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hok law f i rms | se l e c t i m ag e p o rt fo l i o | 2014


HOK OVERVIEW

HOK is a global provider of design services

current problem solving techniques and

for the built environment. We manage the

appropriate building methods and materials,

planning, design, and construction process

enables HOK to meet any challenge in

for all types of projects in every part of the

architectural design, interior design and

world. Industry surveys consistently rank

planning. The most important factor in

HOK among the world’s leading design firms.

the success of HOK has been its ability to manage the total planning, design and

FIRM HISTORY

construction process for projects of any size

HOK was incorporated in 1955 by three

or scope, and to deliver projects on time and

principals with a staff of 26 employees. The

within budget.

firm’s current staff of 1500 in 24 offices around the world includes architects, interior

H O K TEXAS H I S T O R Y

designers, programmers, facility/real estate

In Texas, our practice is diverse, frequently

strategists, and graphic specialists.

published, and client centered. We have a strong multi-disciplinary practice that includes

HOK has been recognized as one of the most

interior design, base building architecture

respected and best managed firms in the

and strategic facilities planning. Our staff of

industry. Contract Magazine ranks HOK as

210 is divided by practice areas, with client-

one of the most respected firms in the nation

dedicated teams serving each project.

and Interior Design includes HOK as one of the top “Interior Design Giants” in the world.

The Texas office of HOK opened in 1958,

This international distinction has helped us

and has experienced steady growth through

build a dynamic professional team which

working with remarkable clients who demand

offers our clients unmatched resources.

the best in creative solutions and innovative thinking. We are pioneers in new office

Our commitment to design excellence,

environments that are tailored to specific

coupled with our complete familiarity with

client requirements and evolving functions.

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HOK OVERVIEW (CONTINUED)

Our distinguished interiors practice clientele

INTERIOR SERVICES

includes Time, Inc., BMW, Deloitte, Starwood

HOK Interiors offers a complete range of

Hotels & Resorts, Ann Taylor, Blue Sky

services in the planning and design of interior

Studios, DLA Piper, LG Electronics, Burson

space, including:

Marstellar, Meredith Publishing, American Express, Canon USA, and Avon Products

Facility Programming

Inc. to name a few. We take pride in these

Strategic Facility Planning

Facility Analysis

Work Process Studies

Facility Management Consulting

Feasibility Studies

Alternative Officing Studies

Interior Design

Programming

Building Evaluations/ Test Fits

long term relationships and the unique opportunities presented by each client’s design challenge. INDUSTRY R ANKINGS

#3 Interior Design Practice, Interior Design, Top 100 Giants, January 2013 #2 Office Architects, Building Design + Construction, GIANTS 300, July 2012

Space Planning

#1 International Design Firm, Engineering

Prototype Design

News-Record, July 2012

Workstation Design

Lighting and Fixture Design

Construction, GIANTS 300, July 2012

Sustainable Design

#1 Architectural/Engineering Firm,

Furniture Specification

Artwork Programs

Lead Green Design Firm, Building Design +

Architectural Record, June 2012

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Brand Integration

#2 in Office Design, Interior Design, Top 100

Lease Consultation

Giants, January 2013

Signage/ Graphic Design


Cost Analysis

We do not have a predetermined “design

Custom Furniture Design

style,” instead our mission is to develop

Building Information Modeling (BIM)

design concepts that translate a client’s

Facilities Management (CAFM)

image and business goals into a reflective

Change Management

We offer these services individually or comprehensively, as required by the client. Typical projects include the five phases of design — Programming, Schematic Design, Design Development, Construction Documents and Construction Administration.

design vocabulary, productivity, better teamwork, optimized occupancy costs and greater flexibility. We provide all types of interiors solutions, from developing workplace standards to inplace renovations and full scope corporate headquarters projects. HOK’s design of work environments always:

A PPROACH TO INTERIOR DESIGN

Supports organizational change

As designers, we have a remarkable

Enhances collaboration and creativity

Reduces occupancy costs

Reflects a company’s brand and culture

Promotes recruitment and retention

for our clients and their communities. We

Accommodates new ways of working

recognize that good design is an investment,

Integrates sustainability 4

opportunity, moreover, a responsibility to help make the world a better, more humane place to live. At HOK, our goal continues to be to create the best possible environments

a way to help organizations meet their objectives. A well-designed workplace can

Our multidisciplinary team approach enables

improve the communication flow and help

us to develop facilities that are appropriate,

organizations attract and retain its most

effective, and aesthetically distinctive,

important resource — it’s people.

resulting in a winning solution for our clients.

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HOK OVERVIEW (CONTINUED)

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SELEC T CLIENT LIST

Credit Suisse

Aegis Media

Deloitte

Aflac

Delta Air Lines Crown Room

American Express

DLA Piper

Ann Taylor

Discover

Arnold & Porter LLP

Dow Jones Interactive/Work.com

AT Kearney

Endurance Reinsurance

AT&T

Fortis Property Group

Avon Products, Inc.

Gap Inc.

Barclays Capitol Americas

GE Capital

BBVA

George Comfort & Sons

Bloomberg

GlacĂŠau

Blue Sky Studios

GTE Training Center

BMW

Gunderson Dettmer LLP

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Guy Carpenter

British Consulate

HarperCollins Publishers

Brooklyn Philharmonic

Heyman Properties

Brother International

Hilb, Rogal & Hamilton

Burson Marsteller

Hoffmann-La Roche

Canon USA

Horizon BCBSNJ

Capgemini

HotJobs

CBS

IBM

China Life Insurance

John Wiley & Sons

Cisco New York

JPMorgan Chase

Colgate-Palmolive

JWT

Computer Associates

King Abdullah University of Science


and Technology (KAUST)

Prudential Insurance

Lehmann Brothers

Radio City Music Hall

Leslie Fay

Roundarch Isobar

Lifetime Television

Russell Investments

LG North America

SEIU Fund

Manulife

Showtime

Marsh & McLennan Companies

Singapore Chancery

MasterCard International

Société Générale

McGraw-Hill

Sony Electronics

MEC (formerly Mediaedge:cia)

Starwood Hotels & Resorts

Merck

Strategies for Wealth

Meredith Corporation

Sun Microsystems

Merrill Lynch

theLab

Metropolitan Center

Time Inc.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

TitleVest

Mindshare

TV Guide

MTV Networks

Viacom International

Nina Footwear

Vinson & Elkins LLP

Nortel Networks

Volvo

Ogilvy & Mather

Warnaco Group

Paine Public Relations

White & Case LLP

Parsons US

Winrock

PepsiCo

WPP

Pfizer

Yahoo!

Philips Electronics

Yeshiva University

Plaza Construction

Zurich Global

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

C O M M I T M E N T T O S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

These resources served as the foundation for

By developing solutions to enhance aesthetic

The HOK Guidebook for Sustainable Design,

goals while limiting resource consumption,

widely recognized as one of the design

improving building performance and

profession’s seminal textbooks.

promoting occupant health and productivity, HOK is leading the way to an increasingly

TA N G I B L E R E S U LT S

sustainable future.

HOK has convincingly demonstrated that “green” projects can be delivered without

U N M AT C H E D E X P E R T I S E

compromising budget constraints, aesthetic

In the early ‘90s, HOK chose to build

goals or building performance. Our built

sustainable design into all practice areas,

projects include office buildings, hospitals,

service offerings and regional offices rather

laboratories, corporate campuses, airports,

than creating a separate specialty group. Our

museums, schools and master-planned

commitment emanates from every level of the

communities throughout the world. HOK

organization — from Chairman Bill Valentine,

currently has 148 LEED-certified projects, 10

to Integrated Design Director Gerry Faubert,

BREEAM-certified projects, 4 Green Mark-

to a network of “Sustainable Managers” in

certified projects and 1 Green Globes project.

each regional office and practice area. INDUSTRY RECOGNITION

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More than 750 HOK employees have become

HOK’s expertise and leadership have

Leadership in Energy and Environmental

been acknowledged through awards

Design® (LEED)-accredited through the US

and recognition from leading industry

Green Building Council (USGBC).

organizations, including:

Long before the creation of the LEED green

For the second consecutive year, HOK

building rating system, HOK developed

ranked #1 on Engineering News-

sustainability checklists by phase and topic.

Record’s “Top 100 Green Design Firms.”


HOK ranked #3 in the inaugural “Architect

For six consecutive years, HOK designs were selected for the “Top 10 Green

magazine, based on sustainability,

Projects list” by the American Institute of

design excellence and profitability.

Architects Committee on the Environment.

HOK’s 15-year commitment and

HOK is the only design firm to earn the

contributions to the green building

“Designing a Sustainable and Secure

movement were honored by the US Green

World” award from Global Green USA,

Building Council with the “Organizational

the US affiliate of Mikhail Gorbachev’s

Excellence” award at the 2006 USGBC

worldwide environmental organization

Leadership Awards program.

Green Cross International.

HOK earned the prestigious 2006 Sustainable Design Leadership Award, presented by CoreNet Global, International Interior Design Association, and American Institute of Architects Committees on the

H O K AWA R D S

#1 “Top 100 Green Design Firms,” ENR “Top Ten Green Projects,” including KAUST. Eight AIA Committee on the Environment

Environment and Interior Architecture.

#1 “Most Influential Green Design Firm,”

The firm was previously honored with

Design Intelligence survey

a “Special Commendation” by this international awards program in 2003. •

100” list published by Architect

The HOK Guidebook for Sustainable Design was named 2005 Best

HOK “Organizational Excellence Award,” US Green Building Council Leadership Awards Program

Sustainable Practice Winner in the

“Sustainable Design Leadership Award,”

category of Educational Initiatives by

Design Firm Winner. Presented by the AIA

the Sustainable Buildings Industry

committees on the Environment and Interior

Council (SBIC).

Architecture, CoreNet Global and the IIDA

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L AW F I R M E X P E R I E N C E

H O K ’ S L AW F I R M T H I N K TA N K

collaboration technologies that allow

Several years ago HOK convened a group

participants from other HOK offices to

of professional designers, managers and

interact with colleagues in a way that very

pre-design experts from around the world,

much feels like meeting in person.

who have the most extensive experience delivering law firm space and who are well-

The current members of HOK’s Law Firm

published on the topic. What began as a

Think Tank have collectively planned,

brainstorming exercise evolved into what

programmed, designed and delivered almost

we now refer to as HOK’s “Law-firm Think

8 million SF of law firm space globally. This

Tank.” This group meets quarterly to discuss

team’s collaborative input allows the best

business issues in the legal industry, but the

possible planning and design solutions to be

core mission of this group is to understand

developed in the most efficient way.

these trends and consider how space might best support the work style and culture of

HOK LAW CLIENTS

today’s law firm.

Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld Arnold & Porter LLP

To do this, the group pushes forward ideas

Ausley & McMullen

that are affecting the legal industry today

Baker Botts

and studies concepts from other corporate

Baker & McKenzie

and professional services organizations that

Blakes

are relevant to law firm design.

Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore Borden Ladner Gervais LLP

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Our worksessions are conducted virtually

Broad and Cassel

using one of HOK’s Advanced Collaboration

Bryan Cave

Rooms (ACRs), which feature a combination

Carlton Fields

of Cisco Telepresence® high definition

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton

video conferencing and Thunder Desktop®

Cook, Yancey, King & Galloway


Crosby, Heafey, Roach & May

Lillick & McHose

Davis and Company

Los Angeles County Bar Association

Debevoise & Plimpton

Lynberg & Watkins

Dechert LLP

Lyon and Lyon LLP

DLA Piper

McCarthy Tetrault LLP

Dreier Stein & Kahan

McGuire Woods LLP

Dutton Brock LLP

Nossaman LLP

Ferruzzo & Ferruzzo

O’Donnell Shaeffer

Finley Kumble Wagner Heine

O’Melveny & Myers

Fraser Milner Casgrain

Oppenhoff & Rädler

Gaedertz, Quack, Krelle, Vieregge

Parker Hudson Rainer & Dobbs

Gallop Johnson Chromalloy

Pillsbury Madison & Sutro LLP

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher

Reynolds Porter Chamberlain

Guilfoil Symington Petzall & Shoemake

Riordan & McKinzie

Gunderson Dettmer LLP

Rogers & Hardin

Gunster, Yoakley, Criser & Stewart

Senniger Powers

Hall, Booth, Smith & Slover

Shaw, Pittman, Potts & Trowbridge

Hancock Rothert & Bunshoft

Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton

Haynes and Boone

SJ Berwin

Heller Ehrman

Stroock & Stroock & Lavan

Holland & Knight

Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Husch & Eppenberger

Van Etten Suzumoto & Becket

Irell & Manella

Vinson & Elkins LLP

Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue

Wessing

Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP

White & Case LLP

Littler, Mendelson, Fastiff, Tichy

Williams Shifino

& Mathiason

Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering

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L AW F I R M B E N C H M A R K S

A C U LT U R E O F L E A R N I N G

HOK looks at broader trends and their

For many years, there has been a heavy

impact on the workplace, understanding

reliance in the interior design industry

the business driver behind each trend and

on benchmarking to establish law firm

its potential applicability to new clients.

design. While benchmarks can be useful for

Benchmarking information from our own

comparison of certain metrics, the reality

work, published other projects, or the Legal

is that each firm is a unique business and

Industry Council of IFMA Benchmarking

deserves a strategy developed around their

report, which HOK sponsored exclusively,

practice, culture and operations and not a cookie cutter solution based on what other law firms have done. While giving a sense of very general trends such as RSF per attorney, what benchmarking does not do is communicate the effectiveness of the work environment in supporting another firm’s practice. When so many firms have been designed to look like each other, the spaces are often outdated from the day of move in. For example, most attorney offices are designed the same way they were 20 years ago, even though technology has evolved significantly since then. So, what is most effective process for understanding how to design a law office that will remain relevant for a new lease term, adapting to technology, new generations of lawyers, and competitive legal practice?

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will provide contextual and comparative data. Folded together with the strategic programming process, the result is workplace made for the business, not copied from another, potentially irrelevant example.

WHAT WE ARE

HEARING Excerpts from the Yale student reponses to HOK’s Law Student Survey


“Most lawyers should be allowed to telecommute from home most days of the week. It is environmentally wasteful to continue to require them to commute 5 days a week on overcrowded roads. Law firms need to think outside the box on how to use the internet to lower the need for gasoline.”

“Sustainability is very important to me, and I expect law firms to have a plan to conserve energy and lower their carbon footprint – if only because it tells me that this is a law firm that is conservative and not wasteful with their money.”

“Natural light, a window, independent office spaces with an open door policy . . . these are all necessities. In fact, it would be best if everyone kept their doors either completely or halfway open. Closed doors give off a vibe of isolation and reclusiveness.”

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At Gunderson Dettmer in Menlo Park, CA, HOK clustered the Attorney offices in glass front offices around shared collaboration areas.

At Gunderson Dettmer in Menlo Park, CA, HOK clustered the Attorney offices in glass front offices around shared collaboration areas.

Why Bother Coming to the Office When You Can Work Anywhere? Planning today’s law offices for interaction Recently I worked on a comprehensive workplace strategy for a large law firm. The study included detailed surveys, time utilization and space analyses, and workshops organized by employee type and practice group. The goal was to optimize this firm’s work environment by identifying the relevant (and irrelevant) components and determining the ideal mix. Attracting the best and brightest was a major concern of the firm, so the partners were very interested in the associates’ opinions on the workplace. One of the key findings was the strong link between interaction and the associates’ job satisfaction and performance. The associates who felt they were doing their best work also believed they had sufficient opportunities to interact with their peers and partners. By contrast, the least-satisfied associates reported few opportunities to engage with their colleagues. h o k .c o m

During one workshop, an associate noted how valuable it was to communicate with a busy partner when he went for coffee in the morning. Through the course of a typical day, the associate might try to drop into the partner’s office, only to find him on the phone or in a meeting. The associate would hover at the door waiting for the partner to become free. Sometimes, he would return to his desk on the other side of the floor and try again later to meet with the partner. The only sure way to get the partner’s feedback was to make an appointment through his secretary. And if the associate could get the partner’s attention in his office, the discussions often were formal. In the pantry area, on the other hand, he felt more comfortable running an idea by the partner in a casual manner. He made it clear that the casual interaction was much more valuable than the formal interaction. During the workplace analysis study, one of the senior partners on the real estate committee mentioned something compelling: Law firms no longer compete on processes. Instead, they compete on the knowledge and strategies of the individuals within the firm. Most law firms have a strong knowledge management system populated with many templates and work product examples. This partner pointed out that an associate could easily find a template and implement it on a case. Yet he noted that the template did not indicate whether the brief was successful, whether other variations of that brief existed, or what the attorney who used it would do differently the next


workplace may offer the most potential. The interconnecting stairway, for example, is one of the best ways to stimulate interaction because it brings people together from more than one floor. These stairways can take up valuable real estate on multiple floors while adding a ubstantial expense to a project. Yet the value they contribute in influencing people to socialize in non-threatening, informal ways seems to offer a substantial return on investment. Though creating coffee areas is an undeniably effective way to encourage this type of social interaction, these spaces don’t necessarily need seating. They simply need to be ample enough to allow people to step to the side and engage in conversations. Planning concepts and materials can contribute to the creation of lively neighborhood-like environments by providing vital visual connections. Long, narrow corridors with opaque walls, for example, don’t contribute to a collaborative workplace. While attorneys still need long periods of heads-down concentration time and high levels of privacy, they do each other a disservice when they hole up in an enclosed office. Lately we’re seeing an increase in the amount of glass on attorney office fronts, even if it is screened for visual privacy and carefully detailed for acoustic privacy. Even adding a modest amount of glass to office fronts draws natural light into the interior while linking the office occupant to others in the workplace. Using this glass also can add points required to help a space achieve LEED certification.

At McGuire Woods in Century City, CA,in HOK breakout space top and At McGuire Woods Century designed City, CA, HOK designed breakout space atat thethe top and bottom of the interconnecting that serves theconference conference centercenter, as well as informal discussions. bottom of the interconnecting stair thatstair serves the as well as informal discussions. time. This is the type of insight that can only be gained through face to face discussions. The partner expressed frustration that associates stayed in their offices with the doors closed, communicating only through email and not interacting by choice. It further emphasized the business imperative of fostering informal interaction. What’s the best way to incorporate true interaction — the type that often generates the best ideas — into the law firm workplace? I have seen many attorney’s lounges sitting empty. Many of these spaces appear to have been modeled after lounges in corporate or high-tech client spaces, and resemble more of a party space than a serious gathering area. In the fast-paced legal environment, the stigma of being seen ‘not working’ in a high-visibility space doomed them to failure. When planning any type of office space, I inevitably think about Malcolm Gladwell’s “Designs for Working” story for the New Yorker’s December 11, 2000, issue (http://www.gladwell.com/2000/2000_12_11_a_working.htm). Applying ideas about planning urban spaces for serendipity and creativity expressed by Jane Jacobs in her 1961 book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities to workplace design, Gladwell articulates a belief that designing an office with the best qualities of Greenwich Village would create the most innovation. “To thrive,” writes Gladwell, “an office space must have a diversity of uses—it must have the workplace equivalent of houses and apartments and shops and industry. … Offices need the sort of social milieu that Jane Jacobs found on the sidewalks of the West Village.”

The way we arrange these offices can create even more opportunities for making visual connections. Law firms may not be ready to disturb the status quo of arranging rows of private offices along the windows, but designers should study alternative arrangements such as clustered offices which improve visual connections while maintaining privacy. This is quite achievable in real estate markets where costs or other factors drive some offices into the interior. Of course attorneys will never want to feel like they are working on what Gladwell calls “the noisy bustling ballet of Hudson Street.” Even so, designers of law offices can create environments that increase the type of interaction that compels attorneys and staff members to talk to each other as comfortably as they would on a Greenwich Village street corner.

Catherine Haley Director of Interior Design HOK, Washington DC Catherine Haley has nearly 20 years of experience in strategy and design of work environments. Her projects include over a dozen law firms as well as corporate offices, conference centers, courthouses, and labs.

This approach leads to a hypothesis that the best way for a space to foster casual social interaction is ‘by accident.’ Chance meetings by people moving through a h o k .c o m


D E CHE RT WAS HI NGTO N, DC


D E CHE RT WAS HI NGTO N, DC


M CG U IR E W OO DS


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