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As this issue of Leaves goes to press, big news on the Holden front is our impending partnership with the Cleveland Botanical Garden. We will keep our members and friends informed as we flesh out and implement this groundbreaking relationship. Exciting times, indeed!

from the president It is natural that we should celebrate all the new projects at Holden; the Eliot and Linda Paine Rhododendron Discovery Garden, the R. Henry Norweb Jr. Tree Allée and the soon-to-be-built canopy walk and emergent tower certainly are exciting additions to our landscape. But of equal, albeit more subtle, significance are the improvements and repurposings that also are underway, making long-standing Holden features and facilities more useful and engaging to visitors. Perhaps the most conspicuous of such improvements have been the renovated Corning Library; turning the former sugarbush into the Working Woods, including transforming the evaporator building into our most-utilized schoolchildren’s classrooms; and restoring the stream and landscape downhill from Heath Pond in the Helen Layer Rhododendron Garden. In addition, just this spring we completed renewing Hawgood Hill, the stunning azalea display that visitors see across Heath Pond on entering the Layer Garden. Other improvements are being undertaken to tease out interesting stories that are implicit in our gardens, which may be evident to the horticultural cognoscenti, but which should be accessible to our general avid audiences. Our mantra is, a great garden at Holden has three attributes: it should be beautiful, it should showcase unusual plants, and it should tell stories that engage and even transform our guests. A case in point is our Myrtle S. Holden Wildflower Garden, whose plant collections and design illustrate the diversity of Ohio’s native flora. The garden’s stories now are being brought to light by thoughtful horticultural work by gardeners Ann Rzepka and Dawn Gerlica, and by new interpretive signage being developed by Marian Williams, manager of information services, and intern Eva Rodriguez for installation next year.

JACKIE KLISURIC

we’ve been installing temporary exhibits showing how to care for trees (and how not to) and, this year, the actual monetary value of trees to a homeowner, through services such as energy conservation and stormwater control. So, as you enjoy our new gardens and features, please also enjoy our more subtle improvements. And thank you, through your membership and support, for making them possible.

Clement W. Hamilton, PhD President and CEO

Fall 2014

Even the Arthur S. Holden Sr. Hedge Collection, which we tend to take for granted, is experiencing a renaissance. Several species of traditional hedge plants have turned out to be aggressive invaders of our native forests, such as Euonymus alatus (burning bush). Over the past couple years we have replaced them with noninvasive alternatives, serving as a physical manifestation of the “plant this, not that” theme we feature in each issue of Leaves. And in the midst of that display, which is just south of the Corning Visitor Center,

MYRTLE S. HOLDEN WILDFLOWER GARDEN

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Leaves Magazine Fall 2014  

Leaves Magazine is the quarterly publication of The Holden Arboretum, focused on horticulture, conservation, education and ecological resear...

Leaves Magazine Fall 2014  

Leaves Magazine is the quarterly publication of The Holden Arboretum, focused on horticulture, conservation, education and ecological resear...

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