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HOK

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HOK

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Published by ORO Editions Publishers of Architecture, Art, and Design Publisher: Gordon Goff www.oroeditions.com info@oroeditions.com Copyright © 2017 HOK Group, Inc. ISBN: 978-1-940743-21-9 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 First Edition Color Separations and Printing: ORO Group Ltd. Printed in China. Proofreader: Jake Anderson Production Manager: Usana Shadday All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including electronic, mechanical, photocopying of microfilming, recording, or otherwise (except that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press) without written permission from the publisher. ORO Editions makes a continuous effort to minimize the overall carbon footprint of its publications. As part of this goal, ORO Editions, in association with Global ReLeaf, arranges to plant trees to replace those used in the manufacturing of the paper produced for its books. Global ReLeaf is an international campaign run by American Forests, one of the world’s oldest nonprofit conservation organizations. Global ReLeaf is American Forests’ education and action program that helps individuals, organizations, agencies, and corporations improve the local and global environment by planting and caring for trees. You must not circulate this book in any other binding or cover and you must impose this same condition on any acquirer.


PREFACE

“Achieving great design with technical

Achieving great design with technical excellence

excellence means setting bold design

means setting bold aspirations that are achieved

aspirations ...” Great design is realized at the intersection of art, craft and science. Technical excellence is critical to that realization and it is important that everyone understands the difference between technical competence and technical excellence, as well as the importance of each to our aspirations for our constantly developing practice. Technical competence is essential to the delivery of good projects and forms the foundation of our professional responsibilities: code compliance, interdisciplinary coordination, good specifications, clear documents and effective construction phase services. Technical excellence requires all of these competencies and much more. It demands a creative process that melds the craft of building with the science of buildings. It is an exciting and joyous process by which a deep understanding of the nature of materials—how they are composed, fabricated and installed—can coax from those materials the communication of a building’s underlying design concept.

by independent thinking, building science and sound judgment—all supported by a collaborative team and advanced digital technology. We provide the best service to both our contractual and extended clients by realizing great designs that are enjoyed by those who experience them, and whose elegant expression is informed by intelligence, efficiency and craft. The 2017 Design Annual illustrates a diverse range of building typologies and scales, from concepts to completed works that exemplify the integration of design ambition with technical excellence. The places and spaces we create combine imagination and knowledge to make the world a better place. Ours is a constant endeavor to evolve and improve, informed by optimism and the thrill of creative effort. Speaking for everyone in HOK, I hope you enjoy seeing our work from the past year as much as we have enjoyed creating it. Carl Galioto, FAIA President


TABLE OF CONTENTS

AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION

COMMERCIAL

CORPORATE

CULTURAL

GOVERNMENT

LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal B New York, New York, USA

12

New LaGuardia Airport Master Plan New York, New York, USA

38

1101 16th Street NW Washington, D.C., USA

54

The Allen Mixed-Use Development Houston, Texas, USA

64

Ghirardelli Square Plaza San Francisco, California, USA

78

Mixed-Use Development Design Competition Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

88

Our Urban Midwest Chicago, Illinois, USA

100

Tower Design Competition Sydney, Australia

114

Bentall Kennedy Office Toronto, Ontario, Canada

128

Corporate Amenities Building for Confidential Client Texas, USA

136

Dairy Farmers of America Headquarters Kansas City, Kansas, USA

146

Dentsu Aegis Network Office Los Angeles, California, USA

160

Polsinelli Offices Dallas, Texas, USA / Denver, Colorado, USA

168

White & Case Office New York, New York, USA

184

Al Fozan Mosque Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia

196

Nile Valley Aquaponics Facility Kansas City, Missouri, USA

206

Central Bank of Kuwait Headquarters Kuwait City, Kuwait

212


HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

JUSTICE PRODUCT DESIGN RESIDENTIAL

SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

SPORTS + RECREATION + ENTERTAINMENT

Center for Academic Medicine for Confidential Client California, USA

220

Ng Teng Fong General and Jurong Community Hospitals Jurong, Singapore

236

Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse San Francisco, California, USA

248

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Design Competition New York, New York, USA

256

Davidson County Criminal Justice Center Nashville, Tennessee, USA

274

Scientific Lab Furniture System

288

633 S. LaSalle Street Tower Chicago, Illinois, USA

296

Sutton Place Design Competition New York, New York, USA

304

Education Building for Confidential Client California, USA

316

The Francis Crick Institute London, UK

326

Medical Research Building for Confidential Client California, USA

348

University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine Tampa, Florida, USA

358

Major League Soccer Stadium St. Louis, Missouri, USA

368

Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium Miami, Florida, USA

376


PROJECT LOCATIONS HOK 2017 Design Annual Projects HOK Office

Bentall Kennedy Office 1101 16th Street NW Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Design Competition 633 S. LaSalle Street Tower

LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal B

Our Urban Midwest Major League Soccer Stadium

New LaGuardia Airport Master Plan

Nile Valley Aquaponics Facility

Sutton Place Design Competition

Dairy Farmers of America Headquarters

White & Case Office

Polsinelli Office Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse Ghirardelli Square Plaza Center for Academic Medicine for Confidential Client Medical Research Building for Confidential Client Dentsu Aegis Network Office Education Building for Confidential Client

Davidson County Criminal Justice Center Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine The Allen Mixed-Use Development Corporate Amenities Building for Confidential Client Polsinelli Office


The Francis Crick Institute

Central Bank of Kuwait Headquarters Al Fozan Mosque Mixed-Use Development Design Competition

Ng Teng Fong General and Jurong Community Hospitals

Tower Design Competition


departures hall concept


AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION

LAGUARDIA AIRPORT CENTRAL TERMINAL B New York, New York, USA

The design of LaGuardia Airport’s Central Terminal B will provide a state-of-the-art passenger terminal and modern New York travel experience. The 35-gate terminal will replace the existing 1964 Central Terminal Building and optimize use of the airport’s limited airside and landside real estate. The design for the new terminal will transform LaGuardia Airport into a single, unified hub with expanded transportation access and best-in-class passenger amenities. A phased construction approach allows it to be built on the constrained site with minimal impact to existing operations. To optimize airfield performance and efficiencies, the team devised an island-concourse gate configuration. A pair of pedestrian bridges connects the headhouse to the island concourses. The bridges traverse over active taxilanes and offer sweeping views of the airfield and Manhattan skyline. The interior will feature intuitive wayfinding, ensuring the efficient movement of passengers through the terminal. Other enhancements will include an abundance of natural light at all levels, short curb-to-gate walking distances, regional cuisine and concession offerings, and spacious waiting areas with ample seating capacity. By moving the terminal closer to Grand Central Parkway, the project will expand the airport taxiways by more than two miles and reduce airport ground delays. Under a 35-year lease agreement with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, LaGuardia Gateway Partners (LGP) will design, build, manage and maintain LaGuardia’s Terminal B. LGP includes Vantage Airport Group, Skanska and Meridiam for development and equity investment; SkanskaWalsh as the design-build joint venture; HOK and WSP for architecture and engineering; and Vantage Airport Group for airport operations and management.

13


14

INFORMATION CLIENT LaGuardia Gateway Partners

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Ruggiero, AIA 1.3 million sq. ft. / 120,700 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. terminal layout

Half of the gates in the new Terminal B will open to the public in 2019. The main terminal area will open in early 2020, and a second set of gates will open in two phases—one later in 2020 and the final phase in 2021. The project is expected to achieve LEED Silver certification for sustainable design. HOK is also providing master planning advisory services for LaGuardia in collaboration with the Port Authority and Delta Air Lines, which operates Terminal C and D on the airport’s east end.


2. roof plan

3. headhouse study model

2.

3.

15


view from departures road


“The design is intended as a commentary on the contemporary expectation of air travel—a celebration of movement utilizing an architecture of transparency and fluidity. The terminal is a civic building serving as a noble welcome to New York. In the spirit of the city’s great high-rises like the Woolworth and Chrysler buildings, which in their time were considered cathedrals of commerce, we see the new terminal as a cathedral of mobility.” - Peter Ruggiero, AIA, Design Principal


18

1. construction timeline

2. arrivals floor

1.

2.


19


20

SECTION 1. north-south section

2. east-west section

1.

2.


21


1. feature wall study model


2. arrivals level


24

1. pedestrian bridges + airfield

2. concessions + bridge floor

2. 1.


25


pedestrian bridge


28

1. pedestrian bridge + headhouse connection


2. departures hall

29


30

1. pedestrian bridge structural model


2. concourse entry

31


headhouse view of airfield


34

1. departures hall

2. departures floor

2. 1.


35


aerial view of central terminal b


conceptual aerial view looking east


AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION

NEW LAGUARDIA AIRPORT MASTER PLAN New York, New York, USA

HOK’s comprehensive master plan and design guidelines for the new LaGuardia Airport will ensure visual continuity as the projects and phases of development proceed beyond construction of Central Terminal B, designed by the LaGuardia Gateway Partners joint venture of HOK/WSP. The guiding principle for the plan is to create a single unified airport of multiple terminals across a varied landscape of constraints and existing conditions. The master plan team developed design guidelines for the long-term redevelopment of all airport facilities to ensure design consistency and to improve the passenger experience—from the moment of arrival to the time of departure. A key element of the plan is to phase and implement various stages of programming while the airport continues to operate. The master plan concept focuses on the exterior expression as viewed from the Grand Central Parkway—a view that will project LaGuardia’s new brand to the community and world. Folded roof plates define the roofscape and form of the new Central Terminal B, giving LaGuardia a distinctive shape. Terminal C and the new AirTrain stations will reinforce this architectural language. The prominent roof shape introduces a unifying canopy and defines a continuous edge that integrates the new structures with the existing garage and adjacent support facilities. The flanking terminals will use similar headhouse massing and architectural details to create visual connectivity. The architectural expression of two AirTrain stations will unify Terminal B with the new Terminal C. Located in the heart of the new airport, the Central Hall will provide a grand entry point for arriving passengers by car or AirTrain while also linking Terminals B and C. A proposed airport hotel will anchor the Central Hall.

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40

INFORMATION CLIENT The Port Authority of New York + New Jersey

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Greg Cranford, AIA 2.8 million sq. ft. / 260,100 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. early concept sketch

The master plan guidelines unite over 2,000 continuous linear feet of frontage along the parkway and further unify the airport by defining a comprehensive approach to roadways, parking and public transit with the AirTrain link to Willets Point Station. Extensive airfield improvements such as dual and loop taxilanes will help the new LaGuardia Airport function efficiently into its next century of service.


2. conceptual view of central hall + airtrain lga station

41


diagrammatic plan of core terminal area + connectors

A. concourse a B. concourse b C. west parking garage D. terminal b E. central hall F. grand central parkway G. concourse d H. concourse e I. concourse f J. concourse g K. concourse connector L. east parking garage

A

M. terminal c

B

D

E

� VAN ��

DN

F

C


G

H

I

737 -9 00

K

L

M

J


44

SITE STRATEGY 1. gate area redevelopment plan

1.


2. redefined airside/landside boundary

45

3. increased circulation capacity of taxilanes

3.2

4. increased gate flexibility

CORE TERMINAL AREA

3.2.1 CORE GATE AREA REDEVELOPMENT 3.2 TERMINAL AREA TERMINAL B TERMINAL AREA 3.2 CORE

Tab

The Redevelopment of Terminals B and C involves moving the terminals closer to 3.2.1 GATE AREA REDEVELOPMENT Grand Central Parkway to provide increased airside operational areas; the basic 3.2.1 GATE AREA REDEVELOPMENT TERMINAL B approach being a recognized need to improve the flow of aircraft premise of this traffic on the B airfieldof and apron parking areas. The Redevelopment Terminals B and C involves moving the terminals closer to TERMINAL Grand Central Parkway to provideBincreased airside operational areas; the basic The Redevelopment of Terminals and C involves moving the terminals closer to An island-gate concept for Terminal B of 35 gates will providethe increased premise of thisParkway approachto being a recognized need to improve flow of aircraft Grand Central provide increased airside operational areas; the basic maneuverability and flexibility aircraft movements around the the flow terminal for the traffic onofthe airfield and apron areas. premise this approach beingfor aparking recognized need to improve of aircraft multiple and numerous traffic onairlines the airfield and apronaircraft parkingtypes areas.operating at LaGuardia Airport. With the elimination of dead-end alleyways, Terminal B will have flowAn island-gate concept for Terminalaircraft B of 35operation gates willatprovide increased through capability with provide a more efficient operation andthe reduced ground delays. maneuverability and flexibility for aircraft movements terminal for the An island-gate concept for Terminal B of 35 gates will around provide increased multiple airlines and aircraft types operatingaround at LaGuardia Airport. maneuverability and numerous flexibility for aircraft movements the terminal forWith the the The 35 gates at and Terminal B are aircraft made uptypes of operation 17operating gates on the west B most concourse elimination of dead-end alleyways, aircraft at at Terminal willAirport. have flowmultiple airlines numerous LaGuardia With the A, and 18 gates onwith the adjacent B. Each ofatthese canflowthrough capability provide aconcourse more efficient operation andconcourses reduced ground delays. elimination of dead-end alleyways, aircraft operation Terminal B will have accommodate twowith ADGprovide IV aircraft within an otherwise ADG IIIreduced fleet. Anground alternate through capability a more efficient operation and delays. layout alsoatbeen developed such that gates aton Terminal B would accommodate The 35has gates Terminal B are made up ofall17 gates the west most concourse as a 35 design aircraft ADG III, andmade no ADG IV 17 gates. In of this case, and as illustrated in the A, and 18 gates on the adjacent concourse B. Each concourses can The gates at Terminal B are up of gates onthese the west most concourse adjacent 3.6: New Airport Gate Area Redevelopment accommodate two IVLaGuardia aircraft within anB. otherwise ADG III fleet. An Plan, alternate A, and 18Figure gates onADG the adjacent concourse Each of these concourses can a total of 38 gates accommodated, 19 gates eachat ofTerminal the two layout hascan alsobe been developed such that allatotherwise gates Bfleet. would accommodate two ADG IV aircraft within an ADG IIIconcourses. Anaccommodate alternate as a design aircraft III, andsuch no ADG case, B and as illustrated in the2. layout has also beenADG developed thatIVallgates. gatesInatthis Terminal would accommodate adjacent Figure NewIII, LaGuardia Airport Gate Area Plan, a total of as a design aircraft and no ADG IV gates. In thisRedevelopment case, and as illustrated in the TERMINAL C 3.6:ADG 38 gatesFigure can be3.6: accommodated, 19 Airport gates atGate eachArea of the two concourses. adjacent New LaGuardia Redevelopment Plan, a total of Terminal C adopts a modified pier layout incorporating dual taxilanes between the 38 gates can be accommodated, 19 gates at each of the two concourses. concourses, versus the single taxilane operation today. This layout represents the TERMINAL most efficientClayout as there is insufficient space to use the island concourse concept. Dual between concourses provide increased capacity Terminal C adopts modified pier the layout incorporating dual taxilanestaxiing between the TERMINAL Ctaxi alanes and bypass capability for aircraft in theoperation terminal area, for reduced taxi-in concourses, versusathe single taxilane today.allowing Thistaxilanes layout represents the Terminal C adopts modified pier layout incorporating dual between the and taxi-out times and reduced gate delays.operation Thespace introduction of and flow-through most efficient layout as single there is insufficient to use thedual island concourse concourses, versus the taxilane today. This layout represents the taxilanes moretaxi thanlanes doubles the airside areaspace for aircraft, increasing use concept. Dual between the concourses provide increased taxiing gate capacity most efficient layout as there is insufficient to usegreatly the island concourse flexibility. Incapability addition, the new taxilane configuration allows for for more flexibility during and bypass forbetween aircraft in the terminal area, allowing reduced taxi-in and concept. Dual taxi lanes the concourses provide increased taxiing capacity irregular events likereduced adverse weather or terminal ground holds. taxi-out times and gate delays. The introduction of dualfor and flow-through and bypass capability for aircraft in the area, allowing reduced taxi-in and taxilanes moreand thanreduced doublesgate the delays. airside area for aircraft, greatly gate use taxi-out times The introduction of dual increasing and flow-through Additionally, each new gate will be ableconfiguration to accommodate any aircraft up to ADG III, flexibility. In addition, the new taxilane allows for more flexibility during taxilanes more than doubles the airside area for aircraft, greatly increasing gate use and someevents willaddition, accommodate ADG IV, assuring there is always a gate available for irregular like adverse weather orconfiguration groundthat holds. flexibility. In the new taxilane allows for more flexibility during the aircraft types that are arriving at the terminal. irregular events like adverse weather or ground holds. Additionally, each new gate will be able to accommodate any aircraft up to ADG III, In summary, main ofbe this approach to gate area improvements will be: and some willthe accommodate ADG IV, assuring that there is always a gate Additionally, each newbenefits gate will able to accommodate any aircraft up toavailable ADG III, for •the An increase ofthat approximately in taxilane length available for ground types are arriving atmiles the terminal. and aircraft some will accommodate ADG 2 IV, assuring that there is always a gate available for maneuvering; 3. the aircraft types that are arriving at the terminal. •In summary, Decongestion of maneuvering aircraft on and stand implementing dual the main benefits of this approach to off gate areaby improvements will be:or loop taxilanes; •In summary, An increase of approximately 2 miles in taxilane length for ground the main benefits of this approach to gate areaavailable improvements will be: •• Ability of every gate to be able2to accommodate minimum ADG IIIfor aircraft, maneuvering; An increase of approximately miles in taxilane length available ground whereas currently a number of gates are restricted to regional jets only; • Decongestion of maneuvering aircraft on and off stand by implementing dual or maneuvering; Availability of some dedicated aircraft deicing positions willby allow aircraft todual move loop taxilanes; •• Decongestion of maneuvering on and offthat stand implementing oroff stand sooner making for use of gates. • Ability of every gate to bemore ableefficient to accommodate minimum ADG III aircraft, loop taxilanes; whereas a number of to gates are restricted to regional only; • Ability of currently every gate to be able accommodate minimum ADGjets III aircraft, By more areaaon the airside to improve aircraft operational areas, the • providing Availability of some dedicated positions thatto will allow aircraft to move off whereas currently number ofdeicing gates are restricted regional jets only; footprint area available both passenger processing facilities andaircraft supporting stand sooner for more efficient use of gates. • Availability of making somefor dedicated deicing positions that will allow to move off roadway, and car has naturally been modified standtransportation sooner makinginfrastructure for more efficient useparking of gates. as The requirements program has not been reduced, butareas, a combined By well. providing more area onfor thethis airside to improve aircraft operational the solution of redistribution ofthe some functions, car parking for example, and greater footprint area available for both passenger processing facilities and supporting By providing more area on airside to improve aircraft operational areas, the vertical is being proposed. roadway, transportation infrastructure and processing car parking facilities has naturally been modified footprintdevelopment area available for both passenger and supporting as well. The requirementsinfrastructure for this program beenhas reduced, butbeen a combined roadway, transportation andhas car not parking naturally modified Further details of how each ofthis these projects function and work together as one solution of redistribution of some functions, car parking for example, greater as well. The requirements for program has not been reduced, but and a combined airport follow. vertical development is being proposed. solutionwill of redistribution of some functions, car parking for example, and greater vertical development is being proposed. Further details of how each of these projects function and work together as one airport will follow. Further details of how each of these projects function and work together as one airport will follow.

Chapter 3 - Recommendations

4.

Tab

Tab Nu

Nu Nu

Nu De Nu

Nu RO De

De

RO Figure 3.2: Masterplan, Redefined Airside/Landside Boundary

Figure 3.2: Masterplan, Redefined Airside/Landside Boundary Figure 3.2: Masterplan, Redefined Airside/Landside Boundary

Figure 3.3: Masterplan, Increased Circulation Capacity of Taxilanes

Figure 3.3: Masterplan, Increased Circulation Capacity of Taxilanes Figure 3.3: Masterplan, Increased Circulation Capacity of Taxilanes

Figure 3.4: Masterplan, Increased Gate Flexability

NEW LAGUARDIA PLAN AND DESIGN GUIDELINES I SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 Figure 3.4:THE Masterplan, Increased Gate Flexability

RO


1. conceptual long-term development plan aerial

2. conceptual long-term development elevation along the grand central parkway

1.

2.


conceptual view of central hall airtrain lga station from the grand central parkway


conceptual view of the east airtrain lga station and landside connector from the grand central parkway


“The vision for a single, unified airport presented design and implementation challenges. By condensing the primary elements of the new Central Terminal B into three key components―a ‘big roof,’ a continuous brow and a continuous enclosure language―we were able to establish parameters for a single language across all the varied aspects of the Grand Central Parkway frontage. This also reinforced linking Terminal B to Central Hall, existing and new parking structures, AirTrain stations and the new Terminal C. We worked extensively with the Port Authority, airport stakeholders and Governor Cuomo’s Airport Advisory Panel to ensure the guidelines illustrated great design for the airport of tomorrow, consistency and achievable programs for all parties.” - Greg Cranford, AIA, Design Principal


conceptual aerial view looking west


building lobby


COMMERCIAL

1101 16th STREET NW Washington, D.C., USA

The design rejuvenates and links two adjacent 1970s buildings into one freestanding, trophy-class office building along 16th Street, framing vistas to the White House in downtown Washington, D.C. The concept pays respect to this historic corridor while introducing modern elements including an all-glass curtain wall system. As with many formal buildings within the district, the design team chose limestone as the primary exterior material. This is accentuated by glass curtain wall systems with evergreen vines supported along vertical tension cables. The irregular structural bays of each building are cloaked by new west and south facades. This new unified facade design expression required careful structural reinforcement at the existing edge of slab conditions. Evergreen vines positioned at the glass curtain wall of alternating floors are sustained by a hydroponic system that continuously circulates tempered and nutrient-rich water to ensure growth throughout the year. The front plaza, which lies beyond the property line, was conceived as a public park. Though green space is not common along the 16th Street corridor, this addition was fully supported by the district’s Historic Preservation Review Board. Spanning the full 16-foot floor-to-ceiling height of the main lobby is a three-dimensional sculptural wall that connects to the secondary lobby at the north and spreads down into the subterranean lobby. The solid basswood feature wall is fabricated with Computer Numerical Control technology optimized for efficient material use and installation. A monumental stair floating within a new two-story atrium complements the fluid, dynamic sculptural wall while seamlessly connecting the previously separate building lobbies. This connective tissue is mirrored in the public park, which features an aluminum-perforated element that carves through the landscape and links the main and secondary building entrances.

55


The team took advantage of this unique repositioning opportunity along the 16th Street corridor to create an additional level of tenant space that replaces two mechanical penthouses on top of the existing structure. Adhering to zoning restrictions, this new penthouse level is set back from the main facade. This creates public and private rooftop terraces with views of the White House a few blocks to the south.

INFORMATION CLIENT Akridge

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Bill Hellmuth, FAIA

The design team is targeting LEED Platinum and WELL certification.

100,000 sq. ft. / 9,290 sq. m.

109 ft. / 33 m. tall 8 floors

annual EUI: 30 kBtu/sf/yr 32.6% below ASHRAE 2007

PLAN 1. existing ground floor

2. lobby concept sketch

16th street, n.w.

56

1.

l street, n.w.

2.


57

3. ground floor

A. building lobby B. landscape plaza C. tenant lobby D. tenant space

D

16th street, n.w.

C

B

A

l street, n.w.

D


58

1. existing condition


2. new exterior view

59


60

FACADE 1. west elevation


2. stainless steel cable trellis

4. section view of curtain wall with trellis

3. trellis with hydroponics vegetation

5. plan view of curtain wall with trellis

2.

4.

3.

5.

61


view of penthouse lounge + terrace


“The building sits within the historic context of 16th Street, which frames the vista to the White House. It combines contextual massing with contemporary details and provides a complete surprise in the lobby.� - Bill Hellmuth, FAIA, Design Principal


1. view to public green


COMMERCIAL 2. study models

THE ALLEN MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT Houston, Texas, USA

Located west of downtown Houston along the Buffalo Bayou, this luxury mixed-use development on Allen Parkway will feature a 42-story hotel and condominium tower, a 22-story office building and a retail pavilion. Green space connects all the architectural elements. The orientation and design of the buildings provide clear, open sight lines. A consistent design concept focused on form, light, materiality and transparency ties together the three distinct components. The hotel and condominium high-rise will be an iconic addition to Houston’s skyline. The tower is made up of three uniform volumes stacked horizontally, with a dramatic shift in the middle. Residents will enjoy expansive views of the park and city. Luxury condominiums on the upper levels feature individual balconies with luxurious “plunge pools.” Amenities include a pool and terraced gardens. Thompson Hotels, a New York-based luxury hotel chain, will operate the 180-key hotel. The design creates a locally inspired Texas experience that incorporates Thompson’s brand DNA. The adjacent office building with approximately 340,000 square feet of Class A office space will share the tower’s sleek, glazed look. The office tower will feature an interior park and a lively retail base. With an organic form and smooth curves, the retail pavilion welcomes the public into the complex. The ground-level structure will house retail outlets as well as a high-end fitness facility overlooking the outdoor public areas. Landscaped pathways, water features, outdoor seating and a civic art program encourage public activity on the site. A pedestrian overpass across Allen Parkway links the development to Buffalo Bayou Park.

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66

INFORMATION

3. landscape sketch - pavillion

CLIENT DC Partners and Tianqing R.E.D.

4. landscape sketch - walkway

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Roger Soto, AIA

5. landscape sketch - walkway

1.3 million sq. ft. / 120,700 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. massing sketch

2. site plan studies

1.

2.


67

3.

4.

5.


68

SITE STRATEGY

“We sought to connect and expand Buffalo Bayou Park into the project and organize the mixed uses around the creation of activated outdoor

1. location map

spaces on multiple levels. The project’s signature elements—the mixed-

2. site plan

use hotel and residential tower and the retail pavilion—engage the city at the skyline and at the ground level to provide both a landmark and a live-work-play experience that will be unique to Houston.” - Roger Soto, AIA, Design Principal

1.

2.


4. elevated park studies

3. building location studies

3.

4.

5. landscape studies

5.

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70

SITE PLAN 1. site

ODES A. retail pavilion B. hotel + condominium

ODES

A

ODES

C. office

FARMER’S MARKET

D. multifamily residential E. medical office building

FARMER’S MARKET FARMER’S MARKET B

OUTDOOR CULTURAL EVENTS

C

public park - market setting

OUTDOOR CULTURAL EVENTS OUTDOOR CULTURAL EVENTS D

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE

public park - private event setting

OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE E

ALLEN PARKWAY MIXED USE _ HOUST public park - concert setting

ALLEN PARKWAY MIXED USE _ HOUST


PRECEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

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3. landscape activity diagram

2. concept landscape

PRECEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

PRECEDENTS - PROGRAM PRECEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

ENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

CEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

PRECEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

Farmer’s market

Outdoor movie

Shaded Walkway

Informal seating

PRECEDENTS - STREETSCAPE + PARK

EETSCAPE + PARK

DECEMBER 01, 2016

DECEMBER 01, 2016

DECEMBER 01, 2016

DECEMBER 01, 2016

2.

DECEMBER 01, 2016

3.

DECEMBER 01, 2016

ALLEN PARKWAY MIXED USE _ HOUSTON, TX

ALLEN PARKWAY MIXED USE _ HOUSTON,

Outdoor exercise

Cultural events


72

1.


HOTEL/CONDO OPTION COMPARISON

1. view from buffalo bayou park

2. facade studies HOTEL/CONDOOPTION OPTIONCOMPARISON COMPARISON HOTEL/CONDO

HOTEL/CONDO OPTION COMPARISON

N2

N5

73

FACADE

OPTION 3

OPTION A

2.

OPTION 6

OPTION B

OPTION C

OPTION A


74

1. view from allen parkway


2. view into park

4. view from condominium

3. view into retail center

2.

3.

4.

75


aerial view


1. central plaza transformation


COMMERCIAL 2. view from the water

GHIRARDELLI SQUARE PLAZA San Francisco, California, USA

From housing the historic Ghirardelli Chocolate Company’s headquarters to becoming our nation’s first major adaptive reuse project, the 160-yearold Ghirardelli Square is one of the United States’ most enduring icons. In 1962, Lawrence Halprin and William Wurster repurposed the historic factory buildings into a tourism destination organized around a large public plaza. Recognizing their cultural value for future generations, the Woolen and Ghirardelli buildings were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Since the 1980s, a series of exterior alterations departed from Halprin’s 1960s vision. These changes introduced challenges including inaccessibility, poor visual connections, excessive clutter, blocked Bay views, incompatible materials and circulation pinch points. All of this combined to hinder use of the plaza and contributed to the Square’s decline. The team led the vision and master plan, design guidelines and design projects to revitalize the Square and guide future improvements. Today, the new Square has become a vital community space for San Francisco’s iconic waterfront, social fabric and urban landscape, providing settings for outdoor dining, art exhibitions, music festivals and more.

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INFORMATION CLIENT Jamestown, L.P.

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Brian Jencek, ASLA

3 acres / 1.2 hectares

HISTORY

1. Woolen Mill Era: 1858-1889

2. Chocolate Factory Era: 1892–1962

3. Mixed-Use Development Era: 1962-1967

Pioneer Woolen Mills circa 1862-1899 at the

Ghirardelli complex circa 1911. The Pioneer

Ghirardelli Square 1965. The property was

original shoreline.

Woolen Mills were originally built in 1862.

designed for adaptive reuse and rebranded

Between 1893 and 1919, the D. Ghirardelli

Ghirardelli Square by Lawrence Halprin and

company developed the site with several new

architects Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons.

buildings.


SITE PLAN

81

A

4. neighborhood context

A. aquatic park pier B. aquatic cove C. hyde street pier D. sf maritime national historic park

C

E. maritime museum F. ghirardelli square G. aquatic park

B

H. powell-hyde cable car I. galileo academy J. fort mason

D

G

H

E

J

beach street

P I

hyde street

north point street

larkin street

polk street

van ness avenue

P

F


82

The city-approved vision plan identified 14 ongoing projects focused on improving public access; day, night 1. site plan

and year-round uses; transportation connections; regional plantings; and thoughtful choreography of historic and modern material and furnishing palettes.

A. upper plaza B. fountain plaza

The vision plan, master plan, design guidelines and implementation projects reconnect the Square to its

C. larkin street

context, transportation lines and extraordinary views. New gateway design elements such as monolithic,

D. west plaza

reclaimed redwood timber seating, pedestal paving and regional plantings enable fresh uses and functions

E. larkin street + beach street stairs

while complementing the historic factory material palette.

beach street

E

D

C A

north point street

larkin street

polk street

B


High-performance design elements include the introduction of stormwater treatment gardens to reduce runoff and improve water 2. sustainability

quality returning to the Bay. Reclaimed redwood timbers are used for sculptural seating, tables and other amenities that link the Square to the Bay Area. Low-voltage, high-efficiency LED fixtures replace the historic incandescent masts, maintaining their character while improving energy performance. Heat island reduction is achieved through new, high-reflectivity precast concrete pavers that decrease the Square’s overall cooling and energy demands. Regionally native and adaptive vegetation replace the previous English garden plantings to reduce water demand and increase regional biodiversity. Because sustainability and accessibility go hand-in-hand, the design introduces universally accessible routes and systems that ensure access to these new amenities and sustainable features across the Square.

UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE ROUTES AND SYSTEMS

LOW-VOLTAGE, LED HIGH EFFICIENCY FIXTURES REUSED, RECLAIMED REDWOOD TIMBER BENCHES

STORMWATER TREATMENT GARDENS

HEAT ISLAND REDUCTION THROUGH HIGH REFLECTIVITY HARDSCAPE

REGIONALLY NATIVE AND ADAPTIVE VEGETATION

icons from the noun project

83


84

1. ground systems

2. pre-renovation

3. post-renovation

A. cast-in-place concrete B. brick inlay C. corrugated steel D. i-beam E. remnant foundation wall F. i-beam pedestal G. cast-in-place concrete 1 H. cast-in-place concrete 2 I. deteriorated waterproofing J. garage structural slab K. drainage pipe L. 6” x 12” concrete modular pavers M. 12” x 48” concrete modular pavers N. paving pedestal O. new waterproofing P. concrete structural slab Q. reuse existing drainage R. additional drainage 1.

The addition of suspended

A

paving systems creates voids beneath the terrace and

L M

B C

plaza for concealed electrical,

D

water and audiovisual

E

infrastructure connections that support plaza programs, events, festivals and films while maintaining the sense of openness and order that is

F G H I J

N

K

Q R

O P

central to the historic factory context.

2.

3.


85

4. materiality A. reclaimed redwood timber seating B. timeless materials C. new paving retraces historic grid patterns + textures D. board-formed concrete wall detail

A

C

B

D


86

1. upper plaza looking east toward heritage olive tree

“The revitalized Square serves multiple roles at multiple scales at the intersection of land, water, city and nature.� - Brian Jencek, ASLA, Design Principal


2. upper plaza looking north toward golden gate bridge

87


view from north


COMMERCIAL

MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT DESIGN COMPETITION Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The design creates a dynamic, multi-use development anchored by an existing luxury shopping mall. The two complementary, highperformance towers reflect the grandeur and upscale sophistication of the mall and its clientele. Similarities in the design language allow the towers—a 32-story office building and 35-story hotel and serviced apartment building—to function as a cohesive unit. The material and texture varies between the two towers, giving each distinct character. The office tower uses the contrast between two alternating glass types to create a texture varying from complete smoothness to deep patterns with vertical shading fins. The slightly taller hotel and serviced apartment tower features a faceted stone facade with deep-set windows and bronze accents that create a richness of color and texture reminiscent of obsidian, onyx or gold ore. Both buildings spring from their base with subtly curving forms to frame the vehicular entry to the development and a new ground-level mall entry. As they rise, the towers reinforce this welcoming gesture by twisting gently away from each other, creating a simple yet elegant composition that emphasizes the ground connections. Featuring nearly identical floor plans at the top and base of each tower, every floor plate has the same area. This provides a high degree of flexibility for commercial office layouts and room arrangements for the hotel and apartments. The hotel tower’s curved form maximizes the number of rooms facing the north side, which features desirable views over the main mall entry court as well as commanding views of the plateau beyond. Upper floors of both buildings offer dramatic glimpses of Riyadh’s city center and the King Abdullah Financial District to the south. To improve energy performance, the design team configured each tower to minimize the amount of eastern and western facade exposure to the harsh sun and positioned the buildings’ masses to shade each other in the morning and evening.

89


90

INFORMATION CLIENT Shomoul Holdings DESIGN PRINCIPAL Roger Soto, AIA

“A hotel and an office are functional opposites in many respects. While an office boasts openness and transparency, a hotel luxuriates in privacy and caters to the individual spirit. The two towers are harmonic opposites: complementary, not contradictory.” - Roger Soto, AIA, Design Principal

hotel 748,090 sq. ft. / 69,500 sq. m. office 710,420 sq. ft. / 66,000 sq. m. hotel 35 floors office 32 floors

CONCEPT 1. precedent


2. site plan

A. hotel tower B. office tower

B

A

91


92

DESIGN 1. model photo - view from north

2. diagram - dna of an icon

1.

2.

FIT

FORM

PROFILE

SKIN


3. model photo - view from south

93


2

Wh/m 1750

94

T O W E R

C O M P E T I T I O N

•

T H E

ENERGY

PROPOSED SCHEME: 1. insulationDAILY + wind INSOLATION VALUES ANNUAL AVERAGE

875

Wh/m2 1750

0

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Average Daily875

0 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Average Daily

69

A V E N U E S

R I Y A


g strategy, of this e effects h building. dgto analyze strategy, eof schematic this

T O W E R

C O M P E T I T I O N

T H E

A V E N U E S

R I Y A D H

95

2. tower form - self-shading

FORM - MORPHOLOGY

3. facade systems

4. facade systems - annual solar insulation

STRAIGHT EXTRUSION

GENTLE TWIST

RATIONALIZATION

I.2.

II. twist

III. stepping

extrusion

Each tower SYSTEM springs from OFFICE 1 its base with subtly curving forms to frame the pedestrian and vehicular entry to the development. OFFICE SYSTEM 1

EFFICIENCY

As they rise, the towers reinforce this OFFICE SYSTEM 2 welcoming gesture by twisting gently away from each other, creating a striking composition and emphasizing the importance of the OFFICE SYSTEM 2 moment of the towers’ connection at the ground. This effect turns the towers away from each other at the inside pocket, maximizing the sense of privacy and

torqued HOTELThe SYSTEM 1 mass of each building is simplified into a series of vertical “stacks,” establishing a unique scale for each tower and directly expressing the tometry at the east and west HOTELtwisting SYSTEM 1 ends of the buildings.

EFFICIENCY

PRECISION TUNING

IV. self-shading language HOTELThe SYSTEM 2 of stepped forms is expanded upon to create a series and south sides of each building, HOTELdramatically SYSTEM 2 increasing capacity for self-shading.

availability of expansive views for both the office and hotel.

3. hotel: north and south

hotel: east and west

office: east and west

office: north and south

19

FACADE DESIGN

4.

FACADE PRINCIPLESDESIGN The character of the building’s envelope is one of the most impactful aspects of the building aesthetic, perhaps only second to the building form. However, it is also a critical component of the building design impacting a wide range building PRINCIPLES The character of theof building’s performance metrics, daylight availability; envelope is one of the including: most impactful aspects of the

OFFICE SYSTEM

of inward-sloping folds on the north

STUDY After settling upon a final massing strategy, the same tools that informed the selection of this massing have also been used to examine the effects of the facade and shading systems for each building. Going forward, these tools will also be used to analyze STUDY After settling upon afi nal massing strategy, and same optimize subsequent studies during theofschematic the tools that informed the selection this

OFFICE SYSTEM


96

1.

1. view from west

2. aerial view of the development

2.


97


drop-off + entry


regional growth of chicago

1850

1870

1880 (Fire)

1890

1910

1930

1950


COMMERCIAL

OUR URBAN MIDWEST Chicago, Illinois, USA

This research study identifies and analyzes major population and lifestyle trends that impact urban development in the Midwest region of the U.S. The study reveals three macro trends within the region: a shifting population, challenges of deindustrialization and an increase in connectivity. While migration to the nation’s urban city centers remains a defining micro trend, the center of the nation continues to lose population as people relocate to the South and both coasts. As the Midwest continues experiencing the effects of de-industrialization, the region is also undergoing a small, but significant shift toward aligning its economies with new methods of production. Though the Midwest ranks fourth in the nation in the number of graduates with technology-focused degrees, a large percentage of these individuals leave the region after graduation. With a robust highway and train network, the Midwest is one of the most connected regions in the U.S. Leveraging this connectivity requires looking beyond the political borders of cities and states to view the region as an interconnected urban and economic unit. The research is helping the team evaluate the impact of its current project work within the broader context of the region’s future opportunities and challenges. Research insights are also guiding the studio’s expansion strategies. An exhibit within the HOK office highlights the practice’s regional impact to clients, prospects and other visitors. An accompanying booklet and presentation will be used for community outreach, educational activities and marketing opportunities.

1990

101


102

INFORMATION CLIENT HOK

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Domenic Salpietra, AIA

“To be as effective as possible in shaping our Midwestern cities through our practice, we must understand the context in which we work and live and the important challenges and opportunities shaping our region. Working within this context helps us identify and prioritize projects that will have a positive impact on reinvestment in our region.” - Domenic Salpietra, AIA, Design Principal

SHIFTING POPULATIONS high growth (>1.25%) normal growth (<1.25%) decline


103


104

SHIFTING POPULATIONS 1. population growth/decline of major midwestern cities

2. national gdp position + growth/decline

3 CHICAGO

INDIANAPOLIS

COLUMBUS

DETROIT

MILWAUKEE

2,719,000

852,000

822,000

688,000

599,000

2,896,000

792,000

715,000

945,000

597,000

CHICAG

610,55

476,446

28

1.

KANSAS CITY

MINNEAPOLIS

CLEVELAND

ST LOUIS

CINCINNATI

468,000

400,000

392,000

318,000

299,000

121,63

442,000

382,000

476,000

347,000

296,000

107,41

30

13

36

Population 2013 Population 2000 (Decline / Growth)

3

26

MILWAUKEE

CHICAGO

INDIANAPOLIS

COLUMBUS

DETROIT

MILWAUKEE

599,000

610,552M

125,864M

117,824M

236,500M

97,307M

597,000

476,446M

110,943M

96,482M

197,789M

86,779M

28

14

27

21

29

CINCINNATI

KANSAS CITY

MINNEAPOLIS

CLEVELAND

ST LOUIS

CINCINNATI

299,000

121,638M

235,733M

124,609M

149,951M

121,407M

296,000

107,411M

200,768M

109,190M

134,290M

104,120M

2.

GDP Growth Rate Below National Average (Number is National Total GDP Ranking) GDP Growth Rate Above National Average (Number is National Total GDP Ranking)

KANSAS


105

3. population trends of major midwestern cities

1950 (3,620,962) *923,662 fewer 1950 people today 3,500,000

CHICAGO 2,719,000

INDIANAPOLIS COLUMBUS 852,000 822,000

2,896,000

DETROIT

792,000

DETROIT

MILWAUKE

688,000

599,000

715,000

945,000

597,000 3,000,000

CLEVELAND

CH

(â&#x2030;&#x2C6;19 Pote

CHICAGO

COLUMBUS

2010 (2,697,300)

KANSAS CITY

OMAHA

MINNEAPOLIS

CLEVELAND

468,000

434,000

400,000

392,000

442,000

410,000

382,000

ST LOUIS

2,500,000

318,000

476,000

347,000

1950 2,000,000

1950 SOUTH

MIDWEST 21.7% NE

1,500,000

1950 1950

WEST

1960 1,000,000

1950 1950

29%

Midwest

Populatio n

1960

Percent

19501950

1960

21% 2015

1950 1950

1970

1970

INDIANAPOLIS 1970 COLUMBUS DETROIT OMAHA 1960 MILWAUKEE

IND CO DE

MI

KA

TOLEDO

CL MI ST CIN DE

500,000 KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS CLEVELAND 1810 1820 1830 1840 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 ST LOUIS TOLEDO CINCINNATI 1960 DES MOINES

1970

1810

1820

1830

1840

1850

1860

1870

1880

1890

1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010


106

Transportation ties

ORMATION

INDUSTRY CONCENTRATION industry concentration comparison per city per sector

CHICAGO

CHICAGO DETROIT ST LOUIS KANSAS CITY

Government

Manufacturing

2.5

Government

Other Services

1.0

1.5

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

Other Services

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0

0.5

NEW YORK

MANUFACTURING

2.0

1.5

COLUMBUS INDIANAPOLIS

2.5

Mining, Logging and Construction

2.0

CINCINNATI CLEVELAND

DETROIT

Mining, Logging and Construction

MINNEAPOLIS

0.5

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

Education and Health Services

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

Education and Health Services

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

Financial Activities

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

ST. LOUIS

KANSAS CITY

Mining, Logging and Construction Government

2.5

Mining, Logging and Construction Manufacturing

Government

2.0

1.0

1.5

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

Other Services

1.0

0.5

Information

Financial Activities

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

Education and Health Services

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

Government

COLUMBUS

CLEVELAND

Mining, Logging and Construction

Mining, Logging and Construction

2.5

Manufacturing

Government

2.0

1.0

Other Services

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

1.0

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

0.5

Information

Education and Health Services

MANUFACTURING

1.5

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

0.5

Leisure and Hospitality

2.5 2.0

1.5

Other Services

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

0.5

LEISURE & HOSPITALITY

Education and Health Services

Manufacturing

2.0

1.5

Other Services

2.5

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

EDUCATION HEALTH SERVICES

Financial Activities Professional & Business Service


107

Government

MINNEAPOLIS

NEW YORK

Mining, Logging and Construction

Mining, Logging and Construction

2.5

MANUFACTURING

Government

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0

Other Services

0.5

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

INFORMATION

Leisure and Hospitality

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

Education and Health Services Professional & Business Service

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

LOS ANGELES

CINCINNATI

Mining, Logging and Construction

Mining, Logging and Construction Government

2.5 2.0

Government

MANUFACTURING

Other Services

0.5

LEISURE & HOSPITALITY

Information

FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES

LEISURE & HOSPITALITY

INFORMATION

Education and Health Services

Financial Activities Professional & Business Service

Professional & Business Service

INDIANAPOLIS

SAN FRANCISCO

Mining, Logging and Construction

Mining, Logging and Construction

2.5

Manufacturing

Government

2.0

1.0

2.5

Manufacturing

2.0

1.5

Other Services

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0

0.5

Government

Manufacturing

1.5

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0

Education and Health Services

2.5 2.0

1.5

Other Services

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0

0.5

Education and Health Services

Manufacturing

1.5

1.5

Other Services

2.5 2.0

2.0

1.5

TRADE, TRANS & UTILITIES

Other Services

0.5

Trade, Transportation & Utilities

1.0 0.5

CHICAGO DETROIT MINNEAPOLIS ST LOUIS KANSAS CITY

Leisure and Hospitality

Information

INFORMATION

Leisure and Hospitality

CINCINNATI COLUMBUS CLEVELAND

Education and Health Services

Financial Activities

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

Education and Health Services

Financial Activities

PROFESSIONAL & BUSINESS SERVICES

INDIANAPOLIS NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO


108

FROM RUST BELT TO BRAIN BELT

In Chicago,

34.9%

growth in tech jobs from 2010-2015.

5TH in the country after SF BAY AREA, D.C., NEW YORK and DALLAS.

Ranked

4TH in TECH DEGREE COMPLETIONS, with 10,454 graduates in 2014.

However, we are experiencing a

NET LOSS of tech jobs relative to graduates.

BRAIN GAIN

+1,400 New York +1,000 St. Louis

+2,300 Detroit +2,100 Denver

+3,300 Columbus, Ohio

+6,700 Kansas City, Missouri

+9,500 Minneapolis

+13,500 Washington, D.C.

+14,800 Austin, Texas

+20,900 Houston

+24,700 Seattle

+25,500 Dallas/Ft.Worth

+89,600 San Francisco Bay Area

WHERE are they headed? How do we ATTRACT AND RETAIN them?


- 17,200 Boston

- 11,200 Los Angeles

- 10,000 Pittsburgh

- 5,100 Miami

- 4,400 Philadelphia

- 1,600 Madison, Wisconsin

- 1,300 Chicago

-700 Indianapolis

BRAIN DRAIN

20 0 20 6 Ja 06 nu 20 Feb ary 0 r 20 6 Mauary 0 r 20 6 Ap ch 0 r 20 6 Ma il 0 y 20 6 Jun 20 06 Ju e 20 06 A ly 06 ug u 20 Sep st 0 20 6 Octemb 0 t e 20 6 No ober r 06 v 20 Decembe 0 20 7 Ja ember 07 nu r 20 Feb ary 0 r 20 7 Mauary 0 r 20 7 Ap ch 0 r 20 7 Ma il 0 y 20 7 Jun 20 07 Ju e 0 ly 7 20 07 Aug 20 Sep ust 0 20 7 Octemb 0 t e 20 7 No ober r 07 v 20 Decembe 0 20 8 Ja ember 08 nu r 20 Feb ary 0 r 20 8 Mauary 0 r 20 8 Ap ch 0 r 20 8 Ma il 0 y 20 8 Jun 20 08 Ju e 0 20 8 A ly 08 ug 20 Sep ust 0 20 8 Octemb 0 t e 20 8 No ober r 08 v 20 Decembe 0 20 9 Ja ember 09 nu r F 20 eb ary 0 r 20 9 Mauary 0 r 20 9 Ap ch 0 r 20 9 Ma il 0 y 20 9 Jun 20 09 Ju e 20 09 A ly 09 ug 20 Sep ust 0 20 9 Octemb 0 t e 20 9 No ober r 09 v 20 Decembe 1 20 0 Janember 10 u r 20 Feb ary 10 ru 20 Mar ary 10 c 20 Apr h 1 20 0 Ma il 10 y 20 Jun 20 10 Ju e 20 10 Au ly 10 g 20 Sep ust 1 20 0 Octemb 1 t e 20 0 Nov ober r 10 e 20 Dec mbe 1 e r 20 1 Jan mbe 11 u r 20 Febr ary 11 u 20 Mar ary 11 c 20 Apr h 1 il 20 1 May 11 20 Jun 20 11 Ju e 20 11 Au ly 11 g 20 Sept ust 1 20 1 Octemb e 1 20 1 Nov ober r 11 e 20 Dec mbe 1 e r 20 2 Jan mbe 12 u r 20 Feb ary 12 ru 20 Mar ary 12 c 20 Apr h 1 20 2 Ma il 12 y 20 Jun 20 12 Ju e 20 12 Au ly 12 g 20 Sep ust 1 20 2 Octemb 1 t e 20 2 Nov ober r 12 e 20 Dec mbe 1 e r 20 3 Jan mbe 13 u r 20 Feb ary 13 ru 20 Mar ary 13 c 20 Apr h 13 il 20 Ma 13 y 20 Jun 20 13 Ju e 20 13 Au ly 13 g 20 Sep ust 1 20 3 Octemb 1 t e 20 3 Nov ober r 13 e 20 Dec mbe 1 r 20 4 Ja embe 14 nu r 20 Feb ary 14 ru 20 Ma ary 14 rch 20 Ap r 1 20 4 Ma il 14 y 20 Jun 20 14 Ju e 1 20 4 A ly 14 ug 20 Sep ust 1 20 4 Octemb 1 t e 20 4 No ober r 14 ve 20 Dec mbe 1 e r 20 5 Jan mbe 1 r 20 5 January 1 20 5 Feb uary 15 r 20 Feb uary 15 rua 20 Ma ry 15 r 20 March 1 20 5 Ap ch 15 r 20 April 1 il 20 5 Ma 1 y 20 5 Ma 1 y 20 5 Jun 15 e 20 Jun 1 e 20 5 Jul 20 15 Ju y 1 l 20 5 Au y 1 g 5 u 20 1 Au st 20 5 Sep gust 15 t 20 Sep embe 1 t 20 5 Octember 1 20 5 Oc ober r 1 t 20 5 Nov ober 1 20 5 Novembe 1 r 20 5 Decembe 15 e r 20 Dec mbe 1 e r 20 6 Jan mbe 16 r u 20 Feb ary 16 ru 20 Mar ary 16 c 20 Apr h 1 20 6 Ma il 16 y 20 Jun 16 e Jul y

number of jobs in major u.s. cities 2012-2016 109

NEW YORK 10000k

8000k

LOS ANGELES 6000k

CHICAGO 4000k

Dallas D.C. Houston Philadelphia Miami Atlanta Boston

SAN FRANCISCO Phoenix DETROIT 2000k MINNEAPOLIS Seattle City ST. LOUIS Kansas Cincinnati CLEVELAND Columbus INDIANAPOLIS 0


110

CONNECTIVITY WITHOUT BORDERS 1. regional highway + interstate network

Chicago Ranked

7TH in U.S. global trade flows

$33.7 BILLION per year primarily with Canada, Mexico, Germany chemicals, computer + electronic products, machinery


111

2. top airports for real estate investment

4. leverage our airports

3. high-speed railway possibilities

5. capitalize on our regional rail

160 AIR CARGO SCORE

REAL ESTATE SCORE

140 76.5

120 62.7

MSP

55.3 100

48.4

62.7 38.4 66.9

80

50.4

23.0 53.2

ORD

29.2

60

42.3

MDW

DTW CLE

43.8

MCI

40

STL

IND CMH CVG

20

68.1

58.2

61.9

64.2

49.5

62.1

25.5

41.1

53.2

46.9

28.6

26.3

MIA

LAX

MEM

DFW

SDF

EWR

IND

ANC

JFK

OAK

ATL

0

2.

ORD

0-5K 5K - 10K 10K - 50K 50K - 80K 80K - 100K 100K - 150K 150K - 200K 200K - 250K 250K - 300K 300K - 415K

4.

433K 741K

1,538K 792K 1,460K 1,163K

206K

206K 570K 363K

223K 288K

102K

1,343K

12,207K

2,393K 313K

Amtrak Routes Passengers Amtrak stations Amtrak other services (bus)

3.

5.


MINNEAPOLIS

OUR IMPACT regional HOKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact 2016-2017

MADISON re-invest in our civic assets

re-connect our region

DES MOINES

re-position our economy

OMAHA re-inhabit our city

KANSAS CITY TOPEKA ST LOUIS

WICHITA

OKLAHOMA CITY


MILWAUKEE

GRAND RAPIDS

DETROIT

KALAMAZOO CHICAGO

TOLEDO

FORT WAYNE

COLUMBUS INDIANAPOLIS BLOOMINGTON

LOUISVILLE

DAYTON

CINCINNATI

CLEVELAND


tower view from sydney harbor


COMMERCIAL

TOWER DESIGN COMPETITION Sydney, Australia

The design creates a tower structure that addresses multiple scales, from silhouette to surface, similar to the nearby Sydney Opera House. At the macro scale, the team designed the 814-foot-high tower to be the tallest building in Sydney, with a distinct profile on the skyline. At the micro scale, the tower is situated within an active pedestrian zone in the city center. It complements and promotes the busy pedestrian laneway network while touching the ground as lightly as possible, despite the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s size. Both scales help create a new city landmark and welcoming destination for residents and visitors to work, eat, shop and pass through. To maximize space on the ground plane, the design pushes the tower bulk to the ceiling of the buildable envelope, lifting the first full floor plate 80 feet above the lobby. This gesture creates a porous, multilevel ground plane and lobby, accommodating grade changes on site. More importantly, it encourages pedestrian movement through the site and draws natural light into otherwise cavernous laneway spaces. To create a flexible office plan, the design creates an offset core to the south of the building, preserving coveted harbor and Sydney Opera House views to the north. An external structural shell supports office flexibility through a 39-foot, column-free band on the north side of the floor plan. The exterior structural grid also protects the north facade from direct solar exposure. The design team, which included HOKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in-house structural engineers, developed a highly efficient, hybrid structural precast column system with tensioned steel diagonals.

115


116

INFORMATION CLIENT Confidential

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Ruggiero, AIA

719,600 sq. ft. / 66,850 sq. m.

814 ft. / 248 m. tall 55 floors

DIAGRAM 1. elevated tower mass + expressed vertical seam

Splitting the tower plan into two slender lobes and expressing the 13-foot slot in the building silhouette creates zones for both catching daylight and providing natural ventilation. The project brief requested that all teams work with artists on their proposals. HOK elected to collaborate with James Carpenter Design Associates to integrate art within the architecture. The design designates plazas as public event spaces rather than just places for sculpture.


2. view east from essex street

117


118

1. site alignment + views


2. view south from rugby place

119


120

1.

1. lobby view from bulletin place

2. eye-level view at pitt street and rugby lane

2.


121

PLAN A

B

3. pedestrian marketplace

4. office lobby floor

C

D

C

A. laneway

C

B. plaza C. retail

A

D. bike storage

A

C

E. lobby F. elevated laneway

C C C 3.

F E C

4.


122

FACADE 1. sketch of precast facade elements

2. detail of 1:500 model

1.

2.


3. north elevation

4. east elevation

5. south elevation

6. west elevation

3.

4.

5.

6.

123


124

1. multilevel office space


125

PLAN 2. typical high-rise office floor

3. roof terrace

A

A. open office B. atrium space

B

C. roof terrace

2.

A C

3.


view north toward the sydney opera house

“The icons of Sydney—the Harbour Bridge and Opera House—are defined by their strong silhouette on the skyline, each with a distinct structural expression.” - Peter Ruggiero, AIA, Design Principal


1. phone rooms


CORPORATE 2. private office

3. lake view corridor

BENTALL KENNEDY OFFICE Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Two ideas framed the design of Bentall Kennedy’s Toronto office. First, this leading commercial real estate firm expressed a strong interest in creating an active hub for employees and clients—the kind of place where one would linger for focused work, collaboration or social engagement. To create a less formal and more welcoming environment, cues from residential architecture informed the layout, furniture and finishes. Collectively, the hub, a large café and smaller decentralized coffee stations facilitate spontaneous interaction and foster community. Secondly, inspiration for the material and furniture palette comes from traditional men’s suit tailoring, in which the understated quality of a garment is juxtaposed against the occasional flourish from a lining or pocket square. The domestically sourced material palette of steel, oak and glass that pervades Bentall Kennedy’s space is contrasted against vibrantly striped phone rooms and signature furniture pieces.

2.

3.

The team designed the office to meet WELL and LEED standards. With 30 percent fewer enclosed offices than in the firm’s previous space, the open floor plan democratizes access to light and air, lines the building’s window walls with accessible corridors and gives prominence to a large, central stairwell that connects its two floors. All of these elements help enhance health and wellness.

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130

“We wanted to pay homage to traditional business practice while

INFORMATION

acknowledging the changes taking place in a modern workforce. A rich material

CLIENT Bentall Kennedy Group

palette creates a formal base to support a newly agile work environment. Accents of color, a warm residential influence and heavy metallic accessories

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Caitlin Turner, NCIDQ

help balance and define the relationship of traditional to modern.” 45,000 sq. ft. / 4,180 sq. m.

- Caitlin Turner, NCIDQ, Design Principal

.7 w/sf LPD / 30% LPD reduction

PLAN 1. level 11

2. level 12

A. reception

C

B. interconnecting stair

D

B

C. conference area

A

D. upper floor café E. lunchroom

E 1.

2.


3. interconnecting stair

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132

1. cafĂŠ

3. interconnecting stair + conference area

2. stair detail

1.

2.

3.


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interconnecting stair + reception


view through breezeway


CORPORATE

CORPORATE AMENITIES BUILDING FOR CONFIDENTIAL CLIENT Texas, USA

This amenities building is designed to fit seamlessly into an existing corporate campus serving more than 2,000 employees. The new facility adds to the design vocabulary while clearly expressing the company’s culture, which has evolved substantially since the campus was built. Early in the process, the client and design team collaborated to define the project drivers that would guide the design process. Themes included cohesiveness, modernization, redefinition, outdoor experience, wayfinding and value. The new building creates a gateway to welcome visitors and employees. Located in the middle of campus, the organic form blends into its natural environment, helping to unify the surrounding structures. At the heart of the complex is a two-story breezeway that acts as the “town center” and links three program wings. The exterior engages with the existing mature plantings and a new landscaped environment. A waterfront dining terrace overlooks an adjacent lake, while outdoor seating areas connect to nearby fields and gardens. The masonry facade reinforces a bond to the earth while signifying craftsmanship. The interior is connected to the site with a transparent ground floor that draws in natural light and blends with the landscape. The second-story mass accentuates this connection and creates a datum that links the three functional components. Surrounding amenities include a soccer field, tennis court and an outdoor wellness terrace.

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INFORMATION CLIENT Confidential

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Roger Soto, AIA

200,000 sq. ft. / 18,580 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. massing diagram building entrance campus core

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The amenities building celebrates the employees located on this campus. Our goal is to improve the workplace, social interaction and functionality while creating an inspiring visitor experience showcasing the innovative work produced here.â&#x20AC;? - Roger Soto, AIA, Design Principal


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PLAN 2. level 0

A. visitor drop-off B. dining + conference center C. auditorium D. fitness area

D

C

B

A


140

FACADE 1. entry bridge


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2. brick texture studies

3. brick texture signage

BRICK STUDIES | SUMMARY

BRICK STUDIES | SUMMARY BRICK STUDIES BRICK STUDIES | SUMMARY | SUMMARYBRICK STUDIES | SUMMARY

SCHEME 1

SCHEME 2 SCHEMESCHEME 1 1

SCHEME 1 SCHEME 1

SCHEME 1

SCHEME 3 SCHEMESCHEME 2 2

SCHEME 5 SCHEME 2 SCHEME 4 SCHEME 2 SCHEMESCHEME 3 3

SCHEME 7 SCHEMESCHEME 6 6

SCHEME 9 SCHEME 6 SCHEME 8 SCHEME 6 SCHEMESCHEME 7 7 CONRAD I EXTERIOR MATERIALITY

2.

SCHEME 5

SCHEME 6 SCHEMESCHEME 5 5

SCHEME 5 SCHEME 5

SCHEME 9

SCHEME 9 SCHEMESCHEME 9 9 SCHEME 9 CONRAD I EXTERIOR MATERIALITY CONRAD I EXTERIOR MATERIALITY CONRADCONRAD I EXTERIOR I EXTERIOR MATERIALITY MATERIALITY CONRAD I EXTERIOR MATERIALITY

3.

HO


142

1. fitness center from north campus


2. dining room

4. fitness center

3. lobby

2.

3.

4.

143


dining deck


1. conference room + adjoining breakout spaces


CORPORATE 2. milk bar

DAIRY FARMERS OF AMERICA HEADQUARTERS Kansas City, Kansas, USA

The planning process for the new headquarters of the Dairy Farmers of America (DFA), the country’s largest milk marketing cooperative, drew input from more than 75 percent of the organization’s staff. The result is a modern, healthy, amenity-rich workplace designed to attract and retain the best and brightest people. The design of the three-story building pays tribute to the dairy farmers that the organization serves while reflecting the cooperative’s global reach. The space juxtaposes organic materials, including concrete, raw steel and reclaimed wood, with sleek applications of white, subtly reflecting the milk and dairy products produced. Located in the emerging Village West growth corridor of Wyandotte County in Kansas, the space is a highly flexible workplace that houses 400 employees. The open-plan environment, which includes informal seating, encourages employee collaboration and communication. Meeting rooms and workstations are easily changed or moved to support future growth, while sit-stand desks and ergonomic seating promote wellness. An efficient steel structural system supports the flexible open floor plates. Easy access to floor and underfloor HVAC gives DFA’s staff control over the environment. The plan orients the building on the site to enable DFA to easily add a wing or construct a new building in the future if desired. Unique employee amenities include outdoor conference rooms, a full-service café, a visitor business center and a multipurpose room that opens to a courtyard and can expand to accommodate all of DFA’s employees. Fitness and recreation facilities include basketball and bocce ball courts, a walking trail and a fire pit.

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148

INFORMATION CLIENT Dairy Farmers of America

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Sloan, AIA

110,000 sq. ft. / 10,220 sq. m. annual EUI: 67.33 62.6% below ASHRAE 2007

CONCEPT 1. building form diagrams A. standard suburban office building B. bent form to create private courtyard C. form pulled apart to focus views + create entry lobby D. agrarian base references farmers E. glass upper floors reference global reach F. core carved out to create public space

A.

B.

C.

D.

E.

F.


2. exterior view

149

“The inspiration of the project was driven by the desire to celebrate the story of milk from farm to table. Clean, modern elements are juxtaposed alongside reclaimed materials to reflect and communicate DFA’s global reach while honoring the local dairy farmer.” - Peter Sloan, AIA, Design Principal


150

1. exterior courtyard


2. movable wall system connecting work cafĂŠ to building courtyard

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152

PLAN 1. level 0

A. building reception B. central three-story stair C. milk bar D. serving area + kitchen E. work cafĂŠ F. multipurpose rooms G. fitness center H. outdoor courtyard I. bocce ball court

D

J. outdoor meeting rooms

C

K. interview rooms L. open workspace

G A

B

E

H

L K

J I

F


2. level 1

4. ground floor concept diagram

3. level 2

5. typical floor concept diagram

4. 2.

5. 3.

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boardroom in open configuration, maximizing space flexibility to host events


156

1. second-floor living room overlooking main lobby


2. open, family-style meeting room is located at each floorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stair landing

3. open workspace includes demountable private offices

4. open workspace

3.

2.

4.

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central stair + adjoining work cafĂŠ


double-height workspace


CORPORATE

DENTSU AEGIS NETWORK OFFICE Los Angeles, California, USA

Dentsu Aegis Network’s new West Coast office is designed with flexibility to accommodate the expansion and contraction of the global media group’s operating companies. The design and construction team collaborated to address the challenges, including ceiling height limitations and the HVAC system, of converting a parking garage into a modern workplace. The office features a classic, mid-century modern design aesthetic. A beaded curtain acts as a space and visual divider between the reception area and café/work zone. Composed of natural walnut and painted beads of varying sizes, the curtain is strung on a tension cable extending from floor to ceiling in the double-story space. This curtain motif continues throughout the space—from the light fixtures to the accent wallcoverings. Drawing inspiration from nature, the neutral material palette is complemented by wood ceiling baffles, accent walls, pantry millwork and furniture. The lower floor houses an unassigned work area with café-style seating including benches, powered picnic tables and adjacent conference rooms. The upper floor features traditional workstations, with breakout furniture accommodating impromptu meetings. The main pantry opens to a terrace to host staff meetings and client events. A drop-down projector screen and audiovisual equipment are integrated into the space.

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162

INFORMATION CLIENT Dentsu Aegis Network DESIGN PRINCIPAL Kristi Zoref, NCIDQ

18,300 sq. ft. / 1,670 sq. m.

.88 w/sf LPD / 12% LPD reduction

CONCEPT 1. stair design sketches

“The beaded curtain and communicating stair emphasize connectivity between the two floors and create a sense of energy flowing through the space.” - Kristi Zoref, NCIDQ, Design Principal


2. proposed stair sketch

163


164

1.

1. feature stair

2. reception

2.


3. ground-floor pantry

3.

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166

1. main pantry


2. lounge looking toward pantry

167


DALLAS OFFICE main lobby + hospitality lounge


CORPORATE

POLSINELLI OFFICES Dallas, Texas, USA Denver, Colorado, USA

Polsinelli has partnered with HOK on 24 office projects in 18 cities over the past six years. These projects have played an integral role in establishing the law firm’s workplace design standards and creating a consistent brand experience across its U.S. offices. By visually communicating the firm’s brand and culture, these offices serve as recruiting, marketing and community engagement tools. Dallas Office The design of Polsinelli’s Dallas office fosters a progressive culture through the creation of a relaxed, collaborative and hospitality-focused workplace. A grand staircase at the center of the lobby offers views of the city’s skyline and seamlessly connects the two-level conferencing center. Conference rooms are pulled back from the windows, creating a gallery hall that offers more dramatic views of the city and serves as an event space connected to a rooftop terrace. A hospitality lounge provides casual client breakout space with sofas, lounge chairs, serving bars, a coffee bar and an open café. Each floor is arranged to maximize efficiency while offering special features. Designers coordinated overhead equipment to maximize ceiling heights and open areas. Vertical wood elements increase the volumetric feeling of the space, which is enhanced by natural light flowing through the expansive glass, high ceilings and office sidelights. A refined palette of neutral whites and grays offsets the firm’s collection of colorful artwork, with yellow used as an accent color to symbolize the warm Texas sun. Denver Office Located on the top four floors of a new downtown office tower, the design of Polsinelli’s Denver office features a modern mountain aesthetic that capitalizes on panoramic views of the Rockies.

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170

As clients and visitors navigate the office, they follow a path inspired by a mountain hike. The dark walls of the elevator lobby lead to the reception area, which features a motif of warm wood and rock. Visitors must break through the fog, mimicked in the etched glass accent wall, to reach the open mountain vistas beyond.

INFORMATION CLIENT Polsinelli PC

Dark and light woods echo the forest, with charcoal-stained oak symbolizing the deeper tones of the forest floor. The use of color reinforces the contrast between darkness and light, creating a dynamic found in nature. Various shades of green, yellow and blue simulate the colors found in evergreens, aspen leaves and the sky.

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Sloan, AIA

Dallas: 63,000 sq. ft. / 5,850 sq. m. Denver: 86,600 sq. ft. / 7,990 sq. m.

Generous corridors feature social spaces, work islands, coffee bars and conversation niches to increase collaboration and spontaneous connections among attorneys. Designed as a series of window boxes, conference rooms are strategically named to correspond to the mountain peaks they frame.

Dallas: .58 w/sf LPD / 42.34% LPD reduction Denver: .6 w/sf LPD / 40% LPD reduction

A dynamic sculptural stair links all four floors, creating visual, physical and social connections. Glass partitions and doors around the stair create a line of security between public and office spaces during an event while preserving visual connections and openness. The project team collaborated with the shell building architect to create a 1,250-square-foot rooftop terrace and lounge used as an indoor/outdoor event space.

DALLAS PLAN 1. level 21

D

A. reception B. central stair C. hospitality lounge

E

D. conference center E. rooftop terrace

F

F. attorney workspace

C A

B


2. multistory volume at central stair + view of casual caucus room

171


conference rooms were pulled inboard to connect hospitality spaces to an outside terrace + views of dallasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skyline


174

1. central stair + reception lobby

2. work cafĂŠ

3. central stair with adjoining caucus rooms

2.

1.

3.


4. client hospitality area with views of downtown dallas

175


DENVER OFFICE main lobby + adjoining conference rooms


178

1. main lobby + view of roof terrace

“Our design approach builds on Polsinelli’s national brand to create spaces that are both uniquely modern and hospitality-centered to encourage social engagement with clients and communities.” - Peter Sloan, AIA, Design Principal


2. central four-story stair

179

DENVER PLAN 3. level 22

A. reception desk B. central stair C. main lobby D. feature wall E. roof terrace F. hospitality lounge G. attorney workspace

G

A B

C

D

F E 3.

2.


180

1. lobby outside multipurpose rooms


2. central stair section

3. central stair

3.

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182

1. client hospitality lounge


2. main reception

4. custom feature wall in collaboration with amy ellingson

3. boardroom

2.

3.

4.

183


1. reception with connecting stair + coffee / wine bar


CORPORATE 2. smoked metal + glass stair with leather wrapped panel wall

WHITE & CASE OFFICE New York, New York, USA

The design of leading international law firm White & Case’s new office encourages collaboration, mentoring and networking among attorneys and legal professionals in a sophisticated, modern workplace. After interviewing more than 80 White & Case partners and associates about their workplace needs, the design team created a highly efficient plan and contemporary design to communicate the firm’s culture. To maximize flexibility and streamline the workflow, the team created a modular plan and kit-of-parts design. Two office sizes accommodate partners and associates, and every workspace has a sit-to-stand option. Open and closed collaboration spaces offer scenic Manhattan views and abundant natural light. A knowledge center and genius bar supports research, shared work and education. Design of the amenity space draws on White & Case’s brand to enhance the experience for visitors and employees. A warm, balanced and natural palette conveys a sophisticated interior ambience punctuated by dramatic light and textured materials. The two-story reception space brings in light and welcomes guests with stoneand leather-wrapped acoustic walls. Linking the reception area to a coffee bar is a dramatic glass and smoked steel stairway. The “first-class” conference center was designed with hospitality in mind. Generous multipurpose and breakout spaces can be transformed for entertaining and town hall meetings. The workplace integrates emerging technologies that support the increasing need for mobility, group workspaces and virtual collaboration. Restaurant-style dining, a full-service fitness facility and a wellness center promote work-life balance. A robust art program includes pieces from renowned international artists on display at key locations throughout the office. HOK led the design of the amenity floors and HYL Architecture designed the office practice floors. Pentagram collaborated on the creation of environmental graphics.

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186

INFORMATION CLIENT White & Case

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Tom Polucci, AIA, IIDA

440,500 sq. ft. / 40,925 sq. m.

.9 w/sf LPD / 10% LPD reduction

PLAN 1. level 50

A. multipurpose rooms

B

C

A

B. reception below C. knowledge center D. fitness center

I

E. wellness center F. lounge / wine bar G. casual dining H. servery I. display kitchen

H G

F

E

D


2. reception looking east to the concierge desk + to the knowledge center

187


conference breakout space + historic artifacts display


190

1. typical practice floor office pantry


2. typical practice floor open collaboration

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192

1. knowledge center looking into the reading room

2. south gathering lounge

1.


â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a leading international law firm, White & Case wanted a first-class executive conference center that fosters social and professional networking. Building on that idea, we enhanced the visitor and staff experience by connecting the top two floors and creating a dramatic reception. We also developed a diverse amenity program. The space is a beautiful balance of natural textures and polish, reflecting light throughout the day and night.â&#x20AC;? - Tom Polucci, AIA, IIDA, Design Principal

2.

193


194

1. lounge + wine bar doubles as small event space

2. casual dining with end grain wood flooring + large oak pivot doors open to the lounge


195


1. view from southeast at dusk


CULTURAL 2. aerial view

3. inner courtyard + daily prayer hall

AL FOZAN MOSQUE Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia

The design of the Al Fozan Mosque creates a memorable, striking form that supports the needs of worshippers while celebrating the culture of Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province. With its patterned and dynamic facade, the appearance of the building’s sculptural form changes depending on time of day and the season. A graceful curve unifies the program elements, which include worship spaces, offices for the Abdullatif Al Fozan Award for Mosque Architecture program, and apartments for the mosque’s imam and muezzin. The curvilinear form creates a sheltered inner courtyard. Accessed via bridges that cross over the reflecting pools and portals under the building, this space integrates the landscape with the architecture. The entry sequence into the central plaza allows worshippers to symbolically cross from the profane to the sacred realm, where they can access the prayer areas.

2.

Just off the central plaza is the polished, monolithic form of the daily prayer hall. The main prayer hall accommodates 1,500 worshippers, with room for 1,200 men on the ground level and 300 women in the mezzanine above. Highly controlled use of light is fundamental in creating a sacred space. The interior of this tall yet intimate prayer hall receives dappled light from the building’s base, with reflections of sunlight emanating from the surrounding reflecting pools. Natural light enters the space through the patterned fenestration, creating an interplay of light and shadow. As the terminus to the entry road of a planned residential community, the mosque will become a new city landmark. Visible from all directions, it will provide a clear reference point for the new neighborhood.

3.

197


198

INFORMATION CLIENT Abdullatif & Mohammed Al Fozan Co.

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Roger Schwabacher, AIA

60,710 sq. ft. / 5,640 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. early massing model

2. design inspiration

1.

2.


3. site plan

199


200

DRAWING 1. level 0

2. section through daily prayer

A. main worship hall B. entry hall C. daily prayer D. ablution E. imamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence F. office lobby

A B

C

E

F

1.

2.

D


201

3. level 1

4. section through main worship hall

G. womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worship H. ablution I. mep J. al fozan offices K. imamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence

H

G

K

I J

3.

4.


202

1. the patterned facade glows at night, creating a beacon in the landscape

“The nautilus form pays homage to the site’s adjacency to the sea. It is referential to forms found in nature, with a spiraling geometry that indicates a center point from which all movement radiates out. The form also references the crescent moon of Islam, connecting the architecture to the function and culture.” - Roger Schwabacher, AIA, Design Principal


2. an iconic landmark in a residential neighborhood

4. detail of the facade concept

3. shafts of light penetrate the interior of the main worship hall, creating ever-changing patterns throughout the day

2.

3.

4.

203


aerial view at night


front entry approach looking south from 29th street


CULTURAL

NILE VALLEY AQUAPONICS FACILITY Kansas City, Missouri, USA

This new development will help remedy a Kansas City food desert and promote urban farming and sustainable living on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impoverished East Side. The project will expand the food production capacity of Nile Valley Aquaponics, a community center that offers year-round access to locally grown vegetables and mercury-free fish. The organization also provides low-income youth with opportunities to learn about aquaponics through lessons, field trips and mentoring. Aquaponics is a gardening technique in which fish and plants grow and thrive together. Modeled after the natural ecosystem, this symbiotic technique uses 90 percent less water than traditional methods of growing food crops in soil. Waste from the fish feeds the plants while nutrients from the plants filter into the water and return to the fish tank. This closed-loop system produces healthy, organic food by avoiding the use of any chemical fertilizers, pesticides or mercury. Adding two new greenhouses on the existing site will double the annual harvest to 50,000 pounds of fish and 70,000 pounds of vegetables. Designed as a modern kit of parts, the new greenhouses will be constructed with economical, sustainable and easily procurable materials to promote the use of this model in other cities. The new facility also incorporates a marketplace, a chicken coop, beehives, rainwater collection cisterns, a wind turbine and raised garden beds. Community gathering spaces, including an event area, harvest tables and a shaded protected terrace provide neighbors and visitors with opportunities to relax and learn. To increase the visibility of Nile Valley Aquaponics in the community, the design incorporates high-impact graphics that showcase the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission and educate visitors on the value of creating a community around healthy, environmentally friendly food. The facility will also serve as a sustainable economic development model for similar sites nationwide.

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208

INFORMATION CLIENT Nile Valley Aquaponics

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Chris DeVolder, AIA

0.7 acres / 0.28 hectares

CONCEPT 1. sketch massing axon

2. sketch diagrams

1.

2.


3. view inside harvest house of tilapia pond and orchard

209


210

1. community plaza

3. aerial view

2. multipurpose space + market

1.

2.

3.


211

4. community raised beds + approach

5. bird’s eye looking southwest

“The design embodies the mission of Nile Valley Aquaponics: to build community around food. Through open spaces and a visitor-friendly experience, the facility supports healthy lifestyles, celebrates and educates the community, and gives them the tools they need to share in the harvest.” - Chris DeVolder, AIA, Design Principal

4.

5.


1. view from the gulf

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Viewed from the city, the stone facades block the intense desert sun and reflect the solidity and permanence of the Central Bank. In contrast, the transparent north elevation looks out across the Gulf, expressing Kuwaitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic openness to commerce and trade with the Gulf region and the world.â&#x20AC;? -Larry Malcic, AIA, Design Principal


GOVERNMENT 2. detail of southeast facade

CENTRAL BANK OF KUWAIT HEADQUARTERS Kuwait City, Kuwait

The Central Bank of Kuwait’s new headquarters building is a symbol of the country’s significant economic power in the 21st century. Located in the Sharq commercial and financial district, it is a new landmark on Kuwait City’s skyline. The office building is formed by a triangular, truncated pyramid tower intersected by a podium that houses reception and banking halls, conference facilities, dining and banquet rooms, and a museum. The building’s geometric forms echo the geometry and order of Kuwaiti architecture. The two walls facing the sun are predominantly stone, while the northern elevation is glass. The stone elevations face the city, communicating the bank’s solidity and security. This stone absorbs the heat of the sun, harnessing it to ward off the chill of desert nights. Horizontal slots with recessed window openings minimize solar gain. At night, the allglass viewing platform at the top of the building glows like a lighthouse. The transparent north-facing wall offers occupants panoramic views of the Gulf, serving as a constant reminder of the sea’s important role in the region’s commerce and trading history. Visitors enter the building through an expansive lobby. The wall opposite the reception desk and adjacent to the escalators features full-height, backlit onyx pleated panels. A retail bank branch on the ground floor provides banking services to staff and the community. On the second level, a 240-400-seat conference facility accommodates corporate events and can be subdivided for smaller gatherings. Overlooking the Gulf, a 330-person auditorium is cantilevered beyond the line of the angled eastern elevation. A two-story juice bar at the opposite end offers views west toward the city. The design creates a modern, comfortable work environment for bank staff.

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214

INFORMATION CLIENT Central Bank of Kuwait

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Larry Malcic, AIA

807,300 sq. ft. / 75,000 sq. m.

728 ft. / 222 m. tall 41 floors

1. northeast elevation


2. main entrance

215


216

1. north elevation

2. southeast elevation


3. banking hall entrance

217


218

1. main entrance reception


2. reception waiting area

2.

3. auditorium

3.

219


1. southeast view


HEALTHCARE

CENTER FOR ACADEMIC MEDICINE FOR CONFIDENTIAL CLIENT

2. historic university campus

3. massing concept sketch

California, USA

This center for academic medicine represents an ambitious effort to provide disparate research disciplines with a common, collaborative environment. HOKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s integrated design services included architecture, landscape architecture, sustainability consulting, interior design, strategic planning, structural engineering and MEP engineering. The location's mild Mediterranean climate and an adjacent nature preserve inspired the team to develop a master plan for the three buildings to act as an extension of the arboretum experience by featuring connected outdoor spaces. The narrow wings envelop a courtyard providing diverse settings for collaboration near the woods and in plazas, balconies, walkways, porches and terraces. Internally, the workplace promotes interaction between medical specialists and the outdoor environment.

2.

3.

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222

INFORMATION CLIENT Confidential

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Paul Woolford, AIA 600,000 sq. ft. / 55,740 sq. m.

annual EUI: 45 kBtu/sf/yr 57% below ASHRAE 2007

1.


223

1. concept models

2. site context map

Pro je Sit ct e

Arboretum

2.


224

LANDSCAPE site plan

A A. eucalyptus grove

B

B. oak woodland C. entry plaza D. porch E. multiuse lawn F. courtyard G. terrace

C

H. arboretum overlook I. bay tree grove J. trx K. stormwater L. service court M. cafĂŠ patio N. ramp to garage

F

D E

G

I H

L

K

B J

N

M


Oak Woodlands - Trees 225

FLORA

auercus agrifolia - coast live oak (not shown) quercus lobata - valley oak quercus doublasii - blue oak quercus wislizenii - interior live oak pinus torreyana - torrey pine

woodland trees

Ericameria linearifolia Interior Goldenbush

Quercus agrifolia Coast Live Oak

aesculus californica - california buckey

Arctostaphylos glauca arbutus unedo - strawberry tree Big Berry Manzanita

Quercus douglasii Quercus lobata rhamnus californica - mound san bruno coffeeberry Blue Oak Valley Oak (not shown)

Courtyard - Planting Palette

heteromeles arbutifolia - toyon ericameria linearifolia - interior goldenbush arctostaphylos glauca - big berry manzanita mimulus aurantiacus - sticky monkey fower eschzcholzia californica - california poppy

woodland understories

Rhamnus californica 'Mound San Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC; Coffeeberry

urantiacus key Fower

Eschscholzia californica California Poppy arctostaphylos - dr. hurd manzanita (not shown) native grass + wildflowers

Pinus torreyana Torrey Pine

graxinus uhdei - orange county evergreen ash

Bloom in spring Aesculus californica Cercis occidentalis quercus agrifolia - coast live oak Western Redbud muhlenbergia dubia - pine muhly California buckeye

Native Grasses w/ Wildflowers

carex divulsa - berkeley sedge salvia spathacea - hummingbird sage

urban garden cercis occidentalis - western redbud (not shown) lavandula - goodwin creek lavender erigeron karvinskianus - santa barbara daisy carex divulsa - berkeley sedge calamintha nepeta - lesser calamint lupinus albifrons - silver bush lupine penstemon margarita bop - foothill penstemon achillea filipendulina - yarrow

courtyard

Cercis occidentalis Western Redbud

Fraxin Evergr


226

1. janus gate

Like the Gates of Janus in ancient Rome, the center for academic medicine acts as a gate with multiple functions: from past to future, from historical campus to new medical school campus, and from university grounds to the arboretum.

The entrance lobby creates a gateway in four directions: north-south and east-west. A south-facing balcony overlooks the main campus and frames the grand entry porch. These elements will become aspirational icons and landmarks for the expanding medical school campus.

The courtyard allows the arboretum to flow through the buildings toward the medical school hospitals. The narrow architectural forms grant efficient access to daylight and natural ventilation, serving as a connection to nature.

The buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access and collaborative zones occur at the corners and ends of the wings. The main entrance lobby and principal collaborative spaces are stacked along the southwest corner closest to the historic campus. Conceived as a large hall overlooking the campus, this space will function as a central collaborative destination for the medical faculty.

A pinwheel rotation introduced to the wings embraces the dynamic site conditions. This provides directionality, hierarchy and opportunities for diverse outdoor spaces. Small gaps and extensions to the wings produce and project the pinwheel effect along the vertical organization. The implicit ground-level rotation is slightly different than the rotation at upper levels, increasing the sense of movement.


2. model view of northeast elevation

3. model view of west elevation

2.

3.

227


228

SUSTAINABILITY 1. design for workplace

2. passive ventilation

tertiary

primary internal

external

1.

2.

low

med

high


229

3. response to climate

4. building performance diagrams

solar + daylight

3.

4.

wind + ventilation

view + open space


230

1. southwest view of courtyard

Built above a parking structure, the courtyard is accessed from under the great hovering west volumeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a porch-like space that will host a range of functions and frame a generous opening to the courtyard and arboretum. The courtyard features a large ovoid lawn bound by a meandering path to the arboretum. Flanked by trees and shrubs of local species, this path extends the arboretum plants into the courtyard.

The courtyard, which can be accessed from both the west and south, is surrounded by activity. Faculty, students and staff from the more public north wing will be drawn to the space and its restaurant, auditorium and gymnasium. The walkways overlook the courtyard and allow for outdoor access while bridges traverse its edges. Completely open to the arboretum, the courtyard is a visual and experiential vestibule to nature.


2. east view of courtyard looking toward arboretum

231


232

1. view from west

An enveloping strategy allays the horizontal proportions, directionality and implicit rotation of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s volumes. Long sequences of repetitive vertical elements are carefully adapted to the facadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specific condition. The subtle, rotating architecture hovers above groundâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except at the northwest corner, where it is rooted in the earth in a wide, terra-cotta plinth. The long, hovering limestone volumes open to the landscape as balconies and terraces. The stone volumes are expressed as planes with vertical

proportioned cutouts that expose an inner layer of glass. The west bar articulates an expanded version of the layered facades. An additional layer of aluminum blades provides shading. A longer overhang recalls the pattern of articulated rooftops on the existing campus. The diaphanous facades along the courtyard are more detailed and take advantage of the climate and outdoor amenities. On the south facade, a landscaped walkway provides solar shading.


2. facade from main road

233


breakout space

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The design is inspired by the ancient, multi-sided Janus Gate in Rome. Like the gate, the center is the portal between the past and future. It looks toward the historic arboretum on one side and the future of medicine on the other.â&#x20AC;? - Paul Woolford, AIA, Design Principal


1. community hospital multi-bed tower


HEALTHCARE 2. acute care hospital

NG TENG FONG GENERAL AND JURONG COMMUNITY HOSPITALS Jurong, Singapore

Ng Teng Fong General Hospital (NTFGH) is Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first medical campus with an outpatient clinic, community hospital and acute care general hospital. The team designed the campus as a prototype for the Singapore Ministry of Healthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort to provide high-quality, affordable care to all. Sustainable design strategies create a facility that functions like a vertical healing garden and oasis in the dense city of Singapore. The sawtooth-inspired plan revolutionizes the traditional healthcare model by providing every patient with a window. The team designed the patient bed towers to optimize access to natural light to enhance the patient experience. The fluid, dynamic design directly responds to the position of the sun and prevailing breezes. Seventy percent of the facility and 82 percent of patient beds are primarily passively cooled and naturally ventilated; only 30 percent of the facility is air conditioned. Thermal mass, ceiling fans, cross ventilation and exterior shading ensure that the temperature remains comfortable throughout the day, with typical ventilation rates that are higher than in a standard U.S. patient room. Operating suites, imaging, isolation rooms and other critical areas are mechanically ventilated. Dense vegetation covering low roofs and much of the site form healing gardens, staff respite areas and community park space. Vegetation also grows vertically up the building, both in planter boxes and along wires linking floors. Rated Platinum under Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Green Mark program, the project also includes solar thermal hot water heating and a large photovoltaic array. The team used detailed computational fluid dynamics models, shading analysis, climate analysis, daylight modeling and energy modeling to develop the design to optimize energy efficiency and the patient experience.

237


238

The AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) honored Ng Teng Fong General Hospital with a 2017 Top Ten Green Project award as one of the year’s best examples of sustainable design excellence. “This project is an extraordinary model for hospitals to behave as healing environments, not seen in the United States,” stated the AIA COTE jury. “The passive strategies demonstrated here are a model for hospitals around the world.”

INFORMATION CLIENT Singapore Ministry of Health

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Henry Chao, AIA

The facility, which includes Jurong Community Hospital, provides seamless integration of care on a single site. Close management ensures integration at the hospital’s infrastructure, administrative and clinical levels. The campus is designed to share service facilities including digital imaging, pharmacy, catering, medical records, storage and training areas.

1.84 million sq. ft. / 171,300 sq. m. annual EUI: 70 kBtu/sf/yr 38% below ASHRAE 2007

As the design and medical planning consultant, HOK collaborated with the Singapore Ministry of Health and a team that included CPG Corporation (prime architect and architect of record) and Studio 505 (design collaborator focusing on building facade development).

CONCEPT 1. standard hospital patient ward

2. ng teng fong patient ward

1.

2.


3. patient ward

239


integrated sustainable strategies


242

hospital greening strategy

H

B G

F

D

A. vertical planting

B. staff respite

C. connector bridge

C E

A


243

F. sky gardens

D. patient wards G. therapeutic garden

E. link garden

H. respite garden


244

1. inner courtyard

2. bed tower care


245


246

hospital campus


“The team’s approach included strategic placement of clinical programs and correlated building massing so that the main patient tower forms one of the focal points on Jurong’s townscape. We also developed an urban design strategy using the hospital campus as part of a new greenway connecting two existing green corridors and weaving hospital in access to the transportation networks.” - Henry Chao, AIA, Design Principal

247


1. entry


HOSPITALITY 2. entry concept sketch

FOGO DE CHAO BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE San Francisco, California, USA

Fogo de Chão’s new San Francisco location is a tenant improvement to an existing ground floor space of an office tower. The site is located across from the W Hotel, Moscone Center and the newly expanded Museum of Modern Art. The design recreates the Brazilian churrascaria experience in the heart of San Francisco, where Fogo de Chão’s service and hospitality stand out in a busy city center. The design includes indoor dining, kitchen space (with a section for opendisplay cooking) and outdoor dining. The character of the interior recalls the owner’s first restaurant in the Brazilian countryside and fuses rural materials and cooking techniques with local design inspiration. The entry experience highlights a statue of O Laçador, a Fogo de Chão tradition, along with a three-sided fireplace to create an immediate warm, relaxing ambience that draws parallels to the culinary experience. The simple material palette reinforces this atmosphere with a focus on wood, bronze and stone. The dining room features a 25-foot rope wall designed and executed by local artist Windy Chien. Four private dining areas include working wine display walls accommodating 1,000 bottles. A large market table and a view into the churrasco grill is inspired by the layout of the popular restaurant’s original location. An outdoor area is set apart from an active pedestrian arcade by a 12-foot-high custom metal screen crafted by a local decorative metal worker to mimic the hills of San Francisco. The resulting space invites visitors to experience the churrasco grilling tradition in a modern, sophisticated environment.

249


250

INFORMATION CLIENT Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse DESIGN PRINCIPAL Daniel Herriott, IIDA

1.

CONCEPT 1. dining patio concept sketch

2. floor plan concept sketch

2.


3. large private dining room

251


252

1.

1. dining room

2. rope wall

2.


3. bar

253


churrascaria + dining + bar

“The interior character pays homage to the owner’s first restaurant experience in the Brazilian countryside and fuses rural Brazilian materials and cooking techniques with local design inspiration.” - Daniel Herriott, IIDA, Design Principal


event terrace


HOSPITALITY 257

JACOB K. JAVITS CONVENTION CENTER DESIGN COMPETITION New York, New York, USA

The expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Center celebrates the design of the original “Crystal Palace” completed in 1986 while creating a modern New York City convention and exposition center experience. This design competition plan includes a 90,000-square-foot expansion to the exposition floor with new entry, lobby, atrium and prefunction spaces. It also adds more than 100,000 square feet of ballroom and meeting spaces. Crystalized cube forms along the building’s south side establish a relationship with the original Crystal Palace at Javits Center. The facets and angles of these new, multistory glass cubes shimmer in the sunlight, creating dynamic shadow patterns along the facade that change at different times of the day and year. At night, the crystalized cubes glow like paper lanterns, inviting visitors to explore the renovated convention center. To enhance the user experience and the operational efficiency of the center, the design team paid careful attention to transparency and the volumes of the spaces enclosing the meeting rooms, ballrooms and back-of-house facilities. As guests enter the addition and move through the atrium, they experience breathtaking views of New York City to the east and south and the Hudson River to the west. Breakout spaces on stairway landings offer more opportunities to experience the dramatic city skyline. At the highest level of the ballroom, an open-air terrace provides visitors with city vistas from an entirely different perspective, under a structural cube. From the south, the building’s uniform textured cladding and simplified geometry create an elegant backdrop to the crystal cubes. On the north side, the truck-marshalling building is clad in glass fiber reinforced concrete panels. Varied openings in these panels enhance natural ventilation and create a texture that mimics the glazing and metal panels on the existing structure. Directly above the truck marshalling structure and adjacent to the ballroom is a garden terrace that accommodates special events and that provides spectacular views of the Hudson River to the west and Manhattan’s skyline to the east. HOK and Skanska USA partnered as a designbuild team for this competition.


258

INFORMATION CLIENT Empire State Development / New York Convention Center Development Corporation

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Kenneth Drucker, FAIA

1.1 million sq. ft. / 102,195 sq. m.

annual EUI: 70.5 kBtu/sf/yr 13.5% below ASHRAE 2007

1. section with flow diagram

A. ballroom B. meeting rooms C. exposition hall

h 2t

e av

1

existing javits center

1

h 1t

e av


2. exposition hall

259


260

CONCEPT 1. view corridors from green roof

OOF - INDICATIVE DESIGN


261

2. section through massing concept one

3. massing concepts

expo space prefunction existing building marshalling back of house pavilion

BOH

GREEN ROOF

MARSHALLING

2. EXISTING

NEW

BOH

MARSHALLING

3.

INDICATIVE INDICATIVE DESIGN DESIGN

ALT. ALT. 1 1

ALT. ALT. 22


262

CONCEPT

3. shifted for program + views

1. context model of 11th ave elevation

2. original massing reinterpreted

1.

2.

3.


263

4. massing elements

5. massing elements

A. entry plaza

D. prefunction space

B. event terrace

E. ballroom

C. illuminated graphic display cube

F. illuminated graphic display cube

A

4.

B

D

C

5.

E

F


264

FACADE 1. crystal facade concept


S SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- SPRING (MAR - JUN)

3. southwest solar radiation studies

250

ght && Views: Views: ght

Natural Daylight & Views:

ght & Views: gh must reduce note that the facade facade design design although although must must reduce reduce ght & Views: note that the gh must reduce gh must reduce note thatreduce the facade facade design although must reduce reduce gh must daylight and views adiation must also allow allow for natural natural daylight and views views note that the design although must adiation must also for daylight and daylight and views and adiation must alsothe allow for natural natural daylight and views views daylight and views views r..daylight transmission While reducing impact of solar transmission adiation must also allow for daylight and While reducing the impact of solar transmission r transmission transmission . transmission While reducing the impact ofdaylight solar transmission transmission ght availability forthe zed facade, our design design ensures availability for for .rred While reducing of solar facade, our ensures daylight availability ght availability for impact ght availability for zed facade, our design ensures daylight availability for ght availability for space sed providing large of the pre-function as well as providing large facade, our design ensures daylight availability for the pre-function sof providing large space as well as providing large providing large of the pre-function space as well as providing large ssof providing large skyline and the river. the pre-function skyline and the river.space as well as providing large skyline and and the the river. river. skyline

Solar Radiation Mitigation:

sfor thesolar westradiation facing transmission was the west facing thesolar westradiation facing for solar radiation transmission wasOur theproposed west facing facing ssOur the west facing proposed ballroom and meeting room areas. areas. for transmission was the west ballroom and meeting room Our proposed Our proposed Our proposed ballroom and meeting room areas. Our proposed Our proposed 0 feet of overfor a deep inset glazing with over 10 feet of overballroom and meeting room areas. Our proposed for a deep inset glazing with over 10 feet of over0 feet of over0 feet ofwalls overfor deep inset glazing with over over 10 feet feet of overover-solar 0 feet of overuce solar al wing which significantly reduce incident for aaincident deep inset glazing with 10 of l wing walls which significantly reduce incident solar uce incident solar uce incident solar al wing walls which significantly reduce incident solar uce incident solar azed areas employ glazed surface. The south facing glazed areas employ lglazed wing walls which significantly reduce incident solar surface. The south facing glazed areas employ azed areas employ azed areas employ glazed surface. The south facing glazed areas employ azed areas employ -shading reduce ine that by virtue of its angles and self-shading reduce inglazed areasreduce employ eglazed that bysurface. virtue ofThe its south anglesfacing and self-shading in-shading reduce in-shading reduce eation that by virtue virtue ofinits angles angles and self-shading self-shading reduce in-shading reduce inhe design, the use on the facade. In addition to the design, the use eation that by of its and reduce inon thethe facade. he design, use In addition to the design, the use hefurther design, the useceramic ation on the the facade. In addition addition to the thefurther design,enhance the use use he design, the use n enhance ance glazing and frit pattern ation on facade. In to design, the ance glazing and ceramic frit pattern further enhance n further enhance nof further enhance ance glazing and ceramic ceramic frit frit pattern pattern further further enhance enhance n further enhance eance the facade. glazing and of the facade. SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUNSOLAR - SEP) RADIATIONSW VIEW - SUMMER INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUNSOLAR -SEP) RADIATION- SUMMER (JUN -SEP) SE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR SUMMER (JUN SEP) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR SE -- INCIDENT -- SEP) SW -- INCIDENT SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUN - SEP) RADIATIONSW VIEW - INCIDENT(JUN SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUN -SEP) RADIATION- SUMMER (JUN -SEP) e of of the the facade. facade. SE VIEW INCIDENT SUMMER (JUN -- SEP) SW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUN -SEP) SE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUN (JUN SEP) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- SUMMER SUMMER (JUN (JUN -SEP) -SEP) SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONSUMMER (JUNSOLAR SEP) RADIATIONSW VIEW VIEW -- SUMMER INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSUMMER (JUNSOLAR -SEP) RADIATIONsummer summer SE -- INCIDENT -- SEP) SW -- INCIDENT

0

Its important to note that the facade design although must reduce impact of solar radiation must also allow for natural daylight and views for its occupants. While reducing the impact of solar transmission through the glazed facade, our design ensures daylight availability for the entire depth of the pre-function space as well as providing large vistas to the city skyline and the river.

A major concern for solar radiation transmission was the west facing window for the ballroom and meeting room areas. Our proposed design provides for a deep inset glazing with over 10 feet of overhang and vertical wing walls which significantly reduce incident solar radiation on the glazed surface. The south facing glazed areas employ a faceted surface that by virtue of its angles and self-shading reduce incident solar radiation on the facade. In addition to the design, the use of high-performance glazing and ceramic frit pattern further enhance the performance of the facade.

on Mitigation: Mitigation: on on Mitigation: sfor the westradiation facing transmission was the west facing solar on Mitigation:

The Javits expansion structure has limited glazed areas on its facade mainly due to the program requirements of the building. The program areas with glazed facade include the main entry and atrium spaces facing east and south, the pre-function spaces at both meeting rooms and ballroom levels facing south and the large west facing window from the meeting room and ballroom spaces. In addition smaller areas of vestibule facing north adjacent to the green roof deck are glazed. All of these areas combined still comprise of only about 30% of glazed area of the total facade area. Furthermore, using high-performance glazing and facade design strategies that mitigate impact of direct and in-direct solar radiation, we are able to reduce the actual solar transmission through the glazed facade.

INCIDENT SOLAR ANALYSIS

eas its facade sionon structure has limited limited glazed glazed areas areas on on its its facade facade sion structure has eas on its facade eas on its sion structure has limited limitedof glazed areas on onThe its facade facade eas on its facade facade The program e program program requirements the building. building. program sion structure has areas its eding. requirements ofglazed the The program ding. The program ding. The program eatrium program requirements ofentry the building. building. The program ding. The program dd spaces facade include the main mainof and atrium atrium spaces program requirements the The program facade include the entry and spaces de atrium spaces d atrium spaces dth facade include the main main entryatand and atrium spaces dd atrium spaces meeting rooms south, the pre-function spaces both meeting rooms facade include the entry atrium spaces outh, the pre-function spaces at both meeting rooms th meeting rooms th meeting rooms south, the pre-function spaces at both meeting rooms th meeting rooms facing window vels facing south and the the largeat west facing window outh, the pre-function spaces both meeting rooms els facing south and large west facing window facing window facing window vels facing south and the the largeIn west facingsmaller window facing window dition smaller areas g room and ballroom spaces. addition areas els facing south and large west facing window g roomsmaller and ballroom dition areas spaces. In addition smaller areas dition smaller areasto the room and ballroom spaces. Inroof addition smaller areas dition smaller areas deck are glazed. ng north adjacent greenIn deck are are glazed. gg room ballroom spaces. addition smaller areas ng north adjacent to the green roof deck glazed. deck areand glazed. deck are glazed. ng north adjacent to the the green green roof deck30% are glazed. glazed. deck areadjacent glazed. bout 30% of glazed s combined still comprise of only about of glazed ng north to roof deck are s combined comprise of only about 30% of glazed bout 30% of still glazed bout 30% of still glazed sfacade combined still comprise of ofusing only about about 30% 30% of of glazed glazed bout 30% of glazed area. Furthermore, high-performance sgh-performance combined comprise only facade area. Furthermore, using high-performance gh-performance gh-performance facade area. Furthermore, using high-performance high-performance gh-performance mpact of direct and de design strategies that mitigate impact of direct and facade area. Furthermore, using de design strategies mpact of direct and that mitigate impact of direct and mpact ofwe direct and to de design design strategies that mitigate impactsolar of direct direct and mpact of direct and ctual solar transdiation, are able able reduce theVIEWactual transde that mitigate impact of and SE INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC -SOLAR MAR) RADIATIONSW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC -SOLAR MAR) RADIATION- WINTER (DEC - MAR) SE VIEWVIEWINCIDENT SOLAR WINTER (DEC (DEC MAR) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR diation, westrategies are to reduce the actual solar transctual solar transSE INCIDENT WINTER -- MAR) SW -- INCIDENT SE VIEWINCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC - MAR) RADIATIONSW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC - MAR) RADIATION- WINTER (DEC - MAR) ctual solar transdiation, wetransare able to to reduce reduce theVIEWactualINCIDENT solar transtransctual solar winter winter SE SOLAR WINTER (DEC MAR) SW SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC MAR) SE VIEWVIEWINCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC (DEC MAR) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- WINTER WINTER (DEC (DEC -- MAR) MAR) the glazed glazed facade. diation, we are able the actual solar SE VIEWINCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONWINTER (DEC --SOLAR MAR) RADIATIONSW VIEW VIEW -- INCIDENT INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONWINTER (DEC --SOLAR MAR) RADIATIONSE INCIDENT WINTER -- MAR) SW -- INCIDENT the facade. the glazed glazed facade. facade. the

265

500 KWH/M2

S

T SOLAR SOLAR ANALYSIS ANALYSIS T T SOLAR SOLAR ANALYSIS ANALYSIS T

SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- SUMMER (JUN - SEP)

S SE VIEW- INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- WINTER (DEC - MAR)

2. southeast solar radiation studies

SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR -SOLAR JUN) RADIATIONSW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR -SOLAR JUN) RADIATION- SPRING (MAR - JUN) SE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR SPRING (MAR (MAR JUN) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR SE -- INCIDENT SPRING -- JUN) SW -- INCIDENT SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR - JUN) RADIATIONSW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR - JUN) RADIATION- SPRING (MAR - JUN) SE VIEW VIEW -- INCIDENT INCIDENT SOLAR SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONSPRING (MAR --SOLAR JUN) RADIATIONSW VIEW VIEW -- INCIDENT INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR --SOLAR JUN) RADIATIONSE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR (MAR JUN) SW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATION- SPRING SPRING (MAR (MAR -- JUN) JUN) SE SPRING (MAR JUN) SW SOLAR RADIATIONSPRING (MAR JUN) SE -- INCIDENT SPRING -- JUN) SW -- INCIDENT

spring 500 250 250 500 500 250 500 250

KWH/M22 KWH/M22 KWH/M KWH/M

2.

fall

spring

500 500 500 500

KWH/M22 KWH/M KWH/M22 KWH/M

SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONFALL (SEPT - DEC) SW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR FALL (SEPT - DEC) SE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONFALL (SEPT (SEPT DEC)RADIATIONSW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATION- FALL FALL (SEPT (SEPT -- DEC) DEC) SE -- INCIDENT SOLAR FALL -- DEC) SW -- INCIDENT SOLAR SE VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONFALL (SEPT - DEC) SW VIEW - INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONFALL (SEPT - DEC) SE FALL (SEPT SW SOLAR FALL (SEPT SE VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONFALL (SEPT (SEPT DEC)RADIATIONSW VIEW VIEW INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATION- FALL FALL (SEPT (SEPT -- DEC) DEC) SE VIEW VIEW -- INCIDENT INCIDENT SOLAR SOLAR RADIATIONRADIATIONFALL (SEPT -- DEC) DEC) SW VIEW VIEW -- INCIDENT INCIDENT SOLAR RADIATIONFALL (SEPT -- DEC) DEC) SE -- INCIDENT SOLAR FALL -- DEC) SW -- INCIDENT SOLAR

3.

fall


266

1. aerial view of 11th ave facade

“The design of the massing and facades for the proposed expansion of the Javits Center was derived from an adaption of the original Javits curtain wall design. The original Pei Cobb Freed convention center celebrated the latest in glass curtain wall technology available in 1986―similar to London’s Crystal Palace of 1850. Our proposal adapts the current massing and facades from the original 1986 structure―three decades later―while reimagining a glass building using today’s glass technologies. This creates a new dynamic entry and integrates the expansion with the adjacent Hudson Yards development.” - Kenneth Drucker, FAIA, Design Principal


2. hudson river elevation

3. view from from hudson river

2.

3.

267


aerial view


270

1. green roof + new marshalling garage


2. ballroom

4. view of circulation from meeting rooms

3. circulation in lobby atrium

2.

3.

4.

271


view of new entrance from 11th ave


1. main entry through the civic plaza


JUSTICE 2. early concept model expressing facade articulation

3. massing study of building

DAVIDSON COUNTY CRIMINAL JUSTICE CENTER Nashville, Tennessee, USA

The new Davidson County Metro Criminal Justice Center in the heart of downtown Nashville completes a civic campus that includes the city’s historic City Hall and Courthouse. Visitors enter the Justice Center through a glass lobby that emphasizes the open relationship between the county government and the community it serves. The building will house Davidson County Sheriff’s Office staff and up to 1,000 inmates, with a 64-bed mental health wing to address the emotional and psychological needs of prisoners.

2.

Because zoning requirements limited the height of the new Justice Center to five stories, the design team made the massing longer and wider to accommodate space requirements. The form and width align with the taller neighboring buildings, giving it a comparable volume. Similar colors and building materials on the exterior blend harmoniously within the historic campus while providing the new Justice Center a thoroughly modern composition. The extended civic plaza outside the building and a new public garden featuring trees and fountains emphasize Nashville’s commitment to community and downtown development. The plaza links the historic courthouse and City Hall and becomes a new gathering place for public activities. Design strategies such as green roofs, stormwater mitigation and photovoltaic systems demonstrate the city’s dedication to sustainability. The facility replaces the existing Justice Center constructed in 1982.

3.

275


276

INFORMATION CLIENT Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Ruggiero, AIA

405,000 sq. ft. / 37,625 sq. m.

annual EUI: 698.3 kBtu/sf/yr 59% below ASHRAE 2007

ELEVATION 1. north elevation of main entry + public plaza


2. southeast aerial

277


view into civic plaza from james robertson parkway


280

PLAN

2. open visitor lobby looking out to civic plaza

1. civic plaza - level 2

3. typical housing unit promotes rehabilitation

A. plaza B. entry lobby C. visitation D. work-release E. lockers + gym F. dayrooms G. outdoor recreation yard

F C

G

C A

B F UP

D

E

G


281

2.

3.


282

DRAWING 1. west elevation

2. north-south section

1.

2.


283


284

1. west facade articulation from 3rd avenue


2. view into public rain gardens

285


civic plaza engages the community

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The success of the design for the Davidson Justice Center lies in the resolution of contemporary attitudes of detention with the demands and expectations of significant civic urban buildings.â&#x20AC;? - Peter Ruggiero, AIA, Design Principal


The aesthetically discreet and functionally integrated lab furniture system features cantilevered work surfaces, open storage, task lighting and integrated services.


PRODUCT DESIGN

SCIENTIFIC LAB FURNITURE SYSTEM HOK Product Design approached Kewaunee Scientific Corporation, a global leader in laboratory, healthcare and technical furniture products, with a concept for improving the workplace in research labs. Conceived as a series of enhancements to improve service management, lighting and collaboration in the lab, the project evolved into the creation of a cohesive architectural furniture system. The system features an oval structural extrusion that supplies gas, power and network connectivity throughout labs while isolating wet and dry services. Work surfaces can be configured in conjunction with glass shelving and suspended cabinets. To reduce the number of table legs, the monolithic extrusion can span two workstation modules. Each frame can feature a cantilevered end table for collaboration. The resulting large technical harvest table, or research pod, optimizes multidisciplinary research, interaction and movement around the perimeter. The product line also includes sit-to-stand heavy instrument tables, lightweight and reconfigurable write-up desks, mobile cabinets and a flexible panel system. LED task lighting is integrated into shelving supports, and upper beams can be configured with linear LED modules that provide indirect adaptive lighting. Services exiting the ceiling lay directly into the upper beams for efficient configuration and expansion. Kewaunee Scientific will introduce the new product line in 2018 with support from HOK Product Design. Additional components are in development.

289


290

INFORMATION CLIENT Kewaunee Scientific Corporation

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Matthew Hern

CONCEPT The original “Enhance” concept won the 2015 HOK Product Design Competition, and was submitted by Gordon Stratford, Ami Shah and Virginia Byers. The design concept explored improving user experiences and enriching collaboration in research environments. The design offered new, more efficient ways of managing overhead services and helping groups share results and improve team culture.


1. top view: Based on 5-foot modules, islands are made up of four shared workstations and teaming tables for collaboration.

2. perspective: The design intent is to reduce intrusions, seams and boundariesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; allowing for openness between stations and promoting interaction among researchers.

1.

2.

291


â&#x20AC;&#x153;The clean aesthetics and scale of the architectural structure foster interaction and innovation to create open, engaging lab environments.â&#x20AC;? - Matthew Hern, Design Principal


The lower aluminum casting adds characteristically expressive form and stability, supporting the vertical columns and cantilevered work surfaces. Services run horizontally and vertically throughout the system, and both task and indirect lighting are provided. End tables accommodate project updates, personalization and teamwork.


southwest aerial view


RESIDENTIAL

633 S. LASALLE STREET TOWER Chicago, Illinois, USA

This design concept for a mixed-use residential tower introduces a contemporary co-living concept to the growing Printerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Row neighborhood south of downtown Chicago. Advancing urban living and coworking trends, the 25-story tower pairs minimal living units with generous shared amenities to draw residents into the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s common spaces. Compact en-suite bedrooms provide private living space, while common areas offer a sense of community rarely found in traditional residential tower models. The towerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efficient design is influenced by the constrained site, parking requirements and adjacency to elevated train tracks. A sky lobby embedded within the parking podium acts as a gateway to the building. It provides a central public space above the sightline of the train tracks. By inserting amenities into the garage podium, common gathering spaces for tenants and guests can be maximized. Flexible spaces surrounding the street entrance can be used for events, pop-up retail stores, street fairs or food vendors. These activities enhance the urban experience and attract foot traffic, maximizing revenue for the building owner.

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298

INFORMATION CLIENT Confidential

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Peter Ruggiero, AIA

225,000 sq. ft. / 20,905 sq. m.

285 ft. / 87 m. tall 25 floors

D

SECTION 1. elevated amenity space A. entrance B. parking C. amenity D. residential

C

B

A


2. garage + amenity space

299


300

CONCEPT 1. northwest view of elevated amenity space


2. southwest view of elevated amenity space

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The design investigates a new paradigm for urban housing and a redefined utility of the urban elevated garage typically found in the podium of residential towers.â&#x20AC;? - Peter Ruggiero, AIA, Design Principal

301


302

PLAN 1. typical residential floor on levels 8-24

A. 4-bedroom unit B. 2-bedroom unit C. 3-bedroom unit D. studio unit

A

D

B B

A C


2. level 0

3. level 4

4. level 25 roof

E. main entrance

I. coworking space

N. 4-bedroom unit

F. bike room

J. bar

O. 2-bedroom unit

G. parking garage entrance

K. outdoor lounge

P. 3-bedroom unit

H. lobby

L. flex + event space

Q. water feature

M. parking

R. terrace

R

G

J N L

E

303

I

H

O

M

K

F

Q

N P

2.

3.

4.


aerial view


RESIDENTIAL

SUTTON PLACE DESIGN COMPETITION New York, New York, USA

Sutton Place is a quiet enclave in Manhattan located south of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge and north of the Midtown East neighborhood. The highly visible East River site creates a significant opportunity for 430 East 58th Street to become an urban expression of Sutton Place on the Manhattan skyline. The new development visually anchors the neighborhood with an elegant tower featuring a terra-cotta frame, punched openings and a taut curtain wall. The top of the high-rise culminates with an oculus facing south to honor the United Nations Headquarters. Terra-cotta reinforces the neighborhood palette, while the four-story frame openings relate to the scale of adjacent townhouses. As the tower rises, staggered fenestrations convey a sense of movement and form a streamlined statement that creates a dialogue with surrounding buildings. Crafted as a contextual “townhouse,” the building’s base includes the resident entrance and amenity floors. Vertical terra-cotta elements are linked with bronze channels and limestone to create a doubleheight cantilevered entry canopy with a welcoming street presence. A private rear garden reinforces Sutton Place’s small park environment. The conceptual design provides floor plan options for both a central core and a north side core without altering the exterior design. The central core option provides 360-degree views and more daylight penetration on all four sides. The north side core offers a more efficient option that allows for improved layouts and better views to the south. Representing a new generation of Sutton Place residents, the timeless design celebrates the unique scale, charming character and breathtaking views that draw people to the neighborhood.

305


306

INFORMATION CLIENT Lehrer, LLC

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Kenneth Drucker, FAIA

305,000 sq. ft. / 28,335 sq. m. 750 ft. / 228.6 m. tall 60 floors

CONCEPT 1. podium elevation study


2. model photo

307


308

elevation studies

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The new development visually anchors the neighborhood with an elegant tower featuring a terra-cotta frame, punched openings and a taut curtain wall.â&#x20AC;? - Kenneth Drucker, FAIA, Design Principal


309


310

1. model photo

PLAN 2. typical floor with center core

A. entry hall of full floor unit B. master suite C. living room D. dining room E. eat-in kitchen

B C

A

D

E 2.

1.


3. typical floor with side core

4. rendered facade study

F. entry hall of full floor unit G. eat-in kitchen H. dining room I. living room J. master suite

I

H

G

F

J

3.

4.


312

1.

1. west elevation

2. street view

2.


3. view from east river looking north

313


view from east river looking south


1. gateway to the campus

2. building geometry as a response to site

1.


SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

EDUCATION BUILDING FOR CONFIDENTIAL CLIENT California, USA

This addition to an existing university building mediates between past and future, work and play, and building and site. The iconic structure completes the overall campus master plan. The building brings together the arts, science and rapid prototyping of various scales. The team conceived the design based on balanced concepts of gateway, heart and pathways. Situated along a natural canyon and next to a future light-rail stop, the center engages the landscape and connects to the light-rail line, forming a new eastern gateway to the campus. Envisioned as a circular hub of activity anchored in the landscape, the heart of the project sits opposite a high-bay workspace fronting the street and future light-rail edge. Passengers arriving at the station will exit onto a ramp that proceeds down between the two anchor points and under the cantilevered mass. This reinforces the gateway concept and provides visibility for the different activities taking place inside. It also begins a series of pathways connecting to the building and existing campus. Two levels of the addition float above this space and act as a wrapper that extends from the existing building and sweeps around to create a dramatic overhang at the canyonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge.

2.

317


318

INFORMATION CLIENT Confidential

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Ernest Cirangle, FAIA

“The design team set out to demonstrate our process and ability to harness crossdisciplinary thinking. Our process adapted the university’s research philosophy of thinking, observing, making and testing. The proposal embodies dualities of seriousness and play, connectivity and placemaking.” - Ernest Cirangle, FAIA, Design Principal

70,000 sq. ft. / 6,500 sq. m.

CONCEPT 1. The central spiral activates the interior space and connects the building heart to the exterior landscape plaza.


319

PLAN 2. level 3 + level 4

A. existing research labs B. existing office C. exterior gathering space D. meeting rooms E. new research studio F. collaboration work space G. office H. vertical + visual connectivy zone

B C

A

H

D

G F

E


320

SITE STRATEGY

2. building concepts

1. site concepts

1.

2.


3. gateway + heart

3.

4. pathways

4.

321


322

MODEL

2. view across canyon

1. design model

3. view from the light rail

4. heart of the campus

2.

3.

1.

4.


5. a new campus heart

323


324

1. interior activity hub


2. typical studio work space

3. building section through heart

2.

3.

325


1. view of main entrance from midland road


SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY 2. main east-west atrium

THE FRANCIS CRICK INSTITUTE London, UK

The Francis Crick Institute was founded by seven major leading institutions focused on biomedical research in the United Kingdom. The partnership included the Medical Research Council and its National Institute for Medical Research, Cancer Research UK, University College London, Imperial College London, Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College London and the Wellcome Trust, a major philanthropic institution funding medical research. Initially seen as a way to provide much-needed new research space for these institutions, it soon became apparent that the building also would provide an opportunity to create an innovative model for research. The Crick departs from traditional research models. The focus is on attracting the best talent and then letting these researchers follow their instincts. There are no departments or specific research directions and almost no idea is off limits. There also is no tenure, with researchers allowed to stay at the Crick for a maximum of 12 years. The intent is to keep the thinking fresh while providing a source of talent for other UK institutions and creating opportunities for collaboration among institutions. There is only limited protection of intellectual property. Discoveries are shared openly with the rest of the world and partnerships with industry are encouraged. To promote this innovative approach, the design is highly flexible and adaptable to meet the everchanging needs of existing and new researchers. It was especially important for every aspect of the design to encourage the interactions and collaborations that generate so many breakthrough ideas. Concepts of visibility and spontaneous encounters are central to the design. The building is composed of four blocks separated by a main east-west atrium and a smaller northsouth transverse atrium. The intersection is an informal meeting, break and support area. An adjacent central stair connects all floors. The linear arrangement of lab neighborhoods optimizes visual permeability, offering views across the atrium into the write-up areas and through the primary labs.

327


328

INFORMATION CLIENT The Francis Crick Institute

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Larry Malcic, AIA DESIGN TEAM LEADER David King, RIBA SCIENCE LEADER Bill Odell, AIA

980,000 sq. ft. / 91,000 sq. m.

annual EUI: 382 kBtu/sf/yr 31% below ASHRAE 2007

CONCEPT 1. design evolution

The building site is in the heart of central London’s growing scientific community. This location provides easy rail links to Cambridge, Oxford and the rest of the EU for connections with other researchers. Its proximity to many London hospitals offers opportunities for the type of interactions between researchers and clinicians that fuel collaboration and innovation. The significant technical challenges of building on this urban site required design measures that prevented vibration and electromagnetic interference from local rail, subway and truck traffic. HOK served as architect and lead designer responsible for the project’s overall design concept, interior design, lab planning and landscape architecture. PLP collaborated with HOK in shaping the building’s distinctive form and striking architectural roof expression. The building was certified BREEAM Excellent for environmental sustainability.


2. proximity + visibility are critical: between write-up + lab, lab + lab, wings of the building + floors

329


330

SITE context map

A. the francis crick institute B. british library C. st pancras station D. eurostar station E. kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross station F. euston station G. ucl campus H. future turing institute I. kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross development

F


I

D

E A

C H

B

G


332

CONCEPT 1. massing strategy

A. maximum volume by zoning + right to light B. center atrium opened for light, views + internal visibility C. cross atrium opened for light, views + to create a center D. internal circulation along atriums for visibility E. four lab neighborhoods with central support, break + informal meeting areas

A.

B.

D.

C.

E.


2. study model in site context

333


aerial view of the crick


©Laing O’Rourke


336

PLAN 1. level 0

B

F

A. public entrance B. employee entrance C. service entrance

A

E

D. lecture theater E. exhibition space F. teaching lab for children

H

G. informal meeting

D

H. seminar suite I. dining area J. kitchen K. servery L. coffee bar + pub M. community facility

G

L

N. garden O. public walkway

I

O

K J

C

N

B M


337

2. level 1

Q

P. wet lab Q. informatics R. administration support S. informal meeting T. write-up areas U. central stairs V. cell lab W. histopathology X. flow cytometry

T

P

T

P

Y. high throughput screening

R

U

X Y

P

T

P

T

S Q

Q

W V


view from lab write-ups toward central collaboration space


340

SECTION 1. longitudinal section through atrium A. labs B. mechanical C. atrium D. entrance E. auditorium F. loading bay

C

D

C

F

E

B

A

B

A

D


2. glazing to transverse atrium

3. ground floor central collaboration space

4. cross-atrium bridges provide opportunities for informal meetings

3.

2.

4.

341


342

ATRIUM 1. open stair connecting the central collaboration space at each level


2. main reception + auditorium entrance

4. elevator bank + call station

3. central stair from above

2.

3.

4.

343


344

LABORATORY 1. primary lab with shared support + write-up beyond


2. perimeter circulation route with offices + write-ups

3. openable white walls create collaboration pods that encourage spontaneous discussions + interaction

4. view from a write-up area with primary lab, shared support + mirrored layout beyond

3.

2.

4.

345


ground floor view of auditorium + atrium

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science is constantly evolving and therefore requires a highly collaborative environment to facilitate scientific breakthroughs. We are delighted that our holistic design solutions will aid in these new discoveries and keep London at the forefront of innovative medical research.â&#x20AC;? - Larry Malcic, AIA, Design Principal


1. main entry


SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY 2. concept sketch

3. exterior detail

MEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING FOR CONFIDENTIAL CLIENT California, USA

The design transformed a 1960s-era office building into a modern, light-filled research workplace to advance medical science at one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier universities. The facility houses high-performance biomedical research laboratories that accommodate a wide variety of collaborative research teams. Specialized spaces include core facilities, shared workspaces and related infrastructure to support each team.

2.

Skylights welcome daylight deep into two-story gathering and circulation spaces. Glass walls with simple, origami-like folds replaced outdated glass window walls at the north and south ends of the existing building. This floor-to-ceiling glass floats above a wide-planked boardwalk along the edge of the outdoor gardens, blurring the lines between interior and exterior environments. The design team collaborated with the client to identify the specific needs of each type of researcher. This informed the size and configuration of open and closed labs, infrastructure, support facilities and collaboration areas. Parametric design tools enabled the team to test the long-term flexibility and viability of three different concepts to find the best solution. The analysis revealed that approximately 20 percent of the research space needed to be flexible to adapt to changing research programs and future technologies. This project has enabled the university to implement, test and refine new standards for planning interdisciplinary research space.

3.

349


350

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Engaging the building plan and section into a synchronous design of simple

INFORMATION

folding planes of glass and vibrant colors, we reimagined how a 1960s

CLIENT Confidential

office building made up of opaque, cast concrete and stone panels could be

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Paul Woolford, AIA

transformed into a contemporary, light-filled research environment. All interior spaces have views out to the natural world.â&#x20AC;?

75,000 sq. ft. / 6,970 sq. m.

- Paul Woolford, AIA, Design Principal

annual EUI: 298.7 kBtu/sf/yr 20% below ASHRAE 2007

CONCEPT 1. building performance diagrams

2.

wet

support wet

views

dry

retrofit

circulation

1.

dry

2. health + wellness diagrams

flexible programs

water reuse

daylight

biophilia


351

PLAN 3. level 0

A. labs B. specialty lab rooms C. work stations D. offices E. collaboration spaces F. administration

E

C

G. kitchen H. wellness room I. open collaboration space

D

A

G

I

F

E B

B

E

H

D I

G

E

A

C


352

1. phenotype models

2. faculty phenotypes

INDIVIDUAL

UNIVERSITY

INDIVIDUAL

UNIVERSITY

1.

The team incorporated three of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five faculty phenotype models into the research building. Investigating a wide variety of planning scenarios enabled the team to create the optimal quantity and mix of wet and dry benches and desks.

2. USED PHENOTYPES

UNUSED PHENOTYPES


3. lab

353


354

1. north collaboration area


2. south collaboration area

355


356

1. south facade garden terrace


2. north building entry at boardwalk

357


1. view from channelside + meridian


SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA MORSANI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

2. site plan

3. site context

Tampa, Florida, USA

The Morsani School of Medicine will create a new downtown Tampa campus for the University of South Florida and establish the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skyline. The building will serve as an anchor for a new 53-acre multiuse development to create a more walkable and sustainable environment for downtown residents, workers, students and visitors. To attract top-tier students and cardiovascular researchers, the university challenged the design team to create a signature, urban facility for its new medical school and heart institute. A rigorous design process resulted in the creation of a prismatic element both in form and effect. Much like a prism refracts light, the building form refracts from the ground to the sky to accommodate and express a diverse mixture of programmatic elements. Subtle, faceted gestures make up the facade and reveal specific moments of public gathering space such as the main lobby, cafeteria, library and prefunction areas. Large, multistory atria were created to internally weave together the different programs. These spaces give volumetric relief along the western and southern edges while enhancing internal connectivity and providing direct, unobstructed views to the plaza and surrounding Tampa Bay. HOK is collaborating with Skanska on the designbuild project.

2.

3.

359


360

INFORMATION CLIENT University of South Florida

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Roger Soto, AIA

340,000 sq. ft. / 31,590 sq. m.

265 ft. / 80 m. tall 15 floors

CONCEPT 1. concept sketches


2. early conceptual building section

361


362

PLAN

2. diagram illustrating internal atria connectivity

1. diagram illustrating programmatic stacking *medical college of medicine (mcom)

mechanical

vivarium

shell

shell

office

labs

mcom*

mcom*

mcom*

public space

2.


363

3. level 0

4. level 1

5. level 2

A. main lobby

F. cafeteria

I. student commons

B. retail space

G. prefunction

J. learning community

C. elevator lobby

H. auditorium

K. classrooms L. experimental learning lab

D. back of house E. loading dock

E H G

D

F 4.

B

L

C

K

A

B

J I

3.

5.


364

1. main lobby


2. cafeteria

4. west atrium

3. library

2.

3.

4.

365


366

1. view from channelside

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The design provides the university with a setting for a new way of learning and for engaging with the city of Tampa.â&#x20AC;? - Roger Soto, AIA, Design Principal


2. main lobby + plaza

367


1. northeast aerial perspective

2. initial concept diagram


SPORTS + RECREATION + ENTERTAINMENT

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER STADIUM St. Louis, Missouri, USA

The design for this proposed Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium provides the region with a top-tier venue for sporting, music and cultural events. The 20,000-seat stadium offers spectacular views of downtown St. Louis while creating a new landmark for visitors approaching from the west. Its open design to the north and east creates a strong visual connection to the surrounding district and downtown core while an elegant raised canopy along the west protects spectators from the setting sun. Both the canopy and the tightly enclosed stadium bowl structure are designed to maximize noise and excitement during games and events. Upper-level seating is flexible to accommodate an expansion to a stadium capacity of 28,500 seats. The site is adjacent to St. Louis Union Station, a National Historic Landmark currently undergoing a renovation, and within one mile of the Gateway Arch, Busch Stadium, St. Louis Ballpark Village, Scottrade Center and Peabody Opera House. The design connects the stadium to this walkable sports, culture and entertainment corridor, which is accessible via three MetroLink light-rail stations. More than 1,400 new stadium parking spaces are planned to complement existing parking options. Entry points at all four corners provide visitors with easy access to the stadium from the surrounding site. A linear green space to the east creates a pedestrian area linking the stadium to the urban landscape and the adjacent Memorial Plaza. This park was envisioned to encourage year-round activity on the site and create a venue to host a variety of festivals and events.

2.

369


370

INFORMATION CLIENT MLS2STL

2. site plan

A. 27,000-seat stadium B. game-day parking

DESIGN PRINCIPAL Eli Hoisington, AIA

C. training + facilities D. entry plaza

450,000 sq. ft. / 41,800 sq. m.

E. game-day plaza F. st. louis union station G. union station improvements

CONCEPT 1. concept diagram


371

B

E

D

A B B F

C

B G


372

1. aerial perspective looking east


2. seating views looking downtown

3. street-level approach

2.

3.

373


field level view of home team stands

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This project hearkened back to the original sports venues and how they were sited by using the natural topography and folding the stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural bowl shape into an existing landscape. Unlike the ancients, however, who found hills and natural forms to work with, our team discovered that repurposing the site of a highway interchange created the opportunity for a natural bowl. By fitting the stadium into the local context and removing acres of barriers in the old highway network, we were able to connect the fabric of the city with this new development. The final move is a gentle tilt to the east, shading the bowl and honoring views to the Gateway Arch.â&#x20AC;? - Eli Hoisington, AIA, Design Principal


northeast exterior view


SPORTS + RECREATION + ENTERTAINMENT

MIAMI DOLPHINS HARD ROCK STADIUM Miami, Florida, USA

The modernization of Hard Rock Stadium offers Miami Dolphins fans a world-class experience that is authentic to South Florida and provides the city with a venue for marquee events. HOK collaborated with the NFL’s Miami Dolphins to develop a comprehensive design solution for the $500-million modernization of the team’s existing stadium. To ensure that the Dolphins would not miss any home games, the extensive renovations were completed in three phases. In 2015 every seat in the facility was replaced and innovative seating products were introduced. Seating options at a variety of price points now accommodate all fans, from corporate clients to families and millennials. Updates to the 100 and 300 level concourses included contemporary food service offerings and amenities. The renovations added a Field Club, North Sideline Club and corner terraces. Creative new living-room boxes meld the home viewing and game-day experiences. Each of the 32 boxes include four individual recliners, up to four programmable high-definition TVs and access to the 72 Club, a unique indoor lounge. The design reinforces Miami’s culture and heritage by incorporating murals by local artists, comprehensive wayfinding and branding, local materials and experiential design components. Each club, suite, social gathering and dining space provides fans with a splash of South Florida.

377


378

INFORMATION CLIENT Miami Dolphins

DESIGN PRINCIPAL George Heinlein, AIA

1.2 million sq. ft. / 111,480 sq. m.

annual EUI: 28.5 kBtu/sf/yr 45% below ASHRAE 2007

In 2016 a new open-air canopy became the stadiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature architectural element. The elegant canopy provides weather protection and sun shading while still allowing ample sunlight to reach the natural grass field. This canopy also captures and amplifies crowd noise, enhancing the game-day experience. Other improvements included 22,400 square feet of new highdefinition video boards, a new audio system and fiber-optic Wi-Fi. Renovations for 2017 included comprehensive updates to all existing premium spaces on the 200 Club and 200 Mezzanine Suite levels and distinct new designs for the sideline and end zone suites. Club interiors, designed in collaboration with Rockwell Group, were refreshed to support the Dolphinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; approach to the fan experience.

PLAN 1. 300 level + upper concourse

D

C

A. support column B. mast

A

C. circulation ramps D. open concourse E. escalators

B E


2. seating bowl

379


380

1. north club


2. public art in concourse

4. north club food + beverage

3. nines premium club

2.

3.

4.

381


382

1. structural drawing of mast

A

A. upper node B. tension support cable C. the mast D. etfe membrane E. roof steel F. lower node G. tension bracing H. concrete support column I. upper concourse

B

C

D E

G

H

I

F


2. mast

383


SECTION transverse section - 50-yard line


south exterior view

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The original stadium lacked identity and an architectural presence. We addressed this by creating an expansive and iconic shade structure. This elegant open-air canopy, which was erected in just seven months, includes more than 17,000 tons of steel and covers more than 600,000 square feet of space.â&#x20AC;? - George Heinlein, AIA, Design Principal


DESIGN TEAMS

AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION

LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal B New York, New York, USA Gerard DeZern Peter Ruggiero (Design Principal) Kholisile Dhliwayo Marie Achalabun Saad Dimachkieh Amir Aghajani Gregory DiRienzo Roosevelt Alexandre Koriey Dixon Zahra Ali George Dolidze Marcus Allen Julie Donovan Abdulaziz Almobarak Madeleine French Robert Asselin Carl Galioto Paul Auguste Yu Gao Cindy Bang Cid Garcia Tom Bayer Hyeongmo Goo Stephen Beacham Apoorv Goyal Matthew Breidenthal Raul Guerrero Jose Briones Pawel Gurdak Ashlee Broadus Meredith Hall John Brocato Nancy Hamilton Bart Butler Lawson Hanna Yuhong Cao Mark Hendel Jeremy Charmchizadeh Brian Henkel Dany Chehade Adriana Hernandez Robert Chicas Julia Heutel Ilya Chistiakov Eli Hoisington James Christerson Alyssa Horn Mario Claussnitzer Kyle Ingber Leesa Coller Julie Janeo Peter Costanzo Nathan Janicek Ashley Craig Justin Jennings Steven Danielpour Naomi Katlowitz Benjamin Denker Hiroyuki Kawakami Devki Desai

12


Eunil Kim Joo Young Kim Varun Kohli Komal Kotwal Aman Krishan Gary Kuzma OChong Kwon Joanna Lam Lamar Lane Julian Lawson Edward Ledoux Kanoknart (Noon) Leelardchareon Zifan Liu Christopher Lodge Eugene Lund Shawn Lutz Al Lyons H. (Anu) Mahendra Donald Marmen Marissa Martorana Glenn McCann Charles McGrail Katherine McPhillips Francesca Meola Michael Miller Oritsegbegbemi Nanna Alexander Nash Sergio Navarro John Neary Edgar Nunnelly Anastasios Papadopoulos

Juyoung Park Jack Parker Amy Patel Nishiel Patel George Pavlovski Jennifer Pittenger Mark Pritchard Courtney Robinson Alejandro Rodriguez Rene Ruiz Roberto Saldarriaga Adriana Sangeorzan John Santoro Meiko Sato Gregory Schleusner Darko Sefic Jeannette Segal Mohammed Shuaib Simon Shim Satomi Shimamura Francisco Silva Michael Smith Julie Somarriba Erica Srolovitz Jacquelyn Suozzi Amer Taghlebi Jiasi Tan Giacomo Tinari Enrico Tomassoli Diana Ton Abbeylane Torres


DESIGN TEAMS (CONT.)

AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION (CONT.)

COMMERCIAL

LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal B (cont.) John Tran Zhenhuan Xu Aaron Ricardo Vazquez Junko Yamakawa Hengfeng Wang Scott Yocom Stephen Weinryb Deborah Young Elizabeth Weintraub Vincent Yu Marion White Bashir Zivari Elizabeth Wu Christopher Zoog New LaGuardia Airport Master Plan New York, New York, USA Gregory Cranford (Design Principal) James Mallory Matt Breidenthal Francesca Meola Javier Buscaglia-Pesquera Daniel Ng Kenneth Drucker Aneirin Owens Anne Fletcher Isaac Plumb Ely Fretz Casey Renner Carl Galioto Maria Salazar Lucy Gross Simon Shim Marc Gross Jiasi Tan William Jenkinson Patrick Vokaty Kooho Jung Justin Warner Nicolas Libeyre Zhaoyan Zheng 1101 16th Street NW Washington, DC, USA Bill Hellmuth (Design Principal) Emillio Stokes Mateusz Gawad Esther Wang Chloe Hiyu Joe Winters

38

54


CORPORATE

The Allen Mixed-Use Development Houston, Texas, USA Roger Soto (Design Principal) Raul Guerrero Kathrin Brunner Jenny Qualls Zach Christeson Joseph Wilfong Jarrett Ewing Ghirardelli Square Plaza San Francisco, California, USA Brian Jencek (Design Principal) Xue Ling Minyoung Choi Arthur Morrissey Kathy Doi Beau Pesa Joon Kim Robin Roderick Ben Kuchinsky Joseph Schneider

64

Mixed-Use Development Design Competition Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Roger Soto (Design Principal) Chris Oliver Kathrin Brunner Seonghyeak Won

88

Our Urban Midwest Chicago, Illinois, USA Domenic Salpietra (Design Principal) Jiasi Tan Baixin Ren

100

Tower Design Competition Sydney, Australia Peter Ruggiero (Design Principal) Farid Pour Matt Breidenthal Sean Quinn Allison Burrell Casey Renner Mark Hendel Domenic Salpietra Kyle Ingber Jiasi Tan Amit Khanna Giacomo Tinari

114

Bentall Kennedy Office Toronto, Ontario, Canada Caitlin Turner (Design Principal) Sally Shi Pia Concepcion Sharon Turner

128

78


DESIGN TEAMS (CONT.)

CORPORATE (CONT.)

Corporate Amenities Building for Confidential Client Texas, USA Roger Soto (Design Principal) Noon Leelardcharoen Cindy Bang Wendy Niziol Kathrin Brunner Joseph Wilfong Dairy Farmers of America Headquarters Kansas City, Kansas, USA Peter Sloan (Design Principal) Mark O’Hara Jake Baker Zachary O’Keefe Lynn Carlton Sandy Price Adam Guzman Molly Smith Eric Linebarger Tracy Stewart JJ Nicolas Bridget Sturr

136

Dentsu Aegis Network Office Los Angeles, California, USA Kristi Zoref (Design Principal) Erika Reuter Kallie Ingersoll Meiko Sato Justin Ping Anthony Spagnolo

160

Polsinelli Office Dallas, Texas, USA Peter Sloan (Design Principal) David Roberts Eric Linebarger Shawn Sanem Emily Payne Tracy Stewart Steven Roark Polsinelli Office Denver, Colorado, USA Peter Sloan (Design Principal) Shannon Moore Erin Adcock Emily Payne Ashley Carter Steven Roark Claire Dooley Danny Shervington Aaron Godfrey Tracy Stewart Eric Linebarger

168

146


CULTURAL

GOVERNMENT

HEALTHCARE

White & Case Office New York, New York, USA Tom Polucci (Design Principal) Rene Ruiz Gregory Bassiely Andrea Tambay Elizabeth Marr Christine Vandover Yelena Mokritsky Al Fozan Mosque Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Roger Schwabacher (Design Principal) Mateusz Gawad Olivia Calalo Leon Ge Andrea Feniak Oliver Vranesh

184

Nile Valley Aquaponics Facility Kansas City, Missouri, USA Chris DeVolder (Design Principal) Tony McGrail Jake Baker JJ Nicolas

206

Central Bank of Kuwait Headquarters Kuwait City, Kuwait Larry Malcic (Design Principal) Simon Lawrence Christopher Colosimo Tom Leung Chris Fannin Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Ian Fleetwood Andy Warner Lacey Daniel Hajjar

212

Center for Academic Medicine for Confidential Client California, USA Paul Woolford (Design Principal) So Young Lee Julia Cooper Ali Nasiri Tom Fortier Ryan Nearman Emily Fowlkes Chris Patneau Daniel Herriott Kyle Prenzlow Michele Hutchinson Philip Ra Brian Jencek Ali Sedaqat Tom Kaczkowski Rotimi Seriki Randy Kray David Vogel Ben Kuchinsky LiYan Yang Minji Lee

220

196


DESIGN TEAMS (CONT.)

HEALTHCARE (CONT.)

HOSPITALITY

JUSTICE

Ng Teng Fong General and Jurong Community Hospitals Jurong, Singapore Henry Chao (Design Principal) Shiva Mendez Mara Baum William Roger Michael Gould Paul Woolford Brian Jencek Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse San Francisco, California, USA Daniel Herriott (Design Principal) Anne Pradenas Dimitri Avdienko Tambra Thorson Casey Hagen

236

Jacob K. Javits Convention Center Design Competition New York, New York, USA Kenneth Drucker (Design Principal) Nathan Hoofnagle Claudia Conde Varun Kohli Shayna Cooper Marina Mazin Carl Galioto Marie-Paule Petitjean Apoorv Goyal Maria Salazar Greg Green Harsha Sharma Marc Gross Davidson County Criminal Justice Center Nashville, Tennessee, USA Peter Ruggiero (Design Principal) Sue Kim Julie (Hyun Jung) Cho Nareg Kurtjian Gregory Cook Jourdon Miller Jeff Davis Cory Murner Fred Goebel Lou Oswald Jeff Goodale George Pavlovski Gerry Guerrero Casey Renner Dan Hartmann Bob Schwartz Larry Hlavacek Patrick Vokaty Yongbeom Ji

256

248

274


PRODUCT DESIGN

RESIDENTIAL

SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

Scientific Lab Furniture System Matthew Hern (Design Principal) Ami Shah Virginia Byers Gordon Stratford Susan Grossinger 633 S. LaSalle Street Tower Chicago, Illinois, USA Peter Ruggiero (Design Principal) Gaute Grindheim Allison Burrell Lou Oswald Javier Buscaglia-Pesquera Domenic Salpietra Ashley Craig Dan Sullivan Sutton Place Design Competition New York, New York, USA Kenneth Drucker (Design Principal) John MacCallum Anne Fletcher James Mallory Kooho Jung Elizabeth Weintraub

288

Education Building for Confidential Client California, USA Ernest Cirangle (Design Principal) Brian Jencek Ashley Craig Randy Kray Robert Cull Ken Sumner Jessica Ginther LiYan Yang

316

296

304


DESIGN TEAMS (CONT.)

SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY (CONT.)

The Francis Crick Institute London, UK Larry Malcic (Design Principal) David King (Design Team Leader) Bill Odell (S+T Leader) Mujib Ahsan Adrienne Bohan Joyce Chan Andrew Childs Claire Cohen Christopher Colosimo Francesco Cortese David Cutmore Mark Drew Paul Duggleby James Eggleton Jeongsu Eun Ian Fleetwood Queralt Goni Robert Gordon Mark Kennedy

326 Gethin Hemmings Angus Kennedy Yuan Liang Tom Leung Liam Mannion Amy McGarry Beate Mellwig Mark Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Femi Oresanya Nilesh Patel Adam Rigby Shem Sacewicz Judith Sayers Jeff Strohmeyer Robert Studd Sarah Scarisbrick Jamie Taylor Alejandra Anguil Vanier Andy Warner Lacey

Medical Research Building for Confidential Client California, USA Paul Woolford (Design Principal) Ben Kuchinsky Tom Fortier Joseph Lewis Emily Fowlkes Ryan Nearman Daniel Herriott Kyle Prenzlow Michele Hutchinson Susan Seastone Brian Jencek Rotimi Seriki Randy Kray

348


SPORTS + RECREATION + ENTERTAINMENT

University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine Tampa, Florida, USA Roger Soto (Design Principal) Christopher Patterson Melissa Collazo Adriana Rojas Amelia Cubbage April Sun Jamie Inskeep Tom Thomas Eddie Pabon Jonathan West

358

Major League Soccer Stadium St. Louis, Missouri, USA Eli Hoisington (Design Principal) Arno Sandoval Chris DeVolder Andrew Zell

368

Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium Miami, Florida, USA George Heinlein (Design Principal) Chris King Scott Bond Halie McCarter Tyler Clark Kent McLaughlin Jeremy Crabb Erica Muhlenbruch Jeff Davis Joe Nehama Micheal Day Mark O’Hara Ewa Glebocka Zachary O’Keefe Jeff Goode Michael Patterson Hannah Grammon Emily Scaduto Greg Green Jeff Sittner Sarah Hunter Lynn Shenk Ed Hurtig Danny Shervington Erik Jertson Tracy Stearns John Jesik Megan Weber Dean Jordon Kyle Wedel Kloe Katubig

376


IMAGE CREDITS

AVIATION + TRANSPORTATION

COMMERCIAL

LaGuardia Airport Central Terminal B

Mir, HOK 12

New LaGuardia Airport Master Plan

Arqui300, HOK 38

1101 16th Street NW

Neoscape, HOK 54

The Allen Mixed-Use Development Ghirardelli Square Plaza

ATCHAIN 64 Jamestown, Marion Brenner 78

Mixed-Use Development Design Competition +imgs 88 Our Urban Midwest Tower Design Competition CORPORATE

Bentall Kennedy Office

HOK 100 Doug and Wolf 114 Tom Arban 128

Corporate Amenities Building for Confidential Client A-TRACE Digital Technology 136 Dairy Farmers of America Headquarters Dentsu Aegis Network Office Polsinelli Offices White & Case Office CULTURAL

GOVERNMENT

Michael Robinson 146 Benny Chan©Fotoworks 160 Michael Robinson 168 Eric Laignel 184

Al Fozan Mosque

HOK 196

Nile Valley Aquaponics Facility

HOK 206

Central Bank of Kuwait Headquarters

Nick Merrick©Hedrich Blessing 212


HEALTHCARE

Center for Academic Medicine for Confidential Client Ng Teng Fong General and Jurong Community Hospitals

HOSPITALITY

JUSTICE PRODUCT DESIGN RESIDENTIAL

SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY

Shanghai Icon Digital Technology 256

Davidson County Criminal Justice Center Scientific Lab Furniture System

Kewaunee 288 HOK 296

Sutton Place Design Competition

HOK 304

Education Building for Confidential Client Medical Research Building for Confidential Client University of South Florida Morsani School of Medicine

ENTERTAINMENT

ATCHAIN 274

633 S. LaSalle Street Tower

The Francis Crick Institute

SPORTS + RECREATION +

Rory Daniel 236 Emily Hagopian 248

Fogo de Chao Brazilian Steakhouse Javits Convention Center Design Competition

Foreground Visuals 220

Major League Soccer Stadium Miami Dolphins Hard Rock Stadium

Steve Parker 316 Chris Ansell, Paul Grundy 326 Bruce Damonte 348 ATCHAIN 358 Pictury 368 Christy Radecic 376


2017 HOK Design Annual  

HOK’s 2017 Design Annual highlights the global design firm’s recent work in architecture, engineering, interior design, planning, urban desi...