So it is with a full measure of gratification that we come across art that is expertly handled, as occurs in Atchugarry’s case. The tradition of the artist/ craftsman remains alive in Europe, where the focus may not be so intensely contemporized as occurs in America, where poet Ezra Pound’s dictum, “Make it new,” remains the goal of artists. So, in contrast, the Italian-residing carver Atchugarry’s art speaks to a tradition that contrasts deeply with New York’s drive toward novelty. Yet his ability to speak to us, now, cannot be denied. His combination of skill and independent imagination makes him a sculptor of abiding interest, whose gifts reflect the grand history of art. But one does not wish to make of him a stand-in for tradi-

tional aesthetic values. First of all, the work is mostly abstract and is tied neatly into the history of abstract sculpture. Second, the forms describe a space in which nonobjective imagery and figuration meet, so that the standing verticals of Atchugarry’s work read as symbols or sentinels. This is a contemporary approach to art, not an antiquated one. In a real sense, Atchugarry’s efforts belong to modernism— his sculptures relate well to the early totemic work of Louise Bourgeois. These were done in wood, but often painted white; they suggest, as does Atchugarry’s work, the image of figures rising up into empty space. The art of the late Greek-born, America-based sculptor Dimitri Hadzi also co-

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mes to mind. Among other mediums, he works in stone, fashioning mostly organic abstractions; while these do not stylistically resemble Atchugarry’s work, the two artists share a commitment to working non-representatively by finding their unique visions buried in blocks of stone. Bourgeois and Hadzi are but two examples of artists through whom we can begin to form a modern context to appreciate and understand Atchugarry’s work.Despite these historical precedents, it is clear that Atchugarry resides in the real world now. The care with which he fashions his columnar sculptures, which stand like watchmen guarding a spirit world, enables him to construct formally powerful works of art. There is something ethereal, nearly religious, in their presentation, whose mysteries delve into the deepest part of the viewer’s awareness. This presence, or aura, represents a rare connection between contemporary marble sculpture and works achieved centuries (if not millennia) ago. The bridge between the two is effected by both a similarity of form—Atchugarry’s work might easily be understood as figures standing in a void—and an emotional alignment built upon what finally comes down to a similarity of purpose: a connection between the work and the viewer that is mysterious but powerful, communicating devotional intent. One must not underestimate the extent to which the sculptor’s art is grounded in art history; Atchugarry looks to the abstract primarily to deepen his—and our—awareness of art as a continuum. The story of stone is by now so well established that it can be difficult to transcend the history of the medium in a contemporary context. Atchugarry

confronts this challenge of making his art current, and succeeds resoundingly despite—or because of—the weight of the past. The real challenge facing Atchugarry is his relationship to a contemporary audience and to future viewers. It is hard now to separate his work from the legacy it comes from. Contemporary art, in its pursuit of novelty, now tends to make use of everyday, non-art, and found materials in an effort to connect to and reflect the contemporary moment. But the notion that certain means of artmaking are inherently more indicative of life now is misguided; what Atchugarry is doing has considerable relevance for art being made in the present. His use of abstraction in materials long associated—until the heady years of modernism—with a history devoted to the figure places him within the modernist narrative of formal innovation through the use traditional means. WThe suggestion of art history inherent in marble and bronze only further contemporizes the non-objective qualities of Atchugarry’s art, thereby pushing it further away from the past into the present. Furthermore, Atchugarry’s originality enables him to build works that transcend the time in which they have been made, consequently speaking not only to what has transpired in sculpture, but also to what is happening now, not to mention the probability that the works will convey to future audiences a sense of timeless force. Actually, that is the key to Atchugarry’s art: his purposeful use of a style is not aligned to a particular moment


in time (with the exception of the use of vernacular abstraction, which locates him within the traditions of the last century), making his art powerful across decades of work. It has become a commonplace to discuss the intention of the artist—his motives and desires in regard to communicating a specific vision. In Atchugarry’s case, we can see that he strives to communicate something of the raw earth from which his marble is excavated. The sculptures are not so much primitive as they are primal; this is because one senses, in the sculptor’s work, the idea that art operates on what we can call a gut level, a vision that is forcefully emotional rather than strictly conceptually derived. It is important, then, to recognize this work as the culmination of an understanding that stone brings with its use a weighty set of associations that must be translated and transformed into an expressiveness that stands squarely in the present tense. Atchugarry succeeds in rendering this venerable and ancient medium wholly contemporary; his unique formal approach to stone illustrates his awareness of and engagement with the outstanding properties of marble, placing him firmly within both art historical tradition and the innovative spirit of modernism. Classicism in general is a tightly tied knot when seen in terms of contemporary expressiveness; untying it requires the ability to reference the past and clear away space in which the sculpture can breathe within a current atmosphere. Untitled (2014)—most of Atchugarry’s works are untitled—consists of pink Portugal marble; its vertical form is made up of narrow, pole-like shapes that are connected to each other, sometimes with a slot separating part of one from the next. It feels like a pure abstraction, except for the fact that the individual palings can be read as approximations of people crowded together in a group. One of the most interesting things about Atchugarry’s work is its complex relationship with figuration. The work simultaneously engages with non-objective expression and a desire to work out a gestalt that does not reject human form. Much of contemporary art occurs on the cusp of abstract and figurative perception, and the sculptor is not exempted from a similar wish to stand on a platform that looks both ways at art. In Atchugarry’s case, the impulse to incorporate two ways of seeing allows him to build work that balances between worlds. Despite their human presence, the works

can also be understood as unidentifiable architectural details or expressions of pure abstraction. This does not mean in any way that Atchugarry’s approach is vague or too eclectic. Instead, it reflects a belief on the sculptor’s part that art can serve a number of perceptions, not all of them nicely arranged in relation to each other. Part of the artist’s achievement has to do with his willingness to allow the meaning of his work to float unfixedly in space, in a way that makes our perception more intricate and complex. It is this variability of vision that makes Atchugarry such an interesting and accomplished artist; people will see what they want in the sculptures, but their reading inevitably is tied to a close view of the art itself, which encourages speculation but not outright fantasy. It is not that the sculptor is guiding us to a particular interpretation; rather, he is offering a work of art that spreads wide its expressiveness in the hope that a meaningful application of form will be found. It is highly important that the viewer, like the sculptor himself, resides in a state of open interest, in which all possibilities of meaning take place at once in the work. Such indeterminacy in Atchugarry’s art is a strength in that it actively involves the viewer. The connection between past and present deserves further examination. For many people today, art suggestive of classical culture is anachronistic, out of touch. But Atchugarry’s work is anything but that. Indeed, it is an excellent model of tradition made new, whereby influence gives way to an innovative presentation of materials and form. It is contemporary in the fullest sense of the word. Part of the work’s contemporaneity comes from the notion that beautifully worked marble does not have to communicate a figurative vision; instead, it is suggestive of representation in a manner that is distant from the close verisimilitude of the past. This means that the aesthetic purpose of the marble has been translated as a material. Its use as an abstraction immediately cultivates an air of modernism, which supports the truth that the work that has been made is being made now. The dimensions of the 2014 red-patinated bronze are quite small, and yet the weight of the work nonetheless gives it a certain monumentality. Consisting of vibrant red turned strips packed closely together, about a foot high, the sculp-

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ture is a result of the ancient technique of lost wax casting, one of several such works that boldly introduce color into Atchugarry’s oeuvre. These patinated bronzes demonstrate an affinity with the work of the late American sculptor John Chamberlain in their vibrant color and dense metal forms. But whereas the latter feels improvisatory and somewhat beholden to the idiosyncrasies of found material, there is a finish to Atchugarry’s work that stands out, clearly indicating his complete mastery over his chosen medium. In the small red bronze, the strips of metal are woven tightly against each other, bent in places that accentuate the three-dimensional form. The force of the shape is vertical and flame-like—an effect highlighted by the sculpture’s red surface. This is a work that feels like it has been built upward, to a place serving both classical and modernist inclinations. It is extremely difficult for a sculpture to exist in two styles at once, but Atchugarry pulls it off, crafting a work with an abiding presence. The striking colors of this and other bronze pieces add an entirely new dimension to Atchugarry’s body of work. Cast from marble originals, the bronzes transform the artist’s signature aesthetic and formal language into something lighter and more immediate—opening up a new expressive path. And yet, as with all his sculptures, the weight of the bronze work gives it a gravitas that is unusual for our time. Time itself is a material, a substance that gives and takes and bends more easily in art than in other mediums. One of the great pleasures of looking at art from any period is its ability to appear as a

current event, and Atchugarry’s work fulfills this perception. One of his strongest attributes is his ability to find a permanence within form and substance, enabling him to present his efforts across geographies and decades of work. The other reference that seems clear, when the artist’s work is regarded, is the likeness to architecture, with the thin bands carved close together imitating a building of some sort. Atchugarry allows his work to subtly reference many structures, some of them recognizable. At the same time, he builds shapes that invite the viewer to imagine affinities that might be non-objective or representational. It doesn’t really matter which—it is of concern as an indication of the artist’s creativity. In Universal Love (2015), a white Carrara marble work 14 inches high, the forms close in on each other in closely placed vertical planes, with slots in the middle of the forms. This results in a highly interesting interplay between positive and negative space, an interaction somehow larger than the forms engendering it. The relationship of the title to the work of art is equally interesting; the grand spaciousness of the sculpture’s name, a bit whimsical if one considers the diminutive size of the piece, attracts an interpretation that could easily read the thin, connected planes as people standing in relation to each other. Yet, of course, the piece functions fully and very attractively as an abstract work of art. In a lot of work that spans the divide between non-objective form and representation, it is hard to discern


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the complex association between the two. But in Universal Love, the alliance works well intuitively and formally, switching nicely between the two ways of presenting form. Because of the verticality of the components, it is hard not to see them as figures; at the same time, these verticals serve as non-objective shapes that are satisfying in their own right. Atchugarry’s aesthetic intelligence enables him to balance differing notions of what art can look like or do. His manifest ability with marble results in work that achieves not only historical feeling but also contemporary insight into the excitement of form for form’s sake, no matter whether its implications are realist or idealized. In the long run, what is most important in art is its capacity to excite the viewer’s perception and even change the insight that accompanies that perception. In Atchugarry’s case, we can see how he transforms marble into something fluid and evocative—but not only of the past. In one work, made in 2015, the connected vertical strips face the viewer in thin repetitions of form, which subtly modulate in slight curves as they rise from the base. More than fifty inches tall, the sculpture suggests a lyre with strings, a plausible reading in part because the ancient musical instrument is evoked with an equally ancient material. But this is only part of Atchugarry’s point; there is also the marked satisfaction of the forms simply as they are, their thin, upright presence a manifestation of an idealism that is as old as human culture.

As an artist Atchugarry doesn’t present us with a dualism to be puzzled out; instead, he offers a melding of associations that place him—and us—in the forefront of new art experience. His sculptures compel us to re-think our conception of art’s legacy, in the sense that he uses marble and bronze, materials associated with the past, to develop work that must be regarded as leading-edge. Thus his work presents an authority in regard to time. But his art also possesses a topical mood, one that is absorbing, graceful, and evocative of both the old and the new. Art today is in need of a strong voice in carved stone, a material and process we don’t often find in contemporary work. Atchugarry has proven that he is just such a voice by demonstratind a real affinity for stone’s ability to speak across time. In every sense his work is new. He fulfills a way of seeing, primarily abstract, that brings stone into a moment meant for the present tense. His command of the medium, coupled with his imaginative ability, results in an art far more direct and versatile than we would assume in such creative work. The story of stone may be written implicitly in Atchugarry’s art, but his real contribution is found in the freshness and innovation of his mind. Jonathan Goodman


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THE QUARRY


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THE HANDS


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THE MAKING PROCESS


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EXHIBITIONS


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ROMA, MUSEO DEI FORI IMPERIALI MERCATI DI TRAIANO " CITTA' ETERNA - ETERNI MARMI" may /22/2015 - february/07/2016


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PABLO ATCHUGARRY “ETERNAL CITY, ETERNAL MARBLES” A collection of forty works, including ten monumental pieces exhibited in the open air, almost all of which are made from Carrara marble, an indispensable source of the unique masterpieces, from Antiquity to the Renaissance, found across Rome. Atchugarry’s skill demonstrates a renewal of the ancient and magical relationship with statuary, evoking undeniable references in the sculptor’s delicately ascending compositions, references to a classicism that is an intimate part of us and nourishes the emotions of those who admire the “eternal marbles”. In admiring the monumental works, which have been positioned outside on this occasion, we gain an understanding of how the process that began more than t wo

thousand years ago has come to its logical conclusion here. The works are in dialogue with one another, tracing paths without overwhelming the grandeur of the background. They provide a context for one another in a unique architectural harmony, in a way that perpetuates the magic. These marbles have finally found their optimum space and the immobility of time; the concept of balance and harmony is not affected by their size, the themes broached or by the substance to which invention has been applied. The works fuel the eternal creativity of the marble that has decreed that glory of which we can now admire a noble and enjoyable representation here at the Museo dei Fori Imperiali. The artist also wanted to set up a workshop space that he himself would lead from September, with guided tours open to the public.

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SÃO PAULO MUSEU BRASILEIRO DA ESCULTURA "A VIAGEM PELA MATÉRIA" SÃO PAULO - BRAZIL July 25th - September 21th /2014


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JOURNEY THROUGH MATTER, PABLO ATCHUGARRY Distinguished with the “Michelangelo Award”, in recognition of his career, the artist shall bring monumental art to this country Private View: 24/07 at 19h / Exhibition: 25/07 until 21/09 of 2014 In July, the Victor Brecheret Institute in partnership with the MuBE (Brazilian Museum of Sculpture) will hold an exhibition of the work of one of the greatest plastic artists of Latin America: Pablo Atchugarry. Born In August 1954, in Montevideo, Uruguay, Pablo shall commemorate his anniversary by taking large works made of marble to Brazil. His father, an engineer by profession, a passionate enthusiast of figurative and imaginative art, and a student of the great master Joaquín Torres Garcia, experimented with collage using various types of materials. It was this atmosphere that inspired Pablo to create his first works, in

cement. Even at a very young age, Atchugarry sought to consolidate his expressions, continuously redefining and, finally, perfect, transposing the barriers of his initial material. Thus was his art conceived, along a seam of continuous search for the origins of a possible transcribed reality, zoomorphic and anthropomorphic alphabets, which have always represented, since those early days, the dedication of his work to Humanity, to Nature, to the desire for “inner peace”, perennially enduring. Atchugarry went to Brazil to show his production, which has never ceased growing and transforming since the very beginning. In the late 1970s, following various study trips in Europe, he discovered Carrara marble, a fascinating material, with ideal properties to express his sculptural language, finely distinguished by its aesthetic beauty, lightness of forms, combination of unique movements and meticulous manual creation.


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In 2003, the artist represented Uruguay in the 50th Venice Biennale, with his work “Dreaming Peace”, a sculpture group of five elements, two of which in Carrara marble, reaching a sweeping height of 3.50m, and another three in Bardiglio de la Garfagnana marble, of a height of 1.50m. The embodiment of the forms conceived in his sculpture is, above all, orchestrated by the spirit of a sensitive, inventive and imaginative artist. The Uruguayan sculptor Pablo Atchugarry is a representative of contemporary art who is expertly able to reveal this notable capacity of creating and transforming raw material. The artist lives and works, moving between his two ateliers, in Lecco, in Italy, and Punta del Este, in Uruguay, maintaining his concentration focused on what he needs. Lecco is situated close to the region known as the “White Sea”, source of the reservoirs of unhewn rock used by the sculptor to produce many of his singular and monumental works that are exhibited in various public spaces in Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, Atchugarry represents a hallmark of excellence in international sculptural art, generating interchange with other artists and easily building bridges of communication between the art of the Old and New World.

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PABLO IN NEW YORK


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HOLLIS TAGGART GALLERIES "LIVES IN STONE" November / 7 / 2013 – January / 4 / 2014


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NEW YORK PALACE HOTEL EXHIBITION OF THE SCULPTURE "CARIATIDE" 2 - 9/ November / 2013.


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TIMES SQUARE EXHIBITION "DREAMING NEW YORK" ARMORY ARTS WEEK in occasion of the INTERNATIONAL ART FAIR March 2nd - 13th / 2012


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HOLLIS TAGGART GALLERIES "PABLO ATCHUGARRY: HEROIC ACTIVITIES" 17/ December/ 2011- 23/ January/ 2012.


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PRESS RELEASE Hollis Taggart Galleries is pleased to present the first New York show of Pablo Atchugarry’s marble sculpture. The Uruguayan-born artist, who lives and works in Lecco, Italy, works with marble and bronze to create pieces that are both elegant and imposing. No undertaking is too daunting for him—from the 2003 Venice Biennale installation representing Uruguay, to the private commission of a five-story high sculpture hewn from a single block of Carrara marble, to the more intimately scaled works on view in the gallery. In white Carrara marble, and pink Portugal and Iran marbles, these pieces fold, layer, and undulate. Atchugarry effectively works the medium to appear both weightless and substantial. Vertical marble pieces such as Totem de la Paz (Totem of Peace) and Dreaming New York (Soñando New York) are pleated and soaring, belying their massive weight. On a smaller scale, a deeply veined pink marble sculpture employs volumetric folds that convey a robust, tactile musculature. And in a bronze piece from this year, Atchugarry employs metal in his characteristic idiom, creating his piece with a slick tactility. The artist has long been recognized in Europe as a leading sculptor; his public commissions are located throughout Europe and South America, and his work is held in private collections around the world. In 1999, the Pablo Atchugarry Museum was inaugurated in Lecco, and his foundation opened in Punta del Este, Uruguay, in 2007. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue featuring an essay by poet, critic, and professor Jonathan Goodman and extensive photographs of the artist’s working process, studio, and public projects.

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MONUMENTAL SCULPTURES


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EUSKADI Private collection. Statuary carrara marble. H 98,82 x 18,11 x 11,80 in (251 x 46 x30 cm) year 2016


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CARIATIDE bronze with geen patina H 90,94 x 25,59 x 23,22 in (231 x 65 x 59 cm) year 2006


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LIFE AFTER LIFE EXPO 2015 MILANO, Uruguayan pavilion, olive wood sculpture, H 221,59 x 47,24 ø in (540 x 120 ø cm) May 1st - October 31st /2015


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VIA CRUCIS Private collection, Belgium. 14 Panel in statuary Carrara marble. Size of each sculpture H 58,78 x 31,49 x 7,87 in (129x 80 x20 cm) year 2014-2015


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MOVEMENT IN THE WORLD Private collection, Kallo-Beveren, Belgium courtesy of Katoen Natie collection. Statuary Carrara marble. H 328,75 in (835 cm) year 2014


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MOVEMENT IN THE WORLD April 2014, the 8.35-metre-high Carrara marble sculpture was installed in the town of Kallo-Beveren, Belgium.

NEST OF DREAMS Camino a Izcua, Tierra Garz贸n, Piero Atchugarry gallery|scuplture park, COR-TEN metal alloy / Weathering steel sculpture, H 460,62 in (1170 cm) year 2013


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LUZ DEL SUR Private collection. Statuary Carrara marble H 159,45 x 57,08 x 32,28 in (405 x154 x 82 cm) year 2013


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OLIMPIC SPIRIT I

OLIMPIC SPIRIT II

installation St. James’s Square garden , cromium frosted steel , H 230,31 x 86,61 Ø in (585 x 220 Ø cm) September / 8 / 2012

installation St. James’s Square garden, cromium frosted steel, H 200,78 x 86,61 Ø in (510 x 220 Ø cm) September / 8 / 2012


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ESPIRITU OLIMPICO I & II STAINLESS STEEL INSTALLATION ST. JAMES’S SQUARE UNTIL 8TH SEPTEMBER 2012 The Albemarle Gallery is proud to announce the installation in St. James’s Square Gardens, London of two monumental stainless steel saAptures by the Internationally acclaimed Utuguayan artist Pablo Atchugany. The works are on display until 8th September 2012 as part of the exhibition Espiritu fermis°, at the Albemarle Gallery from 25th Joy to erlh September 2012. The two wafts Espiritu Campco l and Espiritu Olimpico II have been specifically designed for this venue and are a personal homage by the artist to the Olympic Games. Drawing inspiration from the histcxy of the Games and their ethos, Pabb Atchugarry has created these towering sculptures - respectively 5.95 m and 5.85 m high - as a symbol of The untying power of spat. The swirling profile represents unity; a spiral embradng the five continents under the flag of the five Olympic rings. The central vertical bar, with its dear static function of sustaining the whole structure alludes to the physical and

mental tension that elite athletes endure throughout this, the greatest of scorning events. The choice of the medium itself is significant. Stainless steel is an unfamiliar material far Pablo Atchugarry, who works mainly in marble and bronze. In this Instance however, for the very nature of the project, the artist opted for a light yet strong medium, which has resulted in two ethereal compositions. The thin sheets of steel, vibrafing in the wind are a constant reminder to both the might and fragility of human nature.


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COSMIC EMBRACE Sirone, Como Lake, Italy. Staurary Carrara marble scuplture. H 338,58 x 62,59 x 57,48 in (860 x 159 x 146 cm) 2005-2011


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LUZ Y ENERGĂ?A DE PUNTA DEL ESTE Commemorating the 100th anniversary of Punta del Este, Maldonado, Uruguay. Statuary Carrara marble. H 196,85 in (500 cm) year 2009

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LIGHT OF THE SOUTH Private collection, Estancia VIK , Jose Ignacio, Uruguay. Statuary carrara marble. year 2008


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IN THE WAY OF LIGHT Veduggio con Colzago, Lombardia, Italy courtesy of Loris Fontana collection. Stauary Carrara marble H 326,77 in (830 cm). year 2006


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BIENNALE DI VENEZIA "DREAMING OF PEACE" Uruguay Pavilion in the 50 th Biennale di Venezia "DREAMS AND CONFLICTS" with the plate "dreaming the peace", a group of 5 sculpture of carrara marble. 15/June/2003 - 2/October/2003


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UNTITLED Sirone , Como lake, Italy. Statuary Carrara marble, H 108,26 x 18,89 x 16,53 in (275 x 48 x42 cm). year 2003


MONUMENTO ALLA CIVILTÀ E CULTURA DEL LAVORO LECCHESE Lecco, Largo Caleotto, Como lake, Italy. Statuary Carrara marble, H 244,09 in (620 cm). year 2002


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PLATES


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 20.47 X 7.87 X 3,5 IN (52 X 20 X 9 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 20.47 X 7.87 X 3,5 IN (52 X 20 X 9 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. PINK PORTUGAL MARBLE, H 19,2 X 10,24 X 7,68 IN (48.5 X 26 X 19.5 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 29,92 X 10,62 X 5,52 IN (76 X 27 X 14 CM). EDITION 4|8.


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 31,5 X 12,59 X 7,87 IN (80 X 32 X 20 CM). EDITION 8|8.


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 38,18 X 18,89 X 3,54 IN (97 X 48 X 9 CM). EDITION 4|8


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UNIVERSAL LOVE, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 14 X 8.25 X 4,53 IN (35,5 X 21 X 11,5 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. PINK PORTUGAL MARBLE, H 39.76 X 12.21 X 8.07 IN (101 X 31 X 20.5 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 21.26 X 7.87 X 3.54 IN (54 X 20 X 9 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 245 X 43 X 30 CM.


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UNTITLED, 2014. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE H 52.36 X 12.03 X 6.50 IN (133 X 30.5 X16.5 CM).


UNTITTLED, 2015. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 80.32 X 23.82 X 22.05 IN (204 X 60.5 X 56 CM). EDITION 1|6.


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UNTITLED, 2014. BRONZE WITH GREEN PATINA, H 29.92 X 10.63 X 5.51 IN (76 X 27 X 14 CM). EDITION 3|8


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 39,76 X 15,74 X 10,62 IN (101 X 40 X 27 CM). EDITION 1|8.


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UNTITLED, 2014. PINK PORTUGAL MARBLE, H 70.87 X 12.79 X 12.01 IN (180 X 32.5 X 30.5 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2003. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 50 X 5,91 X 4,72 IN (127 X 15 X 12 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2014. PINK PORTUGAL MARBLE, H 39.76 X 12.20 X 8.07 IN (101 X 31 X 20.5 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. STAINLESS STEEL, H 28.74 X 6.30 X 6.30 IN (73 X 16 X 16 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2016. BLACK MARBLE, H 29.13 X 10,23 X 6,29 IN (74 X 26 X 16 CM).


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UTITLED, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 73.81 X 15.55 X 7.87 IN (187.5 X 39.5 X 20 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2014. BRONZE WITH BLACK PATINA, H 31,5 X 12,59 X 7,87 IN (80 X 32 X 20 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. BRONZE WITH BLACK PATINA, H 38,18 X 18,89 X 3,54 IN (97 X 48 X 9 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MABLE, H 49.02 X 11.81 X 5.12 IN (124.5 X 30 X 13 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. STATUARY CARRARA MARBLE, H 74.80 X 11.81 X 11.02 IN (190 X 30 X 28 CM).


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UNTITLED, 2015. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 17.72 X 8.46 X 7.48 IN (45 X 21.5 X 19 CM ). EDITION 2|8


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 14.37 X 7.68 X 3.5 IN (36.5 X 19.5 X 9 CM). EDITION OF 8


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UNTITLED, 2016. BRONZE WITH AUTOMOTIVE PAINT, H 20.47 X 7.87 X 3,5 IN (52 X 20 X 9 CM). EDITION OF 8


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BIOGRAPHY Pablo Atchugarry was born in Montevideo, Uruguay, on 23 August 1954. His parents, Maria Cristina Bonomi and Pedro Atchugarry Rizzo, passionate art enthusiasts, identified Pablo’s artistic talent and interest when he was still a child and encouraged him to pursue a career as an artist. In his earliest works, he expressed himself through painting, gradually discovering other materials such as cement, iron and wood. In 1971, his first cement sculpture was entitled Horse; this was followed by other cement and iron sculptures including Escritura simbólica (1974), Estructura cósmica (1974), Metamorfosis prehistórica (1974), Maternidad (1974) and Metamorfosis femenina (1974). In the late 1970s, after taking part in several exhibitions in Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Puerto Alegre and Brasilia, Atchugarry made a number of trips to Europe to study and perfect his art. He travelled to Spain, France and Italy, where he mounted his first solo exhibition in Lecco in 1978. His paintings were subsequently exhibited in a variety of European cities, including Milan, Copenhagen, Paris, Chur, Bergamo and Stockholm. After experimenting with a range of different materials, in 1979 Atchugarry discovered the extraordinary elegance of

marble and he carved his first sculpture in Carrara, entitled La Lumière. His first monumental sculpture carved from Carrara marble was completed in 1982. That same year, the artist settled permanently in Lecco, working on the sculpture La Pietà, carved from a single block of marble weighing 12 tonnes. In 1987, he held his first solo sculpture exhibition in Bramantino’s Crypt in Milan, curated by Raffaele de Grada. Late 1996 saw the installation of the sculpture Semilla de la Esperanza in the monumental sculpture park in the grounds of Uruguay’s government building. In 1999, the artist founded the Museo Pablo Atchugarry in Lecco to house works spanning his entire career alongside bibliographical documentation and an archive. Twenty years after his arrival in Italy, the Province of Milan organised a retrospective of Atchugarry’s work entitled “The Infinite Evolutions of Marble” at the Palazzo Isimbardi in Milan. In the same year, he sculpted his first monumental work entitled the Obelisk of the Third Millennium, a sixmetre-high Carrara marble sculpture for the Italian town of Manzano (Udine). He also won the competition to created Lecco’s Monument to the Culture and Civilisation of Work, a sculpture in white Bernini marble also six metres high and weighing in at 30 tonnes.

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In 2002, Pablo Atchugarry was awarded the “Michelangelo” prize in Carrara in recognition of his career as an artist. He was also committed to a range of projects that year, including the Ideals sculpture, which stands on Avenue Princesse Grace in Monaco and was created to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the coronation of Prince Rainier.

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In 2003, he participated in the 50th Venice Biennale - International Art Exhibition with the sculpture Soñando la paz, a work consisting of eight pieces, five in Carrara marble and three in Bardiglio della Garfagnana marble. Also in 2003, he sculpted Ascension for the Fundació Fran Daurel in Barcelona. In 2004, he carved Vital Energy, a Portuguese pink marble sculpture for the Bellinson Center in Petah Tikva, Israel, and the following year the National Museum of Fine Arts in Buenos Aires staged an exhibition of his work. From June to November 2006, the Groeningemuseum in Bruges, Belgium held a major retrospective exhibition of the artist’s career, including works from international private collections; in the same year, the Museu Coleção Berardo in Portugal acquired Vital Path.

In early 2007, Atchugarry opened the Fundación Pablo Atchugarry in Manantiales, Uruguay, with the aim of providing a stimulus for the arts and creating a place for artists of all disciplines to meet in an ideal location that combines nature and art. In the same year, he completed an eightmetre-high monumental work In the Light, carved from a single 48-tonne block of marble, for the Collezione Fontana in Italy.

In 2007-2008, a retrospective exhibition dedicated to his work entitled The Plastic Space of Light was held in Brazil, accompanied by a critical text written by Luca Massimo Barbero. Initially staged at the Banco do Brasil Cultural Centre in Brasilia, the exhibition travelled to the MuBe (Museu Brasiliero da Escultura) in São Paulo and the Museu Oscar Niemeyer in Curitiba. In 2008, the Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales in Montevideo dedicated a retrospective exhibition to Atchugarry’s work of the preceding 15 years.


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In 2009 Atchugarry created the work Luz y EnergĂ­a de Punta del Este, carved from a single five-metre-high block of Carrara marble, for the hundredth anniversary of the city of Punta del Este.

Square during The Armory Show Art Fair in New York City. In April 2014, the 8.35-metre-high Carrara marble sculpture Movement in the World was installed in the town of KalloBeveren, Belgium.

In 2011, after seven years of work, he completed Cosmic Embrace, carved from a 56-tonne, 8.5-metre-high block of marble, and the same year the Hollis Taggart Galleries in New York organised a solo show, curated by Jonathan Goodman. In March 2012, the Times Square Alliance association selected Dreaming New York to be exhibited in Times

In late 2013, Mondadori Electa published the Catalogo Generale della scultura, two volumes edited by Professor Carlo Pirovano cataloguing every sculpture produced by the artist between 1971 and 2013. From July to September 2014, the Museu Brasiliero da Escultura in SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil dedicated a major retrospective to


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the artist’s work, entitled “A Viagem pela matéria». The exhibition «Eternal City, eternal marbles», featuring 40 sculptures, will be exhibited at the Museo dei Fori Imperiali - Mercati di Traiano in Rome from 22 May 2015 to 7 February 2016. Pablo Atchugarry›s works have also been exhibited at the following museums and public institutions: Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales, Montevideo; Museo del Parco, Portofino; Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires; Museo Lercaro, Bologna; Collezione della Provincia di Milano a Palazzo Isimbardi; Collezione della Provincia di Lecco; Fundació Fran Daurel, Barcelona; Groeningemuseum, Bruges; Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon; Pérez Art Museum, Miami; The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, Miami; Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk; Museo Brasilero da Escultura, São Paulo. Atchugarry currently lives and works between Lecco and Manantiales, where he oversees the development of the Fundación Pablo Atchugarry and the international monumental sculpture park, as well as teaching and promoting art.


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SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2015

2014

Mercati di Traiano: Musei dei Fori Imperiali

Roma

Paulo Darzé galeria de arte

Salvador

Costantini Art Gallery

Milano

Art Stage Singapore

Singapore

Palazzo del Parco

Diano Marina

BolognaFiere SH Contemporary

Shanghai

Museu Brasileiro da Escultura

São Paulo

Arte Fiera

Bologna

Albemarle Gallery

London

Fundacion Pablo Atchugarry

Manantiales

Hollis Taggart Galleries

New York

Museo MIIT

Torino

2012

Albemarle Gallery

London

2011

Holllis Taggart Galeries

New York

2010

Albemarle Gallery

London

Bienvenu Gallery

New Orleans

Albemarle Gallery

London

Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales

Montevideo

Museu Oscar Niemeyer

Curitiba

Museu Brasileiro da Escultura

São Paulo

Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil

Brasilia

Lagorio Arte Contemporanea

Brescia

Frey Norris Gallery

San Francisco

Albemarle Gallery

London

Groeninge Museum

Bruges

Galeria Sur

Punta del Este - La Barra

Gary Nader Fine Art

Miami

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes

Buenos Aires

Park Ryu Sook Gallery

Seoul

Gary Nader Fine Art

Miami

Galeria Tejeria Loppacher

Punta del Este - Uruguay

Galleria Rino Costa

Valenza

Villa Monastero

Varenna

Albemarle Gallery

London

Fondation Veranneman

Kruishoutem

50° Biennale di Venezia- Padiglione dell’ Uruguay

Venezia

Fondazione Abbazia di Rosazzo

Rosazzo -Udine

Galleria Les Chances de l’Art

Bolzano

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2013

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003


2002

Ellequadro Documenti

Genova

2001

Palazzo Isimbardi

Milano

Albemarle Gallery

London

Fondazione Il Fiore

Firenze

2000

Galerie Le Point

Monte Carlo

1999

Inter- American Development Bank

Washington

1998

Ellequadro Documenti

Genova

Fondation Veranneman

Kruishoutem

Valente Arte Contemporanea

Finale Ligure

1994

Galleria Nuova Carini

Milano

1992

Galerie L’Oeil

Bruxelles

1991

Galleria Carini

Milano

1989

Biblioteca Civica di Lecco

Lecco

1988

Galleria Carini

Milano

Museo Salvini

Coquio Trevisago

1983

Villa Manzoni

Lecco

1982

Galeria Felix

Caracas

Galleria Visconti

Lecco

Galleria Comuale

Monza

Ibis Gallery

Malmo

Galerie L’ Art et la Paix

Paris

Galeria la Gruta

Bogota

1979

Maison de l’ Amerique Latine

Paris

1978

Galleria Visconti

Lecco

Galleria La Colonna

Como

1974

Galeria Lirolay

Buenos Aires

1972

Subte Municipal

Montevideo

1996

1981

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GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2016

Art Cologne Mi Art Sp-arte Tefaf The Armory show Arte Fiera Art Stage Singapore Este Arte

Koln Milano São Paulo Maatricht New York Bologna Singapore Punta del Este

2015

Art Toronto Art Bo Art Rio ArtInternational Point Art Monaco Art Marbella Art Miami New York Sp-arte Parc Art Cologne MiArt Art Basel The Armory show Tefaf Arte Fiera

Toronto Bogotà Rio de Janeiro Istanbul Monaco Marbella New York São Paulo Lima Koln Milan Kong Kong New York Maatricht Bologna

2014

Art Basel Art Miami Fiac Art Bo Art Rio Arte Ba Parc SP Arte Art Basel Black - Galleria Dep Art Mi Art The Armory show Tefaf Arte Fiera

Miami Miami Paris Bogota Rio de Janeiro Buenos Aires Lima Sao Paulo Kong Kong Milano Milano New York Maatricht Bologna

2013

Art Basel Art Miami Pinta FIAC

Miami Miami New York Paris

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Expo Chicago Art Bo HFAF Art Rio FIA Art South Hampton Art Brussels Arte Ba SP Arte The Armory show Bianco Italia -Tornabuoni Art Art Basel Tefaf Arte Fiera

Chicago Bogota Houston Rio de Janeiro Caracas South Hampton Brussels Buenos Aires Sao Paulo New York Paris Hong Kong Maastricht Bologna

2012

Art Basel Art Miami Expo Chicago HFAF Art Rio SP Arte ArteBa The Armory show Tefaf Arte Fiera

Miami Miami Chicago Houston Rio de Janeiro Sao Paulo Buenos Aires New York Maastricht Bologna

2011

Art Basel Miami Fiac ArteBa SP Arte Legacy Gallery Tefaf Arte Fiera

Miami Paris Buenos Aires Sao Paulo Panama Maastricht Bologna

2010

Fiac SP Arte Tefaf Arte Fiera

Paris Sao Paulo Maastricht Bologna

2009

Fiac ArteBa Arte Fiera

Paris Buenos Aires Bologna

2008

Arco

Madrid

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2007

Art First Arco Galeria Sur

Bologna Madrid Punta del Este

2006

Hollis Taggart Galleries ArteFiera Art London Gallery Bienvenu

New York Bologna London New Orleans

2005

ArteFiera Art Basel

Bologna Miami

2004

Art London Mi Art Arco Arte Fiera

London Milano Madrid Bologna

2003

Arco Artefiera

Madrid Bologna

2002

Galerie Le Point Tefaf Arco Artefiera

Monte Carlo Mastricht Madrid Bologna

2001

Tefaf Arco Artefiera

Mastricht Madrid Bologna

2000

Xenobio Exhibition- a cura di Idehiro Ikegami Tefaf Arco Artefiera

Bologna Mastricht Madrid Bologna

1999

Orion Art Gallery Art Basel Tefaf Arco Artefiera

Bruxelles Basel Mastricht Madrid Bologna

Biennale di Aldo Roncaglia Scultura 98 Castle of Bourglinster Artefiera

San Felice Sul Panaro Sondrio Luxembourg Bologna

Gildo Pastor Center Artefiera

Monte Carlo Bologna

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1998

1997


1996

Palazzo Ducale

Genova

1995

Ellequadro Documenti

Genova

1994

4a Biennal de Sculpture Contemporain

Passy

1992

Palazzo Crepadona 9° Salon d’ Art Contemporain

Belluno Bourg en Bresse

1991

Contemporary Art International

Milano

1990

Simposio di sculture - Castello di Nelson

Bronte

1989

IX Bienal de Arte Internacional- Chile

Valparaiso

1987

Esibizione Internazionale di sculture Esibizione di Arte Sacra- San Francesco Esibizione Internazionale “ Como Illustrazioni” 7a Esibizione d’ Arte Sacra- Basilica San Sempliciano

Castellanza Como Como Milano

1984

XIX Esibizione Internazionale di Scultura 1a Esibizione di piccole sculture

Legnano Castellanza

1983

3a Esibizione d’ Arte Sacra- Basilica San Sempliciano

Milano

1980

Taormina concorso ( 1º Premio)

Taormina

1979

“ Alessandro Volta “ Pittura internazionale

Como

1977

XL Salón Nacional - Premio Adquisicion International Exhibition of Applied Arts Bella Center

Montevideo Copenhagen

1976

Galeria Aramayo Salón de Miniescultura

Montevideo Montevideo

1975

XVI International Salón Paris -Sud

Juvisy

1974

XXII Salón Municipal XV International Salón Paris- Sud

Montevideo Juvisy

1973

XXVI Salón Nacional de Artes Plásticas

Montevideo

1972

XXVI Salón Municipal de Artes Plásticas

Montevideo

1965

IGE Salón de Artes Plásticas para la juventud

Montevideo

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214


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Profile for Hollis Taggart

Pablo Atchugarry: Invocations of the Soul  

Published on the occasion of the exhibition "Pablo Atchugarry: Invocations of the Soul," organized by Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, an...

Pablo Atchugarry: Invocations of the Soul  

Published on the occasion of the exhibition "Pablo Atchugarry: Invocations of the Soul," organized by Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, an...

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