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2015 2016

AN N UAL R E P O RT


MISSION Learning for life in a dynamic world. VISION To be a leader in relevant applied learning in our provincial, national and international communities.

B OA R D O F G OV E R N O R S April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016 K AT H Y O ’ R O U R K E

CHRIS BULMAN

TO D D G A L L A N T

Chairperson until July 2015

Summerside

Charlottetown

BARRY B ECK

DAV I D C A M P B E L L

Montague

Summerside

S H E L L E Y M AC L E A N - E L L I S

M E AG H A N A R S E N AU LT

O’Leary

Tignish

B R A D C O LW I L L

D R . A L A A A B D - E L-A Z I Z

Stratford

Ex-officio

Cumberland KENT SCALES

Chairperson after July 2015 Charlottetown MICHAEL O’BRIEN

Vice-Chairperson after July 2015 Charlottetown

President, UPEI KIM GREEN

Charlottetown

DR. BRIAN MCMILLAN

Ex-officio GRAHAM HICKEN

Mount Stewart

President, Holland College

O N TH E COVER

Honouring the integrity of the building’s 1932 art deco beginnings while incorporating state-of-the-art technology, the Florence Simmons Performance Hall provides audiences with the ultimate, intimate performance experience. 2


P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E S S AG E It gives me great pleasure to present to you the 2015–2016 annual report for Holland College. This has been a busy year for the college, on our campuses, and out in the communities we serve. In 2015, we celebrated the 250th anniversary of the completion of the map of Prince Edward Island by our namesake, Captain Samuel Holland. Holland College has always been proud to bear the name of such an accomplished technician and teacher. This year, we have strengthened the association we have to Samuel Holland by participating in various activities related to the anniversary, including a lecture series and the co-publication with Island Studies Press of Samuel Holland: His Work and Legacy on Prince Edward Island, by respected historians Earle Lockerby and Doug Sobey. Early in 2016, we celebrated the opening of the newly-renovated Florence Simmons Performance Hall, a 300-seat theatre which is becoming an important cultural hub in Charlottetown. This year, we participated in a regional survey of post-secondary institutions. Not only did the college earn a high reputational score in Prince Edward Island, as one would expect, but it tied for first place regionally. To a certain extent, these results reflect the changing attitudes of our time.

that community colleges not only provide relevant, hands-on training to enable graduates to become gainfully employed, but also give students the opportunity to pursue their academic aspirations in a cost-effective way. As you read this report, please take a moment to reflect on the contributions that our staff, students, board members, government and industry partners make to our college, and to our Island community. I extend my thanks to them, and to the college’s many donors and supporters across the country. Warmest regards,

In the past, people assumed that community colleges provided limited educational opportunities. Now, with the degree pathways and articulation agreements that we have with other colleges and with universities world-wide, people are realizing

Brian McMillan, PhD President, Holland College 3


STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

STU D E NTS

LEARNER EXPERIENCE LEARNER SUCCESS, WHICH IS ACHIEVED THROUGH TEACHING EXCELLENCE, APPLIED LEARNING AND RESEARCH, AND FLEXIBLE DELIVERY MODELS, REMAINS HOLLAND COLLEGE’S PRIMARY FOCUS. THE LEARNER EXPERIENCE WILL BE RELEVANT AND ENGAGING, AND WILL BE OFFERED THROUGH SEAMLESS LEARNER PATHWAYS. LEARNER SUCCESS HOLLAND COLLEGE BELIEVES THAT CENTRAL TO LEARNER SUCCESS IS THE NEED TO:

„ „ ENHANCE THE LEARNER EXPERIENCE BOTH ACADEMICALLY AND SOCIALLY FOR LEARNERS OF ALL AGES, IN ALL PLACES OF LEARNING;

„ „ ENGAGE IN PROACTIVE RECRUITMENT THAT ASSISTS LEARNERS IN SELECTING PROGRAMS THAT MATCH THEIR INTERESTS AND ABILITIES; AND

„ „ RESPOND TO THE NEEDS OF DIVERSE LEARNER POPULATIONS THROUGH THE PROVISION OF APPROPRIATE SERVICES.

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S C H O O L O F P E R FO R M I N G A R T S S T U D E N T S T H R I L L AU D I E N C E AT G A L A O P E N I N G Students from Holland College’s School of Performing Arts teamed up for a gala presentation to celebrate the opening of the college’s new Florence Simmons Performance Hall. The Music Performance students provided the house band for the evening, and performed several numbers that paid homage to the rich cultural history of the room. Anya Smith, a

first year student in the program, performed an original song, accompanied by her fellow students, and the concert band and choir rounded out the evening with a rendition of Memories of Old Prince of Wales that brought a tear to more than a few eyes in the audience. Holland College’s School of Performing Arts is a partnership with Confederation Centre of the Arts.

T E A M I N G U P TO G I V E C A D E T S A B E T T E R U N D E R S TA N D I N G O F M E N TA L H E A LT H The Atlantic Police Academy and the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) are working together to ensure that the next generation of police officers understand the complexities of dealing with individuals living with mental illness. During the course of the cadets’ training, clients from the CMHA’s Notre Dame Place in Summerside came into the classroom to talk to them about their personal experiences with the police, and the challenges of communicating appropriately because of their mental illness.

THE CADETS ARE GIVEN THE O P P O R T U N I T Y TO E X P E R I E N C E W H AT I T F E E L S L I K E TO S U F F E R F R O M AU D I TO RY H A L LU C I N AT I O N S , W H I C H F R E Q U E N T LY P L AG U E P E O P L E S U F F E R I N G F R O M P S YC H OT I C D I S O R D E R S . O N C E T H E Y H A D E X P E R I E N C E D W H AT I T WA S L I K E , T H E Y U N D E R S TO O D F U L LY H OW TO I M P L E M E N T T H E P R O C E D U R E S T H E Y H AV E L E A R N E D . LESLIE HADFIELD AT L A N T I C P O L I C E AC A D E M Y

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A DVA N C E D C A R E PA R A M E D I C I N E S T U D E N T S PA R T I C I PAT E I N T R I AG E S T U DY Students in the Advanced Care Paramedicine program participated in a unique trial designed to compare the efficacy of two triage methods commonly used in incidents where mass casualties require rapid assessment. The study investigated the Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) method, most commonly used around the world, and the Sacco Triage Method (STM). The START system is in the public domain, whereas the STM is proprietary software licensed for commercial use only. The results showed that there was relatively little difference between the

two methods, given the limited sample size; but that further investigation would be worthwhile. The study was published in the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine. W H AT B E T T E R WAY TO I N T R O D U C E S T U D E N T S TO C O N C E P T S O F R E S E A R C H A N D I T S I M P O R TA N C E TO O U R P R O F E S S I O N T H A N TO B E I N VO LV E D I N R E A L TA N G I B L E R E S E A R C H ? DR . TR E VO R JAIN , DE PARTM E NT O F E M E RG E NCY M E DICIN E AT TH E Q U E E N E LIZ AB E TH HOSPITAL

STUDENT UNION BREAKFAST PROGRAM GIVES STUDENTS A GREAT START TO THEIR DAY

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Monday to Friday, student volunteers hand out healthy breakfasts in five Holland College centres and campuses across the Island. The program is possible because of a $5,000 donation from PEI Credit Unions.

The Student Union purchases food at local grocery stores and student volunteers put breakfast items into brown bags each morning.

Beth Harris, Breakfast Program Coordinator; Doug Bridges from PEI Credit Unions; and David Campbell, Student Union President.

Business student Amanda Myers and Sport and Leisure student Angelle LeBlanc prepare breakfast bags for students to pick up.


S T U D E N T S U P P O R T S E RV I C E S

TRANSITIONS PROGRAM

The staff of Student Support Services help students to develop the skills necessary to be independent learners and encourage them to reach their full academic potential. The department provides one on one support; training in time management, organization, and study skills; access to, and training in the use of, assistive devices; test and exam accommodations; assistance with funding applications; and notetaking, tutoring, and mentoring.

Students from schools across the Island were exposed to more than 25 Holland College programs, giving them the opportunity to make informed decisions about their post-secondary options. Rotations were complemented by tours, guest speakers, volunteering, fundraising, presentations and portfolio development.

Student Support Services incorporates students’ specific needs related to learning. Students can request supports on their program application form, or at any time during the school year. This year, the Student Support Services department provided assistance to approximately 30 per cent of the college’s students.

„„

75 students completed the Transitions senior high program from Bluefield, Colonel Gray, Charlottetown Rural, Kinkora, Kensington and Three Oaks.

„„

375 students completed the Charlottetown Transitions Career Workshops (each student came on four occasions to attend the various workshops), including Birchwood, Queen Charlotte, Souris and Alternative Education.

„„

152 students completed the Summerside Transitions Career Workshops (each student came on three occasions to attend various workshops, including students from Summerside Intermediate).

„„

The Raymond Loo Garden secured funding through Holland College’s President’s Innovation Fund to add an outdoor stage, stone walkway, portable seating and podium to make the garden into an outdoor bookable classroom.

STUDENT COUNSELLING SERVICES Counselling is available to all Holland College students free of charge. Our counsellors are professionally trained and provide a variety of services in a confidential environment. They help students identify issues, overcome barriers to success, and find effective ways to deal with personal concerns. Some students benefit from one or two sessions of problem-solving training, while some concerns may warrant further counselling sessions. This year, approximately 20 per cent of the student population accessed the college’s counselling services at least once.

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AT H L E T I C S R E P O R T The Hurricanes were pleased to host the 2015 Atlantic Collegiate Athletic Association (ACAA) Golf Championships and the 2015 ACAA Cross Country Running Championships. Holland College hosted the 2016 Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) Women’s Volleyball National Championship, and have been selected to host the 2016 PING CCAA Golf National Championships and the 2017 CCAA Men’s Basketball National Championship. Individually, Hurricanes players were recipients of many regional and national awards including 15 ACAA 1st team All-Stars, 10 ACAA 2nd team AllStars, five ACAA golf All-Conference, two ACAA cross country running All Conference, three Eastern Canadian Women’s Hockey League (ECWHL) 1st team All-Stars, one ECWHL 2nd team All-Star, and six Atlantic Football League (AFL) All-Stars. Nationally, there were five CCAA 1st team All-Stars, two CCAA 2nd team All-Stars, one Canadian Collegiate Baseball AC A A G O L D M E DA L S WO M E N ’ S G O L F, M E N ’ S G O L F M EN ’ S SOCCER , WO M EN ’ S BASK E TBALL MEN’S BASKETBALL AFL CHAMPIONS M E N ’ S F O OT B A L L 8

Association (CCBA) Nationals All-Star and two CCBA All-Canadians. Nine Hurricanes achieved the ranking of CCAA All-Canadians and 14 were CCAA Academic All-Canadians. Gracie Ferguson, Women’s Volleyball and Tynan Murphy, Men’s Volleyball were both named ACAA Rookie of the Year, while five other Hurricanes received the distinction of being ACAA Player of the Year. There were also six Hurricanes coaches who had ACAA Coach of the Year bestowed upon them, with two of them receiving CCAA Coach of the Year honours. On the recreation side, Hurricanes Fitness continued to expand their selection of classes. The popularity of ’Canes Camps increased, both throughout the school year with day camps and during the nineweek summer camp. As well, the concept of a Hurricanes Academy dedicated to sport development on PEI has continued to develop and has offered a Volleyball Academy and a Baseball Academy.

AC A A S I LV E R M E DA L S WO M E N ’ S S O C C E R WO M E N ’ S VO L L E Y B A L L M EN ’ S CROSS COU NTRY

CC A A S I LV E R M E DA L WO M E N ’ S B A S K E T B A L L

C C B A AT L A N T I C C H A M P I O N S AND N AT I O N A L S I LV E R MEN’S BASEBALL

CC A A B RO NZE M E DA L MEN’S BASKETBALL

ECWHL CHAMPIONS WO M E N ’ S H O C K E Y


Major award winners at the annual Athletic Awards Banquet included: Hur r ic a nes Awa r d Dawn Ward, Dance Presiden t’s Awa rd Mikeal Thomas, Sport & Leisure Management Le a der ship in Sport Meg MacKinnon, Women’s Volleyball

2015−16 Student-athlete Scholar Awards*

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CC A A NATI O NAL SCH O L AR-ATH LE TE S

R A N K I N G S EC O N D I N C A N A DA

64

H U R R I C AN E S SCH O L AR AWAR DS

FOOTBALL | BASEBALL | CHEERLEADING | DANCE | HOCKEY

Citizenship Awa r d Mark Kellington, Football Coach of t he Ye a r Jonathan Vos, Men’s Soccer Fem a le Rookie of t he Ye a r Chelsea Slawter-Wright, Women’s Basketball M a le Rookie of t he Ye a r John Ross Young, Football Fem a le At hlete of t he Ye a r Sydney Foy, Women’s Volleyball M a le At hlete of t he Ye a r Trevone Grant, Men’s Basketball

HOLLAND COLLEGE RECEIVED THE CCA A ANNUAL AWARD FOR THE MEMBER INSTITUTION WITH THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF ACADEMIC ALL- CANADIANS.

4

O F T H E S E S T U D E N TAT H L E T E S C H O L A R S

CO M P E T ED I N T WO D I F F ER EN T S P O RTS

*

Student-athletes must achieve an honours standing in order to be recognized 9


STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

STAFF

STAFF IS INTEGRAL TO THE SUCCESS OF HOLLAND COLLEGE , OUR LEARNERS, AND OUR COMMUNITY. WE ARE DEDICATED TO STAFF SUCCESS, BOTH PERSONALLY AND PROFESSIONALLY, AND WILL:

„ „ SUPPORT STAFF THROUGH ONGOING ENGAGEMENT AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT;

„ „ CELEBRATE CONTRIBUTIONS AND ACHIEVEMENTS; „ „ COMMIT TO CROSS- COLLEGE COLLABORATION; AND „ „ ENCOURAGE EXCELLENCE IN PERFORMANCE BY SUPPORTING STAFF TO SHARE NEW LEARNING.

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C A N A D I A N C U L I N A RY F E D E R AT I O N N A M E S E A S T E R N R E G I O N C H E F O F T H E Y E A R Chef Jen Bryant, a food product development technician with Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, the research and development arm of The Culinary Institute of Canada, was named the Canadian Culinary Federation’s eastern region Chef of the Year for 2015 during an event held in Nova Scotia.

Bryant's award-winning food styling skills have led her to work with some of Atlantic Canada’s top food photographers.

Bryant’s work as a product developer, food stylist, and as a mentor to culinary arts students was celebrated. She was a member of the 2012 silver medal winning team at the IKA Culinary Olympics and has traveled to South Africa to participate in the World Chefs’ Tour Against Hunger, raising money and global awareness to help feed school children daily.

S TA F F W E L L N E S S CO M M I T T E E The 14 members of the Holland College staff wellness committee executed events and activities that embodied mind, body, and spirit. Integrating a variety of experiential approaches spanning from nutrition, nature, lunch and

learns, hiking, physical activity challenges, personalized health assessments and flu vaccinations. These events engaged over 700 participants, spanning over five campuses.

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HOLL AND COLLEGE HOSTS ASSOCIATION OF CANADIAN SCHOOL S OF BUSINESS

H O L L A N D CO L L E G E CO - P U B L I S H E S SAMUEL HOLL AND BOOK

A group of deans and academic chairs of business schools from across the country held its annual meeting on Holland College’s Prince of Wales Campus in the fall. The Association of Canadian Schools of Business includes representatives from community colleges, universities, and interest groups such as Colleges and Institutes Canada. The group shares best practices and supports each other through partnership opportunities, professional development activities, and leadership development, and explores opportunities for program enhancement based on industry need and professional standards.

Holland College and Island Studies Press at UPEI co-published Samuel Holland: His Work and Legacy on Prince Edward Island, written by Earle Lockerby and Doug Sobey. Published in conjunction with the 250th anniversary of the completion of Holland’s map of Prince Edward Island, the book is considered to be the definitive work regarding the 18th century surveyor’s mapping of Prince Edward Island.

PH OTOG R APH E RS J OIN FO RCE S TO O FFE R WE E K E N D O F WO R KSH O PS Holland College’s Photography and Digital Imaging program joined forces with the Atlantic chapter of the Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOCA) to put on a one of a kind educational event for students, instructors, professional photographers, and serious amateurs in November.

Inspired Vision PEI 2015 was the only event of its kind in Atlantic Canada. Dave Brosha, who has been described by Nikon as “one of the most celebrated photographers in the world,” was the keynote presenter for the weekend workshop. Other presenters include noted food and lifestyle photographer Yvonne Duivenvoorden; independent film producer, director of photography and visual fx artist Brian Sharp; illustrator and photographer Stephen Desroches; and Felix Russo, the creator, publisher, and editor of PhotoEd Magazine and the PhotoEd GUIDE to Photography. Keynote speaker Dave Brosha

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S TA F F E XC E L L E N C E AWA R D S Three staff members received awards for their outstanding contributions to the college during the annual Staff Appreciation Day activities held in Summerside. The Staff Excellence Award was presented to Brenda Perry from the Admissions Department of the Waterfront Campus. Lowell Murray, a service worker at the Marine Training Centre, received the Facilities Support Services Excellence Award, and the Teaching Excellence award was presented to Doug Kelly, a math and physics instructor for programs in the Applied Science and Engineering Technology department. Recipients for the awards are selected from nominations by fellow staff and faculty members.

I N S T R U C T I O N A L D E V E LO P M E N T The Office of Instructional Development manages the Certificate of Adult Education (CAE) program and provides support for educational training as it relates to teaching and learning at Holland College. A cross-section of college employees are involved in the program, including full- and part-time instructors, lab assistants and administrative staff. Sixty students were registered in the program, seven of whom came from external industries. In the fall of 2015, 16 students graduated with their CAE.

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STR ATEG I C D I R EC TI O N

SUSTAI NAB I LIT Y AC AD E M I C ALLY, FI SC ALLY, AN D E NVI RO N M E NTALLY

HOLLAND COLLEGE IS COMMITTED TO ITS SUSTAINABILITY AND WILL:

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VALUE AND PROMOTE DIVERSITY IN LEARNERS AND STAFF;

„„

CONTINUE TO IDENTIFY AND FOSTER STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS;

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EFFECTIVELY USE AND ADAPT NEW TECHNOLOGIES;

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CONTINUALLY EVALUATE AND IMPROVE OUR BUSINESS PROCESSES;

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EXPAND OUR REACH THROUGH RECRUITMENT ACROSS THE PROVINCE AND OUTSIDE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND;

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PURSUE AND INVEST IN NEW REVENUE DEVELOPMENT;

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IDENTIFY AND ACTION INTERNAL EFFICIENCIES AND COST REDUCTIONS;

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MODEL ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP;

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CULTIVATE AND ENHANCE RELATIONSHIPS WITH ALUMNI; AND

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UNDERTAKE PROBLEM-BASED APPLIED RESEARCH TO SUPPORT INNOVATION IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALIZATION IN PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND.


90

APPLIED RESEARCH There were six Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) funded Engage for Colleges projects awarded to Holland College totalling $142,696. There were three Level 2 Applied Research and Development grants, also funded through NSERC, totalling more than $171,000. Two of the three projects are multiyear projects. Canada’s Smartest Kitchen received its annual funding from NSERC, totalling $350,000. There were 15 projects funded by the National Research Council - Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) Contribution to Organizations fund totalling $75,000. Nine of the IRAP funded projects were completed at Canada’s Smartest Kitchen, one with the Electronics Engineering Technology program, two with the Bioscience Technology program, one with the Construction Technology and Management program, one with the Environmental Applied Science Technology program and one with the Energy Systems Engineering Technology program.

AP P LI E D R E S E ARCH PROJ EC TS I N 201 5 –1 6 Project participation

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PROGRAMS

50 700

FAC U LT Y

S T U D E N TS

The Food Island Partnership supported five innovative packaging projects through Canada’s Smartest Kitchen totalling $75,000. ACOA supported the development of innovative teaching and learning initiatives that will have a significant impact on research through the BDP program, totalling $345,000. The Applied Research department also negotiated a lease agreement with the Center for Aquaculture Technologies, located in Souris, PEI, to have access to lab space from September until February, generating $9,100.

DINNER R AISES FUNDS TO ASSIST NEWEST ISL ANDERS Staff and students held a fundraising dinner that raised over $14,000 for the PEI Association of Newcomers to Canada. One hundred and forty people attended the event, and enjoyed a Canadian/ Syrian meal prepared by staff and students of The Culinary Institute of Canada. Rana Malikie, a representative from the Syrian community on PEI, instructed students on the preparation of some of

the food, enabling the culinary students to learn more about the dishes.

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G R E E N M AC H I N E The Green Machine is a volunteer group of staff and students working together to raise awareness about sustainability in the college and community. Since 2012, the committee has worked with all areas of the college to reduce, reuse and recycle as much as possible.

More 2015−16 Green Machine events: „„

Summerside Waterfront Campus garbage pick-up

„„

Annual Battery Challenge collected over 6,000 batteries and dropped off to IWMC

2015−16 Green Machine statistics

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Summerside Waterfront Campus yard sale

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Earth Day Celebrations at Summerside and Charlottetown campuses featured local farmers and environmental groups

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Established the Raymond Loo Memorial Garden, a green space and organic garden, with assistance from the President’s Innovation Fund

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Holland College Green Machine Sustainability Awards were presented to the City of Summerside and the Bedeque Bay Environmental Management Association

STU D E NT AN D STAFF M E M B E RS

FRO M C H A R LOT TE TOW N & S U M M ER S I D E

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LU N CH AN D LE AR N S AT PWC AN D SWC

TO PI C S: PA S S IV E H O M E D ES I G N , F U EL EFFICIENCY FOR YOUR VEHICLE, ENERGY SAV I N G S & S U S TA I N A B I LIT Y EFFO RTS

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FO U N DAT I O N The Holland College Foundation funded more than $2 million in college priorities during the 2015−16 fiscal year, including student financial aid, teaching and learning resources, and campus revitalization efforts. Three hundred and ninety six students benefitted from $450,000 in scholarships, bursaries, and awards, and 14 new awards were established. Three Holland College alumni were honoured with Distinguished Alumni Awards: Cory LeDrew, Culinary Arts 2001, General Manager, Overlander Lodge; Kevin Proude, Retail Sales and Marketing 1988, Owner and Manager, Proude Shoes; and Wayne Stewart, Plumbing 1981, President, A. R. Wright Plumbing and Heating.

The 15th Annual Holland College Golf Classic took place in September at Belvedere Golf and Country Club. Honourary Co-Chairs were Jamie Hill, Blair MacLauchlan, and Ed Babineau. The event raised just over $40,000 for varsity sports, student aid, and alumni initiatives.

Emily VanToever, a graduating student in our Construction Electrical Technology program, was awarded the keys to a 2015 Nissan Micra. Four other students were each awarded cheques for $1,000 made possible thanks to the generosity of donor, Lou MacEachern. Over 60 students were nominated by faculty and staff on the basis of merit, character, and academic achievement. MacEachern committed to fund the Earn a Car initiative for a second year. The Holland College Foundation’s contribution of just over $1.3 million toward the construction of the Florence Simmons Performance Hall was celebrated at the hall’s official opening in January. The hall was named in honour of Prince of Wales College alumna and lead donor, Florence Simmons. Donors were recognized on a special broadwayinspired donor wall prominently featured inside the main doors. Lead donors were also recognized via named seats and rows in the theatre itself. With the conclusion of this campaign also came the establishment of a new fundraising priority: revitalization of the teaching and learning environment at The Culinary Institute of Canada. The Fall 2015 issue of Benchmark, the Holland College Foundation Magazine was distributed to a readership of approximately 20,000. 17


E D U C AT I O N A L J O I N T V E N T U R E S In July 2015, nearly 100 Chinese administrators and faculty participated in the 5th Educational Joint Venture Best Practice Symposium in Hainan, China to explore the use of training methodologies, particularly Competency Based Education, in the Chinese classroom. In October, 40 Chinese visitors from eight institutions in China arrived in PEI to celebrate the 15th anniversary of Educational Joint Ventures in China and to make plans for the future.

There are close to 1,500 students enrolled in the Automotive Technology, Business Administration (Business Manager profile), Computer Information Systems, Computer Networking Technology, Early Childhood Care and Education, Electromechanical Technology, Golf Club Management, International Hospitality Management, and Marketing and Advertising Management programs at partner institutions in China.

H I G H R A N K I N G I N R E G I O N A L R E P U TAT I O N M O N I TO R Holland College tied for first place ranking in reputation scores for post-secondary institutions across Atlantic Canada according to the Atlantic Higher Education Reputation Monitor by Corporate Research Associates, released late in the summer. The reputation score represents an average score out of 10 when respondents were asked how they would rate post-secondary institutions on a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 is extremely negative and 10 18

is extremely positive. Respondents gave Holland College a reputation rating of 8.3, significantly higher than the regional average of 7.8. The college also received a 99 per cent familiarity rating, well above the regional average of 92 per cent. The familiarity ranking was calculated by subtracting the number of respondents who said they were not familiar with the institution from the total number of respondents.


S U M MARY O F

ENROLMENT

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P O S T- S E CO N DA RY S TAT I S T I C S Students registered from August 1, 2015 to July 31, 2016 FULL TIME

PART TIME

CHINA

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

89

7

108

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (DISTANCE)

6

6

COMPUTER NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY

37

0

75

CONSERVATION ENFORCEMENT

15

0

CONSTRUCTION ELECTRICAL

44

0

FULL TIME

PART TIME

CHINA

ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY

60

2

177

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

14

3

ADVANCED CARE PARAMEDICINE

47

0

ADVANCED CARE PARAMEDICINE DISTANCE

48

1

PROGRAM

AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE ENGINE REPAIR & OVERHAUL TECHNOLOGY APPLIED DEGREE IN CULINARY OPERATIONS

18

0

PROGRAM

0

1

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

24

0

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY

20

1

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

25

0

142

2

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY

38

0

18 8

0

 

CULINARY ARTS DANCE PERFORMANCE CERTIFICATE IN ADULT EDUCATION/BEd (HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT)

55

20

DENTAL ASSISTING

60

0

BASIC FIREFIGHTING

24

0

EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION

47

6

BIOSCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

25

0

135

6

101

4

32

12

2

ELECTROMECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY

17

0

5

0

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

28

1

CARPENTRY

35

2

CHILD AND YOUTH CARE WORKER

21

2

27

0

ENERGY SYSTEMS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

COMMERCIAL DIVING

10

0

20

0

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS MANAGER CANADIAN TOURISM AND HOSPITALITY EXPERIENCE

20

EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE AND EDUCATION ACCELERATED (BLENDED LEARNING)

ENVIRONMENTAL APPLIED SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

217

192


FULL TIME

PART TIME

7

0

GOLF CLUB MANAGEMENT

23

1

GRAPHIC DESIGN

21

HEATING, VENTILATION, & AIR CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY

17

HERITAGE RETROFIT CARPENTRY

17

PROGRAM FUNDAMENTAL ARTS

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

FULL TIME

PART TIME

POLICE SCIENCE (CADET)

101

0

42

POWER ENGINEERING

27

0

0

PRACTICAL NURSING

121

1

0

17

0

54

1

11

0

RESIDENT CARE WORKER

47

1

SHERIFF AND PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER

14

0

SPORT AND LEISURE MANAGEMENT

135

3

1

CHINA

PROGRAM

PRECISION MACHINIST PRIMARY CARE PARAMEDICINE PROFESSIONAL GOLF MANAGEMENT

CHINA

8

0

HUMAN SERVICES

52

5

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL

18

0

INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

35

1

JOURNALISM

33

0

STEAMFITTING/PIPEFITTING

25

0

8

0

THEATRE PERFORMANCE

18

0

MARKETING AND ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT

57

2

TOURISM AND TRAVEL MANAGEMENT

70

0

MEDICAL SUPPORT SERVICES

43

4

MUSIC PERFORMANCE

19

1

VIDEO GAME ART AND ANIMATION

25

1

OPEN ACADEMIC STUDIES

48

9

WELDING FABRICATION

58

0

PASTRY ARTS

34

1

WELDING LEVEL 1

21

0

6

0

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION TECHNOLOGY

38

0

PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL IMAGING

18

0

WIND TURBINE TECHNICIAN

15

0

PLUMBING

34

0

WOOD MANUFACTURING/ CABINETMAKING

12

0

2467

126

LEGAL ADMINISTRATION

PERFORMING ARTS FOUNDATION

223

212

TOTAL

1365

21


A D U LT E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S Students registered from August 1, 2015 to July 31, 2016

170

CHARLOTTETOWN 43

SUMMERSIDE 26

MONTAGUE

101

427 144

52

78

SOURIS

15

15

MORELL

17

17

SCOTCHFORT

12

WEST PRINCE CAMPUS TIGNISH

n DAY PROGRAMS = 495 30 37

4

n NIGHT PROGRAMS = 269

12 67 4

TOTAL = 764

CO M M U N I T Y E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S

CO N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N S TAT I S T I C S

Students registered from April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016

Students registered from August 1, 2015 to July 31, 2016

n LINC = 481

APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING

355

Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada

ATLANTIC POLICE ACADEMY

432

n EEELS

= 37

Enhanced Employability Essential Language Skills

n ELT = 10 Enhanced Language Training Hospitality

22

257

BUSINESS STUDIES CERTIFICATE IN ADULT EDUCATION/BEd

132 51

COMPUTER STUDIES

240

HEALTH & COMMUNITY SERVICES

204

MARINE TRAINING

1628

n LINC SUMMER = 38

TRADES & ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

40

n EAL NIGHT = 30

TRANSITIONS

118

English as an Additional Language

TOURISM & HOSPITALITY

TOTAL = 596

TOTAL

1705 4905


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS Year ended March 31, 2016, with comparative figures for 2015

REVENUE

2016

2015

59 954 783

58 454 706

Salaries and benefits Texts, materials and supplies Utilities Maintenance, insurance and property taxes Rentals Travel Purchases for resale Other operating costs Amortization of capital assets and program development Pension expense

34 2 2 1 1 1 2 6 4 1

33 2 2 1 1 1 2 6 4 1

59 120 201

57 762 390

834 582 24 242

692 316 (41 299)

4 657 835

4 883 089

(3 466 630) (23 333)

(3 441 309) (70 000)

2 026 696

2 022 797

(2 598 000) 870 138

(2 468 961) 594 451

Surplus for the Year Operating surplus, beginning of the year

298 834 1 450 169

148 287 1 301 882

Operating surplus, end of the year

1 749 003

1 450 169

Grants Province of Prince Edward Island $19 208 474 $18 964 517 Other grants 4 067 532 4 077 188 Contract Training 9 713 503 9 824 350 Sales, recoveries and incidentals 4 947 487 4 622 298 Student fees 18 551 157 17 525 044 Amortization of deferred contributions 3 466 630 3 441 309

EXPENSES

Excess of revenues over expenses Investment Income - Equity Method Add back non cash expenses Amortization of capital assets and program development Deduct non cash revenue Amortization of deferred contributions Amortization of lease inducement College operating funds required for: Debt servicing Capital assets purchased from operations

850 638 660 357 048 218 253 550 657 884

082 676 877 109 900 409 302 211 835 800

609 426 889 160 489 142 263 220 883 678

528 048 106 737 132 371 557 622 089 200

23


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Holland College Annual Report 2015-16  
Holland College Annual Report 2015-16