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Sustainer THE

Journal of The Royal Logistic Corps R WINTER 2019

www.royallogisticcorps.co.uk

#WeAreTheRLC


The Royal Logistic Corps Nurture Team

What are we? The RLC Nurture Team is a brand new team set up to help guide and assist with any needs or queries a British Army recruitment candidate may have about The RLC. We work closely with all Army Career Centres around the country providing essential knowledge of The RLC and the trades we offer. Our aim is to support candidates that have a preference towards joining the RLC prior to completing their 14 weeks Basic Training. We do this by having one on one chats in an Army Career Centre or over the phone, answering any question you the candidate may have, while also giving useful advice where needed. We also run Army Awareness Activity weeks giving candidates a better insight into the Army as a whole, as well as providing a more in-depth look at each individual trade that The RLC has to offer.

Who we are and how to contact us

To contact us, in the first instance visit your local Army Career Centre. You can find your nearest centre by visiting the British Army Career Centre finder - https://apply.army.mod.uk/army-career-centre-finder Alternatively you can get in touch with any of us using the detail listed or you can send a PM to the Royal Logistic Corps Facebook page @TheRoyalLogisticCorps


Sustainer THE

Corps Motto: We Sustain Regimental March: On Parade by Albert Elms Regimental Slow March: Lion, Sword and Crown by Craig Bywater

formed in 1993

Volume 27 No 4 R Winter 2019

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75 10

26 7 20

Contents

20 Heads of Trade

7 Hons & Awards

25 Ex MARKET GARDEN SCHOLAR

Comdt DCLPA named Logistician of the Year. New Corps SM Reserves appointed

News from the Photographer, Pet Ops, Mov Con and Tk Tptr trades

Images from this year’s event

39 Farewell Deepcut Looking back at the end of an era

42 Unit reports High risk AT at its best

Felix 5ive row the Atlantic

12 Gore Trophy

The RLC resupplies Brunei Garrison

Learning the logistic lessons

26 Ex TIGER ARRC 10 The Felix Fund

35 The silent 40%

32 Op TRACTABLE Force projection at pace and scale over 2,500km

What you have been up to over the last three months

75 Sport reports Netball, Rowing and Equestrian

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A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE An RHQ Perspective

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I will write next from Worthy Down, which will probably be my last journal entry as I prepare to hand over this appointment to Colonel Jon West. I’d ask that you all make an opportunity to visit Worthy Down

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A very warm welcome to the winter edition of The Sustainer. As I type this, I am surrounded by packing boxes; your RHQ will, by the time you read this, have moved to Worthy Down and be established in the Corps’ new home. As we draw a line under this chapter in our history and that of the RAOC’s, our predecessors here in Deepcut, we must all take some time to reflect on the contribution that Deepcut has made to Defence’s success. It will also, I am sure, have played a role in your own journey in or with the military. Plans are in place to ensure that we have a lasting legacy, a memorial which will be located at St Barbara’s Church. You will see in the pages that follow that we have tried to encapsulate the contributions made by the circa 40% of the Corps’ personnel that are employed outside our RLC Regiments (do not worry as you will also find the usual unit/independent Sqn updates). You should be left in no doubt that The RLC is delivering at every turn, be that in Stores Troops as attached personnel or working as part of staff branches in HQs, or even as part of a wider Joint Service teams. I have had the great privilege recently to witness this at first hand during a whistle stop tour of Cyprus.The contribution made by the Corps’ personnel there, which is increasingly operations focussed, was hugely impressive.The Corps SM and I left with an enormous sense of pride; the Tri-Service community there were effusive in their praise for the RLC’s collective contribution. I also managed 24 hours with the Op TOSCA personnel, which is

formed around the 27 Regt group.They are a third of the way through their tour and their contribution is being keenly felt on the island. More to follow on this deployment in future iterations. You will also see inside this edition that the Corps has once again been training hard, playing hard and having yet more success on the sports field. Our Reserve Regiments have completed their annual deployments, with some finding time to deploy to Cyprus on Ex LION STAR and many of our enablers have spent much of the intervening period on Op TRACTABLE (see pages 32 and 33). Stand out successes on the sports field include: netball, rowing and equestrian (see the back pages for details).We should also take time to reflect on the success of WO2 Kay Howells, who last week received the Special Award at the Women in Defence Awards evening for her outstanding contribution, in adversity, to military life and specifically delivering excellence in her AT trade. I will write next from Worthy Down, which will probably be my last journal entry as I prepare to hand over this appointment to Colonel Jon West. I’d ask that you all make an opportunity to visit Worthy Down. Firstly, to come and see your new RHQ and secondly to witness at first hand the hugely impressive world class facilities that Worthy Down has to offer. Finally, I’d like to take this opportunity to wish you and your loved ones a very Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

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C J Francis Colonel RLC


FROM THE RANKS Wow where has the year gone? As the year ends and we draw down ready for our well, earned Christmas break, I was about to write about all the amazing things that we, as a Corps, have achieved. However, you will find plenty of evidence of that throughout this edition of The Sustainer and through previous editions throughout the year. But it would be remiss of me not to congratulate you all on another fantastic year within the Corps. You should all be very proud of the things we - you - have achieved, be that as an individual or as a collective.The Corps is in a great place at the moment.We are held in very high regard and continue to exceed all expectations, so take a moment to reflect, take credit where it is due and thank those around you. Because without you and your hard work, dedication and commitment; we wouldn’t be able to enjoy the excellent reputation of the Corps now enjoys. I would like to talk to you about “The Offer”.The main effort of the CGS is to fully man the Army. It is currently staffed at approximately 73,500. It should be 82,000. As a Corps, we are sat at c16,000 officers and soldiers.Why is that important? Put simply we need to attract more personnel into our Corps and the Army. I won’t go into hard facts and figures.They change on a daily basis; but what I will say, is how good you are, how good we are and what the Corps can offer you. In line with the CGS’s and The Col RLC’s intent; to man the Corps and Army, we must focus on recruitment. However, it is equally important to focus on retention. Retention, or the reason why you stay, is actually a similar message to why you wish to join. As I travel around the Corps, you tell me how good the Corps

and the Army is. So I will not refer to “The Army Offer” I will use your words.You said:“Sport and AT for all, job security, diversity, rank structure, clear understanding of career progression, CPD, accreditation (all trades are accredited to something), education, SLC, ELC, overseas assignments, travel, a chance to better yourself, coaching, mentoring, leadership, empowerment, health care, children’s education, SFA, SLA, Armed Forces Help to Buy, good money (yes it is), pension, leave, FAM, flexible working”, and the list goes on… Basically, the opportunities are endless and this is the message we should focus on. Use the opportunities to your and your teams’ advantage. Make the most of your time in the Army. It will come to an end sooner than you think. So, these are the reasons why we stay. All the things you like about a career in the Army and The RLC. Use these messages and do your bit to help the Army and Corps recruitment drive. If you are thinking of leaving, think about what else is available to you here; what can you do to make a difference? How can you make our Corps and the lived experience better for yourself and others? Remember, we are doing a lot right, because you keep telling me that. So back up your messages, sell the Corps, sell the Army and to paraphrase Comd HC: Recruit someone this Christmas. Please stay safe over the Christmas break. Have fun, enjoy yourselves and come back refreshed, ready for another awesome year in The RLC. Merry Christmas to you and your families…#ThisisBelonging #WeAreTheRLC

‘‘

You should all be very proud of the things we - you - have achieved, be that as an individual or as a collective. The Corps is in a great place at the moment

WO1 P S Broom Corps Sergeant Major RLC

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THE SUSTAINER | DEFENCE DIGEST

#WeAreTheRLC

GLOBAL ADVANCE A snapshot of The RLC across the world

4 5

KENYA

13 AASR

1 13 AASR will deploy to Kenya in support of 3 PARA on Ex ASKARI STORM in the new year.

SOUTH GERMANY

POLAND

Ex SKI RLC

29 Regt 2

In early 2020 29 Regt and 17 P&M Regt’s focus will shift towards Ex DEFENDER EUROPE in support of the US Army’s 21 Theater Sustainment Command ME. 4

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At the end of Feb 20, The RLC will gather in Ruhpolding for Ex SKI RLC.

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#WeAreTheRLC

DEFENCE DIGEST | THE SUSTAINER

THAILAND

British Forces Brunei

6 RLC personnel serving with BFB will deploy to Thailand next year in support of Ex PANTHER GOLD

6 1

7 4

WORTHY DOWN

RLC relocation 7 NEW ZEALAND NORWAY

Cdo Log Sp Sqn The Cdo Log Sp Sqn will deploy with Cdo Log Regt, in support of 3 Cdo Bde on its annual Arctic Warfare training exercise.

5 Early 2020 will see the final elements of the RLC leave Deepcut, completing the move of the home of The RLC to Worthy Down.

Ex PACIFIC KHUKURI 20 10 QOGLR Chefs will to deploy in support of Ex PACIFIC KHUKURI 20 in New Zealand

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EDITOR’S NOTE The theme of this edition of The Sustainer is ‘the silent 40%’. I am referring to the 40% of The RLC who are attached to other units across the Army and wider Defence. Our chefs, stores troops, posties, drivers, comms specs, instructors and those working in formation headquarters. A request received from the OC of a stores troop, for a regular slot in the magazine, prompted the idea. After all, it’s not just the major and independent units, that do great work, get involved in top level sport or can boast significant achievements. But with 24 regular and reserve regiments, plus several minor, independent and joint units to include in every edition – we must do this as part of our charter – we simply don’t have the space to include everyone else in every edition and all the standalone features, events, sports, operations and exercise reports. At an average of 84 pages per issue, The Sustainer is already the biggest Corps magazine and producing four editions per year costs around £75,000, in terms of production, print and postage. Providing we receive the copy by the deadlines listed below, we do our best to include everything that is submitted. And if you wear The RLC cap badge, irrespective of where you work, your article will be considered. Returning to the question of including regular input from detached personnel and sub-units; in future we will allocate two or three pages within the units’ Charter: The Sustainer records the activities and achievements of the Corps family, its units and personalities, as well as the organisations of the Forming Corps and their Associations. It keeps soldiers of today in touch with each other and soldiers of yesteryear in touch with the Corps of today. The Journal is not only a means of cohesion and communication within the Corps but also a source of research material for posterity. Editorial Staff Editor: Peter Shakespeare Assistant Editor: Miss Anne-Marie Causer BA (Hons) Email: rlcsustainer@gmail.com Graphic Design: David Blake Copy deadlines for THE SUSTAINER: 10 Jan 20, 13 Apr 20, 6 Jul 20, 5 Oct 20 Change of Address: Serving members of the Corps who are due to move into or out of non-RLC appointments (eg E2) and other subscribers are requested to notify the Editor of their change of address. No information, no magazine! Publisher: The Regimental Association of The Royal Logistic Corps, RHQ The RLC, DCLPA Worthy Down, Winchester Hampshire. SO21 2RG. Email: peter.shakespeare100@mod.gov.uk Tel: +44 (0) 7901 676309 Typesetting, Printing, Binding and Distribution: Holbrooks Printers Ltd, Norway Road, Hilsea, PORTSMOUTH, Hampshire PO3 5HX. Data Privacy: We distribute The Sustainer using mailing data held in a secure contacts database within RHQ The RLC. Your inclusion on this database is by virtue of the fact you are serving in the military, or you are a current member of the RLC or Forming Corps Associations. The Sustainer only uses your personal data for the

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section of the magazine for ‘the silent 40%’. Inclusion will either be on a first come first served, or rota basis. If what you are reading resonates with you, please contact me, register your interest and we will take this forward. The theme of the spring 2020 edition is trades and training. We want to use the edition to profile some of our young soldiers and the rewarding careers they are following in their chosen trades. We have already interviewed an 18-year-old mover, who recently spent four months in Brunei and a 19-year-old driver, who is gaining valuable experience at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. We will also be turning our attention to continual professional development. The Sustainer is a valuable recruiting tool for the Corps Engagement Team and the new Nurturing Team. If you think you have a young soldier, who has a good news story to tell about their experiences, please get in touch. By the time you read this, production of The Sustainer will have moved, along with RHQ The RLC, to the Corps’ new home in DCLPA Worthy Down. The media and communications team is very portable and in terms of contacting us, nothing has changed. Finally, we would like to thank you for all your contributions this year and look forward to hearing from you in 2020. 8 Peter Shakespeare Email: Peter.Shakespeare100@mod.gov.uk Contact: +44 (0) 7901 676309. purpose of sending you the magazine. The mailing data is treated in the strictest confidence, is password protected, is only shared with our printer and is deleted after each use. If any serving RLC personnel have concerns with regards to the storage and use of their personal data they should contact RHQ The RLC’s Data Protection Officer, Maj Alistair Carnegie-Brown. Email: Alistair.Carnegie-Brown100@mod.gov.uk Members of the Associations should contact the Assistant Regimental Secretary at RHQ The RLC. Photographs: The Editor accepts photographs for publication on the understanding that those submitting them have, where required by data protection legislation, obtained consent to publication from those depicted. Anyone who believes this is not the case or has a DPA related concern should contact the Editor. peter.shakespeare100@mod.gov.uk Advertising: There is normally no space for commercial advertising, please contact the Editor. Security: This Journal contains official information. It should be treated with discretion by the recipient. © Crown Copyright: All material in this Journal is Crown Copyright and may not be reproduced without the permission of the Regimental Association of The Royal Logistic Corps. © Cartoons are copyright. Disclaimer: No responsibility for the quality of the goods or services advertised in this Journal can be accepted by the publishers or their agents. Advertisements are included in good faith. The contents of this Journal and views of individual authors or units does not necessarily reflect the policy and views, official or otherwise, of the Corps or Ministry of Defence. Front Cover: Image courtesy of 17 P&M Regt RLC

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NEWS | THE SUSTAINER

LATEST RECRUITS WELCOMED On Fri Nov 19, the new Commandant of the Defence College of Logistics Policing and Administration, Brigadier Mike Caldicott CBE, welcomed eight of the latest recruits to join The RLC at their passing out parade from ATR Winchester. The evening before at the Logistic Leadership Awards, Brig Caldicott was named, Military Logistician of the Year, 2019. The awards ceremony was held at the St John’s Hotel, Solihull and MGL, Lt Gen Sir Mark Poffley KCB OBE, Maj Gen David Shoesmith and Brig Gerry Ewart-Brookes,

attended. Sponsored by The RLC Foundation, the Military Logistician of the Year award, is presented in the memory of Lt Col Paul Holder, who was the first active member of the Armed Forces to be Master of the Worshipful Company of Carmen, the City of London Livery Company for the transport industry. Logistic awards for RLC personnel keep on coming. WO2 (RQMS) Canterbury from 9 Regiment RLC was recently named as Most Impactful Military Logistics Leader 2019, by the Engineer and Logistic Staff Corps.

NEW CORPS SM RESERVES WO1 Amanda Ward has taken over as The RLC Corps Sergeant Major Reserves. WO1 Ward joined the Women’s Royal Army Corps and the Army Catering Corps (ACC) in 1986. Upon completion of training, she was posted to the Infantry Battle School, Brecon and then the Cambridge Military Hospital, Aldershot before leaving the Regular Army and joining the Territorial Army (TA), Central Volunteers Headquarters ACC in 1991. With the formation of The Royal Logistic Corps’, Catering Support Regiment and subsequent relocation of the regiment to Grantham, her frequent commute from Portsmouth to Grantham commenced. Remaining with the Catering Support Regiment throughout her career, she supported a variety of exercises in the UK and Germany. On promotion to WO1 in 2011, she joined 2 Operational Support Group, Labour Support Unit, where she remained for seven years during which she completed two Operational tours of Afghanistan. In 2018, she returned home to 167 Catering Support Regiment as RSM. Although sad

to be leaving her family regiment again after only a relatively short return, she is delighted at being selected for the appointment of Corps SM Reserves. During her career,WO1 Ward has completed various military courses and gained numerous qualifications. She was a Physical Training Instructor for over 17 years. She has completed a BSC (Hons) in Sports Science and an MSc in Maintaining and Enhancing Sporting Performance. She has been employed at the University of Portsmouth within the School of Sports, Health and Exercise Science since 2002. In addition, she has completed various qualifications through the National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health (NEBOSH) and is one of the University’s health and safety advisers. Happily married for over 30 years to Dean - who himself completed a full Regular service and Reserve service – they have two grown sons, Niall and Jordan. Still a keen recreational runner her other leisure activities include skiing, golf, gardening, reading and walking her dog ‘Archie’.

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THE SUSTAINER | NEWS

RUNNING IN AID OF THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

8 Participants Sgt Clark and Lt Leathard were given a tour of the Defence Rehabilitation Centre by LCpl Lumb

A team from 6 Regiment has run 140 miles to raise money for a colleague who received life changing injuries in a road traffic collision back in the spring. The Road to Recovery team ran the 145-mile route from James Cook Hospital to the Defence Rehabilitation Centre in Loughborough in six days. The run has helped raise vital funds to ensure that LCpl Emma Lumb has all of the specialist care and equipment she needs in order to allow her the greatest possible level of independence going forward. On 3 Mar 19, Emma had a serious and life changing Road Traffic Collision, breaking her neck and Spinal Cord, resulting in C4 paralysis (everything below the shoulders). The event has had a wide ranging and devastating effect on a young woman and her family, including her young son, Lucas. Despite her injuries, the Regt says that Emma remains an inspiration and has remained positive in the face of adversity and challenge. At the end of the event participants Sgt Clark and Lt Leathard were given a tour of the Defence Rehabilitation Centre by LCpl Lumb herself. You can still donate to Emma’s cause at: https://www.justgiving.com/ crowdfunding/emmasroadtorecoveryyy 8

#WeAreTheRLC

Marking Remembrance Day

Each regiment in the Corps marked 11 Nov with their own acts of Remembrance, but there was an extra special part to play for two members of 17 Port & Maritime Regiment. Sgt Beaney and Pte Gumble helped escort the Torch of Remembrance at this year's Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall, where Her Majesty The Queen and other senior royals were in attendance. They were selected for the honour following their part in the relief effort

8 Sgt Beaney and Pte Gumble at The Royal Albert Hall

to the BVIs in 2015 and to represent the most recent efforts in the Bahamas onboard RFA Mounts Bay. Sgt Beaney said: "It is an absolute privilege for us to be representing the Regt and the RFA Mounts Bay on behalf of all personnel involved with the relief effort. The event itself is the perfect way to honour the memories of our fallen."

1 REGT VICTORIES AT CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPS

1 Regiment has clinched some notable victories at The RLC Cross Country Championships in Colchester. The event, hosted by 3 Regiment at Friday Woods, saw the Regt's female team finish as overall winners with the male team finishing as major unit runner up. In addition, Lt Newton was awarded runner up senior female

8 1 Regt had a notable competition

and LCpl Aldridge runner up senior male and runner up overall male in the competition. A special mention also goes to Pte Wilson who was the U23 winner. SSgt Hogan-Henry was awarded overall female winner and has become The RLC Cross Country Female Champion.

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NEWS | THE SUSTAINER

Para Commando RLC Chef, Cpl Leon Hinds, based with 1st Battalion The Rifles, has won gold representing the Army at the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation (IBJJF) in Rome. This latest medal comes after a run of medals at various Jiu-Jitsu competitions; including a gold at open weight and silver in the super heavyweight category at the (IBJJF) World Masters in Las Vegas and the same again at the IBJJF European Championships held in Lisbon. Las Vegas is the biggest IBJJF of its kind and Portugal is the second largest Jiu-Jitsu competition in the world, attracting over 4000 competitors from novice white belts to elite black belts. The level of competition is so high that Olympians use the competitions as an opportunity to test themselves out. Cpl Hinds said: "It's been an outstanding year and is such an honour to compete for the Army and The RLC, I'm going to continue to promote this sport within the Army." "I've had such great support from

Jiu-Jitsu gold for Para Commando Army Cpl

The RLC, Army Elite Sports Programme and 1st Battalion The Rifles to exhibit my skills in such a great sport. I look forward to

achieving greater success in the coming year." Cpl Hinds' next event will be competing at the IBJJF Paris.

was selected to be the leader of the advanced counter IED team, at the Defence Explosives, Munitions and Search School. Here she taught the next generation of EOD operators and acted as a role model to the young female soldiers going through training. As the team leader she actively encouraged other women to

pursue the Ammunition Technician trade.WO2 Howells proved that not only could women be bomb disposal operators, they could be the best. Not content to only encourage serving women, she has visited local schools as part of a GINI equality initiative to encourage young women into engineering and technical trades.

AT WINS TOP DEFENCE AWARD WO2 Kay Howells, has won the Special Award at the Women in Defence UK Awards. A highly Ammunition Technician, she joined the Army in 2004 with no background in engineering. She is now an Advanced Manual Techniques Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) operator and is trained to safely dispose of improvised explosive devices (IED) in a hostile environment, including devices that could contain a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear threats. WO2 Howells broke her back early in her career and had to undergo extensive surgery. At the time of her injury the thought of operating in a 40kg bomb suit would have been far from her mind.Through her determination and mental resilience, she overcame this set back and went on to complete her Advanced EOD Operator course.WO2 Howells has proven herself on the front lines of Afghanistan, conducting high threat bomb disposal and more recently in Iraq, using her technical expertise as a weapons intelligence operator. She

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THE SUSTAINER | NEWS

The Talisker Whisky Atlantic Challenge is the premier event in ocean rowing. Covering over 3,000 miles from San Sebastian, Canary Islands to Nelson’s dockyard, Antigua. Starting on 22 Dec, a team of five intrepid adventurers are taking part to raise funds for Felix Fund – the bomb disposal charity. They are; Julian Thomas, Headmaster of Wellington College, Capt James Wadsworth MBE CGC, David Edwards, Housemaster at Wellington College, Ian Holdcraft, co-founder of luxury adventure brand Shackelton and Maj David Jarman, a British Army bomb disposal officer. The Felix 5ive will face some 40 days at sea coping with sores and blisters, sea sickness and other illnesses, brutal ocean conditions with storms and 50-foot waves as

#WeAreTheRLC

Felix 5ive Take on ‘The World’s Toughest Row’ well as sleep deprivation, weight loss and an enormous amount of physical and mental stress. So why are they putting themselves through this hell? Not just for the personal challenge but to raise funds and awareness for Felix Fund, a charity close to their hearts. Melanie Moughton, CEO of Felix Fund said: ‘This is an awe-inspiring challenge and the money raised by the team will help the awe-inspiring men and women from the bomb disposal and search communities

who keep us all safe.We wish the Felix 5ive the best of luck and we will be following their progress across the Atlantic closely.’ The team added: ‘More people have travelled to space and climbed Everest than have rowed across an ocean. This is a huge challenge and a considerable undertaking that will test us physically and mentally as individuals and a team.’ 8 You can support the team at their Just Giving page: http://www.justgiving.com/FelixFive

102 LOG BDE STRETCHES ITS LEGS ON EX HALBERD DAWN Ex HALBERD DAWN was a 102 Logistic Brigade exercise held between 7-21 Sep 19, designed to exercise its component parts of 150, 158 and 159 Regts RLC, 254 Med Regt and elements of 6 and 7 Regt RLC, within a realistic and challenging scenario. It trained and integrated Regular and Reserve soldiers in their war fighting role, developing their collective capability. 300 personnel and 180 vehicles deployed on the exercise, the mass used to achieve efficiency, complexity and realism. The training included a CAST style planning cycle for the Reserve staff officers and assistants, supported by their Regular counter parts from 6 Regt and 253 Med and 102 Bde. A supply loop was 10

established from Prince William of Gloucester Barracks, Grantham to Thetford, by 150 and 158 Regts and a Forward Supply Area run by 159 Regt with, for the first time an MRS, medical reception facility that included, medical, dental,

mental health, dentist and physio capability. This is the first time these units have trained together at this scale for a number of years. It is anticipated that this brigade led exercise will be repeated on a bi-annual basis.

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NEWS | THE SUSTAINER

In Aug, a producer from the Belgium national TV station,VRT, contacted The RLC via the website. Katrin Liégeois explained her team was working on a new television series to be broadcast in spring 2020.The programme follows people and organisations as they strive to realise their dreams and ambitions. They planned to feature a nonprofit organisation: the ‘For Freedom Museum’. It is a World War Two museum in Knokke-Heist, Belgium. The museum is, in part, a tribute to Royal Army Ordnance Corps soldier Dennis Jones and all the soldiers who, along with him, helped to liberate Europe from the German occupation. The museum was opened after Dennis’ death, by his sons Danny (70) and Freddy (62).Their dream was to attract more British visitors and for the museum to be recognised in the UK. The museum has different exhibits, which depict WW2 historical facts and about 120 mannequins dressed in the original, authentic uniforms, as well as military vehicles both Allied and German.There is even a German Bibber, one-man submarine. VRT decided it wanted to help them make this dream come true. One of the steps in the process was to plan an exhibition as part of the 75th anniversary of Belgium’s liberation. Danny and Freddy Jones worked very hard for the exhibition to open on 5 Sept 19. Ms Liégeois invited The RLC to send a veteran of the RAOC to the opening. The call went out via the RAOC Association and Maj Gen (Retd) Malcolm Wood volunteered to represent the RAOC. General Wood joined the RAOC in 1973 and retired in 2008. He is President of the RAOC Council. The TV producers did not tell Dennis Jones’ widow and sons about their request.The intention was the attendance of a former RAOC General would be a complete surprise. The producers also asked whether a soldier serving today in The RLC could be present in uniform. The nearest unit was 69 Sqn RLC in Germany and the OC kindly agreed, once clearance was given, to send Cpl Obazee. General Wood delivered a short speech and present some gifts and a picture of Monty’s Rolls Royce to the very grateful and surprised brothers and their mother.

The Freedom Museum

8 The Belgium TV presenter with Maj Gen Wood, the brothers and Cpl Obazee

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THE SUSTAINER | GORE TROPHY

Gore Trophy boo

Craftsman Robert Jackson 7 Regiment RLC LAD

The Gore Trophy, hosted this year by 7 Regiment RLC at Beckingham Ranges, has once again helped raise the bar for military standards across The RLC. At the military skills competition this year, there were Military Knowledge, Physical, March and Shoot challenges, all designed to put competitors through their paces. Lt Col J Edwards, Commanding Officer of 7 Regt RLC, said: “The Regiment delivered to an exceptional level in terms of organisation." "All the hard work by the team setting up and running the event led to exciting and well executed challenges for all teams involved." Competition results were as follows: Winners: Male - Cdo Log Regt (A Team) Female - 4 Regt (B Team) Mixed - 29 Regt RLC (C Team) Veteran - 13 Regt RLC (A Team).

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GORE TROPHY | THE SUSTAINER

sts RLC’s military skills

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THE SUSTAINER | CAREER MANAGEMENT

#WeAreTheRLC

YOUR CAREER, YOUR CALL Career management team RLC soldiers - SO1: Lt Col Stewart SO2: Maj Brown WO1: WO1 Neilson

DIDyouKNOW

A message from the SO1 Soldiers Welcome to the APC winter article which is focussed on the “invisible 40%” of the Corps that is dispersed across Defence. With over 3,000 soldiers outside of the mainstream RLC units we are widely dispersed delivering fantastic levels of support across all three services. We have seized the opportunity to highlight some of the openings that exist out in the wider army and, importantly, to reiterate how these soldiers should be managed and reported on. The winter issue of The Sustainer is aimed at the “Invisible 40%” of the Corps that is spread across Defence, attached to and supporting the other cap badges and services. These ambassadors of our Corps are front and centre in enabling and sustaining the Field Army and the other two services in all that they do. Assignments outside of the main RLC regiments

“up north” or all across the nation . Below are just four such examples of under manned RLC posts: 3 Med Regt based in Preston, 5 Med Regt based in Catterick, 4 Bn REME in Tidworth and 7 Bn REME in Ipswich. If your main factor behind your PPP choices is location, it’s worth noting that the Corps Outreach Teams have 60 posts across all ranks, located in a variety of locations from Inverness, in the Highlands of Scotland, down to Portsmouth on the south coast of England. There are also around 173 posts in the various training regiments, across the ranks of Cpl – WO2. This issue of The Sustainer will tell you more about the dispersed locations of the Corps. If you see something you’re interested in, make sure it goes on your next PPP or you add it to your JPA preferences. How does being assigned outside of your cap badge affect the SJAR? JSP 757, Pt2, Vol2 is your first point of reference when trying to find out how to report on your soldiers and how you should be reported on. As a member of The RLC working for another cap badge your performance is graded alongside that of your non-RLC peers and should you perform well, this will catch the eye of any promotion board. The ability to perform well as part of a small attached RLC contingent, without the safety net of being part of a large regiment where it is easy to be absorbed into the regimental effort, can only serve to highlight

There are LSS, Pte – SSgts, in 1 LO sections across over 100 different units. Interested? Get a recommendation on your SJAR and look out for opportunities in your preferred locations. offer our soldiers arguably the widest variety of employment opportunity of any cap badge. Geographically we are spread to the four corners of the United Kingdom and beyond and more often than not, there is a contingent of RLC soldiers there too. As our soldiers are recruited nationally and indeed, internationally, there is a wide variety of preferred locations to serve in and there is usually disappointment for someone come posting time! This doesn’t always have to be the case, as there are many, not well advertised units that provide opportunity to serve

AUTUMN 2019 – Key Dates Soldiers Key Dates

Event

Action

15-17 Jan

SSgt – WO2 Board sits

No action required.

31 Jan

Sgts SJARs due

Sgts, have you had your SJAR? It is due as at 31 Jan!

3-7 Feb

APC visit to BFSAI

In the Falklands and want to speak with your CM? Get your RCMO to send your request to APC.

6 Feb

SSgt – WO2 Board results

Log onto MS Web at 0900 to get the results.

10-12 Mar

Sgt – SSgt Board sits

No action required.

Late Mar 20

RLC Soldiers visit BATUK

In BATUK and want to speak with your CM? Get your Chain of Command to send your request to APC.

3 Medical Regt, Preston, Lancs (Dvrs)

5 Medical Regt, Catterick, N Yorks (Dvrs)

4 Bn REME, Tidworth, Wilts (Dvrs)

7 Bn REME, Ipswich, Suffolk (Comm Specs)

Rank

PIDs

Gaps

Rank

PIDs

Gaps

Rank

PIDs

Gaps

Rank

PIDs

Gaps

WO2

1

0

WO2

1

0

WO2

1

0

WO2

0

0

SSgt

1

0

SSgt

1

0

SSgt

0

0

SSgt

0

0

Sgt

1

0

Sgt

1

0

Sgt

1

0

Sgt

2

1

Cpl

2

0

Cpl

2

0

Cpl

3

0

Cpl

3

0

LCpl

11

0

LCpl

11

0

LCpl

3

0

LCpl

9

6

Pte

36

8

Pte

25

9

Pte

4

1

Pte

3

2

Overall Manning 85%

14

Overall Manning 79%

Overall Manning 91.6%

Overall Manning 47%

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CAREER MANAGEMENT | THE SUSTAINER

an individual’s command leadership and management potential. In order to present a fair report on a subject as a member of their regiment or corps, when neither 1RO nor 2RO has been completed by an officer of the subject’s own Arm or Service, or as directed in Annex G of JSP 757, Pt 2, Vol 2, the Hd Arm/Svc is to complete the insert slip. The Hd Arm/Svc is to complete the Hd of Arm/Svc Insert Slip once the 1RO transfers ownership in a timely manner to enable the 2RO to complete the AR process and deliver the report to the APC for approval. The insert slip is to report on the subject's technical ability,

future employment and commissioning potential. It should also, when appropriate, provide the subject with special to Arm/Svc career advice/guidance not contained in the assessments by 1RO and 2RO. Soldiers are reported on in their substantive rank. Additionally, comment should be made if they consider the subject has been unjustly or inappropriately graded. It will be very unusual for the Arm/Service view of the subject’s personal qualities and characteristics to differ significantly from those of the 2RO. Any such differences should normally be resolved by liaison during report writing.

DIDyouKNOW The Corps Outreach Teams have 60 posts across all ranks, located in a variety of locations from Inverness to Portsmouth It would be very rare for the Arm/Service officer to know the subject as well as the employing officer or Commanding Officer. While this should make them very cautious about putting their judgement against theirs, it in no way precludes them doing so. Below is the table taken from JSP 757, Pt 2, Vol 2, Annex G showing reporting requirements.

Reporting Officer HoA Insert Slip (1)

Subject Rank

Employment

1

WO1

RSM

CO

Not Required

Fmn Comd Log Sp (Min rank OF 5)

2

WO1

E1 and E2

3

OC or Employing Officer (2)

Not Required

WO2

CO or Supervising Officer (2)

4

SNCO

5

Cpl

Tp Comd or Employing Officer (2)

SSgt/WO/Offr nominated by 2* OPCOM HQ. Log Sp staff (3&4)

OC (5)

6

LCpl

Sgt (7)

Not Required

PI/Tp Comd

7

Pte

Sgt (7)

Not Required

PI/Tp Comd

Ser

1RO

Officer nominated by: 2* OPCOM HQ. Log Sp staff (3)

2RO

3RO

CO (6)

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15


THE SUSTAINER | TRAINING MATTERS

#WeAreTheRLC

The Defence School of Logistics Commandant: Col John Atkins There have been some big, and positive changes recently, within the DST. Most of our fuel training is now delivered in Worthy Down (WD) providing a significant improvement to the quality of classrooms and accommodation: We will use West Moors for a while longer for practical training, but a new local site in Barton Stacey will also be available. Command Wing is now fully established in WD and we are awaiting the inflow of the first Combat Logisticians from Leconfield. The final moves to WD are approaching rapidly: Supply Training Wing (STW) is gearing up to move in the New Year and complete its transition by Easter 2020. We are also really looking forward to welcoming the Royal Navy’s logisticians in the New Year, which will make us, finally, a truly Tri-Service school. Supply Training Wing (STW) Chief Instructor – Lt Col Dutch Holland RLC STW has continued to deliver logistic, supply and other specialised training to the Field Army through its four Divisions throughout a busy spring and summer schedule of courses. Meanwhile the Wing continues to plan for its imminent move to the new college building in WD by Mar 20. Being the last training delivery wing to leave Deepcut, we are keen to move to WD, which will be a huge improvement for the instructors and trainees in terms of infrastructure and the teaching and learning environment. STW instructors include RLC soldiers, Royal Engineer instructors and SSCP WOs drawn from an array of army cap badges. This diverse makeup enhances and broadens the knowledge and experience of the team and undoubtedly adds to the high quality of training that is delivered. This is the focus of the article, which includes another instructor profile, this time from WO1 Sam Martin, one of the most recent additions to the team. Ex TIGER DISTRICT Following a particularly busy period, delivering courses immediately prior to the summer leave stand down; there was time for the instructors to deploy on Ex TIGER

8 Mountain biking: (L to R) Sgt ‘T’ Tamang, Sgt ‘Amps’ Amponsah, Capt Scott Anderson and Sgt ‘Tiger’ Field

16

8 Sgt ‘Macca’ McLellan (ELD) launching himself into the void

DISTRICT, a four-day multi-activity training package superbly organised by Sgt Jon Frost from ELD. STW was accommodated at The RLC`s Lower Gillerthwaite Field Centre in the Lake District. Once over the initial shock of having no phone signal or internet, all personnel settled in quickly and looked forward to four days of AT which included hill walking, mountain biking, canoeing and gorge walking. The week consisted of three groups completing a ‘round robin’ of activities. They included taking in the glorious scenery of the surrounding mountains and Ennerdale Water on a 12-mile hike; enjoying the challenging and exciting mountain bike routes up, down and around Whinlatter Forest and spending the day canoeing from Derwent Water to Bassenthwaite Lake via Middle Derwent River, finishing the day in the picturesque Keswick. On the fourth and final day of activities, everyone took part in gorge walking. This was the highlight of the week and even the three-mile walk in the sun wearing wetsuits failed to dampen the enthusiasm and enjoyment of all involved. Despite starting in very tranquil waters, as the team moved up the valley, climbing through the rapids and waterfalls, the nerves were tested. Starting with a couple of smaller cliff jumps, the group was soon introduced to some testing leaps, culminating in a huge 15 metre jump which tested the very bravest. Extraordinary skills (or lack of) were demonstrated throughout the week, but a couple of highlights were the 2IC (Maj Mike Davies) and WO2 Kev Heron managing to sail backwards down Middle Derwent River and Sgt Gary Field doing his ‘superman’ impression on (or rather off) his mountain bike. With a mixed range of abilities across STW, everyone was tested, physically and mentally, which led to a very successful AT package, bringing everyone together over an enjoyable week.

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UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

Instructor Profile – WO1 Sam Martin - QMD After 24 years of military service, it was either depart the forces on a high and look for a job as a civilian or explore the option of serving in a Senior Soldier Continuity Post (SSCP). After being informed I had been fortunate enough to have been selected on the SSCP, I was then told I would be assigned to Deepcut and then Worthy Down as an RQMS instructor. Having never really done any instructional positions prior to this post, I was somewhat in the panic locker. However, when I arrived, I was soon put at ease by shadowing a three-week SQMS course, during which I was able to learn my new role under the guidance of an experienced instructor. My aim will be over the next few months to gain greater understanding of the SQMS and RQMS courses to provide sound instruction to the Field Army. This has been one of my biggest challenges to date, which I embrace fully with the support of the team here and the direction from the CoC at the STW. I am certain that I will benefit immensely in my future posts with the experience I am currently gaining. Logistic Specialist Training Wing (LSTW) CO – Wg Cdr Elizabeth Corry RAF LSTW provides 75 basic, pre-employment and specialist training courses to circa 5,000 Phase 2 (initial) and Phase 3 (advanced) tri-service logisticians per annum of varying ranks, as well as international students, civilian grades and defence industry partners. Training takes place in four Sqns based at: Marchwood (73 Sqn); Worthy Down (Defence Petroleum Specialist Training Sqn (DPSTS) and Logistics Supply Training Sqn (LSTS)); and RAF Brize Norton (Defence Movements Training Sqn). As part of Project WELLESLEY, DPSTS and LSTS are in the process of relocating to WD. DPSTS has now achieved initial operating capability with LSTS expected to complete its move in Mar 20. The training audience across the Wing includes officers of The RLC and RAF Logistics Branch, as well as soldiers of The RLC Pet Op, Mov Con, Mariner, Port Op,Vehicle Support Specialist, Marine Engineer trades and airmen and women of RAF Trade Group 18: The Logistics (Supplier) and Logistics (Mover).

8 SSgt Craig Melrose, WO2 Mark Page, Sgt Ben Calloway and Capt Stu Ebbrell dismantle Pipeline Pete

Capt Ebbrell says: "We dismantled and packed up Pete, put on our boots and walked the 44 miles to our new home. Unfortunately, the weather was not on our side. Leaving West Moors at 2330hrs on the Tuesday, it rained until we arrived on Wednesday afternoon.We were very well supported by Sgt Lama’s crew and extended stops were made to change socks and boots.Very few minor detours were involved, although one did find us in the middle of a firing range and we were more than ably led by Cpl Sidney Henry and Sgt Ben Calloway. Luckily, they did a recce on their bikes prior to the walk; unluckily it was at a completely different time of the day, so we found ourselves trying to cross a dual carriageway during rush hour! Overall the walk took us 14 hours, with some additional time set aside to meet the CO LSTW for breakfast.‘Pipeline Pete’ was then re-established in his new home outside the Fuels Lab. Although there is some sadness over leaving WM, the new facilities at WD offer both trainee and trainer first class resources, excellent training delivery and an overall better learning experience.”

Defence Petroleum and Specialist Training Squadron (DPSTS) OC – Maj Arianne Kidd RLC Sqn WO – WO2 Mark Page RLC Ex ARCHAEOPTERYX LANDING MOD West Moors (WM) has had a varied and interesting history. Formerly an ammunition compound, a prisoner of war camp and the only jerrycan filling plant for Defence. Since 1946, it has been the home of the Army Petroleum Operator.That was until 25 Sep19, when the last elements of DPSTS picked up ‘Pipeline Pete’ and moved to MOD Worthy Down. And what better way to commemorate this historical moment, than to walk the route; at least that was the way Sgt Ben Calloway and the Sqn 2IC, Capt Stu Ebbrell, sold it.

8 The DPSTS team arrives at Worthy Down. From L-R WO2 Mark Page, Sgt Dan Brewer, Cpl Sidney Henry, Maj Arianne Kidd, Capt Stu Ebbrell and SSgt Craig Melrose

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17


THE SUSTAINER | DSL

#WeAreTheRLC

8 Tp Comds Course 81 (joined by two officers from Kuwait) is welcomed into the Corps

Command Wing Chief Instructor – Lt Col Andy Moss OBE RLC Having been the Chief Instructor for six months, I thought it would be apt to bring the Sustainer fanbase up to speed with all things Command Wing from my point of view. We’ve become a much larger organisation with the three officer-facing Field Logistic (Fd Log) teams and a small team in RAF Cranwell being joined by the CLM delivery Sqns from The RLC (85 Sqn, Maj Herby Herbert) and the AGC(SPS) (Maj Joe Petty AGC (SPS), who some will remember as being the last RAO of Münster-based 8 Regiment RLC before it was disbanded in 2012.We have closed the, shop-soiled offices in Deepcut, delivered our last PowerPoint in the Burden Theatre and had our last bacon butty in the Deepcut Café.We relocated, at short notice and over the course of a few frantic days, to a gleaming state-of-the-art facility in WD. 85 Sqn works through a full-on CLM programme ensuring that our non-commissioned commanders are ready to assume the responsibilities that go with

8 Command Wing DS Team, RLC Mil Skills Competition. Rear rank L-R SSgt Paul Devoy, SSgt Karl Holloway, Cpl Phillip Watson. Front rank L – R Sgt Louisa Steer, Capt Scott Brodie, Cpl Lumansingh Limbu

18

promotion. Fd Log 1 (Maj James Marshall) continues to deliver those ferociously keen, slightly bewildered young officers. Fd Log 2 (Maj Ben Palmer) trains RLC Capts, budding contract managers and international logisticians. Fd Log 3 (Capt Stu Rutt pending a replacement for Maj Paul Eaton) prepares Majs for IG2 appointments, updates those selected for Sqn command and shepherds a Tri-Service audience on the Joint Logistic Officers’ Course (J-LOC) through an estimate and then tests their skills in Budapest. And through our team at RAF Cranwell (Wg Cdr (Retd) Mike Eagles), we remain the conduit to further education opportunities with the University of Lincoln. So what has the Wing has done in the last few months and what is it looking forward to in the near future? 85 Sqn remains a veritable instructor development engine, returning experienced and qualified instructors back to the Field Army and in some notable cases (SSgts Foster & Whitley) developing them for prestigious roles at Sandhurst. The Sqn is at the forefront of developing the replacement regime for CLM, having just delivered the pilot SNCO course and will be increasingly drawn into preparations for the launch of ALDP in Apr 20. It takes instructor development seriously; the Hartz Mountains in Germany have been visited for some lung-busting AT and Ypres was the scene for some contemplation and reflection for our junior commanders. Fd Log 1 released its latest cohort of Troopies (the last to be trained in Deepcut) in August. The current course can look forward to an ambitious battlefield study, encompassing a WW1 battlefield on Armistice Day and learning about Verdun with their French counterparts. They too will be ragged around Salisbury Plain on Ex TIMBER TRUSS, learning their trade with 7 Regt. Fd Log 2 delivered an excellent International Logistic Officers Course (I-LOC), introducing officers from Morocco, Bosnia, Saudi Arabia, Estonia and Oman to British culture and some logistic stuff too. They will be providing the spine of a Short-Term Training Team to the Ukraine later in the year. Fd Log 3 continues to develop our deep-seated relations with the Hungarian Army, with Capt Stu Rutt preparing for his fourth trip to Budapest in recent months. I can therefore report, a Command Wing in good health;

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DSL | THE SUSTAINER

overcoming the inevitable gapping and trawls to deliver a variety of training courses at pace, whilst retaining the space to get people away to do the stuff we all joined the Army to do. Semper perceptum. Food Services Training Wing (FSTW) Chief Instructor – Lt Col Fletch Fletcher RLC FSTW has been a hive of activity over the summer period. Several planned activities came to fruition before the permanent staff embarked on an AT package in Bavaria. In early Jul a small team from Food Services Training Sqn (Land) and Army Recruiting Group went to London to develop a plan for a recruiting video alongside celebrity chef James Cochran (Great British Menu finalist and owner of 12:51 – Shoreditch, London). The complexities of arranging such a showpiece were dealt with by the UNILAD team and the media gurus leaving the chefs to work with James on developing a street food menu from 10-man ORP. The day of filming arrived, and the centre of Shoreditch was the scene of some fantastic culinary invention as well as some armoured vehicles to add to the atmosphere. The food was served by James and the team of army chefs to the public. The full video can be viewed on The RLC Facebook page. Another good piece of public engagement was delivered in July when a small team from FSTW delivered a cookery demonstration to the Pensioners of the Royal Hospital Chelsea. The day was well received by the attendees as they received a full brief on current army catering capability and sampled some of items produced by the team. The highlight of the summer period was the excellent AT package organised by Sgt Sharon Smart (RAF). This was conducted at the Robson Resilience Centre Bavaria. The package offered outstanding infrastructure and reallife support meaning all participants could plough into the activities without worrying about who was on pan wash that evening! During the week everyone completed mountain walking, climbing / scrambling, Klettersteig, canyoneering and canoeing. As expected, many of the attendees tackled fears during the week and made the most of the Bavarian hospitality. On the last day, a guided tour of Dachau Concentration Camp was conducted giving the staff present a moving end to the week. During August, some of the staff managed to complete the high wires confidence course that is located at the Army Training Regiment (Winchester). A new record was

8 Sgt Paul Milne, Pte Dillon Spence, James Cochran and Sgt Manoj Gurung during the filming of the UNILAD video at Box Park, Shoreditch

8 FSTW providing an interest day and curry for the Royal Hospital Chelsea. Rear - Sgt Manoj Gurung, Pensioner - Graham Smith, Sgt Paul Milne, Pensioner - Alan Thubron, Cpl Jason Pyne Front Sgt Hem Limbu, Sgt Amrit Limbu QOGLR

set by one of the team who took seven minutes to make the leap of faith! Further activities continued apace with the Food Services Training Sqn (Air) delivering a ‘Front of House’ training package to the chefs and stewards of the Royal Gibraltar Regiment. The deployment was several months in the planning and was designed to equip the host catering department with some organic front of house capability as well as enhance their catering skills. The deployment was thoroughly enjoyed by all that participated; despite comments about the kitchen being a ‘wee’ bit warm and the accommodation not being up to RAF standards! During the summer, Cpl Sam Shutowski, was with us for three months on exchange from the New Zealand Defence Force. Sam was tasked with gaining an understanding of how the UK military deploys and uses the Operational Field Catering System, as a similar system is due to be rolled out in New Zealand in the near future. During his time here Sam observed and participated in the delivery of the field phase of the Army Defence Chef Basic Course as well as conducting some Field Army visits to see how we do business in the UK. The exchange goes full circle later this year when Sgt Luke Smith heads to New Zealand for two months of graft! Sgt Luke Smith’s deployed to the French Embassy in London where he helped deliver the Ambassadors Bastille Day celebrations. This interaction is hopefully going to lead to more work with the embassy in developing our team’s skills and smoothing over the complications of BREXIT! FSTW also supported the ECAB visit to DCLPA by providing a lunch meal cooked on OFCS and served by a squad of DCBs (as part of their training) to the Army’s hierarchy. This was a fantastic opportunity for trainees and staff alike to profile the excellent standard of training that is delivered by the Wing. This quarter finished with the successful delivery of The RLC chefs’ apprenticeship awards which were held in the realistic working environment of FSTW. Pte Dunn of 4 SCOTS picked up the Best Level 2 Apprentice award.

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19


THE SUSTAINER | TRADES: PHOTOGRAPHERS

By Cpl Simon Lucas Since the early planning stages of one of the biggest days this decade, the Combat Camera Teams (CCTs) have had a role to play with the entire crew broken down into four small groups to cover the event. This article is a snapshot of the work involved. CCT 1 consisted of SSgt Jamie Peters, Sgt Tom Evans, Cpl Rebecca Brown and Cpl Simon Lucas. CCT 2 was made up of a three-man team, WO2 2 Thomas Robinson, Sgt Benjamin Maher and Cpl Robert Weideman. The Army Production Team (APT) was made up of three civil servants, Mr Kevin Capon, Mr Derek Tedder and Mr Chris Pilkington. Finally, the Army Press Office South East, Colchester was made up of two media officers and one photographer, Cpl Jamie Hart. Day 1 and 2 The first day consisted of sorting out all of the kit and equipment and travelling to Normandy to recce the towns where the events would take place including, Ranville, Sannerville, Bénouville and Arromanche. Day 3 CCT 1 The crew arrived at Ranville at 1030hrs to prepare for the veteran’s lunch which started at 1200hrs. Then it arrived in Bénouville around 2045hrs where at 2300hrs soldiers from The Rifles and the Army Air Corps marched down through the town where the Army Air Corps stopped at Café Gondreè for a celebrational champagne toast with Madam Gondreè, whilst The Rifles marched on along the bridge to the memorial. CCT 2 Combat Camera Team 2 started the day in Sannerville covering the entirety of the parachute drops. The team broke down and worked alongside the APT helping to conduct the interviews with the troops and sending stills to Defence Imagery, which pushed the images out to all the newspapers. The Army Press Office South East, Colchester Cpl Jamie Hart started the day out traveling to Bénouville where a 20

#WeAreTheRLC

D-Day 75 through the eyes of a Combat Camera Team

wreath ceremony was held in honour of the 6th Airborne Division at the Pegasus Bridge museum where five of the veterans were awarded the highest French order of merit “Légion d’honneur”. He quickly made his way to Sanneville, where alongside CCT 2, he covered the parachute jumps. It was then on to Ranville where he photographed a second ceremony held in the Ranville War Cemetery before finishing the day off covering the Pegasus bridge night vigil alongside CCT1. APT Making their way to Sanneville to video the parachuting, the crew deployed the trusty old satellite van in order to live stream the entire event collaborating with CCT 2 to use one of the live feed cameras. Day 4 CCT 1 Wheels were rolling at 0600hrs to destination Bayeux. At exactly 1015hrs, the service in the cathedral had ended and it was off to the cemetery ceremony which needed to be covered. CCT 2 A 0445 start allowed the crew to arrive into Arromanches at 0530 in

time to cover “The Lone Piper” who played his bagpipe during the low tide on top of a sunken Mulberry Harbour at 0726hrs, the exact time the first feet touched the beach 75 years ago. The team then covered the “Jeeps on the Beach Party” which began at 0745 and then moved to Sword beach, where they covered a parade and service to commemorate the men of 3 Division. APT There was a 0445 start to place the satellite van in the ideal location to cover the events. The team covered the Lone Piper and the Jeeps on the Beach Party alongside CCT2. It was then onto an event in the 360-degree cinema in Arromanches before covering the celebrations concert which started at 1600. The Army Press Office South East, Colchester Cpl Jamie Hart next task was at 1500hrs in Arromanches, a parade and service in the town. Upon completion of this task he was asked to photograph the Secretary of State for Defence, The Right Honourable Penny Mordaunt MP, visiting the veterans at the service.

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TRADES: TANK TRANSPORTER | THE SUSTAINER

8 There are continued opportunities to deploy on Op CABRIT

By WO2 (SQMS) Steven Elliott Fellow Tank Transporters, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for all your efforts and professionalism conducting heavy lift operations at home in the UK and abroad. Providing Fd Army with this capability is no mean feat and without your continued dedication it would not be possible. The Heavy Equipment Transporter (HET) continues to support armoured Battle Groups deployed on Op CABRIT, maintaining its proven effectiveness inserting battle winning armoured equipment ready to fight. Concurrent to this, HET is delivering support to training and repair taskings daily on Field Army UK admin tasks alongside our civilian counterparts, FTX. This strengthens integration between regular service personnel and the sponsored reserves; maintaining currency and competency for HET readiness. Manning, training Recruitment continues to be an issue. As a trade we cannot recruit from source and against our current establishment, we are considerably undermanned at Pte and LCpl ranks. Located on the edge of Salisbury Plain Training Area (SPTA) in Bulford, the trade can offer location security for service people and their families with good transport links to the south and south west coasts. In

DTTO (Tank Transporter) Head of Trade trade, you will gain valuable experience daily in light and heavy lift transportation and continued opportunities to deploy on Op CABRIT. You work alongside civilian industry in the form of FTX Logistics (HET contract), gaining valuable knowledge of current regulations and using digital tachographs. One thing I can assure is you will be kept busy doing what you joined the Army for. The School of Tank Transporting (SoTT) continues to support capability delivering Class 3, 3-2 upgrade and Class 1 trade courses to enable SP career development and empowering JNCO’s with the ability to command a section of HETs as a Class 1 DTTO.

8 WO2 (SQMS) Steven Elliott

Trade progression after qualifying as a Class 3 Driver from DST: 4 Osh 6x6 MLET – 2 weeks (Spec qual) 4 Class 3 DTTO – 6 weeks 4 Class 3-2 upgrade – Record of achievements book, min 365 days 4 Class 1 Driver Specialist – 3 weeks at DST 4 Class 1 DTTO – 5 weeks 4 Abnormal load Escort driver (City & Guilds Level 2) – 3 days Anyone interesting in re-trading are to submit the request through their CoC. Look forward Looking forward, we will be offering continued real-life support to operations and exercises conducting Fd Army taskings, Op CABRIT, Ex TRACTABLE outload/inload, Ex TRACTABLE (rotating our own operational fleet of HETs in Estonia) and Ex DEFENDER 20. The HET contract is the first under review for MDL 25 and it will be good to see what the future holds for tank transporting, with the introduction of AJAX and strike Brigades and with CR2 still in service, there will be a requirement for The RLC to provide HET capability to defence.

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21


THE SUSTAINER | TRADES: PETROLEUM OPERATOR

By WO1 (Cdr) Paul Franks I’m delighted to write my first article as Head of Trade; a position I had hoped to achieve for a number of years, and one that I am extremely privileged to hold. I have had the pleasure to conduct unit visits over recent months and chat to the trade soldiers which to me is the most important part of this role. I firmly understand there are challenges and frustrations, which I will do my utmost to address. On a positive note; I have absolutely taken away that there is some fantastic work being carried out, both individually and collectively across the trade. I have been extremely proud to present Conductor Coins to a small number of individuals for their outstanding work, some thoroughly deserved recognition. It has been a busy few months for the trade where Petroleum Operators have been conducting various roles from support to 3 Commando Brigade in Norway, to participating on Ex SWIFT RESPONSE in Croatia with 16 Brigade, albeit operating out of trade. Most recently 101x & 104 Bde units conducted the annual Log Brigade exercise (Ex IRON VIPER) which enabled the deployment of consecutive fuel installations. I was very fortunate to conduct a unit visit to 10 QOGLR whilst deployed, accompanied by Col Maddison (Trade Proponent). It was clear to see the hardworking and robustness of individuals operating on that site, the weather and conditions where testing to say the

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Exciting new chapter for Pet Ops

least, but the attitude and JNCO leadership was refreshing. The Defence Petroleum Training Squadron (DPTS) has recently moved from West Moors to Worthy Down, a big change for us as a trade, as West Moors has felt like the home of the Pet Ops for many years. That said, what a new exciting chapter now for the trade, embedded within the Defence College, operating within a modern well equipped and fully resourced facility, clearly enhancing learning and teaching for both students and instructors.

8 Presenting a Cdr Coin to Pte Sharples during exercise IRON VIPER

Looking forward, Sgt William Mutyaba (10 QOGLR) will be attending a work experience package with World Fuel Services (WFS), which is a fantastic opportunity to gain industry exposure and understand best practice procedures to bring back to the trade. A great venture and something I look forward to informing you on in the next HoT update. Before I close this short article, please can I stress that you must keep pursuing to improve both professionally and personally, grasp opportunity whenever you can, ensuring that you are suitably trained and appropriately prepared to meet our commitments. I look forward to seeing you all soon, either at your unit lines or on exercise. Please do continue to invite me and Col Maddison to visit your units as we are always keen to meet the troops. 8 A visit to the 10 QOGLR exercise

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TRADES: MOVEMENT CONTROLLER | THE SUSTAINER

By WO1 Samantha Lindsay Movements Controllers, Movement Operators and all that I have the privilege to serve with in the Movement Controller trade. I begin this, my first Army Movement Controller head of trade article by thanking you all for your continued support over the last few months, with your assistance I have managed to slot into my new appointment with ease. I’m looking forward to the next few years as your Head of Trade, an appointment that I have the privilege to fulfil. I have no doubt of the challenges and demands ahead; however, I am looking forward to embracing them with each one of you. I can ensure you that my time in this appointment, I will always put you, the soldier and our trade first in all decisions made. A busy year 2019 has been another busy year for our trade, demand is greater than ever for our skills, knowledge and experience, and yet you still manage to deliver above and beyond and for that I thank you all. We continue to support operations planning and executing, such as KIPION, TORAL, SHADER, TRENTON, CABRIT and the UK Sp Node to North East Africa. We are providing movement support to OTX activity home base and across the globe at an accelerated rate, with multiple large deployments, including further use of the national and international rail networks in support of major exercises. The trade is also supporting deployments to NOECs and PJOBs and on top of that we have deployed on short term training opportunities to Cyprus and Brunei. 29 Regt and 17 P&M Regt have been the busiest they have ever been. The JAMC continues to perform, having processed well over 250 flights this year already. Op OWL (BFG drawdown) has been successful and whilst our soldiers have been busy with the planning and execution the Op, they have also manged to relocate themselves and families, all with no real complaint but with bags of hard work and professionalism.

The demand for Movement greater than ever

The above has been recognised with nine honours, awards and commendations across the trade, one of which was the MBE awarded to WO1 (SSM) Matthew Bragg in the 2019 Queen’s Birthday Honours List. Looking forward We will need to embrace the new process and policy with the closure of BFG and continue to support DSCOM and other agencies through the future transition periods. As a trade we will be intrinsically involved in Ex TRACTABLE, which sees the in load of Op CABRIT 5 by rail across Europe. Then in 2020 we will be heavily involved in Ex DEFENDER where we will support our US counterparts (21 TSC) as they move a Division into Eastern Europe. I’m pleased that you have all

embraced CDS's words of empowerment and this was well proven on our successful Mov Con WG in Oct. It’s fantastic to see so many of our soldiers confident, focussed and passionate about their trade, long may it continue.

8 WO1 Samantha Lindsay

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THE SUSTAINER | EXERCISE

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By Pte Dinesh Malla Thakuri, Catering Dept 36 Engineer Regiment

Ex INVICTA DEFENCE 2019

On 13 Jul 19, 14 personnel from the QM dept, 36 Engr Regt, deployed to Belgium to conduct a battlefield study, which included welcoming RBLI’s (Royal British Legion Industries) cycling team at the Menin Gate Belgium as part of a charity event. The whole battlefield study was successfully conducted and executed by WO2 Om Prakash Budha (MTWO). The study was conducted in five phases, starting with an educational visit and then on to some historical monuments. The first stop was the Canadian memorial where LCpl Gajendra Rai delivered a short history about its significance; especially as the troops in the area were the first to be subjected (officially) to chemical warfare. Then, we headed towards Hill 60, where LCpl Top Gurung delivered his presentation. The fact that opposing soldiers were fighting in such close proximity (10m) really brought it home about the state of warfare during that campaign. We swiftly moved on to Ypres town centre, where the famous war memorial Menin Gate is located. Cpl Brown’s presentation was

about the Menin Gate and it was one of the most interesting and memorable places I’ve had the privilege to visit. Fallen soldiers are still being remembered by laying a wreath every evening. Once the presentation was completed, we waited for the RBLI Cycling team, with Captain Rajen and WO1 (RQMS) Donnelly RE being members of the team taking part. The cycle began in Aylesford, Kent on Thu 18 Jul and finished on

8 The study took in various memorials in Ypres

Sun 21 Jul 19 at the Menin Gate. After this event, we had a chance to explore Ypres town centre; however, the main reason for the visit was to attend the parade at Menin Gate at 2000hrs and lay a wreath on behalf of the Regt. The following morning, our visit took us to Tyne Cot Cemetery which is the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery; the resting place for over 11900 British servicemen from WW1. Once the MTWO delivered his presentation about the site, we moved on to Brandhoek Cemetery where LCpl Kismat Gurung delivered his presentation on the site, with much focus on Captain Noel Chavasse (RAMC) VC and Bar MC MiD and his heroics during the Battle for Ypres. Having not been to a study in Belgium, I was able to gain a huge insight in to how the battle played out whilst also educating myself. I’m already looking forward to future studies where I will be able to learn more about further battle history and understand how warfare has evolved over the past 100 years. As a team, we would like to express our sincere gratitude to the MTWO for organising such a wonderful visit. 8 RBLI centenary veterans ride

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EXERCISE | THE SUSTAINER

By Maj Jon Jennings DSCOM SO2 EU & RoW Plans Op MARKET GARDEN (17–25 Sep 1944) was an Allied Operation that included two subsidiary operations; an airborne assault to seize key bridges (MARKET) and a ground attack (GARDEN) linking the airborne assaults. The aim of this new Ex was to develop the strategic expertise within DSCOM to deploy and sustain a force over fragile and stretched lines of communication to conduct High Intensity Conflict. From this, the participants would identify the key Log Sp lessons from Op MARKET GARDEN that could help improve current contingent or expeditionary operations. They would also examine how the Airborne Forces were sustained over extended lines of communication in 1944 and how these approaches could be applied today. Day 1 – Eindhoven (101st Airborne Division Landings) Day one saw the group move across the Dutch Belgium border to ‘Joe’s Bridge’. Named after the CO of the Irish Guards battlegroup, who took the bridge on 10 Sep 44, it was where a bridgehead across the first obstacle was established. From this point Op MARKET GARDEN was launched with just seven days planning. What became very apparent as we crossed Joe’s Bridge back into the Netherlands, was the width of the single road in which 20,000 vehicles would move and link up with each Airborne Division. It was important during these early stages of the tour that the group understood that the battle was not sequential and there was multiple concurrent activity further up the single road at Eindhoven, Nijmegen and Arnhem. The next phase of day one moved on to examine how the failure to capture the bridge at Son on the Wilhelmina Canal created the first delay in the link up. As the 101st approached the bridge at Son the Germans destroyed it, therefore requiring bridging equipment to be brought up from within the XXX Corps column.

Ex MARKET GARDEN SCHOLAR

This highlighted that the plan hinged on all the bridges being captured intact and that there was significant risk in the overall plan if any one of the bridges were destroyed. Day 2 – Nijmegen (82nd Airborne Division Landings) The focus of day two was centered on the area around Nijmegen and the 82nd Airborne Division, starting with the decision to drop the Division on the Groesbeek Heights, several kilometres from the Nijmegen Bridge, which resulted in a long delay in its capture.

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The aim of this new Ex was to develop the strategic expertise within DSCOM to deploy and sustain a force over fragile and stretched lines of communication to conduct High Intensity Conflict

Applying the principles of war, the group was able to analyse the impact the 82nd Airborne Division had on the operation and how the inspired leadership shown by General Gavin achieved ‘surprise’ by dropping units either side of the Grave Bridge and was able to capture it quickly with no casualties. Leading up to day three, it became apparent for the group that dropping so far from the Nijmegen Bridge lost the element of surprise

8 Ex MARKET GARDEN SCHOLAR aimed to develop strategic expertise during High Intensity Conflict

and allowed the Germans to reinforce Nijemegen with troops and armour form the 10th Panzer Division. Day 3 – Oosterbeek and Arnhem (1st British Airborne Division) By day three, the group had followed the route of XXX Corps north from the Belgium border to Oosterbeek and Arnhem north of the Rhine. The weather was with us and the final day was conducted on bicycles to fully appreciate the close proximity of the battlefield around Arnhem. Summary With the British Airborne Division left in a perilous situation; low on combat supplies, no source of reinforcements from the south and mounting casualties, brought home the desperate nature of the situation. This allowed the group to not only make an analysis of how important the sustainment planning of operations and exercises are, but also draw comparisons from recent largescale exercises and how the inability to supply specific commodities and supplies can result in failure. This demonstrated that the key exercise objective; identifying logistic lessons and make suggestions to their application, had been achieved.

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THE SUSTAINER | EXERCISE

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8 Pte Tripe and LCpl Strul on Ex TIGER ARRC

High risk adventure training in Greenland Seven RLC soldiers serving with the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps Support Battalion (ARRC Sp Bn) have completed a High Risk & Remote (HR&R) training expedition to Greenland. Ex TIGER ARRC was a Type 3 Overseas, Exploratory Alpine Mountaineering Adventurous Training Expedition, organised by the ARRC Sp Bn for 12 of its members. In total 15 individuals took part in the Ex including seven RLC soldiers. Cpl Rakesh Gurung, 10 QOGLR; LCpl McShane, RLC; Pte Yogan Gurung, 10 QOGLR; Pte Tripe, RLC Pte Umesh Pun Magar, 10 QOGLR; LCpl Strul, RLC; Pte Uman Gurung, 10 QOGLR

By WO2 Bynorth ARRC Sp Bn RAPTCI and Ex Leader The Ex was a huge success, the location coupled with the remoteness meant it was classed as HR&R. Ex TIGER ARRC fulfilled all its aims. 20 months in the planning meant we had first tour soldiers whilst on the Alpine Mountaineering Foundation (AMF) course completing

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confirmed first accents on a HR&R exploratory alpine mountaineering expedition, this hasn’t been done before. The journey was breathtaking from start to finish, we had two base camps with the second one being reached via boat move up the Fjords, which saw us passing the mountain range and hundreds of icebergs of all shapes and sizes. We even got close to

two whales which appeared close to the surface. The planning, organisation and delivery of EX TIGER ARRC has a direct link to challenges which we will face on operations. We succeeded in developing the leadership skills of our young soldiers, as well as enhancing their physical and mental robustness. EX TIGER ARRC achieved this in abundance.

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EXERCISE | THE SUSTAINER

By Cpl Rakesh, 10 QOGLR The Greenland Ex was physically and mentally demanding. We've been preparing for this expedition for the last two years with basic summer and winter mountaineering in different parts of the UK. We've also completed a mountain first-aid course. After an overnight stop in Iceland, we arrived via another air move to Kulusuk, where we met our guide for the expedition. The next day we were taught about survival equipment and

camping ideas by the guides. This included trip flares and shot gun weapon handling lessons, which were required to protect ourselves from possible polar bear attacks when camping in the mountains. The real adventure began after we left the Kulusuk village by boat to go across the sea. We then started mountaineering, we learnt about glaciers, ice climbing and rescues. Walking to the top of the mountains was hard but having ice cold water and cheesy biscuits at the top washed away all pains.

Being able to see the most beautiful scenery and icebergs floating on the sea was simply phenomenal. The peaceful mountains and the cool breeze is something I will never forget. Taking a cold shower and swim in the river and sea is certainly something to remember. Being so remote in the mountains meant we were kept away from all social media, so we had cricket and stone throwing activities to keep ourselves busy.

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THE SUSTAINER | EXERCISE On 5 Jul 19, members of 23 Parachute Engineer Regiment including the Logistic Support Detachment - deployed on Exercise Dragon Corsican Legion, a 14-day expedition on the island of Corsica, to hike the Grande Randonée 20 (GR 20). The route began in the North of the island in a small town called Calenzana and was broken down into 16 stages, finishing in Conca. The aims of the Adventurous Training package were to train personnel to Summer Mountain Foundation qualification standards and also to develop leadership and motivational skills, build self-confidence and strengthen team cohesion. The GR 20 route is widely accepted as the toughest and most difficult GR route in Europe, with an accumulated ascent of 13,595m along a 180km trek. To put that into perspective, the total ascent to climb Mount Everest is 8,848m. The team deployed from Rock Barracks in Woodbridge on a 14hour drive to the south of France, followed by seven-hour ferry to arrive in Corsica. Fortunately, they were able to enjoy a day at the beach before starting the exercise. On day one, the expedition team were dropped off as close to the start point as possible by the support team with a plan to meet them again at the end of the third day. All eager and prepared to deploy, the team set off in warm, humid conditions and it didn’t take long for the scale of the challenge ahead to become apparent. 8 The route provided breathtaking views

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EX DRAGON CORSICAN LEGION

The first day’s trek was around 12km long and included ascents of up to 1550m. Only a few hours into the day, Pte Vatuloka was experiencing significant problems, with the sole of his left boot having fallen off. After another hour or so it had happened again and then he was walking with no grip on either foot! Despite having to wait until the end of day three for a replacement pair, Pte Vatuloka maintained an impressive sense of humour whilst walking on a pair of 8 Cosy two-man tents

8 The view towards RV1

insoles. By the end of the first day, the team had arrived at Refuge d’Ortu di u Piobbu (RV 1), where they spent their first night. Throughout the expedition, the team slept in two-man tents at designated points in the grounds alongside each refuge. Each refuge along the route was different (some a lot better than others) and they provided limited cooking and cleaning facilities, small shops to 8 Pte Vatuloka's wrecked boots

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EXERCISE | THE SUSTAINER

purchase essentials (not including boots) and the option to purchase an evening meal for a set price. Routine had set in after the first few days and the group were up raring to go at first light every morning. Throughout the trek, the routes provided breathtaking views and amazing scenery, which made the jagged rock scrambles, relentless hills and steep descents more bearable. The most popular points along the route were undoubtedly the rock pools and waterfalls, at which it was compulsory to remove your bergan and jump into the icecold water, refreshing the body for the next stage.

8 The rugged GR20 trail

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The team deployed from Rock Barracks in Woodbridge on a 14-hour drive to the south of France, followed by seven-hour ferry to arrive in Corsica. Fortunately, they were able to enjoy a day at the beach before starting the exercise

The group had acclimatised well and were beginning to get into a rhythm until day nine when they made a disastrous miscalculation. The idea of increasing the distance between RVs had been discussed and having arrived at the highest peak of the day ahead of schedule, the group agreed that they would push on after the next refuge, in order to take advantage of the facilities at Village de Bavella. However, after around ten hours walking, they arrived to find that camping was prohibited! After consulting the map, the bad news was that the next camp site was 5km away. In a bid to try and boost morale, the group enjoyed a nice restaurant meal in Village de Bavella but had to set off promptly in order to beat the darkness. It was mostly an uphill battle, but they eventually arrived at the final refuge to set up tents and enjoy a hardearned sleep. By morning there were some heavy legs, but the group were determined to finish what they had started and push on to the finish line in Conca, thereby successfully completing the GR 20.

8 The rock pools and waterfalls were popular

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THE SUSTAINER | EXERCISE On 9 Jul 2019, 14 permanent staff members from BATUK, including SSgt Ryan Cohen RLC, and a guide from Savage Wilderness Adventures embarked on Exercise PANGA SUMMIT, an Adventurous Training Expedition to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. After a night in a lodge near Moshi, Tanzania, the team were met by the local guides from Ahsante Tours and taken to the Machame Gate to start the eightday trek. The team followed the Machame route, considered one of the more challenging ways to climb the mountain. Over the next days the team passed through five ecological zones from rainforest to arctic. Following the “climb high, sleep low” method, they were able to acclimatise well to the high altitudes, stopping at four camps before reaching their eventual base camp (4680m) on the morning of day six. After some food and rest they set off for the summit attempt at midnight, following a steep climb up to Stella point (5685m). It was at this point that one of the team succumbed to altitude sickness and was subsequently evacuated to hospital by air, accompanied by the expedition medic. This was a very stark reminder of the dangers of high-altitude mountaineering. After a cup of tea miraculously produced by some of the porters, the remainder of the team set off up and around the rim of the volcanic ash pit summiting Uhuru

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Ex PANGA SUMMIT BATUK

8 14 members from BATUK have scaled Mt Kilimanjaro

8 After photos, the team started a quick descent

Peak (5895m) at around 0700hrs. After high fives and photos, the altitude and temperature were

starting to take their toll so the team started the quick descent back down to base camp and after some food descended along the Mweka route to Millennium Camp (3820m) for the best night sleep most had had for a long time. The following day they completed the last 13km down to Mweka gate and boarded buses back to the lodge. The stunning scenery, physical effort and friendships forged, made this once in a lifetime trip one that the team will never forget. The team were; Maj Mick Warwick (RAPTC), Maj JK Kelmanson (SCOTS), Maj Claire Blakiston (RA), Maj Mick Cataldo (YORKS), Maj Rob Grant (RE), Capt Ollie Gourd (SCOTS), SSgt Tom Boyd (RAMC), SSgt Jonny Bedford (RAPTC), SSgt Ryan Cohen (RLC), SSgt Dal Ringjali (RE), Sgt Dave Rudling (RE), Sgt Dee Dewa (AGC), Cpl Yagya Gurung (AGC) and LCpl Tony Cavanagh (RE). Thanks go to Glenn Richards, the guide from Savage Wilderness, Julio and his army of guides, porters and chefs from Ahsante and special thanks to WO2(QMSI) Roger Harnden (RAPTC) who planned and organised the trip. 8 Celebrating a successful ascent

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ARTICLE | THE SUSTAINER

The Franco-British Young Leaders Programme was launched in 2017 by The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. It aims to build a generation of 21st century leaders across all sectors, from both countries who will hold the Franco-British relationship at heart and shape the future through lasting bilateral dialogue. Supported by both governments it is delivered by the Franco-British Council with support from the French Foreign Ministry and the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office and several private sponsors. Having been selected to take part in the 2019 cohort, I attended the 2019 Young Leaders Seminar in London along with the other 33 selected young leaders. Meeting at the British Library we departed for the House of Commons for a meeting with the Rt Hon John Bercow MP, who spoke to us about both his experience as speaker and his view on the role of speaker. Departing by coach, we travelled to The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst for our official welcome to the programme by Baroness Tessa Blackstone (Chair of the Franco-British Council) and Hervé Mariton (Chair of the Conseil Franco-Britannique), an introduction to the academy from the Academy Adjutant and an icebreaking session on The Paris Climate Change Agreement ReImagined. This was followed by a session with Baroness Eliza Manningham-Buller, former DG of MI5, during which she reflected on her experiences across her career and answered questions on both current topics of interest and specific questions on her experiences whilst in command. In the afternoon we were fortunate enough to be briefed by Brigadier Rob Thomson, British Defence Attaché Paris, on ‘What Sangin taught me about leadership’. Following a busy day we had a pub dinner followed by a fireside chat with General Patrick Sanders, Commander Joint Force Command. Day two took us straight to No 10 Downing Street for breakfast with Stephen Parkinson, Political Secretary to the Prime Minister. Moving from No 10 we had the honour of meeting The Rt Hon The

Franco-British Young Leaders Programme By Maj Sophie Spencer-Small RLC SO2 G5 CSS Plans 6 (UK)

Baroness Hale, President of the Supreme Court, in Court Room 1 to hear about the Supreme Court and her experiences over the years. The next meeting was with George Osborne before travelling to Lambeth Palace to meet with The Most Revd and Rt Hon Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury. The final meeting of the day was with two volunteer organisations Pro Bono Lab, from France, and Reach Skills, from the UK, who spoke to us all about the volunteer/pro bono opportunities out there for skilled individuals. The evening was spent in the Guildhall, Livery Hall at a Gala Dinner which brought together both young leaders from across all cohorts and sponsors. The guest speaker was Rory Stewart OBE MP. Starting the next day with a few sore heads we were given a tour of

8 The Archbishop of Canterbury presenting to the Franco-British Young Leaders Programme

8 Franco-British Cohort outside No 10 Downing Street

the Globe Theatre before heading to the Havas Creative Group to hear the Global CEO, Christ Hirst, speak about his new book on leadership ‘No Bullsh*t Leadership’. The rest of the afternoon and early evening was spent at the French Ambassador’s Residence talking about the ‘Political Challenges in France and the UK’ as well as a drinks reception hosted by His Excellency Jean-Pierre Jouyet. The final morning of the programme was spent in the British Library discussing the previous three days and a visit to the ‘Leonardo da Vinci: A Mind in Motion Exhibition’. Next year the 2019 cohort will be invited to attend a similar seminar, this time hosted in Paris and between now and then we have been invited to a number of events, including business meetings about Brexit, Defence Conferences and visits to various locations such as the Bank of England. There is no doubt this programme is an incredible opportunity to both meet other young leaders from across all sectors but also to have some unique and privileged experiences. Should you be interested in applying for the Franco-British Young Leaders Programme for 2020, applications will open online Jan 20.

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THE SUSTAINER | ARTICLE

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TRACTABLE: Theatre Enabling and Force Projection By Lt Col C G Munce MBE RLC 104 Logistics Support Brigade, as the Army’s Theatre Enabling Group, deployed on Op TRACTABLE, to command the force projection of the Queen’s Royal Hussars Armoured Battlegroup (BG) and the 3 Army Air Corps Aviation Battlegroup (BG), across Mainland Europe. This was the Field Army’s capstone training event for 2019 and the ideal test of the Army’s and the Nation’s ability, to project a force at pace, and scale, into any theatre. TRACTABLE has been an operation of firsts. The first projection of the Operation CABRIT fleet across Mainland Europe; the first large scale transit of equipment through the Channel Tunnel; the first experience of changing railway gauge in Eastern Europe; and the first time many of our people have operated across an extended AO or simply in the Baltics. The projection of an Armoured BG and Aviation BG comprising 800 personnel and 200 vehicles, required a coordinated network of logistic 32

installations and points of presence across Europe. 300 personnel from the TEG’s units secured and activated three sea ports, two airports, nine convoy support centres, seven border crossing sites, three rail loading sites, one railway gauge change point and a line of communication stretching 2,500 km from Ludgershall, England to Tapa, Estonia. Command and Control The task of commanding the deployment of heavy equipment transporter and EPLS convoys, the self-deployment of six helicopters and transit of five separate trains carrying 166 vehicles and 28 ISOs fell to the Theatre Enabling Group. Deploying into the NATO Force Integration Unit in Bydgoszcz, Poland; this light HQ of 32 staff was based around HQ 104 Log Sp Bde and the RHQ 29 Regt RLC, supported by individual augmentees from across the Army. In support were a number of logistic nodes and liaison officers, spread across the vast AO, from Emden port in

Germany, through to enhanced Forward Presence HQ in Tallinn, Estonia. These nodes and LOs were ‘plugged in’ to the NFIUs in Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, HQ Multinational Corps (NE) and the newly formed Germany Enabling Office in Sennelager. Novel command and control options were used to mitigate the reach of tactical CIS, such as BOWMAN, allowing us to communicate securely across an AO spanning 2,400km. The messaging app ‘WIKR’ was used as an Official-Sensitive voice and messaging service, with a chat room facility providing the operational record keeping facility. MOSAIC was employed as a blue force tracker, accurate down to 5m. With these two systems up and running, an excellent level of functionality was achieved across an AOR spanning 2,400km. Throughout the operation there has been a tremendous amount of support provided by the various host nations and from the supporting NATO HQs. This

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ARTICLE | THE SUSTAINER

integration, aided by the LO network was crucial in ensuring the success of TRACTABLE and should be replicated for all future deployments into the European JOA. The UK and the TEG are learning about what it means to operate within the NATO context. The knowledge and experience gained through the TRACTABLE deployment will be captured and used to shape both the upcoming TEG deployment on DEFENDER in 2020 and for future operations in Europe. Port and Railway Operations 112 vehicles were loaded in the Sea Mounting Centre, Marchwood, by 17 Port and Maritime Regiment and were moved via Strategic RORO to Emden Port in Germany. There a Port Task Group, under the command of Maj Titus Jordan of 17 Regt and with soldiers from across the Corps and the Army, discharged the vessel and prepared the vehicles for their onward movement through Northern Europe by train and road convoy. The trains were loaded under the supervision of the Rail Load Supervisors, including Pte Clipstone of 29 Regt RLC, with the activity being visited by both Commander 104 Log Sp Bde and Major General Antonio Bettelli (Ita), DCos Sp, JFC Brunssum. Sgt Croskell and Capt Andy Rickwood (both 17 Regt RLC) reported back that they were pleased to know the key role they played and working closely with REME support and unit drivers, allowed them to test their skills and learn lessons for the future. For many of the 3 (UK) Div vehicle crews, it was the first time they had experienced working in a port and driving vehicles onto rail flats or into Convoy Marshalling Areas. This experience is vital to maintain currency within 3 (UK) Div and the crews left the railhead confident in their processes and procedures. In total five trains passed through the TEG’s AOR. In addition to the two trains departing from Emden, one train, containing 18 Challenger 2 Main Battle Tanks and two CRAAVs departed from the Stored Equipment Fleet (Germany) having been ‘broken out’ by the QRH in the weeks leading up to the train departure. Two further trains were

loaded in the UK, transiting through the Channel Tunnel into mainland Europe. The movement of these trains created unique challenges. Four of the trains were controlled solely by contractors, meaning the TEG only received one update a day on their location and had no ability to control their movement. Railway gauge-change operations The European Rail Network uses a different gauge (standard) to the Russian Network in the Baltic States (broad), creating a requirement to physically switch equipment from standard gauge trains to wider gauge trains. This was done at the Rail Exchange Point, or RXP, in Lithuania. The RXP was operated by an all arms grouping of 45 service personnel, commanded by 2Lt Claire Charlesworth, a Lead First officer on attachment from 29 Regt’s paired Reserve unit, 162 Regt RLC. The team coordinated the physical transferring of every single vehicle and container without incident and hosted visits of the UK’s Ambassador to Lithuania, Head DSCOM, DCOS Field Army and DCOS 1 Div. Convoys A large vehicle convoy moved from Germany to Estonia along a 2,400km route, over 11 days. The convoy was pre-dominantly RLC soldiers from 1 Regt RLC and 27 Regt RLC and comprised Heavy Equipment Transporters carrying CR2 at a combined weight of 107 tonnes and EPLS carrying BOWMAN Equipment required for the incoming BG. Driving only at

night, and over difficult terrain and long distances, was an unfamiliar and difficult challenge for The RLC drivers and they were tested to their limits. They now have an unmatched experience of convoy operations at night and have developed excellent SOPs along the way. The convoy’s ease in crossing four international borders was aided by LCpls Ball and Bradford, both from 29 Regt RLC. As a bespoke border crossing point team, they pushed ahead of the convoy to liaise with the host nation border agencies at each crossing point. The convoy transitioned smoothly across all international borders, with each host nation’s differing policy and paperwork needs met. Real Life Support for the convoy personnel was provided entirely by the host nations, who activated a number of pre-determined Convoy Support Centres along the route. UK presence in the CSCs came in the form a hard working UK enabling team liaising with the hosts, to ensure that RLS requirements were in place; allowing the convoy drivers to get their much-needed rest ahead of the next leg. Brigadier Chestnutt, Commander of the Theatre Enabling Group, wishes to make it known how grateful he is for the support of all host nations and the thorough commitment of all those involved in TRACTABLE, whatever trade or cap-badge they may be. Without the engagement of all personnel at every level, the achievements throughout TRACTABLE would not have been possible.

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THE SUSTAINER | ARTICLE

By Major Rob Marshall QM 151 Regt RLC The Jubilee Sailing Trust (JST) was founded in 1978 through the extraordinary vision of a dedicated group of people working against the odds to make their dream a reality. In their first 40 years, over 50,000 people have sailed with the JST. Their work with disabled people has always been a crucial part of what they do and has been recognised across the world, including by the United Nations. But over the years they have learned that they also make a profound difference for people from many other social groups including the Armed forces, SSAFA and PTSD sufferers. This year saw the JST partner with SSAFA on an extraordinary project to take PTSD sufferers and cadets on a tall ship as part of the commemorations for D-Day 75. A total of 46 voyage crew came aboard with mixed expectations of what the week would involve. As all sailing expeditions are subject to flexibility, our planned trip to Caen was scuppered within the first 24 hours, as we hit a force 10 storm off the coast of the Isle of Wight. This is now firmly logged in my RYA book and shall be lamented at every Regimental Dinner I attend until retirement. Out of our voyage crew, 11 of the veterans had been diagnosed with PTSD. The JST and I have a relationship and knowing that I have dealt with PTSD suffers before, I became the principle watch leader who was to keep an eye on these chaps and advise on any courses of action that may be appropriate for them. This is all very well on dry land, but a game changer on a 70 meter tall ship in quite a large storm. One of the lads I had to advise on quickly, was uncontrollably shaking as he took the helm of the Lord Nelson in the channel and I had to calm him down and advise the crew that the last occasion that John had held the wheel of a ship was on the 25 May 1982 on HMS Coventry. SV Lord Nelson is due to be decommissioned in Oct 19, in order to streamline the charity and 34

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Jubilee Sailing Trust and SSAFA take PTSD sufferers on a tall ship

concentrate on the other ship SV Tenacious. So it was fairly poignant that SSAFA was involved in the last crew voyage. JST will still support military charities in the future and this is an ideal opportunity for welfare officers to engage with the charity to explore the art of the possible. It was once again humbling and rewarding beyond expectations to see these

8 Foreword Starboard Watch

8 SSAFA veterans on board

men change over five days, from complete strangers to friends, advising and teaching the young cadets how to administrate themselves on board. I would recommend any unit that wishes to get involved in the trust to either contact myself or the JST directly. You can change lives and need no previous experience of sailing.

8 Maj Rob Marshall Helms as Nelson passes under tower bridge for the final time

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ARTICLE | THE SUSTAINER

On 27Jul 19, British Forces Brunei (BFB) received its biennial resupply from the UK with all parties coming together in the coordination effort to facilitate the monumental task. One of Defence’s contracted RollOn Roll-Off (RORO) vessels was allocated to the task of shipping 41 ISO containers and six vehicles. The resupply will allow the Logistic Support Troops within Brunei Garrison to continue their supporting role of the Resident Infantry Battalion (2RGR), 7 Flight Sqn Army Air Corps, Jungle Warfare Division of the Infantry Battle School and supporting units in Brunei. During the resupply task, BFB Logisticians worked with numerous local contractors and Bruneian government agencies to achieve the scale of vehicles, cranes, MHE, administrative and legal support required to receive the vessels and conduct the task. BFB is infrequently resupplied via these means and so this presented a rare challenge! This resupply was testing for the Garrison Logisticians for several reasons; firstly, Brunei is not scaled for this sort of bulk resupply and the majority of the leased containers for loading Exporting BFB salvage had to be shipped in from Singapore. Secondly, all loading and off-loading of ISO containers had to be done using the ship’s crane; this was a slow process and it was compounded by working throughout the night. The new MAN SVs for BFB had to be driven off via the vessel’s side ramp and this was only possible at high tide early in the morning for around one hour. The vehicles had not been started during their 28day transit to Brunei so not all of them started immediately and either had to be slaved or have batteries replaced on ship. Other issues included time constraints due to the requirement for pre-booked police escorts or the availability of cranes and MHE which were required at three different locations simultaneously. A real challenge unique to Brunei was a mid-afternoon electrical storm which occurred during the stowing of the explosives and ammunition in the ammunition bunkers. Once the HE natures were under cover, the work force

BFB logisticians complete massive resupply task

retreated to a safe distance until the storm had passed, thankfully there were no incidents. The resupply facilitated the in load of circa 250T of ammunition to sustain all training in the jungle environment for up to two years. This ammunition will also be expended on overseas exercises with regional partners to facilitate Defence Engagement. Defence Engagement in the wider SE Asia region is becoming more apparent with increased OTXs now being executed by BFB in Thailand, NZ, Australia, Malaysia and New Caledonia. Logistics in Brunei is crucial to the continued success of BFB and Royal Brunei Armed Forces. The activities requiring RLC enablers are becoming more frequent, more challenging and absolutely more interesting as the South East Pacific region becomes increasingly important for multinational training opportunities.

8 The resupply facilitated the in load of circa 250T of ammunition

In addition to receiving ammunition; 2RGR has now received their VIRTUS kit and equipment which will fall to the 1 LO team (QOGLR) to receipt, configure and issue out. BFB Garrison has received uplift in MAN SV and can officially retire Leyland DAF while continuing to deliver troops to and from the jungle. An SV(R) also arrived in theatre and will reduce local contracted recovery costs each year. The execution of the task was not met without challenges, but the synergy created by numerous RLC trades; Port Ops, Movers, Suppliers and Ammunition Technicians working together, ensured a swift resolution to each problem the team faced. The Port Task Group from 17 Port and Maritime Regiment, led by Sgt Coleman, were thoroughly professional in providing ISOs in the required order ensuring that the police escorted convoys could depart on time. Overall, a task that had been months in the planning was a complete success, the efforts of all involved have been recognised by the chain of command in Brunei. 8 The new MAN SVs for BFB had to be driven off via the vessel’s side ramp and this was only possible at high tide early in the morning for around one hour

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THE SUSTAINER | ARTICLE Design, Development and Prototyping (DD&P) at Defence Munitions Kineton, is an engineering design and manufacturing facility that has supported EOD Operator training and munitions processing in depots for many decades. The chances are, if you have been on the Ammunition Technical Officer (ATO) training course, the longest professional technical course in The RLC, then you will have seen at least one of the many replica explosive devices that DD&P has produced. The team at DD&P hold details on most of the IRA’s back catalogue, including mortars and launchers, grenades, time and power units (TPUs) and pipe bombs. We have also worked to produce many replica Taliban pressure plates and switches to support pre-deployment training during Op HERRICK. In the department we have a team of design engineers who can reverse engineer newly discovered items using the information from first look reports and photography to create the drawings required to allow the repeated manufacture of the requested quantities within our own workshop. It is important for us as a team to know that operators are being trained on the latest threats. Over the years DD&P has modernised with the times. From drawings boards and manually operated machinery to the latest 3D Computer Aided Design software, helping to produce data which transfers directly to our industrial grade 3D plastics printer or computercontrolled milling and turning machines. This transformation means we can now produce components and assemblies faster and with greater precision. We have the facilities for welding and fabrication, electrical wiring and paint finishing meaning we can still complete all items in house. If you have trained or worked with ammunition in a Defence Munitions Depot, such as DM Kineton, then you will have most likely used the Conductive Processing Bench manufactured here at DD&P. Over the years we have designed, produced and identified hundreds of different tools and equipment to be used 36

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Supporting EOD Training and Munitions Depots

8 MAIF

8 Conductive Bench

8 Universal Clamp

when processing ammunition within depot buildings (APBs). Each item used for processing in APBs must be formally approved before use, which is a service we offer here at DD&P. A list of all DD&P approved tools and equipment is detailed on the DE&S Intranet. This is also included in the relevant Munitions Processing Instruction (MPI) created by Defence Munitions head office. You may already have the basic tools you need for processing; however, DD&P can help to identify extra tools and equipment to aid an increase in productivity, a reduction of bending and stretching, a reduction in manual lifting and the reduction in the amount of personnel in the danger area. For large tasks, these small changes can have significant benefits. During deployment, you may have seen a Mobile Ammunition Inspection Facility, also know as a MAIF. A recent project we have

8 Improvised Mortar

been working on at DD&P is the modernisation of the design and functionality of MAIFs. In addition, we have ensured they conform to current standards and regulations. Several of our updated versions have now been produced. One of which has been to OP CABRIT, with the rest being used for training and exercises. With the addition of some standard tentage, these converted 20’ shipping containers become a very useful asset in an operational theatre. They allow ammunition to be inspected, re-packaged and re-issued locally, eliminating the need to return it to a DM Depot. We also produce the Small Arms Ammunition Burning Tank which allows local disposal of ammunition, minimising the need to transfer large quantities of unserviceable rounds back to the UK. For further information, please contact us on DESWpnsDMDDPGrpMailbox@mod.gov.uk or search the DE&S Intranet for DD&P.

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FOUNDATION | THE SUSTAINER

The RLC Foundation

Junior initiative award

LCpl Samual award

• The RLC Foundation Regional Partnership Award – Winner: Battlefield Communications Specialists, BDUK • The Best Professional Article in the REVIEW Magazine Award – Winner: Lt Alex Rootes, 6 Regiment RLC RLC Foundation 13 AASR Visit

• The RLC Foundation Thought Leadership Award – Winner: World Fuel Services • The RLC Foundation Junior Initiative Award – Joint Winners: Lieutentant Adam Stephenson, 10 QOGLR & Corporal Claude Keogh, 17 P&M Regt RLC. • The RLC Foundation Apprentice of the Year 2019 – Winner: Lance Corporal Sheldon Samuel, 27 Regt RLC The standard of citations for this year’s awards were of an exceptional standard and highlighted the professionalism and dedication of not only the winners, but all nominees.

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Photo credit awards images: Cpl McKenzie 4 Regt RLC

The RLC Foundation continues to deliver high profile national events in conjunction with our industry partners. On 24 Sep 19, 13 Air Assault Support Regiment showcased military operational logistics and exposed our corporate members to how the orders process works in a tactical field HQ, against the backdrop of an ongoing battlefield scenario. Corporate members received an appreciation of why mission analysis prior to military engagement is so important; showing how the military makes sense of the environment in which it is operating, how the communication chain works, how it creates missions and tasks and manages inherent risks and uncertainties. Whilst there are recognisable planning parallels between industry and the military, the risks are different. Team Leidos with Kuehne & Nagel and support DE&S Army, hosted a ‘demand forecasting and risk management in logistics’ event at Donnington on 16 Oct 19. The event concentrated on military integration, outsourcing, procurement and storage of logistic commodities, in partnership with industry experts. This partnering arrangement has already seen improved service delivery and substantial financial savings for the MOD. Following presentations, delegates were given a tour of the new Defence Fulfilment Centre and Operations Warehouse. The size of these buildings and the scale of operations reinforced the considerable investment by our industry partners within the supply chain network. On 6 Nov 19 The RLC Foundation Awards Dinner was held at Dalton Barracks Officers’ Mess, Abingdon. The event was hosted by MGL and over a hundred military and industry guests enjoyed an excellent evening. A quintet from the Band of The RLC and The RLC Corps of Drums provided musical entertainment throughout. This year there were seven awards presented: • The RLC Foundation Mentoring Support Award – Winner: Mr Sion Farrell, Food Services Training Wing, Worthy Down • The RLC Foundation Industry Professional Development Award – Winner: Kuehne & Nagel


THE SUSTAINER | MUSEUM

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Museum Musings By Maj (Retd) Simon Walmsley Director, The Royal Logistic Corps Museum The RLC Museum Vehicle Collection The Royal Logistic Corps’ past is synonymous with the history of military load bearing vehicles, whether these be drawn by horses or propelled by internal combustion engines. Therefore, it is not surprising that vehicles will all feature in the new museum’s displays. How we exhibit these vehicles in the future will vary. Some will be presented as illustrations or as a painting, others as scale models or in video clips, but where we can we will include genuine historic vehicles in the museum galleries. This article illustrates just some of the vehicles that will be on display. To see the rest, you will have to visit the new museum when it opens in Worthy Down in Apr 2021.

8 Marlborough cart

The Marlborough Cart, designed by the 1st Duke of Marlborough in the early 1700s, was pulled by two horses in tandem and was thus narrow enough to navigate country lanes and even pass by broken down waggons. It could avoid traffic jams and keep the supplies moving. Moreover, its large wheels gave it good cross-country capability. A full size replica of this cart is being constructed for the new museum, with the design being taken from a tapestry hanging in Blenheim Palace. 38

8 Mark X GS Wagon

Over 45,000 Mark X General Service Wagons were used in WW1, normally pulled by two horses, unless on soft ground when more were required. They carried ammunition, food, tentage, forage and the wounded. A unique feature of the design is that the body can be dismounted, wrapped in the canvas load sheet and used as a small boat – possibly the first ever amphibious vehicle! 2000 amphibious DUKW vehicles, built by General Motors in America, were delivered to the British Forces in WW2. Used to support amphibious landings, they could carry 25 soldiers or 2,300 kg of cargo. With a road-speed of 50mph and five-knots at sea, they were excellent at transferring stores from ship to shore. Whilst the Army eventually disbanded its last DUKW Company in 1974, the Royal Marines retained a small number to support training exercises until 2012. Which is how the museum acquired a restored and road legal DUKW, with a modern diesel engine and caterpillar gearbox. The long term plan is to paint it back to its original RASC D-Day livery and display it; although it needs a temporary home within the Corps until it can go on display.

The British Army has used Bedford trucks, since WW2. In the 1950s the RL was introduced, which was also used as the basis for the Green Goddess fire tender, driven by many soldiers during the fireman’s strike. The RL was the principle medium logistic load carrier in the 1950s and 1960s, although some vehicles were kept in service until the 1980s. It was eventually replaced by the Bedford TK and MK. The example on display in the RLC Museum is on loan from the National Army Museum and will sit in a gallery near to a WW2 OY Bedford, which was recently added to the collection. The Royal Ordnance Factory (ROF) Eager Beaver was used by the British Army from the 1970s and on into the 1990s. Essentially a rugged forklift truck, it’s all terrain ability, air portability and durability in the field made it ideal for loading and offloading vehicles out of barracks; in particular pallets of ammunition required to support the Artillery. The Museum Eager Beaver, a Mk2, will be displayed carrying a pallet of ammunition on its upraised forks, along with photographs of it at work on exercise in BAOR.

8 DUKW

8 Eager Beaver

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FAREWELL DEEPCUT | THE SUSTAINER

This is the final edition of The Sustainer to be produced from RHQ The RLC at Dettingen House in Deepcut. By the time you read this, the headquarters will have re-located to The RLC’s new home of Worthy Down. All bar a handful of officers and soldiers serving today, have memories of Deepcut. In recognition of the RLC’s connection with the Princess Royal Barracks, we mark this end of an era, with a short history, which outlines the significant role this Surrey village has played in the history of our Corps and the British Army. The early days Deepcut, derives its name from the cutting dug out to carry the neighbouring Basingstoke Canal. During the end of the 18th and early part of the 19th centuries, the surrounding local area had been used by the British Army for training purposes. It was ideal, in that it enabled large concentrations of troops to exercise together. A number of temporary encampments were set up. Most significant was the one held during the summer of 1853 on Chobham Common, just prior to the outbreak of the Crimean War (1854-56). It was this which led to a proposal for a permanent training camp in the area. Aldershot Heath was selected and purchased in 1854. The needs

The Princess Royal Barracks, Blackdown: A History RAOC Training Centre Blackdown 1967

of the Crimean War led to the building of a military camp in 1855 at Aldershot. The camp expanded rapidly and Aldershot became the only complete military town built in the United Kingdom since the Roman occupation. However, by the end of the 19th century, there was a need for additional barracks to accommodate troops. During the Boer War (1899-1902) a decision was taken by the War Department, to concentrate three Regular Divisions at Aldershot as part of the 1st Army Corps, which led to the building of a number of new camps nearby, at Bulford, Tidworth, Longmoor and Blackdown. The building of the camp The land on which Blackdown Camp was built had been

Deepcut Railway Station

THE OLD RAILWAY LINE There was once a railway line between Brookwood and Blackdown Camp. Opened in 1890, the railway line, known as the Bisley Branch line, originally ran from Brookwood to Bisley Camp and was used only once a year for the annual rifle shooting competition. The two coach train which was used on the line was nicknamed the 'Bisley Bullet'. Then came the First World War and the building of new army camps at Pirbright, Deepcut and Blackdown, which meant a need to transport thousands of troops. This resulted in the extension of the railway into the new camps, and it was the Royal Engineers

purchased by William Pain of Wykeham Park, Frimley. Originally it consisted of 252 acres acquired in 1894 for the sum of £20,250. The building of the camp commenced in 1900. The camp at that time consisted of two lots of barracks, one at Deepcut and the other at Blackdown. The positions of the barracks as we know them today were different, as the south end of Blackdown Camp was known as Deepcut and the northern end was known as Blackdown. Deepcut Barracks were built to house two brigades of field artillery, whilst Blackdown housed two infantry battalions. The actual barrack buildings were a mixture of corrugated iron and wooden huts and brick

and German prisoners-of-war (the latter were held at the nearby Frith Hill Camp) who did most of the work. The three mile long branch was opened by King George V and Queen Mary, who travelled along the line to visit the troops.

The railway line to Blackdown Camp, however, had only a short life, as in1921 it was discontinued, although the line to Bisley Camp was used until 1952, when it also became defunct. There are still visible signs today of the old track, albeit overgrown.

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THE SUSTAINER | FAREWELL DEEPCUT

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Deepcut Café 2019

buildings. These were named after battles similar to the barracks which were part of Aldershot Camp. Blackdown Barracks consisted of Dettingen, a battle fought in June 1743 during the War of Austrian succession and Alma, a battle fought in September 1854 during the Crimean War. Deepcut Barracks consisted of South and North Minden; Minden being a battle fought in August 1759 during the Seven Years War. The barracks were completed by early 1903 and were first occupied by 18 and 20 Brigades of the Royal

Field Artillery (Deepcut), followed by 1st Battalion Royal Scots and 2nd Battalion The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) (Blackdown). Thereafter Blackdown Camp was occupied by a succession- of artillery and infantry regiments. Prior to the First World War the following infantry regiments are recorded as having been stationed at Blackdown: South Lancashire, Leinster, Royal Irish, York and Lancaster, Dorsetshire, King's Royal Rifle Corps, Green Howards and Northamptonshire.

The First World War The First World War brought about the further development of Blackdown Camp. The Bisley Railway was extended in 1915 to Deepcut and Blackdown in order to transport the thousands of troops which were to Pass through. With the advent of air warfare and anti-aircraft operations, Frith Barracks (Blackdown) were built on Frith Hill to house a Royal Artillery anti-aircraft brigade, a Royal Engineers’ search-light battalion and a signals company. Two further barracks were built at Blackdown, Aisne and Marne, between 1919 and 1945. After WW1 Blackdown Camp soon returned to normality, but it was to become the home of the 6th Infantry Brigade. This was an experimental formation in which ideas on organisation, mechanisation, weapons and tactics were tried out. The brigade consisted of four battalions of infantry and support units which were changed every few years. Regiments stationed there included: South Wales Borderers, Sherwood Foresters, Devonshire, Northamptonshire, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, Suffolk, Somerset Light Infantry, Durham

A SHORT HISTORY OF ST BARBARA'S GARRISON CHURCH The Garrison Church, now known as St Barbara's, was built at Deepcut in 1901 to serve the units stationed at Blackdown and Deepcut. The records show that the first service to be held in the new church took place on 31 Mar 1901 (Palm Sunday) and was conducted by the then Chaplain, Reverend Stewart Stitt. The church was, however, officially dedicated on 29 Sep 1901. At the time the church was titled St Michael and All Angels Garrison Church. In 1905 one acre of land adjoining the church was acquired from the crown and a burial ground was consecrated by the Chaplain General. The first recorded burial was of a soldier's young daughter, Daisy Mason, who died of peritonitis. The presence of the various regiments which were stationed at Blackdown Camp is reflected by the number of gravestones depicting different cap badges. The early history of the church is sketchy. Regular services were held but attendance was never high; the common excuse being the state of the weather. Near the church was the Soldiers' Home (now demolished) where meetings of the Church of England Men's Society, the Guild of St Helena and bible classes were

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held. On Sunday evenings lantern slide services were held, which always guaranteed a good turn out. Originally the church was lit by candles and did not have an electric light until 1911. This was considered to be a great improvement, especially to the Sunday lantern slide services. On important occasions the church could never hold everybody, so services were either held in the camp gymnasium or outside if the weather was fine. One such occasion was on Armistice Day, 11 Nov 1918, when an open air Service of Thanksgiving was held. In September 1922 the stained glass windows on the east side of the church, depicting St George, Christ in Glory and St Patrick, were reerected, having been originally installed in Portobello Barracks Chapel, Dublin. They were designed by Alfred Ernest Child, an eminent stained glass artist. The records show a number of prominent military

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FAREWELL DEEPCUT | THE SUSTAINER

Light Infantry, Devon and Cornwall Light Infantry, Royal Berkshire and Royal Welsh Fusiliers. 9 Company RASC. Before long Britain was plunged into WW2 and again Blackdown Camp was to be the home of many thousands of troops, both British and Canadian. Post 1945 When the war ended in 1945, Blackdown Camp was run down, apart from a period when it was used as a Royal Artillery Officer Cadet Training Unit. In June 1948, the Headquarters and No 4 Training Battalion RAOC moved into Minden Barracks, Deepcut from Tidworth. ln 1949 No 4 Trade Training Battalion moved into Blackdown, later to be followed by other RAOC units. By 1962 Blackdown had become the Regimental Depot and Training Centre of the RAOC. By the middle 1960s the old barracks had become outdated. Between 1967 and 1971 the old Minden Barracks, Deepcut, were demolished and replaced with a new modern barracks, renamed Blackdown Barracks. The new Headquarters and Training Centre was opened by Her Majesty The Queen in May 1972. All of the original barracks have disappeared, with

just a few ancillary buildings remaining. The last to be demolished were Alma and Dettingen Barracks in the 1990s. The formation of The RLC in Apr 1993 saw Deepcut camp renamed “Princess Royal Barracks” after the Colonel in Chief, HRH The Princess Royal. Deepcut became the home of the RLC, its Regimental HQ was established in Dettingen House and its HQ Officers and Sgts Messes also located on the site. The end The decision to close Deepcut and end of all military occupation of the site was taken in 2012, as part of a wider rationalisation of the defence estate. Today, the HQ of the RLC and the Defence School of Logistics, delivering continuation and trade training, has largely moved to a new Tri-Service training college (The Defence College of Logistics Policing and Administration) at

men who worshipped at the church. These included Brigadier AP Wavell CMG MC and Brigadier Wilson DSO, one time Garrison Commanders of Blackdown Camp, both of whom later became Field Marshals. The residence of the Garrison Commander was at Blackdown House (now demolished), near the church itself, which was along Deepcut Bridge Road just opposite Woodend Road. The first marriage ceremony under the Marriage (Naval, Military and Air Force) Act of 1932 was conducted at the church on 31 Mar 1934. It was interesting to note that when the Second World War began the records show an increase in the number of marriages; no less than twelve marriages were recorded during the first two weeks after the declaration of war, likewise there was an increase in the number of burial services conducted at the

Worthy Down near Winchester. The majority of RLC phase two training – and 25 Training Regiment RLC - has been relocated to The Defence School of Transport in Leconfield. All military occupation at Deepcut will end in early 2020, with only a few service houses being retained. The remainder of the site is being re-developed as civilian housing estates. Deepcut camp has a military history going back over 100 years and for nearly half of this time it has had a strong association with The RLC and its predecessor and antecedent Corps. A number of lasting memorials will be left to ensure that the military occupation of the site is not forgotten and St Barbara’s Church – which will be re-furbished - will retain a significant array of military memorials and artefacts which both commemorate and acknowledge this long military association.

2000 Alma Barracks being knocked down for Houses

church, prior to interment at Brookwood Cemetery, during the early months of 1940. At the end of the hostilities in Europe and in the Far East, large Thanksgiving services were held in the Church on 8 May 1945 and 15 Aug 1945 respectively. On 1 Oct 1967 the church was renamed St Barbara's Garrison Church, and much of the property of St Barbara's Church, Hilsea, was moved to Deepcut, including the pipe organ, pulpit and the 1914-1919 RAOC Roll of Honour. Several other RAOC memorials were transferred from Hilsea. These include one to the memory of Major-General Sir John Stevens KCB, KCMG, the first Colonel Commandant RAOC. The pipe organ from Hilsea was installed in 1968, but was not satisfactory and eventually had to be reinstalled in 1972. St Barbara's Garrison Church is used by both military and the civilian residents of the village of Deepcut. However, with the departure of the military from Deepcut and the expansion of the village with the new housing estates, it is being handed to the local diocese. It will become a local parish church, but will retain many of its military artefacts and memorials, including stained glass windows and other fittings added over the years.

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THE SUSTAINER | UNITS

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1 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps BICESTER CO: Lt Col N Crew OBE • Adjt: Capt E Thompson • RSM: WO1 A Parker The third quarter of 2019 has been another busy period for 1 Regiment with Ex BARBURY SUN, Ex IRON VIPER and continued sporting successes achieved in multiple fields. 2 CS Squadron This Aug, 2 CS Sqn had the fantastic opportunity to deploy on Ex BARBURY SUN in Gibraltar. The Sqn conducted an array of training including tunnel fighting, FIBUA, AT and the Rock Run. The Sqn deployed on a C130 & an A400M, a new experience for many junior soldiers and arrived in Gibraltar ready to begin a challenging exercise. The Sqn conducted Trg on tunnel fighting and FIBUA to ensure exercising troops were ready for the FTX to follow. The FTX began via a sea insertion courtesy of the Royal Navy followed by an initial tunnel clearance phase which was challenging due to the darkness, hot temperatures and unforgiving ground. The next phase of the exercise was conventional FIBUA in the purpose-built village culminating in a company attack whilst exploiting further subterranean tunnel complexes. The Sqn then competed the Rock Run, a 2.7-mile route to the summit of the Rock, won by LCpl Carl Aldridge with a time of 21 minutes 7 seconds. Soldiers also had the opportunity to conduct several water sport activities and a cultural tour discussing the rich history of the rock. Ex BARBARY SUN proved to be a huge success. 12 CS Squadron 12 CS Sqn has had a busy summer period having deployed on LFTT, Ex TIMBER TRUSS and the Regimental BCS exercise. The Sqn has since switched its focus to providing intimate support to 101 Log Bde’s Main Effort, Ex IRON VIPER. Through this exercise they have seized the opportunity to enhance both tactical and trade skills whilst delivering mission 42

critical equipment across the country. In addition to the plethora of commitments, the Sqn has also found time to be the regimental lead for The RLC Military Skills Competition. In this capacity, the Regt provided five teams (two male, one vets, one mixed and one female) for the competition. The squad led by Lt Bevan Wray (12 CS Sqn) performed brilliantly, securing the fastest six-mile march and third place in the shooting overall, achieving the Regt’s best results in this competition to date. 23 GS Squadron 23 Squadron has continued to maintain a global footprint by

8 Winning team of the fastest loaded march at The RLC Military Skills Competition

8 12 CS Sqn firing from an EPLS on LFTT providing logistic capability to the Falklands, Canada, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia and Cyprus. Within the UK the Sqn's focus has been on participating in Ex IRON VIPER 19 and this has presented the chance to develop LSS skill through preparing and facilitating the exercise in a Neutral Org role. Multiple Sections, under the guidance of SSgt Mapletoft, have mobilised to act in support of 101 Logistic Brigade to create a realistic scenario of Exercise Accounts. A relentless preparation phase comprised of the distribution of 585 pallets of simulated stock that required sorting into commodities, tracking on LogIS and readying for outload to locations around the country. Sporting achievements 1 Regt RLC triathlon and cricket teams have both had exceptional seasons both being crowned RLC champions; the triathlon team for the second year in a row. The Regimental golf team was also crowned Summer Championship Team Handicap winners.

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UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

3 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps ABINGDON CO: Lt Col S Cooke • Adjt: Capt A Thompson • RSM: WO1 G Millar Aug saw the inaugural Dalton Barracks Strongest Man and Woman competition, Ex STRESSED STRONGMAN. The event, hosted by professional strongman competitor “The Big Man” Laurence Dickson, was in aid of raising awareness for a number of metal health charities including MIND, SSAFA, Combat Stress and the Royal British Legion. The competition comprised of five classic strongman events – car deadlift, farmers walk, log press, minibus pull and of course the atlas stones! A fantastic crowd cheered on the competitors who put in some impressive performances and demonstrated incredible feats of mental and physical strength. A hugely successful afternoon raised awareness for some important organisations that support mental health and help so many of our soldiers. Congratulations to the winners Cpl Muskwee (3 RLC) in the male event and Capt Wakefield (Oxford UOTC) in the female event. Ex ALGARVE WATCH Sailing into the sunset is something we normally dream of for retirement after an illustrious career… Not so for members of 3 RLC who were lucky enough to undertake a week of sailing off the coast of Portugal

8 Captain Ryan Smith celebrates after catching his lunch

following an arduous, but ultimately victorious war on the battlegrounds of BATUS. The adventure began in Albufeira where the team rendezvoused with its skipper before setting off with gusto for five successful days, sailing without incident (sea sickness not included), visiting Vilamoura, Faro and Lagos, learning a multitude of skills along the way. The arduous yet enjoyable expedition culminated in a successful return to Albufeira where the crew celebrated its new-found fondness for sailing and knot tying. Visit to Williams F1 Following a successful deployment to Canada on Ex PRAIRIE STORM 1 & 2 this summer, 3 Regt decided to put a slight spin on the annual regimental planning conference. With innovation currently being a key theme for the Regt, the planning conference was held at the Williams F1 racing conference centre in Wantage. RHQ, along with all the SSMs and OCs, assembled at the famous Formula 1 HQ for a morning of activities. The morning started with a tour of the world’s largest collection of privatelyowned Formula 1 cars, belonging to none other than Sir Frank Williams himself.

8 SSgt Ball lifts the Atlas Stones Following the tour, the group conducted a range of activities including racing on the virtual reality simulators, Scalextric racing and a ‘pit stop crew’ challenge. After a very filling lunch, the officers and warrant officers got down to business in the conference centre to conduct some much needed and vital long-range planning alongside the incoming CO, who arrives in Mar. The ‘away day’ was intended to function much like an inset day, conducted by schools across the country prior to the start of term. It gave the command team a fantastic opportunity to plan and prepare for readiness in 2020 in a more relaxed environment, whilst also adding an element of fun.

8 Its not all fun and games, but a little fun helps!

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4 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps ABINGDON CO: Lt Col C Yates • Adjt: Capt S Kennedy • RSM: WO1 D Phillips The past quarter has brought little respite for 4 Regiment with personnel deployed on a multitude of occasions, including on operational tours to Estonia and the Falkland Islands, exercises to Gibraltar, Cyprus and Otterburn, adventurous training to Bavaria and a battlefield study to Europe. Exercises 52 Soldiers from across the Regt deployed to Bavaria to conduct Ex EAGLES ADVENTURE; a ten-day multi-activity adventurous training package designed to cater for all abilities. Foundation qualifications were earned in kayaking, rock-climbing and mountain biking and, for those with more experience, qualification as mountain bike instructors. Soldiers from 4 and 60 Close Support (CS) Squadrons spent two weeks in Gibraltar learning and practicing the skills required to fight in urban areas. Fighting in tunnels was new to nearly every soldier and the experience was thoroughly enjoyed. The exercise rotation saw each Troop live in the tunnels for a period of 24 hours in complete darkness. One Troop Commander commented that “Once you adapt to the darkness and constant heat of the tunnels only then can focus on your Troop skills… it was a very unique experience for all involved.” The final attack saw troops landing via Royal Navy RIBs before assaulting a village on the south end of the peninsular. Not only was this incredible fun, it was an excellent show of a low-level amphibious operation and the power of #OneTeam. Live Fire Tactical Training Prior to summer stand-down, the Regt conducted its Live Fire Tactical Training (LFTT) package in Otterburn and Kirkcudbright. The package was designed to progress skills from the bottom up, focusing on low level skills and drills prior to 44

progressing to complex serials. The first week was spent progressing towards Section level live firing; in attack and defence. The second week witnessed the Regt’s two CS Squadrons redeploy to Kirkcudbright and progress from static shoots to moving loops. The range package culminated in both sub-units conducting a complex Relief-in-Place serial; an excellent way of combining logistic skills within a realistic live fire environment. For many individuals, this was the very first time they had completed a LFTT exercise as a Regt and it therefore proved to be demanding yet progressive in nature and has set the bar high for future iterations of the annual camp. Gore Trophy 4 Regt entered more teams than any other regular or reserve unit into the Gore Trophy this year. Incredibly, all the teams entered by the Unit – five in total – were

8 Tunnel fighting on Ex BARBURY SUN getting used to night vision

successful in winning trophies. Highlights from the hugely successful event include: 1st female team overall; 3rd regular unit; 3rd veterans’ team and overall shooting winners. The trophy will provide a fantastic foundation to work upon as the Regt looks to develop its military skills over the course of the next quarter with Exercise BLACK EAGLE, the annual regimental exercise in Nov. Ex TRAILWALKER As 60 CS Squadron continues its progression towards becoming a 4 Regiment QOGLR Squadron, the sub-unit is making a concerted effort to involve itself in events that have a particularly strong meaning to the Brigade of Gurkhas. Having had only three weeks to prepare, a scratch team of four individuals from the Sqn were entered into Exercise TRAILWALKER – a 100km race along the South Downs in support of Oxfam and the Gurkha Welfare Trust. The 60 Squadron team finished the race in a remarkable 18 hours 11 minutes, placing it 35th of over 400 teams overall. It was a fantastic team effort by all those involved. 8 Eagles draw relief in place

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6 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps DISHFORTH CO: Lt Col L A Green • Adjt: Capt T M Furlong • RSM: WO1 G Sumner

Another busy and successful quarter has flown by for 6 Regiment RLC. There have been lots of sports, charity work, community engagement and of course operations and exercise commitments. 62 Sqn In Jul 19, 62 Squadron deployed on Ex LION SUN. The deployment started with a LFTT package to hone the soldiers’ marksmanship on both the GPMG and SA80, focusing on adopting the different firing positions and aiming accurately over increasing distances. The week on the ranges culminated in conducting the ACMT for both weapons. Upon completion of this phase there was some time within Bloodhound Camp. Troops practiced their battlefield casualty drills, section attacks, fire control orders and CBRN knowledge in

preparation for the overnight exercise in Paramali Village. After a successful exercise, the Sqn took advantage of a full AT package, mountain biking, hillwalking and rock climbing in and around Troodos. 64 Sqn In Sep 19, 64 Sqn deployed on Ex WESSEX STORM as part of the CSS group along with 2 Bn REME. Initially deploying to the Barton Stacey training area, they then re-established in Salisbury Plain with 51 Brigade to provide support to 3 SCOTS battlegroup as it advanced across the area. 600 Sqn Josh Warrington, the world Featherweight Boxer, has always had an interest in the Corps and visited the Regt for inspiration ahead of his 30th professional fight in Leeds.

8 In Sep 19, 64 Sqn deployed on Ex WESSEX STORM

During his visit he drove around the airfield in an EPLS, had a shoot on the DCCT and gave a motivational speech to the troops before gifting 75 tickets to his most recent fight where six of the Regt’s boxers led him out into the ring accompanied by the band of the RDG, another Yorkshire Regiment. The unit looks forward to seeing him at the next inter-unit boxing match in the new year. In other news, 6 Regt entered six teams into the Bismarck Relay held in York with one of the teams achieving an impressive overall second place. Other sporting successes include an overall win for the male running team in the Army 10k championships, second place for the female team in the UK (North) Swimming Championships and the male team won The RLC Hockey championships for the third consecutive year. Nov will see 6 Regt deploy on its CT2/3 exercise to ensure it is ready for various upcoming deployments in 2020. Finally, a huge congratulations to WO1 Gareth Sumner who has been selected for an LE Commission, the unit wishes him all the best in his new career as a LE Captain. 8 Josh Warrington, the world Featherweight Boxer visited the Regt

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7 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps COTTESMORE CO: Lt Col J Edwards • Adjt: Capt E Duplessis • RSM: WO1 A Newham It’s been a frenetic period for 7 Regiment over the last few months with taskings having spread its soldiers all over the world. These have ranged from places including Kenya and Edinburgh on exercise, deployment or sport. At the time of writing, 68 Sqn has settled into Nyati Barracks, Kenya, ready to start Ex ASKARI STORM 19-4/5. This will be a unique and challenging rotation of the exercise as two Battle Groups (1CG and 4SCOTS) will participate on the exercise at the same time. The demands of supporting both formations is something that will test and push all trades within the CSS Group. ASKARI STORM is already a high tempo exercise within a harsh environment, including real-time threats and risks. There is no doubt that it’ll be a hugely rewarding training opportunity and 68 Sqn will come out stronger and well versed in the planning and execution of its activities. REMT 9 Sqn has not been left out in the fray. It was tasked with developing and deploying an ‘Edinburgh’ Troop

8 Army Sergeant Major WO1 Paton and Sgt Jessah (AFMA Secretary)

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to support this year’s Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo (REMT). A huge international event that is broadcast around the world. The Troop was designated as Guard Troop for the event, a ceremonial tasking that normally falls to Infantry units. It was a great privilege for the Regt (and RLC) to be chosen for the duty. As expected, the soldiers stepped up to the event at Edinburgh Castle and were praised extensively for their professionalism and conduct. Mil skills The 19 RLC Military Skills Competition was hosted by the Regiment at Beckingham Training Camp in Lincolnshire. The task fell to 617 Sqn to co-ordinate. The venue was chosen as it enabled all participating units to be centralised in one location and allowed a zeroing range to be facilitated prior to the competition. The event involved 54 teams from across the Corps and included a mix of Regular, Reserve, Mixed and Veterans teams. The teams competed in numerous events including military knowledge, a physical stand, an accuracy shoot and a six-mile loaded march, which included several twists on the way.

8 Gore Trophy Assault Course The effort, planning and team work to setup the event was well noted and paid off as the event was executed to an exceptional level and enjoyed by all participants and spectators alike. Meanwhile, the sporting accomplishments of the Regt have been non-stop. The golf team was crowned 2019 RLC Golf Scratch Champions. The cricket team had a very strong season that saw it go from strength to strength. This culminated in winning the UK Midlands 20/20 Cricket Tournament against 3AAC. The team also got to the final of the RAF Johns Wells Trophy but lost out to RAF Northolt. The Regt hosted the Female Festival of Sport on behalf of the Midlands Region. This saw 16 teams competing in various sports and the unit finished a respectable fourth. Looking forward The Regt is currently planning future commitments that will come online in early 2020. There is also a multitude of CT1/2 training postChristmas leave that will ensure soldiers’ skills are sharp and they’re ready for the next challenge.

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9 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps HULLAVINGTON CO: Lt Col J Brown • Adjt: Capt A Stahlmann • RSM: WO1 R Vincent The past few months have been busy for 9 Regiment. With support to Ex PANTHERS VENOM and Ex IRON VIPER taking up much of the Regt’s manpower in September, every Squadron and department has been tested. On Ex IRON VIPER, the Regt supplied 270000 litres of fuel to dependents from three Brigades, transported supplies to and from the JSA, created 1000 NATO pallets of simulated stores and supported the Brigade with connectivity to MJDI and VITAL. As well as large exercises, the Regt has also had small deployments, including Sustainment Fusion Cell support to Kenya, Ex MAYAN STORM in Belize, one of its contracts’ officers deploying on Ex JOINT SUPPORTER, 84 Medical Supply Squadron supporting Ex JORVIK LOOK and 95 Squadron supporting Ex TRAILWALKER. Many members of the Regt have also been lucky enough to be involved in various adventurous training expeditions, including 95 Squadron’s Ex HAUTE PANTHER, which saw a team trek the Haute Route, covering 12 mountain passes between Chamonix and Zermatt. Trade skills The Regt has continued to improve its trade skills and knowledge by conducting professional development training. 84 Medical Supply Squadron conducted a visit to DE&S at MOD Abbey Wood to learn about the fourth line of logistics and the role of DE&S in the procurement and life cycle of military equipment.

The Regimental Training Wing has been incorporating the Battle Craft syllabus with dismounted training on Ex PANTHERS VENOM and conducting a range of driver training courses successfully training many soldiers to provide real life support to the Regt. It has also been busy providing G4 support to The RLC Military Skills Competition and Ex CAMBRIAN PATROL teams, supporting the Regt by providing MATTs training and organising regimental adventurous training. Sport successes Sporting success has been abundant this quarter, with Capt Powell winning a gold and silver medal in the European Masters Swimming Championships and Pte Osei and LCpl Acheampong placing first and second in their categories in the Army Powerlifting Bench Press competition. Additionally, the Regimental Athletics team competed in The RLC and Army Athletics with the female team winning the 100m sprint, 4x100 relay and long jump. Meanwhile the Regimental

8 Ex PANTHERS VENOM and Ex IRON VIPER took up much of the Regt’s manpower in Sep Football team became Major Units Football Champions in this year’s competition. The Regt has also been focusing on developing sporting talent with WO2 (RQMS) Pye and LCpl Richardson organising a very successful first RLC clay target shooting training day. This was attended by 40 personnel from 13 different units, all receiving excellent instruction from CPSA level 1 instructors. Community work The Regt has held its annual Health Fair and Regimental Families Day organised by SSgt Price and the Welfare team, respectively. Both events were highly successful and an excellent way to engage with families and friends of the Regt, as well as the local community. There have also been several charity fundraising events, organised by members of the Regt, including fundraising for the ABF in Morrisons, Chippenham, organised by WO2 (SSM) Jones, and Ex PANTHERS CHALLENGE, a 100 mile indoor rowing challenge led by Cpl Agyenim of 66 Squadron. In September, the Regt said goodbye to Lt Col Andy Geary, Commanding Officer since Apr 2017, who has now handed over to Lt Col Joe Brown. 8 The Regimental football team became Major Units Football Champions in this year’s competition

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10 The Queen’s Own Gurkha Logistic Regiment ALDERSHOT CO: Lt Col A F West • Adjt: Capt S Patterson • RSM: WO1 P Gurung This quarter has seen 10 The Queen’s Own Gurkha Logistic Regiment (10 QOGLR) deploy as the Primary Training Audience on the 101 Log Bde CT4 earning FTX IRON VIPER 19 before celebrating Dashain and Tihar with its customary flair. On returning from summer leave, all focus shifted to Ex IRON VIPER 19 to ensure the Regt was fully manned, equipped and mentally ready for an arduous three weeks in the field. The RHQ experimented with configurations and SOIs as the Sqns prepared their vehicles before staggering the Regt's deployment to Cottesmore to conduct RSOI. The RSOI package, well organised by 17 Port & Maritime Regiment, allowed the regiment to complete some MATTs, receive a Road to War brief and get fully read into the exercise scenario. After three rolling 48 hr packages, the Regt was staged and integrated with elements of 156 RLC, part of its Non-Regular Deployable Component. From Cottesmore, the Regt deployed to Swynnerton, across the international border between Gorgas and Atropia. The exercise focussed on end to end CSS, encompassing 104X in the JSA at Hull, through the rear area and DSG units in the Midlands, to the BSGs and front-line units on Salisbury Plain. 10 QOGLR was also the coordinating authority for the four other units within the DSG and as such were responsible for security, track plans and internal movements. As soon as the Regt established itself in Swynnerton

and started to receive materiel, the threat escalated. The enemy started to use surveillance drones to gather intelligence and call in mortar strikes. Enemy Special Purpose Forces fires and raids forced the Regt to disperse. 1 Sqn, using an innovative mobile headquarters, bounced between Swynnerton and Stafford, as 28 Sqn dispersed across Swynnerton training area using hardened buildings and tree cover to mitigate the threat. 151 RLC soon deployed and integrated with ten 40ft HGVs and numerous green fleet vehicles, force multiplying the Regt’s lift capability exponentially. The RHQ embodied dynamism and agility as it planned and executed from two customised 15T SVs parked back to back, ready to move at a moment’s notice. As mortar fire shook the walls of the hardened bunkers, the RSM and OC 36(HQ)Sqn galvanised a QRF and set about drone hunting. The RHQ used this opportunity to change control, using an innovative dummy HQ to take the heat as they

8 Ex IRON VIPER 19 was a challenging, innovative and ultimately rewarding exercise

moved and dispersed the Ops and Plans 15T SVs. Parked 300m apart, but connected by fibreglass cables and field telephones, RHQ continued to plan and execute concurrently. As the BSGs moved forward, the lines of communication extended and 10 QOGLR dispersed further. 36 (HQ) Sqn established a forward logistic node in Weeford Quarry, braving the quagmire and enemy to enable the Regt’s front footed approach, forward loading stock and reducing the distance to the BSGs. The RHQ and SHQs moved multiple times, hundreds of pallets of materiel were delivered and thousands of miles covered by 1 and 28 Sqn, while LAD worked solidly to keep an aging DROPS fleet on the road. It was a challenging, innovative and ultimately rewarding exercise for which 10 QOGLR achieved validation from 101X. Ex IRON VIPER 19 rolled straight into Dashain for a well-deserved celebration. The gym was fantastically decorated and wonderful food eaten as the stage was set for khukuri dancing and pipes and drums. The dancing continued well into the evening. Jai QOGLR! 8 Khukuri dancing and pipes and drums

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11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Regiment RLC DIDCOT CO: Lt Col N G Joynes QGM • Adjt: Capt R Kelly • RSM: WO1 A Turner 11 EOD & Search Regiment continues to deliver EOD capability and Ammunition Technical support in the UK and overseas, in addition to commitment to regimental and adventurous training, sporting and charitable activities.

personnel. This gave the opportunity for EOD teams to be put through their paces in task scenarios under assessment to gain validation to conduct MACA duties for a further twelve-month period.

Alpha Troop Amid an intense three-month training and validation period, Alpha Tp took the lead for a Sqn AT package which saw members of the Sqn mountain biking and climbing in Wales. Under the supervision of the instructors, there was clear progression made by all, even if it was to get to the bottom as quickly as possible for tea and cake! Disablement Troop This quarter has been dominated by training for Disablement Tp, predominantly in preparation for Ex HOTSANDS. This consists of two, one-week training packages at RAF Wittering. The objective of the Ex is to train Defence EOD Operators and the No2 Operators to conduct EOD duties within a CBRN environment on Military Aid to Civil Authorities (MACA) operations. Ex SATON FORCE 521 EOD Sqn conducted its biannual IEDD licensing event, Ex SATON FORCE, a week-long exercise at Wathgill Camp, Catterick Garrison. The IEDD licensing involved training and

8 SSgt Fitzsimon with his medals assessment in conjunction with numerous police forces. This allowed for greater integration training with the military and civilian police when dealing with EOD incidents, as well as other emergency services. Ex SATON FORCE also brought about the changing of the guard, with Maj Luedicke being replaced by Maj Frankling as OC 521 EOD Sqn. The main effort of Ex SATON FORCE involved licensing for Operators, No.2s and ECM

Regimental Training Wing (RTW) Again, yet another busy quarter for the RTW which began with supporting the C Tp MATTs week in Weymouth, closely followed by the first Sgts Pre CLM training package, delivered by Sgt Thomas; these were a great success. The RTW then switched focus to supporting the delivery of search training serials for 421 EOD & Search Sqn, on Ex GOLDEN SEARCHER. Soon after, several members of the RTW deployed to Beckingham Training area to assist 521 EOD Sqn in the delivery of military skills training in preparation for the Gore Trophy; this reaped strong results from both teams. With the Regimental Training Wing and the Technical Training Team soon to merge, there is more than enough to keep the RTW busy! Bomb Disposal Suit Marathon Challenge 2019 SSgt Fitzsimon of 621 EOD Sqn, an experienced and enthusiastic longdistance runner, decided to combine a passion for completing marathons with his day job of being an EOD operator. The challenge was to complete two marathons wearing the complete EOD bomb disposal suit, a feat never achieved before! Two military charities were the beneficiaries of the fundraising for this dangerous challenge; The Felix Fund and Tickets For Troops. In total, in just under 18 hrs of running, both the Manchester and London marathons were completed. The support along the 26.2-mile routes in both cities was incredible! The media interest gained from the challenge helped to exceed the fundraising target. 8 Regt Trg Wing – Sgts Pre-CLM

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13 Air Assault Support Regiment RLC COLCHESTER CO: Lt Col J Beere • Adjt: Capt O Stilgoe • RSM: WO1 N Waring This period has been characterised by change and multiple commitments, ensuring no let up of pace for 13 Air Assault Support Regiment. The new Commanding Officer, Lt Col J Beere, took over command from Lt Col M Genko early into the quarter and with various regimental commitments from low level training to deployments across the world, it has been a fastpaced introduction to the Regt. The last few months have seen personnel deploy on Op ELGIN and Op TORAL, participate in the Gore Trophy and Cambrian Patrol and conduct various professional development activities. Operations and Exercise Two soldiers are currently deployed in Bosnia and Herzegovina on Op ELGIN, Britain’s contribution to the European Union’s Op ALTHEA. They are putting their trade knowledge to the test in their role supporting 1RGR through managing the daily resupply of fuel and lubricants. Concurrently, several members of the Regt are deployed with 2 PARA on Op TORAL providing, amongst others, driver and recovery subject matter expertise. In Sep, soldiers from across the Regt deployed on a JNCO development exercise in Thetford, Ex BLACK LEADER. The exercise was conducted as a competition that focused on basic leadership and military skills, testing them in field conditions, with emphasis on physical robustness, command and control and the orders process. The exercise was a great success and 63 Sqn emerged victorious. Moral and conceptual development Continuous professional development is essential to ensure the Regt has professional, welltrained and ready personnel. Officers and soldiers from across the Regt deployed to Arnhem to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Op MARKTET GARDEN. 47 Air 50

Despatch Sqn deployed on Ex DAKOTA LEGACY, a comprehensive battlefield study and conducted focused discussions to learn lessons from those that went before. Simultaneously, other members of the Regt deployed on Ex FALCON LEAP, alongside their 16 Bde counterparts, with several members of the Regt jumping into Arnhem. Unfortunately the opportunity to jump out of a Dakota didn’t materialise due to engine trouble. Shortly after the Arnhem commemorations, officers from the Regt hosted The RLC Foundation and industry partners in the deployed HQ. The day proved incredibly successful, introducing the combat estimate and giving a chance for guests to conduct some simple planning tasks, all topped off by a curry lunch prepared by 13 AASR chefs. Facilitating logistic services for one of the busiest brigades in the Army is no easy feat but the soldiers who attended the visit to the Amazon Fulfilment Centre in Essex, were amazed by the effective and efficient ways in

8 Ex DAKOTA LEGACY which Amazon conducts its business. The aim of the visit was to identify ways of improving productivity, time management, storage methods and stock rotation, as this helps to reduce wastage. Amazon has been able to master its five principles of logistics: right item, right quantity, right condition, right place and right time, through use of technology. The soldiers had a fantastic day and are eager to share their experience with the Regt and have already lined up a second visit for the officer cohort. Look forward As the year continues, the Regt will remain busy with sport, AT, exercises and other deployments. The boxers are in training for the Regimental Inter-Squadron Boxing Competition. A handful of officers and soldiers are in the final stages of completing P Company in Catterick with the hope of being loaded onto their jumps course soon after. RHQ will deploy to Salisbury Plain for CAST; a PNCO course will run; mountain biking in Germany and a conceptual development day between 13AASR and CLR will take place. Closing off a busy year will see an increase in preparations for the deployment to Kenya on Ex ASKARI STORM in support of 3 PARA in the new year. 8 Ex BLACK LEADER

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17 Port & Marine Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps SOUTHAMPTON CO: Lt Col P Eaton MBE • Adjt: Capt M McGarvey-Miles • RSM: WO1 M Calverley For 17 Port & Maritime Regiment, the third quarter has been characterised by three key commitments: the delivery of Reception, Staging, and Onward Movement/Integration (RSOM/I) for Ex IRON VIPER 2019 (Ex IV19); the supply of essential aid on Atlantic Patrol Task North (APT(N)); and supporting TRACTABLE. Deployments As the Theatre Enabling Group (TEG) OF4 Headquarters, Ex IV19 was a rare opportunity to conduct a limited scale end-to-end logistics operation. Following months of build-up training for the RHQ, it conducted a progression of TTXs, CPXs and planning cycles, so was fully prepared to meet the command rigours of the TEG. With attachments and detachments from far and wide, the Regt was responsible for the RSOM/I of 10 QOGLR and assisting with the outload of the Joint Supply Area, centred around Cottesmore Airfield, to the Divisional Supply Area in Swynnerton. At the tactical level, 53 Enabling and Headquarters Squadron and Workshops led the RSOM/I training, which covered arrival theatre briefs, ranges, CBRN and CEO over a six-day window. Undeterred by a lack of experience in facilitating this sort of operation, all involved threw themselves into the activity and designed a package and successfully facilitated the Reception, Staging

8 Delivering support to Dorian survivors and Onward Movement of 600 personnel from 101 Log Bde. Ex IV19 provided a valuable training serial prior to the challenges that face the Regiment on Ex DEFENDER EUROPE. The Regt has also been working hard on APT(N), aiding the survivors of hurricane Dorian. The 30-soldier detachment from the Regt has been crucial in delivering aid, working in the joint environment and providing much needed support. The Mexeflote has been vital in the operation and as Defence’s only heavy ship-to-shore capability, has been very much the work horse of the unit. In October, members of the Regt deployed on TRACTABLE, the Army's mobilisation across Europe to complete the fleet rotation of vehicles

deployed on Op CABRIT. The Port Task Group, led by OC 51 Port Squadron, has been instrumental in supporting the movement of vehicles and equipment into Europe. 52 Port Squadron has been especially busy, focusing on readiness and deployability. Despite the weather trying to dampen the Sqn’s spirits, it spent two weeks working on both trade and green skills. Led by SSgt Roche and SSgt Taylor, the Sqn deployed to Browndown Beach for a week of trade training, before deploying to Longmoor training area for a week of Soldier First training. A fantastic opportunity for the new OC and SSM, Major Goodall and WO2 Bruce, to witness what their soldiers can achieve. Sport and adventurous training September saw the basketball teams compete in The RLC InterUnit competition. Despite a difficult start, the women's team came away with the Jones, Leverton and Braithwaite memorial cups. The men's team put in a strong performance and finished third overall. This month also saw the Marchwood Dolphins winning the Williamson Trophy in a hard-fought tournament of three games. October saw the Regt enter two teams into the Bismarck Challenge, a 1 (UK) Division 4.5-mile military endurance relay. This was the first opportunity for the Regt to demonstrate to its new 2-star HQ its sporting prowess. The Regt placed 29th and 95th out of 203 teams. Of note was the CO’s rapid time of 43.47 minutes, beating the RSM's 47.01 minutes! In support of Different Travel, a travel company which raises funds on behalf of numerous charities, SSgt Doak led a team of civilians to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro. Summitting through heavy wind, rain and snow, the team raised over £42k for charity. 8 Soldiers embark on the Bismarck Challenge

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25 Training Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps LECONFIELD CO: Lt Col M A Scannell • Adjt: Capt F Harris • RSM: WO1 J Girvan In its new home 25 Regiment has reached FoC with the starting of the first Combat Logistician courses. The benefits of a centralised location for the delivery of initial trade training to all RLC CEGs are beginning to be seen as the Regt moves forward instilling Corps ethos into the newest members of The RLC. 109 Sqn The 109 Sqn instructor and administration team has been worth its weight in gold during this transition period proving more than capable in delivering the requirements that an Initial Trade Training establishment demands. The Sqn continues to deliver its mandated requirements exceeding expectations by enabling ITTTs to be introduced to training and delivering competitive teams to the Corps’ sporting and military events. Cpl Denny and Cpl Pemberton recently partook in The RLC XCountry running camp, taking with them 20 ITTT’s to give them a taste of the standard that The RLC sets. 109 Sqn aims to keep setting the standards high by motivating and inspiring young soldiers into always striving for more and never giving up. 109 Sqn continues to deliver dynamic opportunities for trainees with a hugely successful drill competition and a Battlefield Study in the pipeline. Soldiers and officers in 109 Sqn are continuously trying to modernise lessons and training with innovative thinking. 110 Sqn Jun saw 110 Sqn conduct a multiactivity adventurous training package to Low Gillerthwaite Field Centre, Ennerdale, Cumbria. Cpl Melanie Bird led the challenging training package with Cpl Shavaughn Venus acting as a dedicated Second in Command. Following the success of Capt Patrick Shelton’s adventure training package to Wales, Cpl Melanie Bird was keen to set the bar even higher on Ex NORTHERN WARRIOR. An 52

excellent opportunity was provided for permanent staff and initial trade trainees alike to push their personal boundaries and develop their competitive skills outside of the office environment. Highlights of the training included mountain biking, kayaking and mountaineering. Pte Nathan Gardner performed the roll exceptionally well in the kayak with Capt Stuart O’Hagan’s guidance. Capt Simon Lowe and SSgt Laurence Eades participated in an ambitious mountain biking route led by the fearless Sgt Komal Singh Thakuri testing their skills, balance and mental resolve. The volleyball skills of the group however left a lot to the imagination. Ex NORTHERN WARRIOR has

8 Pte Timothy Faulkener and Corporal

Chris Lawton enjoy a well-earned rest on a strenuous Mountain Biking route

paved the way for success for incorporation of individual trade trainees on future training packages. There are two more adventurous training packages pencilled in for the spring of 2020. Recognition The permanent staff are aiming to expose as many trainees to as many Corps level sports and activities as possible in their time with the Regt. The female football team narrowly missed out on being crowned Corps champions and the male team put in a strong showing to come runners up in the plate competition. The cross country, swimming, cricket and orienteering teams have also been in action. The RLC Military Skills Competition saw the trainees rewarded for their efforts with the Colonel RLC’s Discretionary Award. Cpl Jo Roberts and Sgt Nicola Galbraith were formally recognised for their support to the Regt and DST with a DLW Commendation. 8 Pte Nathan Gardner executes the perfect roll in a kayak

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UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

27 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps ALDERSHOT CO: Lt Col D J Fisher MBE • Adjt: Capt O Mcgarvey-Miles • RSM: WO1 R Coleman 27 Regiment’s focus for this quarter has been the predeployment training and subsequent deployment on Op TOSCA 31. The pre-deployment training involved Public Order Training, BCS, MATTs, ETL and Life-Guard courses to name a few. In addition to this, a select few were identified to deploy as the TOSCA Regimental Adventure Training Team (TRATT). Their training saw them spend several months gaining various AT instructor qualifications including rock climbing, mountain biking, hill walking and sea kayaking. The Regt’s pre-deployment training concluded in an All Ranks Brief and Mission Rehearsal Exercise, which then gave the Regt the formal go ahead to deploy in its Peacekeeping Role. After a couple weeks conducting a thorough hand over with 4 Regiment Royal Artillery, on 1 Oct 19, the Commanding Officer 27 Regiment assumed command of Sector 2 at the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus Transfer of Authority Ceremony. Op TOSCA preparations were a regimental effort, where those not deploying worked tirelessly providing RLS as well as giving the practicing Public Order Troops some testing situations to quell. In addition to this, prior to deploying, the Regt also held a very successful families day. It was a fantastic opportunity to get the

8 19 Sqn soldiers with the Steve Long Memorial Trophy

families together, display the Regt’s capabilities and promote cultural diversity. As personnel went out the door, the ROG has has switched its attention to setting up a new custodian account and supporting the plethora of 101X exercises that are just around the corner, such as Ex IRON VIPER. Although minimally involved in the Op TOSCA deployment, 19 Squadron has led the charge when it comes to keeping busy, completing challenges and developing their soldiers and officers. The Sqn’s niche capability has

meant it is heavily involved in Op TRACTABLE – supporting the deployment and RSOM of Op CABRIT in Estonia. The Sqn provided the heavy lift capability at the seaport of Marchwood, as well as supporting the set-up of a rail head at Ludgershall. Additionally, it has delivered Ex CARMENS CRUSADE; a regimental navigation exercise on Salisbury Plain Training Area. The exercise was designed to test the soldiers’ mentally and stimulate team cohesion, stretching a challenging distance across the plain with several command tasks. 19 Squadron has also found time for fun amongst all the hard work. WO2 Bedingfield and Sgt Firkins competed in the Army Carting championships taking home the Steve Long Memorial Trophy after battling it out against the Army, Signals, Engineers and REME teams. The silent 40% For the past 18 months, a handful of Logistic Supply Specialists from 27 Regt have been supporting the Multi-Platform Support Unit at Joint Helicopter Command in accounting for decades worth of equipment. Although this task is not the everyday work of a Supply Specialist, it has been extremely important for both JHC and for the soldiers’ development. The task has required attention to detail, many hours of online research and perseverance to ensure equipment no longer in service is disposed of correctly with minimal cost to the public. Without these soldiers and their expertise, this task would be drawn out for several years and likely require contractor support, costing the MOD a large amount of money. Their diligence and hard work has been formally recognised by JHC and their skills and knowledge of supply has vastly improved. 8 Soldiers from 27 Regiment complete petrol bomb inoculation as part of Public Order training

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29 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps SOUTH CERNEY CO: Lt Col Munce MBE • Adjt: Capt J Broad • RSM: WO1 L E Russell The past three months have continued at pace for 29 Regiment RLC, with personnel deployed on multiple operational commitments and exercises worldwide and our continued firm base activity. Exercises and operations The undoubted unsung heroes are 50 Sqn. It has ensured the Joint Air Mounting Centre continues to operate 24/7, deploying over 12,000 passengers, 556 tonnes of baggage and 401 tonnes of freight so far this year. The Regt’s commitment to the Op CABRIT fleet rotation (TRACTABLE 19) has also been intensive. This multi-modal deployment has seen equipment move from the UK and Germany, using trains, strategic Ro-Ro ferries and a road move of over 2,000km, taking approximately 10 days to complete. The experience and lessons learnt will ensure the Regt is well prepared for Ex DEFENDER 20; a USAREUR-led exercise designed to demonstrate the United States ability to rapidly position a division into Europe. Deploying as the Joint Expeditionary Force Theatre Enabling Group, at multiple nodes across Western Europe, this exercise, the largest in 25 years, will provide a fantastic training opportunity for all involved.

End of an era This summer, 69 Sqn has been entirely committed to the closure of British Forces Germany (BFG) and the rebasing of 20 Brigade. Closing four Post Offices that have been in situ for decades and moving 100s of tonnes of unit freight has been a herculean effort. Working hand in hand with BFG and BFPO, the tactical execution has been excellently delivered. As the final RLC sub-unit to leave Germany it has been an emotional farewell, truly the end of an era. Sport and AT On top of deploying individuals across the globe, 50 Sqn managed to squeeze in a diving expedition, just off the coast of Malta. In

8 Op TRACTABLE Cpl Wilson and Maj Gen Bettelli

tandem was a skydiving expedition to Spain, to complete the accelerated freefall course lead by OC 80 Sqn, Major Nicolle. Under the watchful guidance of the Silver Stars instructors, eight novice students were put through their paces in the skies above Madrid. LCpl Williams should be particularly commended for conquering her fear of heights and there were a few participants who might well be Silver Stars of the future. Carrying on the sky sports theme, congratulations go to LCpl Ross, who was part of the Army Parachute Display team which won gold at the National Formation Championships. The Regt has also had success in the British Army Powerlifting Championships, with Cpl Wilson securing first place in discipline. Last but by no means least, a big well done to all the 29 Regt teams that took part in this year’s RLC Military Skills Competition. A special mention must be made of the mixed team, led by 2Lt Pattison-Hudd, for winning its category. An excellent regimental effort, in what was an extremely competitive event. 8 Gore Trophy Mixed Team

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UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

The Defence EOD, Munitions and Search Training Regt BICESTER CO: Lt Col R G Hallett OBE • Adjt: Capt S V C Fox • RSM: WO1 D Piner

The 2019/2020 training year will see the delivery of another two international courses at the Defence Explosive Munitions School (DEMS) Kineton. The International Improvised Explosive Device Disposal (IEDD) course attracts EOD Operators from a wide variety of countries: Algeria, Bahrain, Barbados, Belize, Egypt, Estonia, Germany, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Lebanon, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Singapore. The students that attend this course are already EOD operators within their own country and arrive with varying levels of experience and capability. Their primary aim is to develop their IEDD skillset by learning new techniques and seeing a different perspective on IEDD. Course overview Week one of the course delivers an all-encompassing fundamentals package. This teaches the students the UK Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) which incorporates UK IEDD philosophies and principles that have been developed and adjusted for nearly 50 years.

The week also includes training in the use of Remote-Controlled Vehicles (RCV), semi-remote techniques such as hook & line, Electronic Counter Measure (ECM) awareness, types of Improvised Explosive Devices (IED’s), X-Ray techniques and Render Safe Procedures (RSP’s). Following this, the students then take part in a two-week exercise, Ex INTERNATIONAL WARRIOR. The exercise exposes the operators to various scenarios which are recreations of IED taskings that have been seen in various theatres of operations such as Northern Ireland, Iraq and Afghanistan. The tasks are specifically selected to deliver a broad spectrum of devices and give the operators an opportunity to implement their newly acquired skills. The exercise also provides the Directing Staff (DS) a chance to learn techniques that are utilised by international partners. The two weeks provide ample time for the students to conduct numerous training tasks and the week culminates in four formal assessments which statistics show a high degree of success. For some of the students, the weekends on the course provide some well-earned respite. With the

8 Students get to grips with the International IEDD course

cultural differences and language barriers posing daily challenges, local knowledge and some course familiarity means the directing staff are often assisting the students with first world problems. Cultural visits to Warwick Castle, The Tower of London and the Etihad stadium are often planned and enjoyed. Students who request to close the M40 at 2am due to difficulty in sleeping is one of the scenarios that wasn’t anticipated. The next International IEDD course commenced in Oct 19 and saw the arrival of students from familiar nations as well as Thailand. Staff at the Felix Centre are working diligently to ensure the literature is kept up to date and to engender the most rewarding experience possible for students.

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150 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps HULL CO: Lt Col M Casey • Adjt: Capt K Gresham • RSM: WO1 P Berry On Friday 11 Oct 19, 20 soldiers from RLC reserve regiments from across the UK, downed tools from their civilian jobs and travelled to Beckingham Camp for their twoweek PNCO course. This was the first PNCO course 150 Regt, has run for a significant period. The course was comprised of trades from across the Corps, with drivers, chefs and suppliers all being measured to the same exacting standards. Throughout the two weeks, they would be tested mentally and physically, culminating in a demonstration of what they had learned during a challenging infantry-based exercise, in line with the new BCCS. Week one started with the customary entry test to establish the students’ knowledge levels. From here, students were taught the elementary foundations for good quality leadership and how the practicalities of values and standards can be used as a tool to lead. With a solid foundation, they moved onto the complexities of their new roles: Discipline, effective writing, developing subordinates and drill, to name but a few. The first week represented a significant academic step up for the course. For many, this represented their first intense period of learning in their Army Reserve careers. For almost all of the course, this was also their first taste of the orders process.

At first a daunting prospect, the soldiers put a great deal of effort in. With a lot practice during the BCCS phase, they soon began to master the dark art of delivering orders. In addition to the enormous amount they were required to take in, they also faced physical tests throughout the first week. Two loaded marches tested their physical and mental robustness in preparation for leading their peers during the following weeks exercise. By the end of week one, the training had built up progressively. Week two would test their ability not only to retain this new knowledge, but to demonstrate their understanding. The week began with a formative written test; the results deciding if this would allow them to continue the course. Then it was straight into

8 Using a model during an O Group battle prep, with the TCV waiting to drop them right into the exercise phase. Just as they did in week one, the students conducted progressive training. Beginning with the occupation of their new location, they conducted patrols to resupply, locate the enemy and control the ground. Further recce patrols were conducted, in the build-up to a final platoon attack. Post attack, the casualties became the priority, the section commanders were then pushed to extract their casualties to the ERV, before collecting their kit and completing the exfiltration march back to camp. Each soldier had an opportunity to be both a section commander and a section 2IC throughout the exercise. This solidified their understanding of these roles and responsibilities while testing their ability to lead in challenging situations. It was clear to see that the students not only enjoyed their PNCO course, but that it was an enormous lesson for them. Having seen the dramatic change between start and end state, it was rewarding knowing that their determination, enthusiasm and infectious personalities would now be returning to their parent units to begin their leadership journeys having passed this demanding course. 8 The successful PNCO students

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RESERVE UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

151 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps CROYDON CO: Lt Col D Taylor • Adjt: Capt B Heinrich • RSM: WO1 C Sutherland This quarter has seen some personnel changes within 151 Regiment RLC. WO1 Chappell retired from the Regular Army and WO1 Sutherland has taken his place as RSM. 2Lt Cook was commissioned and joins 124 Sqn in Warley. We bid farewell to Lt Savarian who has transferred to 6 RIFLES and to Lt Ashton who has joined the Regular Army as a nurse. The RAO, Maj Breach retires and we said farewell to Maj Balchin. In Jul, 562 Sqn ran a battlefield study tour. The study focused on the famous Op MARKET GARDEN. Soldiers from around the Regt learnt about how the operation was planned and how it played out. The first OC Disposal of the training year, allowed 151 Regt to cover a range of training topics. 562 Sqn ran a driver orientated weekend. 124 Sqn learnt about law enforcement and crowd control and 508 Sqn took a different approach and looked at the use of deception. CIOR ran its annual Young Reserve Officer conference in Tallinn, Estonia. 2Lt Kriehn and 2Lt George attended the week-long conference. 2Lt Kriehn attended the YROW conference where young officers from around NATO discussed a number of topics such as 'what role will reserve forces play in the future', operational law and cyber threats. 2Lt George also attended the CIOR Summer Congress, where in addition to her presidential liaison officer role, she also acted as visits officer, coordinating visits by senior officers including, Gel Sir James Everard, who is Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe. The start of a busy autumn period brought Saraghari Day. 562 Sqn invited members of the Sikh community to celebrate the battle of Saraghari. It was a great opportunity for the local community to meet officers and soldiers from 151 Regt and commemorate the Sikh community’s warrior past. The guests were provided with a range

of military stands. Lunch was provided by Covent Garden’s ‘Punjab’ restaurant. The Regt’s Annual Continuous Training (ACT) was Ex IRON VIPER 19. The Regt made up the bulk of the ‘Non-Regular Deployable Component’ (NRDC) Squadron, bolstered by troops from 154, 157 and 2 OSG. The initial part of the exercise was spent in Aldershot, conducting an RSOI package, including familiarisation on 40ft civilian articulated trucks. The NRDC then deployed to Swynnerton training area, where it was taken under the command of 10 QOGLR. The two NRDC troops were utilised throughout,

8 Lt Col Deborah Taylor

8 Members of the NRDC Squadron testing everyone’s abilities. It was a novelty to have the artics, which had excellent lift capability, but proved challenging when operating in what was essentially a swamp thanks to the inclement weather. Near the end of the exercise, the NRDC moved to Bicester and set up a CSC, where exercising units passed through on their way to inload the final destination at Hullavington. On return to Aldershot, the exercising troops enjoyed a leadership development challenge day, followed by a smoker where the Regt was introduced to the new Commanding Officer. The final day saw soldiers and officers go on a cultural day to the south coast, visiting the D-Day Map Room, Fort Nelson and the D-Day Museum. As summer leave came to an end we said farewell to the CO, Lt Col Miller. The CO, RAO, Maj Balchin and Lt Ashton were dined out in the mess at Regents Park Barracks. We welcomed the new CO Lt Col Deborah Taylor. After a distinguished career in the Regular Army serving on several operational tours including Bosnia, Kosovo and Iraq, she left the Regular Army in 2015 to join the Reserves.

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152 (North Irish) Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps BELFAST CO: Lt Col C Sykes • Adjt: Capt R Mitchell • RSM: WO1 Llewellyn-Jones Ex VIKING STAR provided the focus of the third quarter of 2019, with over 100 soldiers and officers of 152 (NI) Regiment deploying to Denmark to undertake a challenging exercise programme concocted by XO, Maj Dunlop. Split into two blocks divided by a period of AT and a cultural trip to Esbjerg, the exercise saw soldiers tested in both BCCS and driver training skills. Maj Dave Allen (OC 211 Sqn), executed the training serials, whilst trialling his refreshed SHQ set-up in preparation for the Non-Regular Deployable Component (NRDC) revise which will triple the Army’s requirement from the Regt. Running alongside the first phase of the ex, WO2 Crawley (SPSI 220 Sqn) and SSgt Hayes (PSI 220 Sqn) delivered distributed Close Support Tanker (CST) driver training, qualifying 19 soldiers for the Regt. WO2 Patterson (SPSI 211 Sqn) and SSgt Williams (PSI 211 Sqn), passed on their extensive experience of conducting Protected Logistic Manoeuvres (PLM) and Distribution Points (DP), as well as convoy drills and cross country driving. Maj John Simpson (OC 227 (HQ) Sqn), exercised a Convoy Support Centre (CSC), again in accordance with the likely NRDC requirement, something the Regt has never done before. Phase two of the exercise sought to develop the marksmanship skills of the Army’s Reserve Operational shooting champion unit, with WO2 (SSM) Patience and his team from 220 Sqn, alongside WO1 (RSM) Llewellyn-Jones, conducting day and night live fire ranges; an experience many of the soldiers won’t forget in a hurry. Maj Mark Livingstone (OC 220 Sqn), created an Operating in Built-Up Areas (OBUA) package that sought to enhance leadership, communication and close quarter battle skills. This was many of the junior soldiers’ first experience of this and the feedback was universally positive; hard work but very rewarding. 58

Ex VIKING STAR culminated in a three-day battlefield study led by Maj Wray (Projects Officer) and Maj Simpson (OC 227 (HQ) Sqn) centred around Arnhem and Op MARKET GARDEN. With 2019 being the 75th anniversary, it was a poignant opportunity to remember the incredible feats of bravery and courage on display

8 The 104X Command Board saw Brig Thorpe and his HQ staff kept busy

8 Ex VIKING STAR saw over 100 soldiers and officers from the Regt deploy to Denmark

during this phase of World War 2. A ceremony of remembrance was conducted in Oosterbeek cemetery, also the site of the Air Despatch memorial, then a part of the Royal Army Service Corps. Other news In Jul, 152 hosted the 104X Command Board. Brig Thorpe accompanied by his HQ staff, as well as his Commanding Officers and Regimental Sergeant Majors were treated to a busy weekend including a guided trip to Stormont Parliament Buildings. A food filled weekend, hosted by his “Favourite Regiment in the brigade,” also included his dine-out at the Royal North of Ireland Yacht Club; a stunning venue. Finally, the Regt said goodbye to its Commanding Officer, Lt Col Andrew Chambers. After two and a half years in post, he hands-over to Lt Col Colin Sykes who receives the Regt in a good place, with exciting opportunities on the horizon for everyone.

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154 (Scottish) Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps DUNFERMLINE CO: Lt Col J Yates • Adjt: Capt F Hunter • RSM: WO1 K Poole In Aug, 31 members of 154 (Scottish) Regiment and 27 Regiment deployed to Haus Magnus in Bavaria for a week of klettersteig, rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking and white-water rafting. The first three days of Ex NORTHERN BAVARIAN RESPONSE were introductory training to the various disciplines, followed by a day in Austria to carry out some white-water rafting by Faszinatour, the local experts in the area. Some good rainfall provided a good water level and all participating found the activity exhilarating and well worth the trip. Days five to eight saw the teams split down into their chosen activities to provide foundation training and log-book experience to enable them to progress through the Joint Services Adventurous Training system. The instruction provided ensured every member was pushed out of the comfort zone and the exercise definitely met the aims of adventure training! 251 Sqn open day On the 7 Sep 19, 251 (Ayrshire) Transport Squadron opened its gates to the public with the usual mix of military vehicles and recruiting stands, but also local businesses and emergency services were in attendance. Stands from across the local community included fairground

8 White Water Rafting on Ex NBR RBLS, as well as 105 Regiment RA, which provided an excellent display. This event ticked so many boxes for the Sqn with recruitment, retention positive, community engagement and employer interaction all being met in one well delivered package.

8 Trying out Klettersteig attractions, local haulage firms, the fire brigade, vintage fire service, owl magic, the local Cadets and

RLC military skills competition A selection of soldiers from across the four Sqns competed in the 2019 RLC Military Skills Competition. Their hard work and commitment in training was rewarded on the day by their fantastic results bringing some silverware back home. They were awarded the prestigious ‘Lamb Trophy’ for the overall highest points scoring Reserve team, only the second time the Regt has won this in the competition’s history. The team also won the Commander’s Cup for the fastest team around course. The challenge is now on to retain the titles next year! Welcome Lt Col Yates assumed command of 154 (Scottish) Regiment on 28 Aug 19. 8 The Mil Skills team and their silver

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156 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps LIVERPOOL CO: Lt Col K Haigh • Adjt: Capt J Blake • RSM: WO1 R Armour Historically, quarter three has proven to be the busiest of the year for 156 Regt RLC, with 2019 being no exception. Most notably, the Regt has embarked on its Annual Collective Training (ACT) period (Ex MASTERS STRIKE) with the main contingent on 101 Log Bde's Ex IRON VIPER 19 and concurrently, a 15 strong group deploying with 157 Regt RLC on Ex LION STAR 6. The Regt has seen a change in command over the summer, with Lt Col Gould QGM moving onto pastures new in AHQ and Lt Col Haigh RLC taking the helm. The Regt wishes Lt Col Gould all the best in his future role and thanks him for his devoted service. The Regt also welcomes a new XO, Maj Hutcheon to the team. Ex IRON VIPER 19/LION STAR 19 As part of Annual Collective Training, 52 members of the Regt, led by Maj Tang, OC 236 (Salford) Sqn, initially deployed to Swinnerton Training Area as part of Ex IRON VIPER 2019, embedded into 10 QOGLR. From start to finish, the exercise offered an opportunity for the troops to fully integrate themselves with their regular counterparts, enabling them to get real time LSS experience and develop working relationships in preparations for any future operations. As part of Ex LION STAR 6, 15 troops headed to Cyprus to complete challenging, but very rewarding infantry-based training serials. The searing heat was a welcome change for some escaping the wet UK climate; however, it presented an opportunity for the exercising troops to conduct core soldiering training in a realistic environment, representative of many operational theatres. ALTCAR CHALLENGE In addition to ACT, under command of Maj Collier, OC 381 (Lancaster) Sqn, a 15 strong team successfully completed a training and 60

administrative support task as an element of Ex ALTCAR CHALLENGE, conducted as DCFA’s International Reserve Military Skills Competition. This event saw 22 teams, including four foreign entries, complete a range of military skills events over a 72-hour period. Ex NORTHERN HIGH SIERRA II/ Ex ALGARVE WATCH 19 California's Sierra Nevada was the setting for this year’s main overseas adventurous training expedition; categorised as high-risk and remote. Eleven selected members of the Regt covered a demanding 64-mile route over six days at altitudes over 3000m, with sections hitting 3500m at times. Intersecting with the famous John Muir Trail at the half-way point, a key milestone was crossing over

8 Ex IRON VIPER 19 Log RV Troop Supply Specialists overseeing loading of stock for outload

8 Ex NORTHERN HIGH SIERRA II expedition about to hit 3644m on the famous Muir Pass

the Muir Pass at 3644m. Everyone had committed to several weeks of build-up training in the Lake District and Snowdonia and were physically and mentally prepared. For the vast majority of those involved, this was their first overseas exped and was considered to have been a once-ina-lifetime experience. On the other side of the Atlantic, eight troops deployed on Ex ALGARVE WATCH 19. On board the Corps Yacht, Spirit of St George II, the crew experienced both arduous offshore sailing in high winds, whilst also being able to luxuriate in the Portuguese culture in several coastal marinas. Looking forward As The Regt now approaches the winter period, the Regt looks forward to hosting both Commander 101 Log Bde and Deputy Commander (Reserves) on their inaugural unit visits. The CO's Military Skills Competition will give all Sqns the opportunity to claim back the Chalker Cup from 238 (Sefton) Sqn. Finally, members of the RHQ are also poised to conduct Op REDFOLD duties depending on the imminent Brexit culmination.

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157 (Welsh) Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps CARDIFF CO: Lt Col B D N Beaumont • Adjt: Capt A J Gutzu • RSM: WO1 C Hunter The Regiment bids farewell to the Commanding Officer Lt Col AM Madams and wishes her well on her OCE to Kenya and welcomes Lt Col BDN Beaumont who took over Command of the Regiment on 20 Sep 19. Freedom of Swansea The Freedom of Swansea was graciously awarded to 157 RLC on 27 Jul 19. It was with great honour and privilege the Regt received this accolade, further cementing the special bond with the people of Swansea, something that has been flourishing over many years. The CO was awarded the freedom of the city in a ceremony at the Guildhall led by the Lord Mayor of Swansea, Cllr Peter Black. This was followed by a parade reviewed by H.M. Lord Lt of West Glamorgan, and GOC 3 Division, Maj Gen JFP Swift. The Regt proudly marched through the city, finishing at the National Waterfront Museum. On returning to barracks to celebrate, the Regt took the opportunity to reward its people. Congratulations to Sgt Anthony, awarded Corps Colours for Boxing and to LCpl Lock and LCpl Wojcik on promotion to Corporal. This truly was the icing on the cake, on a fantastic day in the Regt’s history. Ex LION STAR This is the sixth time RLC reservists have ditched their vehicles and made the journey to Cyprus in order to brave the challenging climatic conditions and improve basic soldiering skills.

8 There was time in Cyprus for some AT!

In order to acclimatise the primarily Welsh contingent to the hot climate, a four-day range package opened the exercise. The operational shoots with the SA80 A2, pistol and GPMG whet their appetite. The OTX phase saw aggressive fighting patrols, close target reconnaissance and ambush drills culminating in a deliberate company attack on the ruined village of Paramali. The training camp provided a fantastic environment for leadership development with budding Officer Cadets taking command of Platoons for the first time. This came with the safety net of experienced Platoon Sergeants and fantastic Directing Staff watching on from the wings. Overall it was a fantastic opportunity to deploy with our military counterparts. A special thanks goes to 4 Regt RLC and 156 Regt RLC for their seamless integration. Ex IRON VIPER Concurrent deployments saw 12 members of the Regt deployed and Ex IRON VIPER in support of 101 Log Brigade. On arrival the 157 Regt personnel were absorbed in to 124 Sqn, 151 Regt RLC and were welcomed without any hesitation.

8 Officer Cadets were made Platoon Commanders

Deployed across the country from Aldershot, Swynnerton to Bicester, the Sqn’s skills were put to the test. The task was to establish, control and execute the Convoy Support Centre (CSC) to enable the resupply. The Sqn had never done this before but handed over a fully functioning, well drilled CSC to 28 Sqn, 10 QOGLR at ENDEX. Military skills competitions The RLC Military Skills Competition had moved away from the trusty Deepcut training area and saw the event take a new direction. In the absence of an assault course, an arguably more arduous stand replaced it. Consisting of a stretcher carry, body drag and fire and manoeuvre, it put the teams through their paces. Undoubtedly, it was the network of support, team work and unwavering determination that bagged 157 RLC the title as the best Mixed Reserve team. The RLC Military Skills Competition set the conditions for continued success. A huge congratulations to the Regimental team which achieved a Silver at the world renowned arduous Ex CAMBRIAN PATROL – well done!

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158 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps PETERBOROUGH CO: Lt Col A Gifford TD • Adjt: Capt P Goodfellow • RSM: WO1 P Anderson This quarter has seen 158 Regiment culminate its training for war fighting by deploying on Ex HALBERD DAWN. It has taken part in several sporting events and still managed to squeeze in a bit of adventurous training. Maj Swales has left the Regt on promotion to work in Army Headquarters and the unit has been joined by Maj Andy Balchin as the Regimental 2IC. Ex HALBERD DAWN At the beginning of Sep, the Regt deployed to Prince William of Gloucester Barracks in Grantham to begin Ex HALBERD DAWN. The exercise was a massed Annual Continuous Training (ACT) event for all logistic units within 102 Logistic Brigade. The Regt was the largest contribution to the exercise with over one hundred members deploying. The first few days saw the Regt come together to form a Non-Regular Deployable Contingent (NRDC) Squadron, as well as forming the RHQ for the exercise that sub-ordinated a Sqn from both 150 and 159 Regiments. Once everyone was reorganised for the exercise, the NRDC Sqn deployed to STANTA to conduct some RSOI and build up training. Although a chaotic start, the Sqn quickly got to grips with its task and after a couple of days was operating to a high level, conducting second line logistic operations. Whilst this was happening, the RHQ underwent a period of training on the combat estimate under the instruction of 6 Regiment. With support from 6 Regt's team, the RHQ progressed from novices who had only just come together, to carrying out their own combat estimate and producing orders in less than a week. Following a period of drivers rest, the Regt conducted battle prep for the next phase of the exercise. The newly formed RHQ delivered orders to the Sqn and the Sqns deployed once again to conduct logistic operations, although this time 62

working as part of a CSS group with attached medical elements. The exercise provided excellent opportunities for all, from the officers that had never worked in an RHQ before, right through to the driver who had never conducted a distribution point. It has provided a great foundation for the NRDC which reaches FOC next year and highlighted many opportunities for regular and reserve regiments to work together. Adventurous Training This quarter was not all hard work. In Aug, 203 Sqn organised a weekend of adventurous training based at the Nuffield Trust centre in North Wales. Once everyone had gathered on the Friday evening, a plan for the next day was hatched over a few sociable beers. The

8 Mountain biking at Bike Park Wales Saturday saw members of the Regt mountain biking at Bike Park Wales, scale Mount Snowdon and canoe down the Llangollen Canal navigating a nerve racking stretch across a viaduct. The next day, the teams rose early for climbing on Holyhead Mountain and another canoe trip. Sport It has been another busy sporting period for the Regt. A team competed at the Army festival of fishing and although they didn't manage to net any silverware, they continued to improve their standing. The Regt was represented at the Bismarck challenge by 2Lt Middleton, WO2 (SSM) Wing, SSgt Wright and Cpl Perry. They completed a relay around a challenging 4.4-mile course performing well with SSgt Wright running a 9.18-minute mile split. Shooting team The shooting team had another successful competition at the Army Reserve Pistol Competition where it finished sixth. Two members of the team are currently attending selection for the Army Reserve Shooting team tour to America. 8 Ex HALBERD DAWN was a massed Annual Continuous Training (ACT) event

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159 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps COVENTRY CO: Lt Col S Dines • Adjt: Capt D Gibson • RSM: WO1 N Cabo As the summer season comes to an end and the nights start drawing in, 159 Regiment’s soldiers are busy preparing for promotional courses and the like. It has been a very busy summer for the Regt. Some of the highlights include promotions for its soldiers from private to Lance Corporal and Lance Corporal to Corporal. A handful of soldiers have successfully transitioned from civilian to soldier whilst attending the A2L course. They are now fullyfledged logisticians and have even gained their driving license. Summer training August saw some of the Regt’s soldiers attend their Driver Class 3 training which involved mastering the six and nine tonne SV vehicle and Land Rover training. The driving was by no means easy. The night-time driving phase meant the soldiers had to be tactical whilst driving into location and were only allowed to be guided by torchlight. There was also a handful of the Regt’s soldiers down on the south coast learning how to Scuba Dive, in preparation for Ex BARBARIAN KERNOW ODYSSEY, the Regt’s Scuba Diving expedition being held later this year. Military skills A special mention goes to Pte Clamp and Pte Goldsby. This year they represented the Regt by taking part in an arduous military

competition held in Estonia. This was by no means an easy feat, it is a severe physical test for anybody to undertake and both ladies showed incredible commitment. The competition involved orienteering, a swimming obstacle course, land obstacle course, firing on the ranges and being tested on various other military skills. This is a showcase event where many of the teams train all year round and many nations are represented. Other activities The Regt welcomed its new Commanding Officer Lt Col Dines who is now firmly in post and said a heartfelt farewell to WO1 Barry Withers after an astonishing 38 years of service. He has been an

8 The Regt masters mil skills in Estonia integral part of the Regt and will be sadly missed. In his own words, Barry’s greatest highlight was “To have spent 38 years serving in the reserves meeting and developing friendships all over the country.” The Regt would like to wish him luck in all his future endeavours. Sep marked the start of Exercise HALBERD DAWN in which the Regt was deployed in support of 102 Logistic Brigade. The exercise involved operating in field conditions as suppliers and providing and sustaining stores in a Brigade battle space. This proved to be a fantastic opportunity allowing the unit’s soldiers to integrate with regular soldiers and showed real professionalism and teamwork. As the temperature starts to drop, the Regt is now preparing for the upcoming ski season. In Jan 20, the unit has soldiers deploying on its annual ski expedition to Flaine where they will be taught by the unit’s very own SL1 instructors Cpl Carney, Cpl Parker and WO2 Ruane. 8 An early morning at the FSA on Ex HALBERD DAWN

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162 Regiment The Royal Logistic Corps NOTTINGHAM CO: Lt Col T Hope MBE • Adjt: Capt B Spilsbury • RSM: WO1 J Thompson The summer months saw 162 Regiment work alongside its regular counterparts from 29 Regiment in their efforts to complete the drawdown of British Forces (Germany). The Annual Continuous Training (ACT) provided valuable trade training for both Postal and Courier Operators and Movement Operators across all ranks. The reserve soldiers were integrated with 69 Sqn (OC Maj S Lavery) and put to work in the Forces Post Office (FPO) and across a range of movement taskings including rail heads, port task groups and air heads. In addition to the ACT, 162 Regiment also achieved CT2 validation; a first for the Regt. Elsewhere, as the County Task Force Lead (CTFL) for Derbyshire, members of the Regt were deployed to Whaley Bridge to assist the civil authorities with the perilous situation affecting Toddbrook Reservoir. The rapid deployment of the Military Liaison Team (MLT) saw Sgt Bate (RSUSO 281 Sqn) and Capt Broadhurst (RCMO) liaising with the Police, the Fire and Rescue

8 The Army Foil team outside the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) in London 64

Service and the RAF to bring the situation to a swift conclusion. In addition to a hectic forecast of events, the Regt has still maintained a presence in many operational theatres across the globe with soldiers deployed on Op KIPION, Op TORAL and Op SHADER, as well as the British Falkland Islands (BFSAI) and Cyprus. Operational shooting The regimental shooting team has been busy over the past few months both training and competing at a host of military operational shooting competitions. The hours spent on the ranges have clearly worked as the Regt enjoyed three top 50 shots at the Army Reserve Operational Shooting Competition (AROSC), where Capt Goffredi (871 Sqn, Marlow) also qualified for the Army Reserve team which is due to compete at an international competition in Arkansas, USA, in 2020. Sgt Bate (RSUSO 281 Sqn, Bilborough) has also been selected to represent the British Army at Target Pistol and recently spent a week on a training camp in Italy to hone his skills. He has also been selected to train for the European

8 The Army team after winning their Foil match against the RAF

Shooting Confederation (ESC) and is a strong contender to represent Team GB in the future. Inter Service Fencing Championships For the last 18 years, Sgt Weedon (280 Sqn, Swindon) has been competing as a member of the British Army Fencing Team. He recently represented the Army Team at the Combined Service Championships at the Honourable Artillery Company (HAC) Headquarters in London in the Foil discipline, one of three weapons fought at the Championships - the other two being Epee and Sabre. The Army team convincingly won all their fights against the Navy. However, the RAF proved much tougher opposition. After an opening fight loss, the Army soon regained control and finished the match as victors. Helped by Sgt Weedon not losing a fight, the Army team went on to win both matches and took the overall Foil title. Unfortunately, the RAF won the overall event having beaten both the Army and Navy in the Epee and Sabre categories.

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165 Port & Maritime Regiment RLC PLYMOUTH CO: Lt Col C Hampton-Stone • Adjt: Capt P Cussins • RSM: WO1 M Dowland Summer has proven to be a busy time for 165 Port and Maritime (P&M) Regiment with the Annual Deployment Exercise (ADE), sporting successes and recruiting activities being at the forefront. Five members of the Regt have also received GOC’s commendations; congratulations to Captain Wynn, WO2 Audas, LCpl Dyer, LCpl Mitchem and Pte Freeman-Moore for their service. ADE Sep saw the Regt deploy on their ADE with squadrons deploying to various locations ready to hone their trade skills in a variety of situations and live taskings. Port Operators, Mariners and Marine Engineers travelled to 17 P&M Regiment, 165 P&M’s partner regiment in Marchwood to conduct live taskings and training serials. Mariners sailed through the Solent waterway on the MEXE float vessel and army work boats practiced their trade before supporting RFA Lyme Bay in an equipment transfer that involved carefully docking the MEXE into the rear of the ship, a true test of skill. Marine Engineers were able to get hands on with all three different vessels familiarising themselves with the internal components and controls of the vessels whilst aiding 17 P&M Regiment in the maintenance of their own vessels. The Port Operators had little time to adjust before being given a live tasking to resupply a ship heading to the Falkland Islands. The second week saw soldiers deploy to Browndown training area to set up, execute and dismantle a beach unit whilst receiving multiple maritime resupplies from the MEXE vessel 24 hours a day. The troops enjoyed their AT packages with cultural visits to Portsmouth’s Historic Dockyard and HMS Victory, mountain biking in the New Forest and sailing before resuming training. The Regt’s Vehicle Specialists deployed to Germany to exercise in the Stored Equipment Fleet

Germany (SEF(G)). This saw the Sqn move over 500 vehicles in the first week alone and practise their full spectrum of operations including storage, maintenance, issue and receipt of a plethora of vehicles. The exercise also allowed them to practise rail head operations for the first time in some years. Whilst a very busy period for the Regt, all members of 165 P&M who deployed on their respective ADEs gained invaluable training opportunities and had the chance to further progress in their trades. AT and sport This season the Regt has been extremely successful in its sporting pursuits. The golfers have been busy as the Regimental golf team won The RLC Corps Handicap Trophy, triumphing with 138 points, winning for the second time in four years. In addition to this, the new Corps Handicap Champion is 165 P&M’s very own WO2 Andy King. Women’s basketball enjoyed success too with LCpl Peace competing with 17 P&M Regt and leading their team to win The RLC inter-unit competition.

8 Five members of the Regt have received GOC’s commendations

Multiple AT trips have taken place such as Dive 165 which instructed members of the Regt in diving. The diving conditions at Plymouth South presented a challenge but all the Dive 165 participants qualified at the end of the trip. Ex ALGARVE WATER, the Regt’s seven-day offshore sailing trip around Portugal, was graced with perfect weather ensuring all onboard the ‘Spirt of St George 2’ had a great time in the Mediterranean sun. Recruiting This time of year is filled with recruiting events and the unit executed stalls at events all over the South. 266 Sqn attended the Romsey Show and Bournemouth Air Show engaging with the masses at the beach, whilst 142 Sqn attended the MOTO GP at Silverstone. 710 Sqn went to the Buckingham Country Show and Party in the Park. All these events proved to be great for spreading the regimental brand, attracting new recruits and engaging with the local communities that the Regt serves.

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167 Catering Support Regiment RLC GRANTHAM CO: Lt Col J Young • Adjt: Capt J Gajdus • RSM: WO1 A Ward 167 Catering Support Regiment RLC deployed to Cyprus at the end of August. The first regimental level overseas exercise for more than three years. For two weeks, Army Reserve Chefs and attached personnel, would: learn about the history that shaped the political landscape of Cyprus, its catering methods and ingredients, conduct adventurous training (AT), a range package and deploy out on a FTX. The training was progressive and incorporated acclimatization, building upon training delivered on previous training weekends. The heat of the Cypriot summer, was managed by programming the AT, continuous professional development (CPD) and battlefield study (BFS) elements first. The range package was limited to mornings and nights. The field phase was delivered at the end, with the Regt as acclimatized as possible. The AT was hillwalking and mountain biking and was delivered by members of the Regt. It gave the participants an opportunity to explore parts of the island seldom seen and develop rarely practiced skills. CPD for the Chef trade is a delicious experience; here learning about the process and techniques involved in making local cuisine. The BFS looked at the history behind the conflict that led to the UN involvement in Cyprus and included talks with men who were actually involved in the conflict. A health and nutrition package featured in this phase, along with extensive swimming lessons which saw five soldiers pass the military swim test for the first time and eight qualify as endurance training leaders. Commander 104 Logistic Brigade visited the exercise and was treated to an evening meal based on the CPD lessons, prepared by 167 Chefs. He also took the time to present honours and awards, to members of the Regt and took part in a ceremony of remembrance at a memorial for the 66

British military chefs who have died on duty in Cyprus. The range package provided a different type of range work than the Regt usually conducts. It led straight into the field phase of the exercise. This was designed to provide a progressive and challenging scenario that was relevant and realistic for likely deployments for chefs. The theme was based upon what they had learnt about the Cyprus emergency and the Greek Cypriot uprising. The Regt’s mission was to establish secure Sustainment Centres, providing medical and welfare triage and feeding for any internally displaced persons and friendly forces. This tested deploying and re-deploying the operational field catering system under pressurised timelines, feeding planning without deployable fridge or freezer capabilities, catering for diversity and conservancy. It also tested basic soldiering skills such as radio

8 Remembrance ceremony procedure, patrolling, area defence and search. A full complement of 120 personnel deployed either as exercising troops, real life support or training staff. This included 11 soldiers on over age extensions and 40 with PAPMIS restrictions. This proved the value of chef-trade specific training, it also demonstrated that with careful management and thorough communication, the risks associated with deploying those over the age of 55 and those with medical limitations, can be effectively managed while developing and delivering capability. The validating officer deployed to Cyprus for the field phase. His feedback on the delivery of this exercise highlighted the successful planning and delivery of the training; “The training offered was second to none, highly interactive and engaging”. Powerlifting The fourth annual Ladies’ Day Powerlifting competition was held in Catterick Garrison, Private Megan Davis of 113 Sqn won the clean sweep of squat, deadlift and bench press in her category and best overall lifter. A huge achievement and one for which, she should be justifiably proud! 8 Chefs on exercise

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2 Operational Support Group RLC (2OSG) GRANTHAM CO: Lt Col A Hoey • RSM: WO1 A Clayton 2 Operational Support Group hit the ground running, after the summer recess, with a range of well-attended activities. Sgt Adam Nodwell, took several members of the Group to Oakhampton, on a rigorous Mountain Bike adventure training package in late August. The remainder of the permanent staff prepared for the Annual Continuous Training (ACT) period. The MTB went very well, with a total of six members of the group taking part. A total of 280 miles were covered over some quite demanding terrain. The ACT included a training package based around Theatre Enabling Group reinforcement - a real-time opportunity. The nine-day period included: a port and route recce, briefing packages, a visit to Ex IRON VIPER, Felixstowe Port and a BCS phase. The port recce was carried out on the Port of Boston in Lincolnshire. The participants were given the task of planning a road move of an Armoured Infantry Brigade from Grantham to Boston and then back brief the CoC on the move and choice of route. The BCS phase was also quite testing, but this was down mainly to torrential rain. The group was broken down into two sections and everyone involved fully participated in all aspects of patrolling, obstacle clearance, moving into a harbor area and the inevitable withdrawal under enemy fire. For a Group with an average age of 48, that was no mean feat. All personnel involved, did so in good spirits and refreshed their all-important soldering skills. The final few days involved a visit to the International Freight Port at Felixstowe. The Group was hosted and shown the port and its workings. Everyone left, amazed at the scale of the logistics involved. A big thank you must go to Lt Col Richard Jacobs for arranging the visit. His day job is the port’s health manager. Everyone agreed that the ACT

was an overwhelming success and had met and surpassed all the training objectives required. Ex HUSKY BEAVER 2 OSG, with members of 167 Regt, conducted a battlefield study on Op HUSKY (The Battle for Sicily) over the period 16-20 Oct 19, under the direction of the CO, Lt Col Aidan Hoey, with expert military historical knowledge provided by Lt Col Wilson Turkington, Senior Officer 498 LSU. The study enabled the Group to understand the importance of Op HUSKY and how it enabled the allies to eventually defeat the Axis forces in Italy. The Group was able to study and discuss in detail, the logistic support elements of the operation; how information was managed; the military doctrine used; the personalities and qualities of the military leaders of both the allied armies and the Axis powers; how media was used and manipulated; the terrain and the ethics and tactics used by both sides.

8 Ex HB2 in Sicily The Group was also able to complete an Act of Remembrance at the Commonwealth War Grave in Catania, where 2135 Commonwealth soldiers and officers are buried. All that attended, confirmed the study a resounding success and the knowledge and cohesion the Group gained from the experience was invaluable. It is hoped that these events will remain in the program as they are a great retention and recruiting tool and provide those that attend the privilege of being able to study in depth some of the most important battles and operations of our time. 2 OSG is a nationally-recruited unit based in Grantham. It provides specialised support to the Field Army in Operational Staff Support, Labour Resource, Contract Management and Communications. For further details or to visit and join us, call: 0115 957 3137 or 3359.

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105 Logistic Support Squadron (BATUS) OC: Maj L Davis

Another year, another exercise season in the rear-view mirror for BATUS. For the personnel of 105 Logistic Support Squadron, the exercise season proved to be as busy as ever, with staggering quantities of supplies being consumed over the four-month exercise period. As the beating heart of the BATUS logistical machine, the shop floor typically bore the brunt of the frantic activity during the exercises. Responsible for managing an inventory containing 19,000 different items at a combined value of over £40 million; the team worked round the clock to ensure that the troops on the ground got the necessary stores they needed to successfully complete the exercise. On average, the team processed 400 items a day, totalling a staggering 25,000 items issued by the end of the culmination of the exercises. Keeping the sheer quantity of vehicles involved on Ex PRAIRIE STORM moving requires a spectacular amount of fuel and lubricants; and in a determined effort to prove General Patton correct regarding his comments on modern warfare and gasoline, the exercising battle groups turned up in force and thirsty as ever. Over the course of both exercises, the 105 Log Sp Sqn Fuel depot was responsible for overseeing the distribution of 2.4 million litres of fuel to both the exercising units and supporting forces. Making this feat

all the more impressive is the fact that the entire operation is managed by a team that numbers a mere five personnel! In a similar vein, the ammunition depot was also a hive of activity during the height of exercise season. Ammunition Troop range ATs were responsible for disposing of 133 items of UXO across the training area, allowing troops to continue training safely. The depot also issued and recovered over 1.5 million items of ammunition, ranging from 5.56mm rifle rounds to 155mm artillery shells. Not to be outdone in the race to get the most impressive figures; the Forces Post Office handled over 20,000 pieces of mail during the exercise season, providing a critical service in maintaining the morale of both exercising troops and permanent staff alike.

8 The fuel depot was also a hive of activity during exercise season

No rest for the wicked With the departure of the final members of the exercising battle group, a collective sigh of relief could be heard across all of BATUS. For many departments this is a time to wind down, take the foot off the gas and start initial planning for the following year. In 105 Log Sp Sqn however it just means it’s time to switch focus from supporting exercising units to supporting Ex PRAIRIE PHOENIX, the repair and reconditioning programme led by 6 Bn REME. If last year is anything to go by, the coming six months will see 105 Log Sp Sqn issue over 21,000 items to REME workshop lines in order to get the BATUS fleet whipped back into fighting shape. Despite the relentless level of yearround activity, the members of 105 Log Sp Sqn occasionally get the opportunity to let their hair down and enjoy some of the better aspects of being stationed in a country as beautiful as Canada. Throughout the year, numerous personnel were able to escape to trails End Camp where AT opportunities such as horse trekking, canoeing, dog sledding and skiing are available. 8 105 Logistic Support Squadron is the beating heart of the BATUS logistical machine

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44 Support Squadron Royal Military Academy SANDHURST OC: Maj K Carpenter • SSM: WO1 S Clarke On 10 Sept 19, 44 Support Squadron RMAS, commemorated the actions of one its predecessors, the Royal Waggon Train (RWT), at the Battle of Waterloo. Waterloo is one of the five Battle Honours held by The RLC and was the key engagement that created the conditions to end the reign of Napoleon Bonaparte. The 44 Sqn lines are home to one of the cannons seized during the battle and the Squadron Headquarters is named after General Sir George Scovell. He was a Commander of the RWT for a time and later Governor of the then Royal Military College Sandhurst. 44 Sqn was joined by guests from across the Academy and RLC to commemorate the battle. Officer Cadets in the Senior Term who have been selected to commission into The RLC were also in attendance for an educational day on the proud history of the Corps. Briefs from the soldiers of 44 Sqn brought the event to life and the importance of the RWT at the time. The achievements of Sir General Scovell and the key role he played in the victory in the Napoleonic Wars was the first. This was followed by an overview of the role of the RWT and how, apart from some changes to equipment, similar it is to the role conducted by The RLC today. Some 40 reenactors were there to bring the battle itself to life. Following a visit to a Napoleonic era infantry camp, a re-enactment of the latter stages of the Battle of Waterloo was conducted. Across the lawns in front of Old College, the crack of musket and rifle fire with the boom of cannon could be heard, as a dramatic display was laid on for all in attendance. Following the victory by British forces, a horse cart and team, exact replicas of those used at the battle, conducted a resupply. This tied in perfectly with a brief on the valiant achievements of Private Brewster of the RWT at Hougoumont farm, a key stronghold in the battle.

Through the fire of both French and British forces, Private Brewster drove his cart and horses to resupply the chateau at Hougoumont, ensuring it was not lost to the French onslaught. All enjoyed the day, finished off with some Gurkha messing provided by 10 QOGLR chefs. It instilled a sense of pride and a greater understanding of the importance logistics has always had in war. The key message was this: The RWT, now The RLC, conducts

8 44 Squadron commemorates the actions of the Royal Waggon Train at Waterloo

the business of logistics in war and peace with a tireless professionalism. It may not be the most honoured, but no one can deny the importance of what it does. “No person can be more impressed than I am of the absolute necessity of a corps of the description of the Royal Waggon Train.” Field Marshall Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington.

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Ladies doing it for themselves

Silver Stars

By Capt Amii Calway

On 26 Sep, six women from across the Army proudly took part in the British Army’s first ever all-female parachute display at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst’s STEM Female Focus Day. As the only qualified female display jumpmaster in the Army, I had the honour (and pressure!) of leading the team into the display. Early in the 2019 display season, I was given a chance to make history. Administration would fall to The RLC Silver Stars Army Parachute Display Team (APDT), but as Team Leader (des), I was responsible for confirming that all team members were competent and had authority to conduct their respective role in parachute displays. Firstly, I had to trawl the skydiving population for a team and then find the time to get the team together for training; not a simple task with soldiers/officers from all over the British Army during a busy display season. The team included; Capt Amii Calway (me!), RLC Silver Stars APDT, jumpmaster; Capt Lauren Barr, REME Lightning Bolts APDT; Capt Laura Wealsby ACG; Sgt Sue Nuttall, REME Lightning Bolts APDT; Sgt Liz Warner, ACG, DZ control (ground to air comms with pilot); and Cpl Stacey Briggs, Red Devils APDT, commentary. Having managed to sufficiently herd the ladies into the same DZs at the same time and tick all competency, currency and training boxes, we were ready for a trial display into AFC Harrogate on 12 Jul 19 for World Youth Day, with a helping hand from the Silver Stars. A gusty day made for tricky conditions; nothing like a baptism of fire for me on this, my first mentor-less display as jumpmaster. The display was a huge success 70

with the staff and guests alike and we were delighted. But this was merely a test run. Finally, months of training and preparation later, the day of the display dawned. We met at Netheravon under the scattered clouds of promising skies and set about our final preparations. The odds were just in our favour; we’d at least “fly and try”. Decision made, the DZ party departed but with two hours until PHr, anything could happen. As PHr approached the weather deteriorated and the promise of the morning dwindled in the 400ft cloud and torrential rain. Then a break in the rain and a sudden glimmer of hope presented itself. We seized the chance; kit up, flight line checks, ancillary checks, emplane, take off. The flight to Sandhurst was turbulent but

8 The first all-female army parachute display team

miraculously clear and in the nick of time we were overhead. Without a second thought, we were in the sky, smoke trailing and flag flying over the prestigious old college before all landing safely - to the delighted cheers and whoops of the 1000 schoolgirls who were attending the Female Focus Day at the college. The smiles said it all; we’d achieved exactly what we had set out to. We were the successful first, all-female parachute display by a British Army Parachute Display Team and I’d been the jumpmaster to lead the team. It is an accolade to be hugely proud of but one that I could not boast without the professional display parachutists in my team or without the support of the four APDTs; The RLC Silver Stars, The REME Lightning Bolts, The PWRR Tigers and The Red Devils. So, what’s next? First things first, we’ll be working on a team name! We hope that there will be opportunities for us to conduct more displays next season and we’ll take things from there. To find out more about display parachuting search ‘RLC Silver Stars’ on social media. 8 High fives all round

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Commando Logistic Support Squadron (LSS) BARNSTAPLE OC: Maj C Allford • SSM: WO1 C Brett Despite being busy with multiple exercises and operational commitments, Logistic Support Squadron (LSS) has made time to get away and have fun, whether it is competing at a sporting event or AT expeditions. Adventurous training On 1 Sep, LS Sqn deployed on Ex Tiger Dagger, a multi-activity adventurous training package based out of Low Gillerthwaite Field Centre in the Lake District. The activities included mountaineering, rock climbing and mountain biking. For many of the individuals involved it was not only the first adventurous training they had done for a while but for some, the first AT they had done since completing basic training. Paras’ 10 With LSS coming away from Colchester Paras’ 10 as Team TAB Winners last May, it felt necessary to enter the sister event held in Catterick this Sep. Catterick proved to be much harder terrain and have much tougher competition with a team from 2 RGR clinching the title. However, Lt Howell managed to continue his winning streak from Colchester, winning the Catterick individual. This event has become a mainstay in the LSS calendar along with the annual Spean Bridge Speed March and the Sqn will be looking to win both events next year. It was however, excellent training for The RLC Military Skills Competition. Gore Trophy Training for the two teams the Sqn

entered into The RLC Military Skills Competition commenced the following Monday morning leaving them only one week to prepare. The teams headed up to 7 Regt RLC on Friday feeling confident and fit and the competition could not have gone much better. LSS ‘B’ team placed first in the Military Knowledge stand, closely followed by LSS ‘A’ team in second place. LSS ‘A’ team placed second in the Physical Stand and fourth on the Speed March going on to become Minor Unit winners, followed by Gore Trophy winners. The Sqn has retained the Gore Trophy for two years in a row, an achievement not accomplished since 2004. The ‘B’ team performed to a high standard throughout also, placing ninth overall, an incredible achievement for such a small squadron. Poole to Lympstone A small team of four then went on to compete in the annual Lympstone to Poole race, an 88-mile race over the arduous Jurassic Coast.

8 The Paras’ 10 has become a mainstay in the LSS calendar

Against some extremely tough competition from the fighting units, the team unfortunately struggled to finish in the top five. However, it was very enjoyable and joins the Paras’ 10 TAB in the LSS calendar. RLC Inter-regimental Basketball Championships The Sqn mustered a six-man basketball squad to attend the Corps championship in Aldershot in Sep progressing to the 3vs3 tournament final against 3 RLC. A second and third place finish and Corp-representation places for three LS personnel make for an encouraging first outing for the Sqn. Special thanks to Cpl Singh for organising and managing the squad, and congratulations to Pte Waqa and Sgt Ngaru for being selected for The RLC team. Pre-AACC The four-week long Pre-All Arms Commando Course to prepare individuals for the Pre-Commando Physical Assessments (PCPA) will start on 31 Mar 20 at the Commando Training Centre, Lympstone. If you wish to get in touch and find out how you can become an Army Commando contact Sgt Craig Birley: Craig.Birley175@mod.gov.uk 8 The Sqn has retained the Gore Trophy for two years in a row

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Defence Munitions (DM) Kineton Station TEMPLE HERDEWYKE CO: Lt Col J N Williams • SSM: WO1 S Brennan Soldiers working for Defence Munitions continue to supply tonnes of ammunition to the Field Army processing it in laboratories and preparing it for road, sea and air moves. But it isn’t all work as the troops have found time for technical propellent burns, the Gore Trophy, community engagement in the form of STEM and inter-unit sports. Trialling new techniques Part of being an Ammunition Technician is having the technical knowledge to be able to conduct trials and proofing of new techniques. A recent Ammunition Repair and Refurbishment Bid was carried out in Sep to dispose of 218 x Charge Propelling L8A1. The disposal utilised several of the recognised burns procedures, but also encapsulated several new previously untried techniques. Firstly, a pipe cutter was procured and used to great effect, to cut the charges circumferentially to separate out the energetic components. The Chief Ammunition Technical Officer had requested that several ‘new’ burns procedures were trialled for the disposal of the combustible cartridge cases. No recognised procedure was available and so a pyrotechnic burns tank, cage pallets and the ‘Crawford-Vine’ method were all trialled over the course of the week. These trials allowed feedback to the wider trade, providing technicians more tools and methods when supporting the Field Army.

Summer of STEM This quarter has seen two massive achievements from Kineton's STEM team. Firstly, their Summer of STEM project concluded with great success having engaged with 1500 people. This saw the STEM Ambassadors working over the school summer holidays with two key community partners, British Motor Museum and Compton Verney Arts Gallery. Activities over the summer included painting with robots, races with robots and creating short Wallace and Gromit style cartoons; all with the aim of introducing children to new and different technologies. The new school term starts with a key event for Kineton with the grand opening of the STEM Zone. This purposefully designed area provides the ambassadors a bespoke area to host site visits of school children and provide a place to learn with innovative equipment that they may not be exposed to in school.

8 Cpl Rayworth has been tenaciously recruiting kayakers

Sports It has been a summer of water sports for Kineton. Cpl Rayworth has been tenaciously recruiting kayakers after a highly successful Army Sprint and Marathon Championships earlier in the year. This recruitment took the form of a unit sports day where the soldiers and officers got to try their hand at various kayaking techniques at the recently refurbished lake on camp. Meanwhile, SSgt Stark has been away with Army Rowing coaching a Learn to Row course and the Army Development Squad who walked away with a large haul of medals from this years Joint Service Regatta. Social Media Kineton Station has evolved its social media presence. No longer is there a Facebook page for the Station, but instead it has taken the example from the Army Photographers and moved to a more national effort. The newly branded page, RLC Ammunition Technician, is there to provide a national focus on the trade for which Kineton Station remains its ‘home.’ You can find the page by searching on Facebook @RLCAmmunitionTechnician. 8 The Summer of STEM project engaged with 1500 people

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OTHER UNITS | THE SUSTAINER

British Forces - The Royal Logistic Corps Personnel BRUNEI OC: Maj C Frost RLC • GSM: WO1 DA McLachan RLC The Royal Logistic Corps is represented well throughout Brunei Garrison, with two officers and 43 ORs supporting training 24/7 in Brunei or on the Resident Infantry Battalion’s (RIB) Overseas Training Exercises (OTXs) in the wider SE Asia region. Outside of Garrison HQ appointments there are seven departments in which RLC personnel could be employed in Brunei. QOGLR 1LO This team consists of a SSgt and three JNCOs whom provide G4 support to 2RGR and at present are gearing up to issuing VIRTUS to the battalion and wider Garrison. They are responsible for managing all SAFI accounts in order to sustain BFB as well as supporting OTX, JLC and new recruit intakes. RLC Chefs The team is currently manned with a WO, three SNCOs and 12 JNCOs who man the Garrison Officers Mess, Garrison & 2RGR WO’s & Sgt’s Messes, two junior ranks diners and the exercise kitchen located at Sittang camp. Looking to the future QOGLR Chefs will to deploy in support of Ex PANTHER GOLD in Thailand and Ex PACIFIC KHUKURI 20 (PK) in New Zealand in 2020. Movement Control Cell (MCC) MSS is currently manned with a WO, a SNCO, a JNCO and three LECs with supporting augmentees frequently required from the UK to bolster a very busy section facilitating movements of personnel to the UK & Nepal, as well as deploying to support OTXs in NZ, Thailand and Australia. A welcome back to WO2 Vambe who has replaced WO2 Sibbald and will now be in the hot seat for the huge task of the expected unit move 2020 with 1RGR replacing 2RGR in Brunei. Ammunition Supply Depot (ASD) ASD is currently manned with a WO (AT), Cpl supplier and a JNCO

(AT). The team manages in excess of 400 tonnes of ammunition and explosives, conducts routine issues and receipts to the exercising units. The ASD is currently engaged in the disposal of 4000 Mortars by demolition and has drafted additional support from 11EOD&S Regt RLC to support this task. RLC Stores Section The section is manned with a SNCO, two JNCOs and two LECs, the stores are accountable for 120 days stock of fast-moving MT, Tech and limited range of GS stores which are held as first and secondline spares to support British Forces Brunei. The RLC Stores Section takes full responsibility of all freight that moves in and out of Brunei, as well as a local auction process to

8 BFB Charity Breakfast increase the cost effectiveness of the Garrison. QOGLR MT This department consists of one officer, one SNCO, four JNCOs, one Pte soldier and 33 LEC drivers and bus escorts. QOGLR MT sustains the daily transportation operation for the entire Garrison with regular details for school buses and the Post Office mail run, as well as additional support to infantry training requirements and OTXs. It booked 599 hire cars and 797 taxis in 2018/19. RLC BFPO 11 This is manned by a SNCO, JNCO and three civilians. They are responsible for the Postal and Courier services for the whole Garrison, the High Commission, Royal Navy and Loan Service Teams with Royal Brunei Armed forces. In 2018/19 BFPO Brunei received 66 tonnes and dispatched 14 tonnes of civilian mail and will soon be preparing for the seasonal inundation of Christmas parcels. 8 Mortar demolitions

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THE SUSTAINER | OTHER UNITS

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Joint Helicopter Support Squadron (JHSS) BENSON, OXFORDSHIRE OC: Maj E Andrews • SSM: WO2 G Johnson Aside from the normal business of running the Helicopter Underslung Load Parks at RAF Benson and RAF Odiham and the enduring commitments of Op NEWCOMBE in Mali and BFSAI in the Falkland Islands; summer 2019 has seen Joint Helicopter Squadron’s (JHSS) National Standby commitment activated twice. Emergency action The first National Standby commitment came at Wainfleet, Lincolnshire and then again six weeks later at Whaley Bridge, Derbyshire. Both operations involved a Chinook helicopter under-slinging hundreds of one-tonne bags of aggregate which were individually assembled, prepared and hooked to the aircraft by JHSS personnel. In Wainfleet, the bags were dropped in the river to create a dam and seal a breach. At Whaley Bridge, the bags were dropped in the dam to reinforce it to prevent it from failing. These operations called upon the wide-range of skills at the Squadron, from MT to SQMS and especially the Communications Specialists who, on the day, were required to work with a range of civilian emergency services and other agencies such as the Environment Agency and Canals and River Trust.

8 Pte Leah Andrews at the Whaley Bridge Dam

8 Pte Callum Kilsby at the edge of the reservoir at Whaley Bridge

Pte Callum Kilsby, the first Comms Spec at the scene, said: “Working with all the different agencies in such a high tempo environment was an amazing

experience. From the minute we stepped off the Chinook, the Police, Fire and other government agencies made it clear straight away that they were relying on our team to get the job done.” “As a Communications Specialist, my job at Whaley Bridge was not only to talk to the helicopter crew, but also liaise with the Police and Fire over their radios to coordinate road-blocks for the HLS and general updates on the progress of our task. At the end of the whole operation, the police control room broadcasted a thank you message to our team for everyone at Whaley Bridge to hear.” Exercises Through all the activity, the normal daily business continued with JHSS still providing a team for multinational exercises including SWIFT RESPONSE (Croatia), IMPERIAL ZEPHYR and NOCTEM WARRIOR (USA). The Sqn has welcomed a range of new people, including a new Ops Officer, Capt Deborah Fielder, who started in Oct 19. 8 Hooking in action

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SPORT | THE SUSTAINER

RLC Netball The RLC Netball season culminated with three strong teams entering the Inter-Corps Championships, with the first and second teams battling hard for top finishes in their respective leagues. Following a tough and technical training camp, the forty selected squad players were organised into three balanced teams; a competitive team to vie for each league title and a development team to build the future Corps players. After some exceptional competition over two days, both the first and second sides were a single goal away from reaching the finals in their respective leagues and the standard of play meant that there was every chance that at least one of them could/would have won. The first team was agonisingly close to a place in the final and should be commended for their third place position behind the Army Medical Corps by a single goal difference. The second team narrowly missed out with a draw against the winning side to make the final. With a scene straight from a Hollywood blockbuster, the final whistle was blown with the ball in flight but the goal was not counted as the ball had not cleared the ring before the game was over. Despite the agony felt by all on missing out on the titles by such a small margin, the squad knew that this was a plan that would take a couple of

8 The squad touring and training in Jamaica

8 So near but so far at the Inter-Corps champs

years to achieve. The entire squad should be celebrated for its exceptional athleticism, cohesion and skill against some frankly outstanding competition. For the entire RLC Netball Squad, the last 12 months has been resoundingly successful with all 2018/19 season aims exceeded this momentum will continue into the 2019/20 season. The teams looked the part, had the required

level of support and the drive and mindset to produce championship winning performances. Our best players have returned and there is some great talent coming through; the latter is key to developing a squad with the depth to assert ourselves as competitors for both league titles. 2020 is going to be an exciting year. Regular fixtures have been planned throughout the season including league matches and showcase events; highlight events will be the Cardiff UK Tour and the 2020 Championships where the squad will be back with a vengeance. Congratulations to the following RLC Netball Squad members selected for the 2019/20 Army Squad: Open and Development Team: Capt Kate Whitby Capt Gemma Pearson Lt Charlotte Pattison-Hudd Sgt Sarah Ness Cpl Ali Taylor LCpl Fern Davies Pte Lo Tuigau Army Masters Team: Maj Toni Gray WO1 Oliver Capt Amanda Game WO1 Cath Rotanavunisava WO1 Lisa Wainwright Sgt Ana Buinitaria Cpl Leni Drummond Pte Los Naitau 8 LCpl Fern Davis Jamaica

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THE SUSTAINER | SPORT

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RLC Equestrian winter 2019 In early Sep, members of RLC Equestrian trained at the Larkhill Saddle Club in preparation for the RAF championships 13-15 Sep and for the Grassroots league for new riders, beginning in October. The members attended a packed two-day training camp and it was great to see some new riders participating in the training getting ready to compete in their first ever competition. It’s amazing that the club can offer this opportunity to new riders and watch them develop from a complete beginner to a confident rider ready for low level competitions! The team had a brilliant last show of the season at the RAF championships. The show was held at RAF Cranwell and ran over three days with a day for Dressage, Show Jumping and Cross-country. Pte Chrissy Harris from 167 Regt RLC, new to the club this year, rode a super Show Jumping round, showing confidence and skill on her shared horse and was all set for a win until she had

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an unfortunate mistake at the penultimate fence. The team was highly impressed and she is definitely one to push up the levels for the future! Cpl Danni Parker from 159 Regt RLC was on Larkhill Saddle Club hirling, Dangermouse. She had a great few days and came home with a third in Show Jumping and a Fifth in the Cross Country. Maj Rose Lambert from DE&S attended on her own horse Fines Fox and had a great few days also bringing home top placings in all three disciplines. It was great to have The RLC represented at this show and hopefully more will attend next year. The newly recruited Corps Grassroots team, also took home the ribbons at the first Army League on 14 Oct. Lt Jonny Shaw, 6 Regt RLC was placed second in the dressage competition and Pte Chrissy Harris 167 Regt RLC, fourth and LCpl Luke Harris 7 Regt RLC, sixth in the Dressage and Show Jumping combined competition. This was the first

ever show for both Lt Shaw and LCpl Harris, who have both only been riding since the summer. The league will continue through the winter months and offers our new riders a chance to compete at Army events. The club also sees its top Show Jumper, LCpl Holly Hall 254 Med Regt, on an overseas sports tour in Spain, where she competed on the international stage with various top professional riders. At time of writing, LCpl Hall had secured a win and a second place in the 1.10 metre classes in the first week of a four week international show. LCpl Hall returned in time to compete for the Corps at the Olympia Horse show on 17 Dec in the main arena of the Christmas horse show in London. If you would like to see if horse-riding is for you, then join The RLC Mounted Sports Club Facebook page or email Rose.Lambert334@mod.gov.uk for more details on how to attend a trial day.

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SPORT | THE SUSTAINER

RLC Rowing The RLC Rowing Club continues to dominate the Army Rowing Clubs Association (ARCA). This year, the club had the largest presence at the pinnacle event of the year, the Joint Service Regatta (JSR) and walked away with its fair share of medals. The RLC continues to be the largest, and most successful, club within ARCA. This year’s JSR was hosted by our friendly rivals, RAF Rowing. Its choice of venue could not be faulted as the soldiers and officers were treated to a competition on Peterborough Rowing Club’s purpose built 1000m rowing lake. Even with some questionable wind conditions, the lake offered just the right amount of challenge for novices and experienced rowers alike. Throughout the day, The RLC rowed under the banner of Army Rowing. It saw six RLC rowers compete in various events testing the physical endurance and technical ability. The Club Chairman, Lt Col Roberts, competed and won the women’s Blue Riband event, the coxed four. In the closest race of the day, she finished just one foot ahead of the RAF. The RLC’s two novice females then progressed in two heat races, before finalising their victory against the RAF and Navy in the double scull. One of our newer rowers, LCpl McKenzie then rowed in the women’s novice single to take home another gold medal. The women weren’t quite finished as the RAF organisers agreed to include a last-minute race, combining both

the senior and novice women into a coxed eight, which the Army then proceeded to win. The RLC men had been training for three days prior to the JSR as part of the Army Development Squad. Their focus had been on the coxed eight; a notoriously competitive event for the men. This training paid off as they maintained focus throughout the race and pulled away in the last 500m to win by a full length! Cpl Steve Cox, our high performance athlete, has had a busy year on the world stage. His key races have included Bulgaria, Germany, Henley Royal Regatta and the Netherlands, before competing at the World Championships in Austria. Cpl Cox is currently the favourite to compete in the single scull for Zimbabwe, at the 2020 Olympics, having achieved the fastest race time amongst his competitors.

8 RLC Rowing rowed under the banner of Army Rowing

Since returning from the World Championships, his training volume has increased dramatically. An average training day will consist of 40km… which he’ll do six days a week, to really push his physical limitations. Recently, he has been awarded a place in the Talented Athlete Scholarship Scheme; this provides athletes with support in physiotherapy, psychology and strength and conditioning. Looking ahead, RLC Rowing will continue to provide a dominant force in the development side of Army Rowing throughout the winter season. If you already know how to row and want to get involved, then please contact army rowing via ArmyRowing@mod.gov.uk. We’re keen to attract more coxes, so small and loud people are particularly sought after!

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THE SUSTAINER | EXERCISE

By Pte Stacey Carter, 165 Port and Maritime Regiment 165 Port and Maritime Regiment completed a week of adventurous training in sunny Portugal during Jul 19. The offshore sailing programme (Ex ALGARVE WATCH) allowed the opportunity for reservists to find their sea legs and work towards gaining RYA recognised qualifications. Starting out as a complete novice and never stepping foot on a yacht, I was pleasantly surprised with the space and comfort of the ‘Spirit of St George II’. Under the watchful eye of WO1 Anthony Houghton, we all embarked on our offshore adventure. Learning the different types of knots, ropes and nautical terminology was at the forefront of all the novices’ minds. Those who were already competent crew and were looking to progress, were learning charts, navigation and route planning; turns out it’s a little different from land route planning! Figuring out the mechanics of the yacht took a little while, however we all started to come together as we embarked on numerous boat-handling exercises, trying to desperately find some wind to sail with. Lots of bellowing orders were to be heard from “tacking, “let fly”, to “reapply sun-cream!” - it was, after all, extremely hot with glorious sunshine. A gust of wind taking a hat overboard provided a fantastic opportunity to conduct some man overboard drills; the hat was recovered and the mission deemed a success.

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Ex ALGARVE WATCH

It wasn’t all work though, after numerous attempts at coming alongside and securing the vessel, we bonded together over a few evening drinks followed by morning pontoon yoga. A good stretch out is all you need of a morning! Completing the offshore programme meant that we often had time to set down anchor and take the opportunity to swim and explore the nearby caves. The XO, Maj Stu Vernon, relished the

8 The Ex allowed reservists to find their sea legs

opportunity to explore nearby caves and prove he is in fact, half mermaid. However, one of the highlights of the trip was conducting the nighttime sail. It was amazing to see the effects of light pollution on the shoreline when you are desperately trying to locate a beacon which flashes once every three seconds in a pattern; it’s often difficult to locate it again if you look away so it brought a fresh appreciation for the perils of night-time sailing. It meant that we had to be even more vigilant to keep an eye out for other sailing vessels whilst we conducted our training. It was the luminescent algae that really took my breath away though, watching the water peel back from the bow of the ship in luminescent waves and seeing fish dart away glowing was perhaps the best memory that I have of this excellent and challenging training exercise. 8 The ‘Spirit of St George II’

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THE ROYAL PIONEER CORPS ASSOCIATION | THE SUSTAINER

After five years of Pioneer reunions held at The Royal Court Hotel Coventry, it has been decided to return the reunion at Bicester in 2020 (12/13 June). The Pioneers have a long history at Bicester, stretching back to 1940. Apart from helping to construct the various camps around Bicester during the war, they were also employed laying the railway track, digging air raid trenches and defence works at Bicester aerodrome and the Bicester town defences. In 1962, 23 Group moved to Bicester from Wrexham and commanded companies in Long Marston, Kineton and Bicester. In 1964 the Group sent a company to Cyprus for the troubles there and in 1966 it supplied men to Bahrain and Aden. On 26 Nov 1971 450 Pioneers paraded at Bicester to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Pioneer Corp gaining its ‘Royal’ title. In 1982, men from 23 Group RPC were despatched to the Falkland Islands to undertake responsibility for the recovery, re-burial and

The Pioneer Reunion repatriation of the 81 British Servicemen who fell during the conflict and who were temporarily buried on the Islands. In 1991 the Group sent a large number of troops to the First Gulf War. Over 60% of the Royal Pioneer Corps was involved in this conflict, many from Bicester. On amalgamation on 5 Apr 1993, 23 Group RPC was re-named 23 (Pioneer) Regiment RLC and the companies became squadrons. The outlying squadrons at Long Marston and Kineton were re-located to Bicester and Bicester became the home of the Pioneers when the RPC Training Centre at Northampton closed in 1992. 23 (Pioneer) Regiment RLC was awarded the Freedom of Bicester in 2008. Also, in 2008 on the 15th Anniversary of the formation of The RLC, two Pioneer units - 518 Sqn from Bicester and 170 Sqn from BAOR - were involved in public duties at Buckingham Palace. Between 1993 and 2014, when the Regiment was finally

disbanded under the 2012 Defence Review, the unit had served in every conflict. The review announced that the Pioneer CEQ within the Army would cease. 168 Pioneer Regiment RLC(V) disbanded in Oct 2013 and 23 Pioneer Regiment RLC disbanded in Sep 2014. To mark the disbandment of the Pioneer CEQ, a new painting was commissioned by the RPC Association. The three Pioneers depicted in the painting, wearing different periods of dress in the Pioneer’s history, are: WO2 Charlie Wood, Cpl Andrew Roberts and Pte Ratu Sillbaravi. They all lost their lives whilst serving in Afghanistan on Op HERRICK. 8 Membership of the RPC Association is free to all ex Pioneers (including personnel employed in Pioneer units). For more information contact: The controller c/o Bicester Garrison Support Unit, Arncott, Bicester, OX25 1PP. Tel: 07868 7578642 royalpioneercorps@gmail.com

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THE SUSTAINER | OBITUARY

8 Major General PA Chambers CB MBE It is with deep regret, we report that Maj General Peter Chambers CB MBE passed away, aged 72, on 1st Oct 2019, following a short but incurable illness. General Chambers was born in Liverpool on 23 Apr 1947. He attended the La Salle School and went on to study history and politics at Liverpool University, gaining an Honours Degree. He was commissioned into the RAOC in 1969 as a graduate entrant and attended the Mons Officer Training School.While at university, he met his wife to be,Valerie.They were married in 1968 and Valerie was to accompany him throughout the majority of his military service.They were an inseparable team, right up to his untimely death. After Mons, General Chambers saw service at Blackdown Barracks, before being posted to Detmold in 1971. Following this he was appointed in the role of Adjutant, Commander RAOC 4 Division in Herford. His career progressed rapidly and having attended Junior Staff College, he began the first of two tours in operational logistics in Headquarters Northern Ireland. These tours were broken by a three-month German language course and attendance at the Army Staff College in 1979. His second Northern Ireland tour was as DAA & QMG in the HQ, after which he was awarded the MBE. His next tour was as a Squadron Commander in Obernkirchen. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel at the earliest possible age

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in 1983 and served for two years as an SO1 in the Army Logistic Executive in Andover. In late 1985 he returned to Germany to command 1 Ordnance Battalion in Verden, leaving on promotion as Colonel Ord 1, under the charismatic and mercurial Major General Jerry Hulme. As one of the youngest Brigadiers in the Army, he returned to Germany in 1990 as Commander Supply 1st British Corps in Bielefeld. During this very busy three-year period, he was at the heart of the end of Cold War restructuring and withdrawal (Options for Change), logistic support to the first Gulf War and the creation of the Allied Rapid Reaction Corps. During this time, he led the British military pilgrimage to Lourdes. He was a committed Roman Catholic and fulfilled this commitment more than once, as well as supporting the Army Chaplaincy and providing pastoral support to those in need, outside his military duties. In late 1993, he returned to Andover as Director Logistic Support Policy, helping to shape the fledgling Royal Logistic Corps. He was promoted to Major General in 1997 and completed two tours in his final rank. He was senior member (Army) and Deputy Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies. His final appointment was as Deputy Chief of Staff Headquarters Land Command in Wilton. He was made a CB and retired in 2002. On leaving the Army he used his compassion and ability to the benefit of others. He rescued and restructured a North London charity, Hill Homes and followed this by putting this experience in the care home sector to good use, as Chief Executive of the Richmond Council for Voluntary Services. He was twice Representative Colonel Commandant of The RLC and both Chairman of the RAOC Association and the RAOC Council.Together with Valerie, he attended branch functions with veterans and their families all over the UK.Together they gave talks about the life and times of a military career, illustrated with humourous examples of Army service and overcoming the challenges, for all ranks, of a nomadic existence. Despite his short illness, he was bolstered by his strong faith and complete absence of selfpity. He leaves his widow Valerie, a daughter Victoria and six grandchildren. Sadly, his first daughter Claire predeceased him.

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LAST POST | THE SUSTAINER

LAST POST Ashbrook – On 10 June 2019, Mr J Ashbrook RCT Atkinson – On 19 July 2019, Mr G W Atkinson RAOC Bloomfield – On 8 August 2019, Mr L Bloomfield RCT Bolger – On 2 June 2019, I/P T Bolger RASC Brinsden – On 28 May 2019, Mr D S Brinsden RAOC Brooker – On 6 September 2019, Mr ET Brooker RCT Brown – On 23 June 2019, Mr JD Brown RASC/RCT Burton – In September 2019, Mr FM Burton RCT Butterworth – On 6 May 2019 Mr H Butterworth RASC Buzec – On 20 July 2019, Mr J Buzec RCT Carolan – On 18 November 2019, Lt Col PM Carolan RCT Carrington – On 23 September 2019, Mr J Carrington RASC Case – On 28 June 2019, Maj AV Case RCT Chambers – On 1 October 2019, Maj Gen P A Chambers CB MBE late RLC/RAOC Clarke – On 7 October 2019, Mr G Clark RCT Cobbold – On 15 May 2019, Mr T Cobbold RCT Cochrane – On 7 October 2019, Lt Col D Cochrane RPC/RLC Copestake – On 16 March 2019, Mrs M Copestake (RCT) Cordall – In 2018, Mr R Cordall RASC Corner – On 7 May 2019, Mr B Corner RASC/ RCT Davison – On 3 October 2019, Mr D Davison RASC BEM L D’Hon Devonport – In July 2019, Mr S Devonport RCT Driscoll – On 22 July 2019, Mr B C Driscoll RAOC Durbin – On 16 August 2019, Col P Durbin OBE TD RCT Eales – On 17 August 2019, Mr W Eales RCT Eastwood – On 16 August 2019, Mr A Eastwood RAOC Erskine – On 18 November 2019, Mr MJN Erskine RCT Field – On 14 June 2019, Mr G Field RASC Finnis – On 13 July 2019, Col MMS Finnis late RCT Gilder – On 12 July 2019, Mr R Gilder RCT Gritton – On 13 October 2019, Maj M J D Gritton RAOC Hain – On 1 October 2019, Lt Col JET Hain RCT Hamper – On 28 June 2019, Maj ND Hamper TD RCT Hannigan – On 6 November 2019, Mr R A Hannigan RAOC Hayward – On 4 November 2019, Major H T Hayward RAOC Hoult – On 5 September 2018, Mr K Hoult RCT

Howard – On 31 July 2019, Mr C Howard RAOC Hulme – On 10 September 2019, Mr K R Hulme RLC Hymes – On 7 October 2019, Mr P Hymes RASC Kendrick – On 28 August 2019, Brig RE Kendrick late RCT Knowles – On 2 September 2019, Lt Col SG Knowles RCT Kubinski – On 22 October 2019, Mr H Kubinski RASC/RCT Lawton – On 13 October 2019, Lt Col R A Lawton RAOC Ledlie – In November 2019, Mr D Ledlie RASC Lewis – In November 2019, Mr S Lewis RCT Lilley – On 2 March 2019, Mr J Lilley RCT Lucas – On 15 September 2019, Mr T F Lucas RAOC Maley – In October 2019, Mr J Maley RCT Mallon – On 9 Aug 2019, Mr J Mallon RAOC Maxwell – On 6 September 2019, Mr R Maxwell RAOC McAllister – On 12 July 2019, Lt Col CD McAllister RCT Moloney – On 3 July 2019, Mrs F Moloney (RCT) Paget – On 28 June 2019, Capt VR Paget RASC Pape – On 6 September 2019, Mr R A Pape RAOC Penrose – On 14 September 2019, Mr L Penrose RAOC Perkin – On 14 May, Mr J Perkin RCT Read – On 25 August 2019, Mr R A Read RAOC Rhodes – On 12 December 2018, Mrs A Rhodes (RASC) Ross – On 13 July 2019, Mr DG Ross RCT Ross – On 31 July 2029, Mr J Ross REME Roulston – On 23 June 2019, Mr J Roulston RASC/RCT Santon – On 17 October 2019, Maj R Stanton TD RCT Shuttleworth – On 30 March 2019, Mr R Shuttleworth RAOC Smith – On 9 September 2019, Mr S J Smith RAOC Stonnard – On 16 September 2019, Mr DA Stonnard RCT Stringer – On 24 May 2019, Mr N Stringer RAOC Tucker – In July 2019, Mr R Tucker RCT Turner – On 28 September 2019, Lt Col THE Turner RCT Walker – On 18 July 2019, Mr B Walker RCT Webb – On 29 August 2019, Mr C G Webb RAOC Williams – On 19 October 2019, Mr J T Williams RAOC Willson-Lloyd – On 6 September 2019, Lt Col MA Willson–Lloyd RCT Wrightson – On 31 August 2019, Lt Col M Wrightson TD RCT

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RLC The Sustainer Winter 2019  

RLC The Sustainer Winter 2019

RLC The Sustainer Winter 2019  

RLC The Sustainer Winter 2019

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