Page 1

MAY 18, 2015

www.HispanicOutlook.com

VOLUME 25 • NUMBER 15

MONTCLAIR

STATE UNIVERSITY

Ranked #2 in New Jersey

TOP 100 ISSUE


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Mangos! Jeb Bush Thinks He’s Latino By Carlos D. Conde

S

o Jeb Bush thinks he’s Latino or wants to be Latino. I suppose there are many people who at times also wish they were Latinos because that’s not a bad thing to be nowadays, socially and politically. Hispanismo in the U.S. has a much better image now and is getting better. Many can still remember when Hispanics, and their culture, were a disparaged, discriminated ethnic group; a U.S. minority seemingly destined to the social and economic backlots. John Ellis Bush, aka Jeb Bush, finds it amusing that recently a clerk in the Florida election bureau unwittingly discovered that in the 2009 voter registration application form he had marked himself as “Hispanic.” “My mistake! I don’t think I fooled anyone,” Jeb Bush said. Some people, mostly the non-Bushes, non-Republican crowd tried to cast this as not being particularly funny and socioculturally perplexing —maybe politically driven—while wondering what Jeb was trying to pull off with this gambit. The Florida Democratic Party said the former governor may have committed a felony with his impersonation. It’s a bit incredulous that some people would think the “yo-soy-Hispano” by Jeb Bush was an attempt to increase his political currency or other motives and won’t accept it as an inadvertent Freudian slip. I don’t know if there’s a penalty—probably not—for this civil infraction except for the potential of creating some political mischief later on when Jeb Bush takes his politics nationally. You can’t deny it’s amusing. Still it makes some people wonder if those sentiments for Latinos make those feelings palatable. Jeb Bush has never talked about this inexplicable “Latino thing” he has had with his DNA and he never bothered to explore it other than the circumstances that led him to feel the Latino chromosomes whirling in him. He comes from New England peerage but was born in Midland, Texas, the son of former president, George H.W. Bush, who then was getting richer in the West Texas oil business. Midland, Texas is cowboy, oil roustabouts’ country and the Latinos who live in that part of West Texas would be mostly Mexicans toiling in agricultural work but the environment in those days wasn’t right for Jeb Bush’s Latino thing.

Like most sons of New England peerage and following his dad’s footsteps, Jeb went away to school at Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass. His Latino epiphany apparently came forth and blossomed while on a student sabbatical to Mexico. Sitting in a town’s plaza one day, as in the “West Side Story” movie, he saw “the most beautiful girl in the world,” Columba Garnica de Gallo, a local lass, strolling by. The rest, like they say in the movies and politics, is history. Jeb passionately romanced Columba and married her in 1974 in Austin where young Bush had forsaken the Ivy League school tradition of his family for the University of Texas. The story goes this brought him closer to Columba. Being in Texas away from the WASP community also reinforced his affinity for the Latino culture and its lifestyle. Looking at it politically and professionally, Jeb Bush seems to have gravitated toward Latinos and the Latino world by choice. His transformation seems genuine and who knows, perhaps preordained. Many of his political and business associates and social circle in Florida are Latinos, mostly Cubans, Ask him and he’d probably say he has a preference for Mariachi music, enchiladas, and maybe a Cuban mojito. It’s also telling that his wife is a Mexican who has stuck to her culture, raising the family in the Mexican way and they have three “little brown ones” as Grandad Bush once referred to them. It also helps that Jeb Bush’s happy marriage experience and his cultural preference was further enhanced living in South Florida’s Latino-dominant environment with a Latino family and friends and serving as governor. A Northwestern University psychologist, Eli Finkel, citing research on the topic said in a New York Times op-ed piece that cognitively, there may be something about Jeb Bush feeling heart and soul Latino that may be attributable to his happy marriage and relationship with Columba. In a happy union, one tends to fuse one’s identify to that of the spouse with “we” or “us.” So if that makes Jeb Bush feel Latino, let him be Latino. • Carlos D. Conde, award-winning journalist, former Washington and foreign correspondent, was a communications aide in the Nixon White House. Write to him at CDConde@ Aol.com


MAY 18, 2015

Contents 6

Top 100 Colleges for Hispanics As Budgets and State Funding Shrink, Tuition Continues to Climb by Mary Ann Cooper

18

Summer Institute Cultivates Emerging Minority Business Leaders by Michelle Adam

22

New College Guide Offers Roadmap for First-Generation Students by Frank DiMaria

25

Community College Initiative Could Have Major Impact on Latinos by Gary M. Stern

Cover Image by Montclair State University

4 | MAY 18, 2015


Published by “The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Publishing Company, Inc.”

Departments 2 28

Latino Kaleidoscope by Carlos D. Conde

Targeting Higher Education

Unique College Opportunity for Hispanics by Gustavo A. Mellander

30

Uncensored

by Peggy Sands Orchowski

31

Scholars’ Corner

32

Book Review:

by Marla Andrea Ramírez

Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America Reviewed by Mary Ann Cooper

Interesting Reads by Mary Ann Cooper

Back Priming the Pump Cover Why Helicopter Parents Should Be Grounded

Publisher José López-Isa Executive Editor Marilyn Gilroy Senior Editor Mary Ann Cooper Washington DC Bureau Chief Peggy Sands Orchowski Contributing Editors Carlos D. Conde, Michelle Adam Contributing Writers Gustavo A. Mellander Chief of Human Resources & Administration Tomás Castellanos Núñez Chief of Advertising, Marketing & Production Meredith Cooper Research & Development Director Marilyn Roca Enríquez Art & Production Director Ricardo Castillo Director of Accounting & Finance Javier Salazar Carrión Article Contributors Frank DiMaria, Marla Andrea Ramírez, Miquela Rivera, Gary M. Stern Editorial Office 299 Market St, Ste. 145, Saddle Brook, N.J. 07663 TEL (201) 587-8800 or (800) 549-8280 Editorial Policy

The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine® is a national magazine. Dedicated to exploring issues related to Hispanics in higher education, The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine®is published for the members of the higher education community. Editorial decisions are based on the editors’ judgment of the quality of the writing, the timeliness of the article, and the potential interest to the readers of The Hispanic Outlook Magazine®. From time to time, The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine® will publish articles dealing with controversial issues. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and/or those interviewed and might not reflect the official policy of the magazine. The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine® neither agrees nor disagrees with those ideas expressed, and no endorsement of those views should be inferred unless specifically identified as officially endorsed by The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education Magazine®.

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by Miquela Rivera

MAY 18, 2015 | 5


Colleges for Hispanics Budgets and State Funding Shrink, Tuition Continues to Climb

E

By Mary Ann Cooper

very year HO reviews the past year in student enrollment and degree completions to determine which institutions are training the most Hispanic scholars. Also this year we singled out a school that has showed great improvement in granting degrees to and enrolling Hispanic students. To that end, this year’s Top 100 issue cover features Montclair State University in New Jersey. Our high regard for this university dates back to 1997 when our publisher José Lopez Isa selected it as one of his Publisher’s Picks. In 2002 MSU was a Publisher’s Pick for the 6th consecutive year, labeling MSU as one of the schools “that we believe enable so many of our Hispanic youth to succeed.” In the 13 years that have followed MSU has continued to build on its diversity success. In just the past two years they have increased their graduate enrollment among Hispanics by almost 15 percent, while consistently improving their undergraduate Hispanic degrees granted and total enrollment. As we predicted in 2002, MSU’s achievements in diversity “will doubtless ripple down through succeeding generations.” MSU is just one of the outstanding schools with a great reputation for Hispanic enrollment and degree earners. In recent years we have coupled our findings with the College Board’s (CB) annual survey titled, “Trends in College Pricing (2014 edition),” which is one of the best predictors of trends in higher education. In these uncertain economic times, the price of a college education remains a key determining factor in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. Between 2013-14 and 2014-15, average published tuition and fee prices increased by 2.9 percent for in-state students in the public four-year sector, by 3.3 percent for out-of-state students in the public four-year sector and for in-district students at public two-year colleges, and by 3.7 percent at private nonprofit four-year institutions. These increases are higher than the 2.0 percent increase in the Consumer Price Index between July 2013 and July 2014, but in all sectors these price in-

6 | MAY 18, 2015

Ilustration by © Depositphotos.com/kikkerdirk


creases are lower than the average annual increases colleges range from $1,429 in California and $1,645 in New Mexico to $6,500 in New Hampshire and $7,320 in the past five years, the past 10 years, and the in Vermont. past 30 years. This continues a trend line the CB reported for 2013-2014. According to the CB’s same Trends report last year, “The 2013-14 increase in published tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities is the smallest we have seen in many years. This does not mean that college is suddenly more affordable, but it does mean that the rapid growth of recent years did not represent a ‘new normal’ for annual price increases. That said, after large increases in grant aid in 2009-10 and 2010-11, especially from the federal government, growth in this student assistance has not continued.” The increases in in-state published tuition and fees at public four-year institutions of 2.9 percent in 2014-15 and 2.8 percent in 2013-14 are the only increases since 1974-75 that have been less than 3 percent (not adjusted for inflation). The average published tuition and fees for in‐state students in the public four‐year sector increased by $254 (2.9 percent), from $8,885 in 2013-14 to $9,139 in 2014-15. Room and board charges are $9,804. By the same token, average published out-of-state tuition and fees at public four year institutions rose by $735 (3.3 percent), from $22,223 in 2013-14 to $22,958 in 2014-15. Average total charges are $32,762. On the other hand, average published tuition and fees at private nonprofit four-year institutions rose by $1,100 (3.7 percent), from $30,131 to $31,231 in 2014-15. Average total charges are $42,419. The average published tuition and fees at public two-year colleges increased by $106 (3.3 percent), from $3,241 in 2013-14 to $3,347 in 2014-15. Finally, the average tuition and fees for full-time students in the for-profit sector increased by about $190 (1.3 percent), from $15,040 in 2013-14 to $15,230 in 2014-15. It is not enough to view national statistics as a way to determine the economic realities of obtaining a college education. There is no one-size-fits-all when examining financial burdens placed on students and their families. Each state paints a slightly different picture than the next. According to the newest CB survey, published instate tuition and fees at public four-year institutions range from $4,646 in Wyoming and $6,138 in Alaska to $14,419 in Vermont and $14,712 in New Hampshire. In-district tuition and fees at public two-year

In 2014-15, published tuition and fees for in-state students at flagship universities range from $4,646 at the University of Wyoming and $6,099 at the University of Montana to $16,552 at the University of New Hampshire and $18,464 at Penn State. In 15 states, average in-state tuition and fees at public fouryear institutions increased by less than 10 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars between 2009-10 and 2014-15. In 18 states the increase was 20 percent or more. How much more than 20 percent? The number might surprise you. California’s 58 percent inflation-adjusted increase in average published tuition and fees for full-time students at public two-year colleges between 2009-10 and 2014-15 was second only to Louisiana’s 62 percent. On the other hand, California’s price remains the lowest in the country. In 2014-15, the published out-of-state tuition and fees at public four-year institutions range from $9,910 in South Dakota and $14,876 in Wyoming to $31,982 in Michigan and $34,331 in Vermont. As the CB report points out, these increases aren’t happening in a vacuum. It’s a trickle-down effect of less state funding to these institutions from cashstrapped budgets and the cost of everything going up for these schools. Over the 10 years from 2001-02 to 2011-12, average education expenditures per full-time equivalent (FTE) student increased by a total of 6 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars at public doctoral universities and declined by 7 percent at public twoyear colleges. In 2013-14, public colleges and universities received an average of $7,161 per FTE student in state funding, which was 23 percent less than the $9,290 (in 2013 dollars) they received in 2007-08. Total state appropriations declined by 16 percent, from $90.5 billion (in 2013 dollars) in 2007-08 to $76.2 billion in 2013-14; public FTE enrollment increased by 9 percent over these six years. In 2013-14, state appropriations per FTE student for public colleges and universities ranged from $3,184 in New Hampshire and $3,494 in Colorado to $14,045 in Wyoming and $18,857 in Alaska. Between 1991 and 2011, the percentage of FTE staff members who were faculty increased from 31 percent to 34 percent at public institutions and from 29 percent to 34 percent at private institutions. • MAY 18, 2015 | 7


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Total Bachelor’s

Colleges for Hispanics

RANK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

8 | MAY 18, 2015

INSTITUTION NAME

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

Florida International University The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas-Pan American University of Central Florida California State University-Fullerton The University of Texas at San Antonio California State University-Northridge California Stat e University-Long Beach The University of Texas at Austin San Diego State University California State University-Los Angeles University of Houston Arizona State University-Tempe Texas A & M University-College Station University of Florida Texas State University California State University-San Bernardino University of California-Riverside University of New Mexico-Main Campus University of South Florida-Main Campus California State University-Fresno California State Polytechnic University-Pomona Florida Atlantic University New Mexico State University-Main Campus University of California-Santa Barbara Texas A & M University-Kingsville Ashford University University of California-Los Angeles University of Arizona San Francisco State University The University of Texas at Arlington Florida State University San Jose State University California State University-Dominguez Hills University of North Texas University of California-Davis California State University-Sacramento University of California-Irvine University of California-Berkeley The University of Texas at Brownsville University of Houston-Downtown University of California-San Diego CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice University of California-Santa Cruz CUNY Lehman College Texas Tech University Rutgers University-New Brunswick Texas A & M International University Northern Arizona University University of Illinois at Chicago University of the Incarnate Word

FL TX TX FL CA TX CA CA TX CA CA TX AZ TX FL TX CA CA NM FL CA CA FL NM CA TX IA CA AZ CA TX FL CA CA TX CA CA CA CA TX TX CA NY CA NY TX NJ TX AZ IL TX

7,746 3,194 2,734 12,320 7,472 4,384 6,885 6,831 9,154 5,881 3,599 5,730 9,278 9,538 8,244 5,715 3,129 4,402 3,493 7,617 3,702 4,177 5,124 2,599 5,222 1,730 12,722 7,329 6,494 6,344 6,244 7,938 5,209 2,481 6,365 7,015 5,514 5,963 7,775 1,041 2,388 6,344 2,323 4,038 1,783 5,207 6,924 783 4,427 3,809 1,201

5,007 2,552 2,446 2,232 2,219 2,059 1,910 1,850 1,583 1,580 1,552 1,496 1,479 1,456 1,450 1,428 1,360 1,319 1,286 1,285 1,284 1,262 1,208 1,193 1,190 1,187 1,182 1,178 1,163 1,163 1,156 1,155 1,105 1,098 1,000 986 983 958 937 928 855 849 824 797 773 767 743 739 727 725 706

1,991 1,023 940 874 748 986 705 673 706 622 575 621 705 704 620 581 438 522 515 501 509 630 473 463 479 387 396 441 487 437 449 465 450 373 371 403 363 397 404 351 261 385 310 327 232 391 336 266 240 308 220

3,016 1,529 1,506 1,358 1,471 1,073 1,205 1,177 877 958 977 875 774 752 830 847 922 797 771 784 775 632 735 730 711 800 786 737 676 726 707 690 655 725 629 583 620 561 533 577 594 464 514 470 541 376 407 473 487 417 486

65% 80% 89% 18% 30% 47% 28% 27% 17% 27% 43% 26% 16% 15% 18% 25% 43% 30% 37% 17% 35% 30% 24% 46% 23% 69% 9% 16% 18% 18% 19% 15% 21% 44% 16% 14% 18% 16% 12% 89% 36% 13% 35% 20% 43% 15% 11% 94% 16% 19% 59%


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Degrees Granted RANK INSTITUTION NAME 51. Montclair State University CUNY City College 52. University of Miami 53. University of Southern California 54. California State University-Bakersfield 55. University of Nevada-Las Vegas 56. Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi 57. DePaul University 58. CUNY Hunter College 59. Kean University 60. George Mason University 61. California State University-Stanislaus University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 62. CUNY Queens College 63. Sam Houston State University 64. Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus 65. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 66. Miami Dade College 67. University of Maryland-College Park 68. California State University-San Marcos Nova Southeastern University 69. California State University-Chico 70. University of La Verne 71. University of Washington-Seattle Campus 72. California State University-East Bay 73. New York University 74. Metropolitan State University of Denver 75. William Paterson University of New Jersey 76. Grand Canyon University 77. Northeastern Illinois University CUNY Bernard M Baruch College 78. New Jersey City University 79. DeVry University-California 80. Northern Illinois University 81. Monroe College 82. California State University-Monterey Bay 83. California State University-Channel Islands University of Utah 84. University of Colorado Boulder St John’s University-New York Washington State University 85. Rutgers University-Newark 86. Baylor University 87. American Public University System 88. The University of Texas at Dallas 89. Boston University 90. University of Houston-Clear Lake 91. Georgia State University 92. University of Maryland-University College 93. St Mary’s University 94. California Polytechnic State U-San Luis Obispo 95. Stony Brook University 96. DeVry University-Illinois 97. Colorado State University-Fort Collins 98. University of Connecticut 99. Loyola Marymount University Texas Woman’s University 100. National University Portland State University

State NJ NY FL CA CA NV TX IL NY NJ VA CA NC NY TX PA IL FL MD CA FL CA CA WA CA NY CO NJ AZ IL NY NJ CA IL NY CA CA UT CO NY WA NJ TX WV TX MA TX GA MD TX CA NY IL CO CT CA TX CA OR

SOURCE: NCES, IPEDS Database 2013 total BA degrees granted.

Total

3,201 2,026 2,451 4,740 1,480 3,857 1,464 3,802 2,876 2,704 4,920 1,621 4,627 3,207 3,256 10,573 7,645 829 7,214 1,964 1,538 3,495 1,075 7,651 2,808 5,333 2,962 1,996 5,371 1,639 3,042 1,211 1,376 3,848 1,026 1,048 1,231 5,139 5,752 2,252 5,275 1,609 2,709 4,020 2,761 4,071 1,203 4,608 4,159 513 3,300 3,799 2,595 4,736 5,122 1,524 1,926 1,611 4,321

Hispanics 656 656 621 603 596 595 592 583 562 545 538 532 532 529 514 502 497 495 484 482 482 479 478 467 461 441 424 413 405 404 404 397 384 378 377 373 372 372 370 370 370 368 363 362 360 359 351 348 343 340 338 330 327 326 325 324 324 320 320

Latino 197 229 264 271 197 209 181 222 163 192 207 162 224 160 200 213 231 168 211 1 63 110 203 149 195 150 155 156 162 92 140 164 146 214 180 107 120 119 172 167 148 144 147 131 238 165 124 92 136 167 123 198 139 162 146 135 140 27 115 129

Latina 459 427 357 332 399 386 411 361 399 353 331 370 308 369 314 289 266 327 273 319 372 276 329 272 311 286 268 251 313 264 240 251 170 198 270 253 253 200 203 222 226 221 232 124 195 235 259 212 176 217 140 191 165 180 190 184 297 205 191

%

20% 32% 25% 13% 40% 15% 40% 15% 20% 20% 11% 33% 11% 16% 16% 5% 7% 60% 7% 25% 31% 14% 44% 6% 16% 8% 14% 21% 8% 25% 13% 33% 28% 10% 37% 36% 30% 7% 6% 16% 7% 23% 13% 9% 13% 9% 29% 8% 8% 66% 10% 9% 13% 7% 6% 21% 17% 20% 7%

MAY 18, 2015 | 9


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Graduate Student

Colleges for Hispanics

RANK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

10 | MAY 18, 2015

INSTITUTION NAME

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

Nova Southeastern University Florida International University University of Southern California The University of Texas-Pan American Grand Canyon University The University of Texas at El Paso CUNY Graduate School and University Center National University University of New Mexico-Main Campus University of Florida The University of Texas at San Antonio California State University-Los Angeles Texas A & M University-Kingsville New York University The University of Texas at Austin California State University-Long Beach University of California-Los Angeles California State University-Fullerton University of South Florida-Main Campus Rutgers University-New Brunswick Columbia University in the City of New York New Mexico State University-Main Campus University of Miami Harvard University CUNY Hunter College University of Illinois at Chicago Texas A & M University-College Station Barry University Webster University University of La Verne University of Central Florida California State University-Northridge University of Arizona San Diego State University Texas State University Azusa Pacific University American Public University System California State University-Fresno Loyola Marymount University The University of Texas at Arlington University of Houston University of the Incarnate Word Arizona State University-Tempe University of North Texas The University of Texas at Brownsville University of California-Berkeley Florida Atlantic University University of Washington-Seattle Campus University of Maryland-University College CUNY Lehman College

FL FL CA TX AZ TX NY CA NM FL TX CA TX NY TX CA CA CA FL NJ NY NM FL MA NY IL TX FL MO CA FL CA AZ CA TX CA WV CA CA TX TX TX AZ TX TX CA FL WA MD NY

20,514 8,521 22,923 2,823 20,292 3,307 5,389 8,133 6,176 16,710 4,281 3,669 2,799 21,984 12,080 4,993 12,121 5,209 10,328 14,135 18,987 3,183 5,555 17,763 6,330 11,367 11,625 4,689 14,376 3,580 8,256 4,539 8,951 4,800 4,541 4,212 11,458 2,765 3,456 7,639 7,834 2,194 9,972 7,072 1,065 10,247 4,969 14,006 12,817 2,199

4,496 3,575 2,648 2,196 2,030 2,008 1,874 1,758 1,652 1,551 1,538 1,339 1,317 1,245 1,241 1,227 1,195 1,148 1,122 1,118 1,103 1,089 1,055 1,054 1,049 1,041 1,036 1,032 1,030 1,007 995 991 962 930 930 899 876 873 850 847 829 818 794 793 792 779 775 765 760 758

1,360 1,430 935 837 507 834 738 617 657 670 584 443 416 432 575 401 524 402 416 351 466 368 452 523 239 390 521 278 455 334 413 270 396 326 331 246 527 249 256 293 361 290 435 298 253 361 305 340 397 158

3,136 2,145 1,713 1,359 1,523 1,174 1,136 1,141 995 881 954 896 901 813 666 826 671 746 706 767 637 721 603 531 810 651 515 754 575 673 582 721 566 604 599 653 349 624 594 554 468 528 359 495 539 418 470 425 363 600

22% 42% 12% 78% 10% 61% 35% 22% 27% 9% 36% 36% 47% 6% 10% 25% 10% 22% 11% 8% 6% 34% 19% 6% 17% 9% 9% 22% 7% 28% 12% 22% 11% 19% 20% 21% 8% 32% 25% 11% 11% 37% 8% 11% 74% 8% 16% 5% 6% 34%


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Enrollment RANK

51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57.

INSTITUTION NAME

George Mason University California State University-San Bernardino CUNY Queens College Brandman University San Jose State University Texas Tech University California State University-Dominguez Hills George Washington University 58. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor 59. Johns Hopkins University 60. Texas Woman’s University 61. Texas A & M International University 62. Mercy College 63. Touro College 64. CUNY City College 65. Western Governors University 66. Northwestern University Fordham University 67. Our Lady of the Lake University 68. Boston University 69. Northern Arizona University 70. University of Colorado Denver 71. Florida State University 72. DePaul University 73. Lamar University 74. Stanford University 75. University of California-Davis 76. New Mexico Highlands University 77. Montclair State University 78. University of Pennsylvania 79. St Thomas University 80. University of St Thomas 81. University of San Francisco 82. Georgetown University 83. Ashford University 84. Texas A & M University-Commerce 85. Carlos Albizu University-Miami 86. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 87. DeVry University-Illinois St John’s University-New York 88. Alliant International University 89. Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi 90. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston 91. San Francisco State University University of California-Irvine 92. The University of Texas Health Science Ctr at San Antonio 93. University of Houston-Clear Lake 94. University of Nevada-Las Vegas 95. University of Denver 96. University of Wisconsin-Madison 97. Stony Brook University 98. Sul Ross State University 99. Regis University University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 100.Northcentral University

SOURCE: NCES, IPEDS Database 2013 total graduate student enrollment.

State VA CA NY CA CA TX CA DC MI MD TX TX NY NY NY UT IL NY TX MA AZ CO FL IL TX CA CA NM NJ PA FL TX CA DC IA TX FL IL IL NY CA TX TX CA CA TX TX NV CO WI NY TX CO NC AZ

Total

11,927 2,207 3,623 3,861 5,416 6,067 2,189 14,907 15,427 14,801 5,543 846 3,494 7,041 2,830 11,240 12,309 6,752 1,372 14,246 4,434 9,196 8,381 7,994 4,653 11,072 6,774 1,294 4,033 13,105 1,280 1,953 3,720 10,213 7,209 4,622 697 12,247 6,485 4,956 3,284 1,761 3,914 3,749 5,365 2,355 3,311 4,751 6,261 11,949 8,151 839 4,550 10,757 10,678

Hispanics 742 741 740 734 725 721 715 715 712 711 705 699 690 679 678 677 668 668 667 657 643 640 638 616 609 605 599 571 569 566 550 544 543 540 536 534 533 531 528 528 526 522 517 512 512 510 502 501 500 497 492 482 476 476 475

Latino 280 242 190 227 237 313 203 279 355 360 91 230 121 133 207 312 351 213 187 280 182 242 284 276 169 353 250 167 155 265 205 122 181 236 154 213 93 259 209 175 128 135 188 200 236 201 171 198 175 250 177 150 170 200 190

Latina 462 499 550 507 488 408 512 436 357 351 614 469 569 546 471 365 317 455 480 377 461 398 354 340 440 252 349 404 414 301 345 422 362 304 382 321 440 272 319 353 398 387 329 312 276 309 331 303 325 247 315 332 306 276 285

%

6% 34% 20% 19% 13% 12% 33% 5% 5% 5% 13% 83% 20% 10% 24% 6% 5% 10% 49% 5% 15% 7% 8% 8% 13% 5% 9% 44% 14% 4% 43% 28% 15% 5% 7% 12% 76% 4% 8% 11% 16% 30% 13% 14% 10% 22% 15% 11% 8% 4% 6% 57% 10% 4% 4%

MAY 18, 2015 | 11


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Undergraduate Enrollment

Colleges for Hispanics

RANK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50.

12 | MAY 18, 2015

INSTITUTION NAME

State

Total

Miami Dade College South Texas College Florida International University El Paso Community College East Los Angeles College Lone Star College System Houston Community College Mt San Antonio College The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas-Pan American Broward College Cerritos College Tarrant County College District Santa Ana College California State University-Northridge Central New Mexico Community College Valencia College San Antonio College San Jacinto Community College Rio Hondo College Long Beach City College California State University-Fullerton Fullerton College Austin Community College District Pima Community College The University of Texas at San Antonio Pasadena City College California State University-Los Angeles El Camino Community College District Chaffey College Santa Monica College California State University-Long Beach University of Central Florida Bakersfield College Fresno City College Southwestern College CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community College The University of Texas at Brownsville Riverside City College University of New Mexico-Main Campus Los Angeles City College Texas State University Northern Virginia Community College Northwest Vista College University of Houston Los Angeles Pierce College Los Angeles Valley College Palomar College College of Southern Nevada California State University-San Bernardino

FL TX FL TX CA TX TX CA TX TX FL CA TX CA CA NM FL TX TX CA CA CA CA TX AZ TX CA CA CA CA CA CA FL CA CA CA NY TX CA NM CA TX VA TX TX CA CA CA NV CA

66,298 31,232 39,142 30,468 36,606 64,072 57,978 28,481 19,696 17,230 43,883 21,404 50,771 28,598 33,771 28,891 42,180 23,004 28,385 16,548 24,020 33,116 24,301 41,627 30,082 24,342 25,268 19,589 23,996 19,211 29,999 30,593 51,333 17,770 21,344 19,591 24,186 11,220 18,165 22,416 19,635 31,005 51,803 15,965 31,706 20,080 18,762 24,665 34,177 16,191

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

44,545 29,130 26,160 25,917 22,886 21,625 18,362 16,713 16,252 15,495 14,750 13,997 13,829 13,630 13,562 13,371 13,346 13,194 13,191 12,613 12,512 12,379 12,243 12,131 12,074 11,791 11,785 11,673 11,434 11,276 11,196 11,180 11,055 10,987 10,688 10,324 10,299 10,110 10,014 9,788 9,758 9,748 9,732 9,392 9,359 9,174 9,150 9,024 8,888 8,871

18,636 12,610 11,575 10,995 10,297 8,716 7,714 7,686 7,407 6,809 6,116 6,249 5,527 7,315 5,544 5,663 5,733 5,284 5,621 6,136 5,512 5,054 5,658 5,217 5,394 5,910 5,320 4,540 5,448 4,614 5,240 4,469 4,977 4,624 4,892 4,818 4,436 4,278 4,265 4,127 4,342 4,148 4,334 4,078 4,533 4,090 3,974 4,864 4,007 3,191

25,909 16,520 14,585 14,922 12,589 12,909 10,648 9,027 8,845 8,686 8,634 7,748 8,302 6,315 8,018 7,708 7,613 7,910 7,570 6,477 7,000 7,325 6,585 6,914 6,680 5,881 6,465 7,133 5,986 6,662 5,956 6,711 6,078 6,363 5,796 5,506 5,863 5,832 5,749 5,661 5,416 5,600 5,398 5,314 4,826 5,084 5,176 4,160 4,881 5,680

67% 93% 67% 85% 63% 34% 32% 59% 83% 90% 34% 65% 27% 48% 40% 46% 32% 57% 46% 76% 52% 37% 50% 29% 40% 48% 47% 60% 48% 59% 37% 37% 22% 62% 50% 53% 43% 90% 55% 44% 50% 31% 19% 59% 30% 46% 49% 37% 26% 55%


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

(2- and 4- year schools) RANK 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100.

INSTITUTION NAME

State

Total

The University of Texas at Austin CUNY LaGuardia Community College Texas A & M University-College Station California State University-Fresno Laredo Community College Los Angeles Trade Technical College San Diego State University College of the Canyons San Diego Mesa College San Bernardino Valley College California State Polytechnic University-Pomona Reedley College University of Arizona Citrus College Palm Beach State College San Diego City College Modesto Junior College CUNY Bronx Community College San Joaquin Delta College Arizona State University-Tempe Ventura College Orange Coast College New Mexico State University-Main Campus City Colleges of Chicago-Wilbur Wright College Imperial Valley College Cypress College Los Angeles Mission College Hillsborough Community College University of California-Riverside California State University-Sacramento City Colleges of Chicago-Richard J Daley College California State University-Dominguez Hills Del Mar College The University of Texas at Arlington Sacramento City College University of North Texas College of the Sequoias Glendale Community College Florida Atlantic University Santa Rosa Junior College Texas A & M University-Kingsville San Francisco State University Antelope Valley College University of Florida Texas A & M International University New Mexico State University-Dona Ana San Jose State University College of the Desert Mt San Jacinto Community College District Hartnell College

TX NY TX CA TX CA CA CA CA CA CA CA AZ CA FL CA CA NY CA AZ CA CA NM IL CA CA CA FL CA CA IL CA TX TX CA TX CA AZ FL CA TX CA CA FL TX NM CA CA CA CA

39,979 19,564 44,072 20,295 8,726 13,879 27,099 18,508 24,251 12,329 20,952 13,807 31,670 12,920 29,763 16,310 17,084 11,368 17,629 38,730 12,908 21,886 13,582 12,640 7,701 15,881 8,990 26,590 18,621 26,094 9,384 12,481 10,502 25,690 23,509 31,243 10,720 20,872 25,790 22,094 9,430 26,156 14,262 33,168 6,585 8,837 25,862 9,259 14,170 9,439

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

8,679 8,675 8,634 8,494 8,480 8,113 7,901 7,893 7,878 7,769 7,767 7,747 7,714 7,675 7,596 7,545 7,258 7,221 7,216 7,145 7,116 7,052 7,043 7,019 6,987 6,850 6,744 6,685 6,683 6,671 6,633 6,619 6,612 6,536 6,522 6,435 6,395 6,385 6,367 6,366 6,357 6,341 6,327 6,273 6,217 6,177 6,133 6,118 6,080 6,067

4,044 3,600 4,304 3,340 3,710 4,368 3,377 4,001 3,615 3,393 4,043 3,208 3,375 3,459 3,196 3,363 3,171 2,990 2,990 3,727 3,137 3,551 3,072 2,838 2,891 2,914 2,654 2,741 2,757 2,643 2,570 2,313 2,838 2,813 2,748 2,896 2,796 2,828 2,676 2,842 2,712 2,459 2,544 2,721 2,571 2,540 2,741 2,668 2,553 2,766

4,635 5,075 4,330 5,154 4,770 3,745 4,524 3,892 4,263 4,376 3,724 4,539 4,339 4,216 4,400 4,182 4,087 4,231 4,226 3,418 3,979 3,501 3,971 4,181 4,096 3,936 4,090 3,944 3,926 4,028 4,063 4,306 3,774 3,723 3,774 3,539 3,599 3,557 3,691 3,524 3,645 3,882 3,783 3,552 3,646 3,637 3,392 3,450 3,527 3,301

22% 44% 20% 42% 97% 58% 29% 43% 32% 63% 37% 56% 24% 59% 26% 46% 42% 64% 41% 18% 55% 32% 52% 56% 91% 43% 75% 25% 36% 26% 71% 53% 63% 25% 28% 21% 60% 31% 25% 29% 67% 24% 44% 19% 94% 70% 24% 66% 43% 64%

SOURCE: NCES, IPEDS database. All undergraduate students (part time and full time) – degree seeking and non-degree seeking as of fall 2013. (2- and 4-year schools)

MAY 18, 2015 | 13


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Colleges for Hispanics

Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded to

Agriculture/ Agriculture Operations

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

Texas A & M University-College Station

TX

1,057

133

71

62

13%

2.

University of Florida

FL

498

83

32

51

17%

3.

University of California-Davis

CA

336

58

21

37

17%

4.

California State University-Fresno

CA

238

54

26

28

23%

5.

California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

CA

199

52

12

40

26%

6.

Cornell University

NY

432

41

23

18

9%

7.

California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

CA

361

32

13

19

9%

8.

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

IL

445

30

10

20

7%

9.

New Mexico State University-Main Campus

NM

97

29

17

12

30%

TX

52

26

18

8

50%

10. Texas A & M University-Kingsville

Architecture

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

The University of Texas at San Antonio

TX

145

90

48

42

62%

2.

California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

CA

211

67

45

22

32%

3.

Texas Tech University

TX

165

54

38

16

33%

4.

University of Houston

TX

112

43

34

9

38%

5.

Florida Atlantic University

FL

93

35

20

15

38%

Texas A & M University-College Station

TX

133

35

13

22

26%

6.

Arizona State University-Tempe

AZ

171

34

22

12

20%

Woodbury University

CA

98

34

21

13

35%

7.

California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

CA

219

32

19

13

15%

8.

University of California-Berkeley

CA

158

29

21

8

18%

9.

University of California-Davis

10. CUNY City College University of New Mexico-Main Campus

Homeland Security Law Enforcement Firefighting

CA

109

26

11

15

24%

NY

59

22

10

12

37%

NM

56

22

13

9

39%

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice

NY

1,272

440

213

227

35%

2.

Florida International University

FL

496

323

145

178

65%

3.

The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

220

211

109

102

96%

4.

California State University-Los Angeles

CA

283

189

92

97

67%

5.

The University of Texas at El Paso

TX

179

164

76

88

92%

6.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

304

152

74

78

50%

7.

The University of Texas at San Antonio

TX

249

151

74

77

61%

8.

California State University-San Bernardino

CA

241

145

64

81

60%

9.

San Diego State University

CA

342

139

53

86

41%

TX

583

135

59

76

23%

10. Sam Houston State University

14 | MAY 18, 2015


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Hispanics by Academic Programs Ethnic Cultural Gender Studies

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

University of California-Los Angeles

CA

292

97

19

78

33%

2.

University of California-Santa Cruz

CA

176

94

25

69

53%

3.

University of California-Santa Barbara

CA

128

69

18

51

54%

4.

University of California-Berkeley

CA

258

65

16

49

25%

5.

University of California-Davis

CA

104

44

13

31

42%

6.

California State University-Long Beach

CA

101

38

9

29

38%

7.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NC

244

36

7

29

15%

8.

University of Washington-Seattle Campus

WA

319

34

10

24

11%

9.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

57

27

8

19

47%

FL

51

26

11

15

51%

Education

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

The University of Texas at El Paso

TX

390

346

47

299

89%

2.

Florida International University

FL

405

303

26

277

75%

3.

University of New Mexico-Main Campus

NM

385

159

33

126

41%

4.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

415

153

6

147

37%

5.

Ashford University

IA

1,713

147

9

138

9%

6.

University of Central Florida

FL

932

133

40

93

14%

7.

New Mexico State University-Main Campus

NM

199

118

29

89

59%

8.

Northern Arizona University

AZ

610

111

13

98

18%

9.

Arizona State University-Tempe

AZ

491

93

23

70

19%

FL

441

90

8

82

20%

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

10. Florida International University

10. Florida Atlantic University

Communication Journalism 1.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

995

285

88

197

29%

2.

The University of Texas at Austin

TX

1,121

227

80

147

20%

3.

Florida International University

FL

271

195

42

153

72%

4.

California State University-Northridge

CA

560

153

75

78

27%

5.

University of Florida

FL

691

143

38

105

21%

6.

University of Houston

TX

340

135

44

91

40%

7.

San Francisco State University

CA

586

127

50

77

22%

8.

The University of Texas at San Antonio

TX

244

122

39

83

50%

9.

The University of Texas at El Paso

TX

142

118

40

78

83%

10. The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

118

109

29

80

92%

MAY 18, 2015 | 15


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Colleges for Hispanics

Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded to

Liberal Arts and Sciences General Studies and Humanities

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

Excelsior College

NY

1565

144

109

35

9%

2.

California State University-Northridge

CA

432

143

26

117

33%

3.

California State University-San Bernardino

CA

258

133

7

126

52%

4.

California State University-Long Beach

CA

335

132

18

114

39%

5.

Northern Arizona University

AZ

519

131

46

85

25%

6.

Florida International University

FL

212

130

48

82

61%

7.

California State University-Fresno

CA

286

119

16

103

42%

8.

California State University-Dominguez Hills

CA

202

117

17

100

58%

9.

Fairleigh Dickinson University-Metropolitan Campus

NJ

411

107

48

59

26%

TX

453

92

57

35

20%

10. Wayland Baptist University

Mathematics and Statistics

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

The University of Texas at El Paso

TX

48

41

22

19

85%

2.

University of California-Los Angeles

CA

305

37

21

16

12%

3.

The University of Texas at San Antonio

TX

70

36

23

13

51%

4.

The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

38

34

20

14

89%

5.

California State University-San Bernardino

CA

68

32

17

15

47%

6.

University of California-Riverside

CA

91

29

12

17

32%

7.

University of California-Santa Barbara

CA

133

26

16

10

20%

8.

The University of Texas at Austin

TX

234

24

14

10

10%

9.

University of California-Berkeley

CA

298

20

16

4

7%

10. San Diego State University University of California-San Diego

CA

56

18

9

9

32%

CA

140

18

12

6

13%

The University of Texas at Brownsville

TX

21

18

10

8

86%

University of New Mexico-Main Campus

NM

56

22

13

9

39%

Psychology

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

Florida International University

FL

843

602

133

469

71%

2.

University of Central Florida

FL

1,250

297

67

230

24%

3.

California State University-Northridge

CA

686

221

62

159

32%

4.

California State University-San Bernardino

CA

415

204

40

164

49%

5.

The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

194

184

42

142

95%

6.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

506

183

47

136

36%

7.

CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice

NY

401

171

37

134

43%

8.

San Diego State University

CA

474

165

39

126

35%

9.

CUNY Hunter College

NY

686

151

28

123

22%

TX

321

147

40

107

46%

10. The University of Texas at San Antonio

16 | MAY 18, 2015


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Hispanics by Academic Programs Social Sciences

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

1.

Florida International University

FL

708

479

232

247

68%

2.

University of California-Riverside

CA

970

387

140

247

40%

3.

University of California-Los Angeles

CA

1,727

371

132

239

21%

4.

University of California-Santa Barbara

CA

1,347

368

143

225

27%

5.

California State University-Northridge

CA

840

335

98

237

40%

6.

University of California-Irvine

CA

1,228

300

115

185

24%

7.

California State University-Long Beach

CA

658

240

89

151

36%

8.

University of California-Berkeley

CA

1,609

238

93

145

15%

9.

San Diego State University

CA

759

231

114

117

30%

CA

1,264

225

93

132

18%

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

10. University of California-Davis

Engineering 1.

Florida International University

FL

352

231

188

43

66%

2.

California State Polytechnic University-Pomona

CA

740

202

169

33

27%

3.

The University of Texas at El Paso

TX

256

201

156

45

79%

4.

Texas A & M University-College Station

TX

1369

187

144

43

14%

5.

University of Florida

FL

1038

182

140

42

18%

6.

University of Central Florida

FL

786

167

133

34

21%

7.

The University of Texas at Austin

TX

1093

147

118

29

13%

8.

The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

155

130

117

13

84%

9.

California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

CA

1118

124

99

25

11%

TX

256

121

107

14

47%

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latina

%

CA

857

165

69

96

19%

10. The University of Texas at San Antonio

Visual and Performing Arts 1.

California State University-Long Beach

2.

Columbia College-Chicago

IL

1315

118

57

61

9%

3.

Arizona State University-Tempe

AZ

739

117

58

59

16%

4.

Texas State University

TX

426

114

42

72

27%

5.

California State University-Northridge

CA

406

110

58

52

27%

6.

San Francisco State University

CA

590

106

52

54

18%

7.

The University of Texas-Pan American

TX

123

103

44

59

84%

8.

California State University-Fullerton

CA

465

94

45

49

20%

9.

Florida International University

FL

134

89

31

58

66%

New York University

NY

1103

89

46

43

8%

TX

119

88

44

44

74%

10. The University of Texas at El Paso

SOURCE: NCES, IPEDS Database 2013 total Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded to Hispanics by Academic Programs

MAY 18, 2015 | 17


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | INNOVATIONS / PROGRAMS

Summer Institute

Cultivates Emerging Minority Business Leaders By Michelle Adam

F

ifty-four Latino and African-American university sophomores and juniors gathered last summer at the University of California (UC) at Davis School of Management to become future leaders for MBA programs nationwide. They participated in University of California’s Summer Institute for Emerging Managers and Leaders (SIEML), a program designed to help increase the number of minority students considering MBA programs. The UC Davis Graduate School of Management was home to the third year of this program, which was established by six University of California schools in 2012 to attract more minorities to master’s programs in business.

University of California schools have made this effort in response to the low number of minority students currently applying to, let alone attending, MBA programs nationwide. Based on the number of these students taking the GMAT, the exam required for entrance into MBA programs, Hispanics currently make up 6.2 percent of potential MBA applicants, and at UC Davis alone, only one to two students out of 40 to 50 students in its full-time program are underrepresented students. (According to GMAC research, as of 2011 there were 101,436 GMAT test takers that were U.S. citizens. Of this number, 15,456 were underrepresented minorities. Of all GMAT test takers,

Students from the SIEML program at University of California, Davis, Graduate School of Management

18 | MAY 18, 2015


INNOVATIONS / PROGRAMS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

the year before. The goal for SIEML is to increase Hispanic participation every year. “The majority of the team that came to us was very professional, high-performing, and very engaged in the program. Some had done leadership programs and had work experience, but there was a wide range with students,” said Gleed. “We were very pleased with the majority of them.” During the UC Davis program, students spent every other morning learning from MBA professors in mini-classes, followed by lunch with different business school deans. In the afternoon, professors provided students with case studies on ethics or similar subjects that required they work interactively. Here they focused on leadership competencies, organizational behavior, approaches to negotiation, and marketing projects where students had to build products with rubber bands and duct tape, and propose their ideas. During dinner hours, alumni from the consulting industries or other fields spoke with students about their work in the real world. Kathy Gleed

only 6.2 percent are Hispanic, and 8.6 percent are African-American). “Business schools are looking to increase the diversity of their pools,” said Kathy Gleed, organizer of UC Davis SIEML and senior director of admissions and chief diversity officer for the UC Davis School of Management. “Since students look for others that look like them when they decide to apply to schools, it is important that we build the pipeline now.” Building that pipeline is what UC Davis and the five other University of California MBA programs at UC Berkeley, UC Irvine, UC Los Angeles, UC Riverside, and UC San Diego have been doing. Their first two-week, all-expenses-paid, career-building fellowship was held at UC Berkeley in 2012, followed by UC Los Angeles, and, most recently, UC Davis. Mostly sophomores and juniors attend two summer intensives for two years in a row. Those students who completed their first year of the program at UC Davis this past summer will now participate in the 2015 summer program at UC San Diego. “This is the first time that University of California Schools have collaborated to expose students to the UC education, and to start them thinking of the MBA as an education that is much broader than they think,” said Gleed. “A number of business schools have programs that are similar to SIEML. We are trying to help clarify misinformation and assumptions out there. We are trying to get the message across that the MBA prepares you for management and leadership in almost any industry and that you can do almost anything with an MBA.” Last August, UC Davis hosted 24 returning students (ones who had completed the two-week UC Los Angeles program), and 30 new students. These students were selected from a pool of applicants from Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) that were primarily in California and HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges) that were mainly outside of the state. Of the 27 institutions represented last summer at UC Davis, 30 percent of students were from HSIs and the rest from HBCUs. Although only 11 the total participants were from HSIs, this was an increase from seven

MAY 18, 2015 | 19


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | INNOVATIONS / PROGRAMS

…opportunities don’t come as often to minority students as they do for others who may have the help from their parents to go to college. This gave us a way to be there and network and pursue opportunities.”

Luis González, participant, UC’s Summer Institute for Emerging Managers and Leaders On alternative days of the program, fellows went on field trips: to Silicon Valley and its Tech Museum of Innovation and Google Campus; to San Francisco and Well Fargo’s headquarters; to the California health giant, Kaiser Permanente; and other places. During these days, students met with and became inspired by top CEOS and leaders of prominent companies. “When we took these students on site visits, they met with the president of Kaiser,” said Gleed. “Many executives like the president were impressed with the students we brought, by the questions they asked, and how they interacted with the executives.” Toward the end of the program, students were also invited to participate in a case-study competition, hosted by the financial-consulting firm, Deloitte. They were asked to work with teammates to provide solutions to business problems, which they shared on Power Point presentations shown to Deloitte executives for small cash prizes. Meeting with companies and their leaders was an important aspect of the summer fellowship, especially for Luis González, a junior at the University of California at Merced. As one of 11 Hispanic students in the program, his meeting with the CEO of Kaiser Permanente left an indelible impression.

20 | MAY 18, 2015

“His whole story inspired most of the group to focus on our goals and live a well-balanced life,” said González, who is currently studying management and economics with an emphasis on finance and strategy. “As a CEO, he has put in as much effort and work into what he does as professional athletes do.” González, who came to the U.S. from Mexico in the 5th grade, had attended his first year of the SIEML program at UC Los Angeles prior to going to UC Davis. He was well prepared, given that he had graduated as valedictorian from high school despite the fact that his parents had no schooling whatsoever. Their drive kept him going, and inspired him to not only attend UC Merced and become president of the community council there, but to also one day build a business of his own. Going through the SIEML program taught González the importance of working effectively with others in order to achieve his goals. “I went in thinking that the business world was really competitive and that if I wanted to get a competitive edge I needed to compete and do everything on my own,” he said. “The program expanded my perspective on what it takes to launch your career. You are depending on many different people to make sure your business plan goes as planned. It was important for me to understand why I need to rely on other people, and that the network you build now will help you expand your network as a business person.” When González returned to his campus this year as community council president, he began to delegate more and build partnerships to further his plans, and became president of the Entrepreneurship Society there. “It was a great program. I met some bright minds and it is something I would definitely recommend to other minority students to attend. It was great to work with people from the capitol and politicians and alumni who are making a name for themselves and owning international businesses. I saw how even minorities can do well as long as they keep on working,” he said. “Everyone does struggle at some point, and opportunities don’t come as often to minority students as they do for others who may have the help from


INNOVATIONS / PROGRAMS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Anthony J. Portantino, visiting fellow, USC Unruh Institute of Politics, speaks to SIEML students

their parents to go to college. This gave us a way to be there and network and pursue opportunities.” Ileana González, a junior at the University of Texas, San Antonio, was, like Luis González (not related to him, though), able to receive the benefits of SIEML at UC Davis this past summer. For her, though, it was the first year of the program, and because of that she didn’t know what to expect. “I went in scared of how it would all go,” said González, who came to the U.S. from Mexico at 14 years old. “I didn’t know who I would encounter and what I was going to learn, but now I can’t wait to go again this year to learn more.” For González, the program empowered her to pursue a business major more fully (after this experience, she changed her major from international business to management and entrepreneurship), and showed her how she can accomplish a lot with different kinds of people. “I learned a lot about black institutions, and how these people came to empower themselves in this nation. It empowered me to make an impact in the Hispanic community and pull through like they have,” she said. “From the MBA perspective, I didn’t know much about management and focusing on different aspects of business, such as

finance. Learning this put me a step ahead of my classmates here.” González also switched her major after returning from the program because she saw “so many strong and powerful people wanting to go from nothing and then creating businesses. It gave me an insight into doing my own thing and being successful at it if I am passionate about what I do,” she said. “I learned so much, and especially from being around people I’m not used to and learning about California and businesses there. This program gave me more of an incentive to go through an MBA.” Inspiring students to pursue an MBA is a large part of why SIEML began offering these students fellowships, and why Gleed hosted this past summer’s program at UC Davis. But she also hoped to expand minority students’ views of what’s possible with an MBA. “I don’t think they understood before that all kinds of places—nonprofits, sustainability companies, and many other jobs—need the expertise that MBA’s can bring,” she said. “These students have learned this, while also bonding as a group, and broadening their networks. It helped them think about things in different ways, and give an MBA some thought.” • MAY 18, 2015 | 21


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

New College Guide Offers Roadmap for First-Generation Students By Frank DiMaria

H

oratio Alger peppered his novels with characters that pulled themselves up by their bootstraps and succeeded despite being born into poverty. Alger’s characters embody the American Dream, yet few ascend to the highest rungs of the social later without some help from others. Like characters in an Alger novel, high school students need help, especially when choosing a college. Some students, however, just don’t have the support networks that others take for granted. Jane Sweetland, EdD, a former dean at California State University, Channel Islands, has written The Other College Guide, a new college guidebook that walks high school students and their parents through the college selection process. Most college guides, says Sweetland, are nothing more than prestige meters featuring colleges that seldom take into account who they are serving and what they are teaching. U.S. News and World Report and other guides like it rank schools based on the number of students they reject and how much money they raise rather than which schools charge a fair price for an education. Her guide is different. 22 | MAY 18, 2015

Sweetland and her co-author Paul Glastris of the Washington Monthly, did not specifically write The Other College Guide for first-generation, low-income students. But it seems perfectly suited for those students who do not have social support networks, encouraging them to seek help and to ask the important questions that will lead to choosing the best college for them. Many college guidebooks, says Sweetland, assume a level of knowledge that most underserved students don’t have. “What we wanted was a guide that is different than that. One that doesn’t assume that the students or the parents know the rules of the game already,” says Sweetland. The difference between students who have parents or a network of people who they could ask questions of or who could support them is very different from those who don’t, she says. Sweetland is confident that low-income Hispanic high school students who have not gotten guidance from a role model or who cannot lean on a parent who has navigated the college application process can use this book to make an informed decision on where he or she should go to college. But like the characters in Alger’s nov-


RANKINGS | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

els, no one can do it alone, she says. Everyone, no matter his or her financial situation, needs guidance and she encourages all to ask for help. “Will the book help? Yes. We wrote it in a way to give students, their families and their counselor the questions to ask. And then they need to find somebody to answer those questions,” says Sweetland. First-generation college students have access to higher education but they are not graduating at the same rate as their white peers. This poor graduation rate can be improved if first-generation students had the resources to make a more informed decision. Sweetland’s book is one of those resources. No matter a student’s socioeconomic status or race, a school must “fit” him or her in four ways: academically, financially, socially, and physically. Sweetland calls this the Four-Way Fit. Since the primary goal of attending a college is to earn a degree, the first “fit” a student must consider is academics. Surprisingly many fail to consider some of the most crucial aspects of academic life, like

What we wanted was a guide that is different than that. One that doesn’t assume that the students or the parents know the rules of the game already.”

Jane Sweetland, EdD, co-author, The Other College Guide

class size. Others waste time and money applying to schools they have no chance of getting into. Right upfront a student has to know what a school requires academically, says Sweetland. A school’s graduation rate is another key aspect the student should consider. Sweetland implores students to take a really hard look at a school’s graduation rate. Underserved students should dig especially deep into graduation rates. “Sometimes there is a differential between the graduation rate of the population at large and the graduation rate of black students, the graduation rate of Hispanic students, and the graduation of Asian students,” says Sweetland. To allow students to dig deeper into graduation rates, The Other College Guide lists a school’s graduation rate along with its graduation rate performance. This number considers the preparedness of the students the school admits based on ACT and SAT scores. The higher their test scores the better the students should perform. When students at a particular college don’t perform up to expectations set by their test scores, the school’s graduation rate performance suffers. If a school is a good fit academically the next question a student must ask is, “Can I afford this school?” There’s little doubt that the biggest obstacle to a degree for underserved students is cost. Sweetland spilled a great deal of ink to ensure that those who use her book get a quality education without burying themselves in debt. Society in general, says Sweetland, is conditioned to equate cost with quality. People assume that if they are paying more for the education it must be better. However, there are a lot of great schools out there that are affordable. The Other College Guide helps students find them. It’s imperative that students consider the cost of a school along with the other criteria. She suggests students explore available federal aid early in the process to avoid sticker shock when it’s time to enroll. However, since financial aid packages are not dispersed until spring, it’s hard for students to make a fully informed decision on a school’s affordability until then. That’s where The Other College Guide’s “Best Bang for the Buck” section is invaluable. Students can see MAY 18, 2015 | 23


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | RANKINGS

Underrepresented students, Hispanics especially, should explore the support structures on campus. →

Jane Sweetland, EdD

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the cost at each school based on their families’ income. For example the average net price for all students attending Eastern Carolina University in North Carolina - which tops the list of southeastern schools - is $9609. However when one factors in financial aid, students whose families earn $0 to $30K pay only $6601. Astonishingly Harvard, which Sweetland calls “an affordable elite” school in her book, charges a net price of $1,533 to students whose families earn $30,000 per year or less. Once students find a school that is a good fit academically and financially, they must evaluate the social and physical fits. Underrepresented students, Hispanics especially, should explore the support structures on campus. “The social fit of a school is not just about what parties are going on. Social is about comfort level and belonging,” says Sweetland. Students must also consider the school’s size and its location. Most students, says Sweetland, go no further than 100 miles from their home to attend college and over half stay in the region in which they attended high school. For many students family obligations determine how far they will travel to get their education. To help students digest the information they gather during their search, The Other College Guide provides the Four-Way Fit Worksheet, which allows students to consider 32 factors within the four categories. Students write the names of the seven schools they are most interested in across the top of the worksheet and rate them in a number of categories. After totaling each section the student should have a clearer picture of the schools that fit them best. The most popular college guides on the market today rank schools by who they don’t admit. Sweetland and Glastris see things differently. Students should not look for the schools that turn people away; they should look for those that are the best fit for their career interests, financial situation and aspirations. A student should not choose a school based on how its name looks on a hoodie but rather whether it meets his or her overall needs. “Employers are less impressed with where people go and more impressed with what people know,” says Sweetland. •


FINANCE / TUITION | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

Community College Initiative Could Have Major Impact on Latinos By Gary M. Stern

report from the Pew Research Center noted that this plan could exert major impact on Latino students and could spark increased enrollment. Latinos comprise 22 percent of the 7 million community college students in the U.S., exceeding the 16 percent Hispanic population in the U.S. Many Latinos opt for two-year colleges because they are cost effective, and the report noted that half of the Latinos enrolled in colleges have family incomes below $40,000. Another incentive for Latinos has been the open enrollment policy of most two-year colleges. Approximately 46 percent of Latinos attending community college are in California and Texas, which have larger community college systems. If passed, free community college legislation could “give more students the drive and fortitude to pursue postsecondary education. Many look at the financial aspects as a barrier,” said Kevin Christian, a senior program associate for diversity, inclusion and equity at the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). The plan provides “access and affordability,” two of the driving forces that entice students into pursuing college, he added. This effort would serve as a stimulus for more first-generation Latino and African-American →

I

n his 2015 State of the Union speech, President Obama proposed introducing free community college tuition for all interested and qualified students nationwide. A recent

Kevin Christian

MAY 18, 2015 | 25


HISPANIC OUTLOOK | FINANCE / TUITION

students to test out higher education, Christian says. Many juggle taking care of families with handling part-time jobs and academic responsibilities and can feel overwhelmed. Many minority students are reluctant to amass heavy debt so this plan counteracts that fear. “Hearing that they can get their first two years at a relatively low price, virtually nothing, will raise their level of expectation,” he says. The New York Times reported that the average community college tuition for full-time students costs $3,800 a year, and 45 percent of all undergraduates attend two-year schools. It said President Obama’s plan would increase enrollment by 1.6 million students by 2026, but it also noted that only 35 percent of full-time community college students graduate within six years. Even if tuition is covered, there are additional costs that students face. Students must pay for transportation, books, supplies and other fees, which can quickly add up.

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Cheryl Hyman

Under Obama’s America’s College Promise, enrolled students would receive two years free tuition at community colleges as long as they maintain a 2.5 GPA. Christian noted that the details of the $60 billion education plan haven’t been determined, so it’s unclear if it covers students pursuing a certificate, not just associate’s degrees. If the plan is authorized, community colleges must strengthen their resources to make it successful. The colleges would need to “offer high-quality academics and make sure they help students navigate the process,” Christian noted. They would need to hire additional staff, add technology, strengthen counseling and establish a clear pathway for students to achieve a degree. In addition, many first-year minority students will need strong developmental courses to improve their reading, writing and math skills. Moreover, helping students who graduate transfer into four-year colleges to earn a bachelor’s degree will be a critical component of the program. But Christian noted that many minority students who earn an associate’s degree “will have the drive and determination to keep going.” The first statewide initiative that offered free community college education to high school graduates, Tennessee Promise, attracted over 35,000 applicants of the 60,000 graduating seniors. Tennessee Promise students must complete their FAFSA applications, attend mandatory training sessions, and performer eight hours of community service. The program is also trying to train mentors, and so far, has attracted 4,500 people and intends to add 1,500 more mentors. The program will start in the fall 2015, and students can attend any of the state’s 13 community colleges and 27 colleges of applied technology. In Tennessee, there are no income or academic restrictions; it’s open to all students. Over 1,000 high school guidance counselors were trained to help students complete the elaborate financial aid forms. Officials in Tennessee expect that 6,000 to 12,000 additional participants will enroll in community college due to the program. Prior to President Obama’s proposal, Mayor Rahm Emanuel had already announced a plan,


the Chicago Star Scholarship, in which every Chicago high school student who graduates with a 3.0 GPA and possesses sufficient English and math skills will receive free community college tuition at any of the city’s seven community colleges. In addition, books are paid for and fees are waived. To prove their proficiency, students must take the ACT and obtain a score of 21 in math and English. Starting in fall 2015, the Chicago Star Scholarship covers the difference between the approximate $11,000 cost of a community college education and what a student’s federal and state financial aid pays for. Students who don’t initially meet the criteria can be retested during their first year and, if they pass, can start tapping funds during the fall semester or upon completion of an associate’s degree, whichever comes first. Mayor Emanuel has stated that the Chicago Star Scholarships enable every student “who is willing to work hard to have access to a quality education, regardless of whether they can afford it or not.” This scholarship “removes a financial barrier to college and gives many more students in Chicago a ticket to the middle class that a college education provides.” The seven Chicago community colleges involved are: 1) Harold Washington College, 2) Harry S. Truman College, 3) Kennedy-King College, 4) Malcolm X College, 5) Olive-Harvey College, 6) Richard J. Daley College, and 7) Wilbur Wright College. In 2014, over 10,000 students completed certificate programs and 4,000 were awarded associate degrees. Though the graduation rate doubled, it was only a modest 13 percent in 2014. The students attending the City Colleges of Chicago are extremely diverse. In fact, of the entire 115,000 student population, the ethnic breakdown is: 37 percent Latino students, 37 percent African- American, 16 percent white and 7 percent Asian. City Colleges of Chicago expect to attract an additional 800 to 2,000 students during the initial year of this scholarship. It estimates that the entire program will cost about $2 million annually. City Colleges saved about $61 million

FINANCE / TUITION | HISPANIC OUTLOOK

If passed, free

community college legislation could give more students the drive and fortitude to pursue postsecondary education. Many look at the financial aspects as a barrier,”

Kevin Christian, senior program associate for diversity, inclusion and equity at the American Association of Community Colleges from eliminating administrative overhead and is transferring those funds to cover the cost of the Star Scholarships. Chancellor Cheryl Hyman said in a written response, “The Chicago Star Scholarship is a merit-based award that rewards and aims to inspire student achievement, college-going behavior and college persistence.” It removes cost as a “barrier” to higher education. She added that students who earn associate degrees earn “nearly $500,000 more in additional lifetime earnings than a high school diploma.” And those who earn bachelor’s degrees generate nearly a million dollars more than high school graduates. Ultimately, America’s College Promise could transform community colleges in the U.S. and spike Latino and African-Americans enrollment. This initiative provides an “excellent way to serve historically underrepresented populations and provide support to colleges that may not have had success in working with these populations in the past. All in all, it will be a way to provide open access for education at community colleges,” AACC’s Christian said. • MAY 18, 2015 | 27


Unique College Opportunity for Hispanics By Gustavo A. Mellander

This issue of Hispanic Outlook highlights 100 colleges and universities that have a proven record of assisting Hispanics – students, faculty and other professionals. Most of those institutions have been accurately characterized as Hispanic -Serving Institutions, HSIs. That says it all. They are worthy and logical choices for Hispanic students seeking an education or for Hispanic professionals exploring career opportunities. A Look Backward Today many Hispanic students are able to consider a variety of different colleges and thus may not fully fathom the quantum changes that have transpired. Most of those changes have been for the better. I won’t dwell on the fact that some colleges at one time did not recruit Hispanic students. A few were accepted but little was done to help them succeed once enrolled. But let’s not drift into a victim mindset. Hispanics aren’t the only group to face discrimination. Virtually every immigrant group found established colleges less than inviting. Sound research has documented that reality for such diverse groups as Italians, Irish, Swedish, Chinese and others. There was some religious marginalization as well. Catholics and other religious groups established several colleges because their students were clearly not welcomed at some old line institutions. The black college experience was different. There were a few colleges open to blacks even before the Civil War in the North. But most black colleges and universities were established after the Civil War, with significant assistance of numerous white northern religious missionary organizations. Today there are 106 historically black college and universities, HBCUs. They include public and private institutions, two-year and four-year colleges as well as medical and law schools. But establishing HBCU institutions was not enough to ensure blacks the equality they deserved. It took the 1960s Civil Rights Movement to forge state and federal legislation to secure far more open access to higher education. HBCU sustainability was significantly strengthened in 1965 with the adoption of the 1965 Higher Education Act which provided direct federal aid to “any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans.” The 1965 Act also uniquely established direct federal funding to match private endowment contributions to black institutions. Chicano Leadership Another not very well-known fact, even among scholars, is that Hispanics, specifically Chicanos, began their civil rights struggle for justice years earlier. Their successes through the courts paved the way for blacks to achieve theirs. In 1948 six years before the landmark 1954 Supreme Court

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decision, a group of Chicano lawyers brought a schooldiscrimination case against the Texas Bastrop Independent School District to the United States Supreme Court. They prevailed. The high court ruled educational segregation of Mexican-American children was discriminatory and declared it illegal. The decision overturned past practices that had discriminated against Mexican-Americans for decades. All agree 1954 was a defining year because of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. It was a shattering judgment which passed 9-0 thanks to the determined lobbying of Chief Justice Earl Warren. He met with each justice in their chambers and pressed for a unanimous decision. Ironically, Warren had been appointed Chief Justice by President Dwight Eisenhower because of his conservative record as governor of California. He was considered safe; he would not rock the boat. But he did. The unanimous decision rejected the “separate but equal” doctrine that had guaranteed educational inequality to thousands of blacks and other children for decades on end. Two weeks earlier the same Supreme Court had decided the Hernandez v. Texas case which created a clear pathway for the evolving Chicano Civil Rights movement. That seminal decision was cited by black attorneys in their struggle through many subsequent court cases. Briefly, the facts are: a Chicano, Pete Hernandez, had been tried and found guilty of capital murder in Jackson County, Texas. His Chicano lawyers challenged the conviction on the grounds that the trial was unfair since Hernandez had been convicted by an all-white jury. Further and to the point Jackson County had long denied Mexican-Americans the right to sit on juries. Hernandez’s lawyers presented evidence showing that in the previous 25 years not a solitary Mexican- American had ever served on a single jury even though the county was nearly 16 percent Mexican-American. In contrast during that period over 6,000 white jurors had been selected. Chief Justice Earl Warren and the rest of the Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of Hernandez. Specifically, the court held that the 14th Amendment protects all racial classes not just blacks and whites. The rights and protection enjoyed by those was extended to all other racial groups. Hernandez was ordered retried with a jury reflecting ethnic realities. The ruling was yet another important step forward in the Civil Rights movement and a blow to racial inequality under the law. This time, a racial minority, other than blacks, benefited from such a decision. The ultimate impact of this ruling was that henceforth all racial groups would be protected under the 14th Amendment. (For more detail see: Colored Men And Hombres Aquí: Hernandez v. Texas and the Emergence of Mexican American Lawyering. Edited by Michael Olivas.) Hispanic- Serving Institutions In the 1965 Higher Education Act, no specific funding was granted institutions that served Hispanics. And that


is surprising for President Lyndon B. Johnson, who was determined to have that bill pass Congress, had been influenced as a young teacher by the inferior education offered Mexican-Americans. Recently released Oval Office recordings attest Johnson lobbied furiously for the bill. Two snippets provide insight into his thinking. He is recorded telling his staff that as a young man he taught in a grade school that only had Mexican- American students. He said he loved it because the children were so enthusiastic, so desirous of learning. Yet, he said, with the passage of time their enthusiasm waned. Johnson said he “saw their eyes grow dim” as they realized they would never be afforded the quality of education white folks had. Johnson said it broke his heart. At another meeting while discussing all the problems they were having while trying to get Congress to agree on the bill, Johnson asked rhetorically, “Why do we work so hard to become president?” He responded “to accomplish great things” and this education bill “can do that for poor people.” Thus it is surprising that although blacks received significant additional targeted funds in the 1965 Act, others in need as well did not. Hispanics would have to wait several decades more for equal funding. HACU Although many groups were involved, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU), led a successful effort in 1992 to secure congressional approval to formally support campuses with significant Hispanic enrollments. Federally designated HSIs began to receive specific federal appropriations. How is a college designated a Hispanic- Serving Institution? Interestingly it is not predicated on an institution’s mission. It is granted to any college or university whose student body is 25 percent (full-time equivalent) or more Hispanic. That is the only criteria. The number of Hispanic- Serving Institutions increases every year as more and more Hispanics pursue higher education. Today there are 409 HSIs, up from 189 in 2004, more than a doubling in 10 years. They receive significant grants which can be used for many academic purposes serving all ethnicities at the institution. They include funds for faculty development, creation and improvement of academic programs, curriculum development, scientific and laboratory equipment, academic tutoring, counseling and other student support services. Excelencia in Education - a Washington, D.C. research and advocacy organization compiles and publishes accurate data about many facets of Hispanics and higher education. In a recent fact-laden report predicated on 2013-14 academic year data Excelencia reported the existing 409 HSIs serve 1.6 million undergraduates. That’s 60 percent of all Hispanic undergraduate students. This latest compilation, available on Excelencia’s homepage, also notes that HSIs represent 12 percent of higher education institutions. Of the 409 HSIs, 203 are twoyear colleges and 206 are four- year institutions. In the past decade there has been a significant increase of four-year colleges. Where are HSIs? They are located in 21 states and Puerto Rico. Surprisingly some are located in states such as Washington, Kansas and Indiana which are not known for their Hispanic populations. But the vast majorities are in California, Texas, Puerto Rico, New Mexico, Florida and New York. The top eight states house 80 percent of the nation’s HSIs. Some HSIs offer graduate programs as well and enroll 38 percent of all Hispanics graduate students.

HSIs and HBCUs Institutions In a desire to present accurate data about HSIs and HBCUs institutions to policymakers and others, Excelencia in Education and the United Negro College Fund analyzed both cohorts. Studying and publishing the commonalities between these two groups can be helpful, it is hoped, in raising general awareness about Hispanic and black students and the institutions that serve them. Although HBCUs and HSIs only represent 20 percent of all higher education institutions in the nation, they educate nearly half of all black and Hispanic students, many of whom are low-income and first-generation college attendees. Both HSIs and HBCUs are positioned to help increase the country’s overall college completion rate. In 2012-13, half of HBCUs (50 percent) and most HSIs (68 percent) were public institutions. In terms of gender distribution, more women than men attend each group of colleges. Most recent statistics show HBCUs institutions had 60 percent female vs. 39 percent male. For HSIs, the distribution was 58 percent female vs. 40 percent male. Should Hispanics Be Encouraged To Attend HSIs? Seems like a no-brainer, but as is true in many situations, there are two camps. A minority, including some Hispanics, answers “no.” They argue that since Hispanic students upon graduation will probably enter an Anglo- dominated world, in the private or public sector, it behooves them to study in a non-Hispanic environment so as to better make the transition upon graduation. In short, they contend it is best to mainstream Hispanics as early as possible. That’s really a weak argument since Hispanics are in a minority at HSIs colleges. They interact of necessity with non-Hispanics every day. Further, classes and research are conducted in English. Others voices cool on HSIs feel that HSIs are not as academically rigorous as mainline colleges, that the education experience offered is not of the highest quality and thus Hispanics will be at a disadvantage when they graduate. But the successes of thousands of HSIs graduates belie that assertion. I have studied and reflected on these criticisms. My research and personal experiences show clearly they are without foundation. Bottom Line The truth is that Hispanic students attending HSIs can receive a solid education. An additional benefit is that some of their classes will be taught by successful Hispanics who were in their shoes just a few short years before. Hispanic counselors and other professionals help create a hospitable supportive environment. Similar backgrounds, shared experiences and a desire to have students succeed make HSIs a particularly logical choice for Hispanic students to consider. Attending college is an adventure. It is also stressful for most students, particularly for those who are the first in their families to attempt college. Therefore, to be able to attend a college with a student body that is at least 25 percent Hispanic and with a good sprinkling of Hispanic faculty is an opportunity not to be underestimated. Seize it! •

Dr. Mellander was a university dean for 15 years and a college president for 20.

MAY 18, 2015 | 29


By Margaret Orchowski

ADJUNCTS ORGANIZING Feb. 25 marked the first “National College Adjunct Walkout Day.” In California, Arizona and some other states, nontenured part-time college faculty marched and demonstrated to “call attention to their low pay and tenuous working conditions.” As the nation’s middle class increasingly depends on community and state colleges for their children’s postsecondary education, the plight of the majority of professors at these institutions is being noticed. Part-time adjuncts teach the courses all students depend on, but often have to work out of their cars and meet their students in the cafeteria because they have no offices. Most adjuncts get no benefits. Many teach in multiple institutions but still earn far less than tenured faculty who teach only two or three classes a semester on one campus with full benefits. Adjuncts have to pay for their own training on new equipment and substitute for the full-time faculty at far less pay when the FTers take off for paid sabbaticals and conferences. When an adjunct develops a popular course, it is almost always grabbed by the full-time faculty the next year. Public service unions are conflicted about representing adjuncts along with the full- time faculty. There is no equality. But the Service Employees International Union has begun a campaign demanding adjuncts be paid $15,000 per course - up from just a few thousand dollars on most campuses. TITLE IX PROHIBITS SEX DISCRIMINATION; THAT INCLUDES LOVE You never know how these discrimination laws are going to evolve, but this one is making news. Title IX is the landmark ruling that allowed women’s sports to flourish, since schools and colleges were no longer allowed to offer more athletic opportunities to boys than to girls (with the exception of the football industry of course) on the basis of sex discrimination. But now Harvard University has used Title IX to make explicit, in writing regulations that no romantic relationship between a faculty member and a student is allowed because it is deemed to be “sex discrimination” in an unequal relationship.

CIS ACCUSED OF FAVORING DREAMers OVER LEGAL IMMIGRANTS The Republicans took over the Senate this year and little differences are apparent already. Some subcommittees have been renamed. For example: the Senate Judiciary subcommittee that deals with immigration legislation used to be called by Democrats the “Immigration, Refugees and Border Security” committee. Now it’s been renamed the “Immigration and the National Interest” committee. On March 3, its new chairman, Jeff Sessions of Alabama, put the Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS) bureau of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the hot seat. The CIS is the most benign of all the immigration departments in that it doesn’t do enforcement. Its mission, unlike the rest of the DHS, is service. Its priority is the naturalization of permanent legal resident (PLRs - better known as green card) holders. It also manages numerous integration services for naturalized citizens and immigrants in the country. Most of its operating revenue comes from fees charged for its “services.” But it has too small a staff to handle the huge backlog of applications for citizenship. On top of that, President Obama charged CIS with vetting all applications for his DACA (Deferred Acton for Childhood Arrivals - better known as DREAMers) and DAPA (Deferred Action for Parents of Americans) programs. Those are the infamous executive action programs that would grant some 7 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally not only temporary waivers from prosecution and deportation, but also give them work permits as well. But the applications have to be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Sessions and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, accused (CIS) of changing their priorities away from legal immigrants to illegal immigrants. During questioning, CIS officials admitted that because of the heavy caseload, DACA requirements had been loosened to exclude high school and GED documents. “Even members of gangs will be admitted,” Grassley said. CIS witnesses acknowledged that a million dollar rented facility in Chrystal City to house hundreds of new DACA employees stood empty; only one person has been employed by March. BE GLAD YOU’RE NOT A TEACHER IN FRANCE New rules in France, a country already struggling with immigrant integration, will require teachers to “talk with parents and possibly take disciplinary action if students are seen as disrespecting French values.” How’d you like to have to do that? •

Margaret (Peggy Sands) Orchowski was a reporter for AP South America and for the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. She earned a doctorate in international educational administration from the University of California-Santa Barbara. She lives in Washington, D.C., where she was an editor at Congressional Quarterly and now is a freelance journalist and columnist covering Congress and higher education.

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From the

Scholars’Corner

By Marla Andrea Ramírez, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies University of California, Santa Barbara 2014 Graduate Fellow My interest in the history of Mexican immigration from race, ethnic, class, gender, and legal perspectives developed from my early understanding of immigration law through my own family’s complex legal status and my advocacy for immigrant rights. An interest furthered developed through my current dissertation work on the Mexican repatriation and banishment of U.S. citizen children during the Great Depression era, early 1920s-1940s. Ultimately, I plan to work at a Research One institution to continue researching and teaching Chicana and Chicano Studies through a legal history lens. I arrived from Zamora, Michoacán, Mexico to East Los Angeles, California, at the age of 14 with no English skills and no knowledge of the U.S. culture or its academic systems. A year later, my family moved to North Long Beach, California, where I attended Jordan High School. Unfortunately, my parents separated during my transition from Cerritos Community College to the University of California, Los Angeles, making me the head of the household at an early age. I had to quickly learn to juggle academic and family responsibilities and excelled in both; largely thanks to mentors and outreach programs such as the Scholars’ Honors Program at Cerritos Community College and the McNair Scholars Program at Claremont Graduate University. In fact, the McNair Scholars Program first introduced me to the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education in 2007 when they hosted me as a conference attendee. The same program provided the needed tools to transition into a PhD program. Now, as a doctoral candidate at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in the department of Chicana and Chicano Studies, I am finalizing my dissertation under the super-

vision of my co-chairs, professors Inés D. Casillas and Miroslava Chávez-García, and plan to defend and file the dissertation in June 2015. As I prepare to transition into an assistant professorship, I am fortunate to have been part of yet another mentoring program as a 2014 AAHHE fellow. AAHHE creates a pipeline for first-generation Latina/o students such as myself and facilitates our transition into different realms of academia. My participation in AAHHE reassured my passion for academia and opened new alternatives I had never considered possible before. Latina women university presidents inspired me as I listened to their experiences in panels, Q&A sessions, and one-on-one conversations. Now I aspire to ascend into administrative positions later in my academic career. AAHHE created a network of friends, colleagues, mentors, and role models that is extremely crucial for underrepresented groups in higher education. My personal experiences, supported by mentorship programs such as AAHHE, have motivated my research questions and long-term academic interests. My lived experiences, paired with my sense of social justice and love for the history of immigration law, engrained in me an intense academic interest. My doctoral degree has allowed me to pursue my immigration history research interests by examining the prolonged consequences of Mexican repatriation and U.S. citizen children’s banishment. I examine a historical event with current ramifications on three family generations. My archival research, oral histories, and legal analyses help us better understand the history of complex Mexico-U.S. migration relations and its prolonged consequences, crucial to better understand current immigration debates today.• MAY 18, 2015 | 31


Immigrants and Boomers: Forging a New Social Contract for the Future of America by Dowell Myers 2008. 362 pp. ISBN: 9780871546241. $17.95 paper. Russell Sage Foundation, (212) 750-6000. New York, N.Y. 10065. www. russellsage.org/

Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America by William H. Frey America has been known as the world’s melting pot. Today it is on the cusp of becoming a country with no racial majority. The concept of a “minority white” may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time. 2014. 224 pp. ISBN: 978-0815726494. $24.00 paper. Brookings Institution Press, www.brookings.edu/about/ press, Washington, D.C., (202) 536-3600. Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class by Ian Haney López In Dog Whistle Politics, Ian Haney López offers a sweeping account of how politicians and plutocrats deploy veiled racial appeals to persuade white voters to support policies that favor the extremely rich yet threaten their own interests. Haney López links as never before the central themes that dominate American politics today. Dog Whistle Politics will generate a lively and much-needed debate about how racial politics has destabilized the American middle class - white and nonwhite members alike. 2014. 304 pp. ISBN: 978-0199964277. $24.95 cloth. Oxford University Press, New York, N.Y. (800) 445-9714. www.global.oup.com/ The American Dream and the Public Schools by Jennifer L. Hochschild and Nathan Scovronick The authors show how policies to promote individual success too often benefit only those already privileged by race or class, and often conflict with policies that are intended to benefit everyone. They propose a framework that builds on our nation’s rapidly changing population in order to help Americans get past acrimonious debates about schooling. Their goal is to make public education work better so that all children can succeed. 2004. 320 pp. ISBN: 978-0195176032. $19.95 paper. Oxford University Press, New York, N.Y. (800) 445-9714. www.global.oup.com/

32 | MAY 18, 2015

On a recent visit to the nation’s capitol I visited the Newseum, a museum devoted to news events and media coverage throughout history. What struck me was the attention that was devoted to the Boomer generation. The news coverage of this demographic group began in the 1970s when news magazines forecast the dominance of this age group decades in the future. These forecasts were not wrong. In the same 30-year span the other demographic attracting attention has been the massive influx of immigrants. While Boomers dominance was viewed with a collective shrug, massive immigration has been greeted with great anxiety, fearing new burdens and unwanted changes to the nation’s ethnic, social, and economic identity. In the new book, Immigrants and Boomers, sure to stimulate discussion and debate demographer Dowell Myers proposes a new way of thinking about these issues and argues that each of these two powerful demographic shifts may hold the keys to resolving the problems presented by the other. Using California as its bellwether state because it is representative of a place where whites are no longer a majority of the population and represent just a third of residents under age 20, Myers demonstrates how immigration will impact that population and become the blueprint for other states to follow. Drawing on detailed census data, Myers demonstrates that long-established immigrants have been far more successful than the public believes. Among the Hispanics who make up the bulk of California’s immigrant population, those who have lived in California for over a decade show high levels of social mobility and use of English, and 50 percent of Latino immigrants become homeowners after 20 years. The progress made by immigrant families represents a reasonable argument suggesting that these families will be able to fill up the workforce as Boomers retire. Without an influx of younger workers the pool of middle-class taxpayers would shrink, endangering entitlement expenditures to Boomers. In addition, as retirees sell off their housing assets, the prospect of a generational collapse in housing prices looms. Myers suggests that it is in the Boomers’ best interest to invest in the education and integration of immigrants and their children in order to bolster the ranks of workers, taxpayers, and homeowners that America will depend on 10 and 20 years from now. In short, Myers uses this book to call for a new social contract between the older and younger generations, based on their mutual interests and the moral responsibility of each generation to provide for children and the elderly.

Reviewed by Mary Ann Cooper


RISE

THE BEST PLACE IN L.A. TO SEE STARS

This is where individuals rise and through them we all do. See how CSUN graduates impact the region at CSUN.EDU/RISE

MAY 18, 2015 | 33


FAMILIA Texas State University, to the extent not in conflict with federal or state law, prohibits discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability, veterans’ status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression. Texas State University is a tobacco-free campus. 15-413 4/29

34 | MAY 18, 2015

IT’S AT THE HEART OF EVERYTHING WE DO. txstate.edu


Committed to StUdeNt SUCCeSS Committed to student success and providing an exceptional educational experience, California State University, Fullerton is proud of its record supporting Hispanic student achievement in higher education.

· Ranked first in California and consistently among the top 10 in the nation for the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded to Hispanic students · Among the top institutions graduating Latino students entering the health professions · Recognized as a “Best Bang for the Buck” university 1

2

3

“Incredible things happen when we truly reach higher – to transform lives and help students graduate into a diverse world and reach their dreams.” – President Mildred García

1 Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education (May 2015)

2 Excelencia in Education “Finding Your Workforce: In Health” (May 2015) 3 Washington Monthly (October 2014)

TITANS REACH HIGHER MAY 18, 2015 | 35


Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) Washington State Convention Center • Seattle, WA • November 11-14, 2015 ABRCMS advances undergraduates and postbaccalaureates from

underrepresented populations, including those with disabilities, in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) along the path toward graduate2014 ABRCMS Attendees by Location 2014 Abstract Submissions by level training. The Education Level conference features 2000 1,700 poster and oral Doctoral presentations, scientific 1500 Masters sessions, professional Postbac development and 1000 Senior networking sessions, and Junior approximately Sophomore 500 325 exhibit booths showcasing summer 0 Graduates Undergrads/Postbacs research and graduate 2014 Distribution of Scientific Disciplines school opportunities. WA

MT

ID

ND

ME

MN

OR

WI

MI

NV

IA

NE

UT

IL

IN

TX

OK

AR

AL

GA

FL

HI

PR

3000

Grads/Postdocs Undergrads/Postbacs

2000

1000

2001

2005

2010

Guam

Virgin Islands

Unspecified - 710 (9%)

300 + 200 – 299 100 – 199 50 – 99 25 – 49 1 - 24

Chemical 487 (6%)

Developmental Biological 588 (7%)

Molecular 496 (6%)

Social & Behavioral Sciences & Public Health - 463 (6%)

Microbiological 800 (10%)

Physical Sciences & Mathematics - 362 (5%) Physiological - 389 (5%)

Neuroscience - 669 (8%)

2014

Abstract Submission: ....................................September 11, 2015 Travel Award Application: ...........................September 11, 2015 Judges’ Travel Subsidy Application: ..........September 25, 2015 Discount Registration: ..................................October 19, 2015

“Attending and winning in my category was one of the best experiences in my scientific life. Coming from my background, I doubted myself in the past. I now feel confident because when I presented my poster I left like I belonged. This conference really made me believe that I can pursue a career in science.” Student

For more information, please visit: www.abrcms.org.

36 | MAY 18, 2015

Attendees

Cell Biological 885 (11%)

Immunology 562 (7%)

Important Deadlines

facebook.com/abrcms

SC

Biochemical - 855 (11%)

Cancer Biology 681 (9%)

Faculty/Judge 0

DC

TN

MS

Non-Students

VA

NC

LA

4000

DE

WV

NM

“It was a great opportunity to see the extraordinary research being conducted in the country and also to encourage and offer thoughtful advice to the future scientists.”

RI

NJ MD

KY

AZ

ABRCMS Registration

CT

OH

MO

KS

MA

NY

PA

CO

AK

VT NH

SD

WY

CA

twitter.com/abrcms

abrcms@asmusa.org

Managed by:


FLAMENCO VIVO CARLOTA SANTANA presents

ANGELES / ALMAS Spring 2015 NYC Season at BAM Fisher May 19 - 24, 2015 Company's BAM Debut Features Two Programs, Three World Premieres Please Join Us: Program A Tuesday, May 19, 2015 at 7:30pm Wednesday, May 20, 2015 at 7:30pm Thursday, May 21, 2015 at 7:30pm Program B Friday, May 22, 2015 at 7:30pm Saturday, May 23, 2015 at 2pm and 7:30pm Sunday, May 24, 2015 at 2pm RSVP for press tickets to Michelle Tabnick, 646-765-4773 michelle@michelletabnickcommunications.com

From here, it’s possible. Desde aquí, es posible! “...one of seven schools that empower women.” – AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN (AAUW)

“…a national leader in recognizing and commemorating our nation’s veterans.” – MILITARY ORDER OF THE PURPLE HEART

“...outstanding achievements in promoting diversity in the workforce.” – CHAMPION OF DIVERSITY AWARD (AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF AFFIRMATIVE ACTION)

“…demonstrated an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.” – INSIGHT INTO DIVERSITY HEED AWARD (2012-2014)

For more information visit

WWW.TTU.EDU/DIVERSITY

MAY 18, 2015 | 37


HUNTER COLLEGE

56178 CUNY HUNTER COLLEGE

FINANCE CONTROLLER

STUDENT CAREER PROGRAM MANAGER 3.625” X 4.75

Job Opening ID: 12735

Hunter College of the City University of New York seeks qualified applicants for Finance Controller for the Business Office. This position reports directly to the Executive Director of Finance and Business Operations. The Controller is responsible for managing and directing the Accounting Office, Office Services and the Revenue Accountability Department of the College. In addition to the general duties, the Controller will be responsible for coordinating financial analysis of various special activities and programs of the College. The Controller will oversee the non-tax budgets of various entities and manage the endowed and restricted accounts to ensure that they are spent in accordance with the donors' restrictions. Under the direction of the Executive Director of Finance and Business Operations, the Controller will work on special projects and handle day to day problem solving and trouble shooting in support of school-wide initiatives. A Bachelor's degree in Accounting, Finance or a business discipline is required, a CPA is preferred. Knowledge of Oracle PeopleSoft is preferred. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. Applications must be submitted on-line by accessing the CUNY Portal on City University of New York job website (http://www.cuny.edu/employment.html) and following the CUNYfirst Job System Instructions. Current users of the site should access their established accounts; new users should follow the instructions to set up an account. To search for this vacancy, click on Search Job Listings, select More Options To Search For CUNY Jobs and enter the Job Opening ID number 12735. The required material, as stated on the CUNYfirst vacancy notice, for the application package must be uploaded as ONE file in .doc, .docx, .pdf, .rtf, or text format. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Hunter College/CUNY is committed to enhancing our diverse academic community by actively encouraging people with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women to apply. We take pride in our pluralistic community and continue to seek excellence through diversity and inclusion. CUNY is an AA/EO/IRCA/ADA Employer.

HUNTER COLLEGE

CLINICAL PROFESSOR CHEMISTRY Job Opening ID: 12596

The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seeks an outstanding teacher with leadership potential to fill a clinical professor position in General Chemistry or other areas of chemistry. Duties include teaching large and small lectures, especially in undergraduate General Chemistry. A dynamic leader of the department's educational initiatives, such as coordinating the team of lecturers, improving teaching innovations and laboratories. Clinical Professors are experienced teachers and are appointed on a full-time, non-tenure bearing faculty titles. This is a one-year term appointment with the possibility of annual renewals based on satisfactory performance but may not serve in the title for more than a total of seven years. Experience in teaching large classes and innovative use of technology is preferred. Bachelor's degree and a record of achievement in a profession or field of expertise related to teaching assignments. Also required is the ability to cooperate with others for the good of the institution. Ideal candidate will have a Ph.D. in Chemistry. A demonstrated interest in chemical pedagogy at the college level. Ability to work with and instruct a culturally diverse student population. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience ($40,844-$97,000). HOW TO APPLY: Applications must be submitted on-line by accessing the CUNY Portal on City University of New York job website (http://www.cuny.edu/employment.html) and following the CUNYfirst Job System Instructions. Current users of the site should access their established accounts; new users should follow the instructions to set up an account. To search for this vacancy, click on Search Job Listings, select More Options To Search For CUNY Jobs and enter the Job Opening ID number. The required material, as stated on the CUNYfirst vacancy notice, for the application package must be uploaded as ONE file in .doc, .docx, .pdf, .rtf, or text format. Incomplete applications will not be considered. The search will remain open until the position is filled. Hunter College/CUNY is committed to enhancing our diverse academic community by actively encouraging people with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women to apply. We take pride in our pluralistic community and continue to seek excellence through diversity and inclusion. CUNY is an AA/EO/IRCA/ADA Employer.

38 | MAY 18, 2015

Hispanic Outlook

Career Development Services, Division of Student Affairs 5.11.15 P2

Job Opening ID: 12799

GENERAL DUTIES • Develops and manages career development programs and services in a College of Unit and assumes a leadership role in the design and delivery of creative approaches to career education and planning. • Assists in unit planning, such as setting goals and objectives, and monitors status of progress toward meeting goals • Designs and produces outcomes assessment reports; reviews outcomes and feedback and recommends strategies to expand and improve services. • Directs a portfolio of targeted career programs, such as mentoring, internship, and alumni programs • Manages one or more aspects of career office operations, such as on-campus recruiting • Evaluates new technologies, assessment materials, and other career tools, makes recommendations, and acquires/implements them • May counsel a limited number of students • Performs related duties as assigned. FLSA Exempt CAMPUS SPECIFIC INFORMATION • Reporting to the Director of Career Development Services, the responsibilities of the Student Career Program Manager include, but is not limited to: • Managing career office operations such as the on campus Recruiting Program, Career Expos, Senior Programs. • Working with Associate Director to develop new employer relationships for the development of internship and job opportunities for students and alumni. Maintaining strong employer relationships with both new and existing partners. • Assessing programs, writing reports, reporting outcomes, and making recommendations to the Director. • Collaborating with other academic and administrative units to promote the goals of the office. • Performing related duties as assigned. QUALIFICATIONS • Bachelor's Degree and six years' related experience required. • Master's degree in higher education, or related field preferred. • 5 or more years of proven work experience in field of higher education. • Knowledge of current labor trends and recruitment. SALARY commensurate with qualifications and experience. HOW TO APPLY: Applications must be submitted on-line by accessing the CUNY Portal on City University of New York job website (http://www.cuny.edu/employment.html) and following the CUNYfirst Job System Instructions. Current users of the site should access their established accounts; new users should follow the instructions to set up an account. To search for this vacancy, click on Search Job Listings, select More Options To Search For CUNY Jobs and enter the Job Opening ID number. The required material, as stated on the CUNYfirst vacancy notice, for the application package must be uploaded as ONE file in .doc, .docx, .pdf, .rtf, or text format. Incomplete applications will not be considered. The search will remain open until the position is filled. Hunter College/CUNY is committed to enhancing our diverse academic community by actively encouraging people with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women to apply. We take pride in our pluralistic community and continue to seek excellence through diversity and inclusion. CUNY is an AA/EO/IRCA/ADA Employer.

56180 CUNYCOLLEGE HUNTER

Hispanic Outlook 3.625” X 4.75 LECTURER DOCTORAL SCHEDULE (GENERAL5.11.15 CHEMISTRY) - CHEMISTRY P 2 Job Opening ID: 12557 The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department seeks an outstanding teacher with leadership potential to fill a lecturer position in General Chemistry or other areas of chemistry. This is a full-time nine-month position. Duties include teaching large and small lectures, overseeing and assisting adjunct lecturers, and working with the laboratory staff to co-ordinate the laboratory program, in undergraduate General Chemistry. This is a one-year term appointment with the possibility of annual renewals based on satisfactory performance. Experience in teaching large classes and innovative use of technology is preferred. QUALIFICATIONS: Ph.D. in Chemistry or related field. A demonstrated interest in chemical pedagogy at the college level. Ability to work with and instruct a culturally diverse student population. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. HOW TO APPLY: Applications must be submitted on-line by accessing the CUNY Portal on City University of New York job website (http://www.cuny.edu/ employment.html) and following the CUNYfirst Job System Instructions. Current users of the site should access their established accounts; new users should follow the instructions to set up an account. To search for this vacancy, click on Search Job Listings, select More Options To Search For CUNY Jobs and enter the Job Opening ID number. The required material, as stated on the CUNYfirst vacancy notice, for the application package must be uploaded as ONE file in .doc, .docx, .pdf, .rtf, or text format. Incomplete applications will not be considered. The search will remain open until the position is filled. Hunter College/CUNY is committed to enhancing our diverse academic community by actively encouraging people with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women to apply. We take pride in our pluralistic community and continue to seek excellence through diversity and inclusion. CUNY is an AA/EO/IRCA/ADA Employer.


Hispanic Outlook 1/2 page Issue 5-4-15 Deadline 4-23-15

Associate Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer UC Santa Barbara, a premier research university with an outstanding faculty and talented and diverse student body, is distinguished by its worldclass programs, and commitment to innovation. The University serves more than 21,500 students, including approximately 3,000 graduate students. Academic units on campus include the College of Letters and Science— the largest with more than 17,000 undergraduates and 2000 graduate students, the College of Engineering, the College of Creative Studies, and two professional schools: the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education. Because teaching and research are integrated at UC Santa Barbara, students are full participants in an educational journey of discovery that stimulates independent thought, critical reasoning, and creativity. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer (AVC/CIO) is a senior campus leadership position responsible for developing an institutional focus on information technologies that advance the mission and strategic goals of UC Santa Barbara. The AVC/CIO will have oversight for all IT activities that contribute to planning, creating, and implementing a campus-wide IT vision, and for integrating them into UCSB’s strategic plan. The campus is in the process of augmenting the staff and budget for the newly created Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) unit, and related units, in order to implement UC-wide payroll systems and modernize campus financial, time-keeping, calendaring, and e-mail systems.

The AVC/CIO will be an innovative and collaborative visionary who will manage the newly created Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) unit, assuring effective organizational operations, practices, standards, planning, and development. He/she will also be responsible for the design, development, release, and maintenance of enterprise technology systems and enterprise services. This will be accomplished by collaborating and coordinating with IT units and organizations on campus; working and consulting with IT governance structures (IT Board and IT Council); executive and academic leaders as well as with faculty, staff and students; building strong relationships with senior university leadership and key stakeholders; driving innovation and differentiated IT strategy; and improving the business services associated with IT. Additionally, the AVC/CIO will represent the university externally and will work with University of California system-wide IT, financial, and business offices to coordinate local implementations with UC-wide enterprise systems. Qualifications & Experience: Significant leadership experience in IT, business, and/or related work ideally gained within a higher education environment. A track record of success in managing and working closely with multiple, large, cross-functional teams or projects, and influencing and consulting with senior-level management and key stakeholders. Capable of developing, communicating and obtaining broad support for a vision for the present and future role of information technology in higher education and of understanding how advancements in information technology will yield competitive advantages to the university. Demonstrated ability to successfully conceptualize, launch, and deliver multiple IT projects that meet campus objectives on time and within budget, especially within a decentralized environment. Bachelor's degree in related field; or equivalent work experience. Advanced degree preferred. Initial screening of applicants will begin immediately, and continue until the position is filled. The University of California, Santa Barbara will be assisted by Michelle Bonoan, Matt Aiello and Tracie Smith of Heidrick & Struggles, Inc. Nominations and applications should be directed to: University of California, Santa Barbara Search Committee c/o Heidrick & Struggles, Inc. 11100 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90025 (404) 682 7316 ucsb@heidrick.com

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.

H Is D 1/

PRESIDENT

Syracuse, New York The State University of New York has initiated an international search for an innovative and highly collaborative academic medical center leader to serve as the next President, SUNY Upstate Medical University, located in Syracuse, NY. Upstate’s next President will be responsible for guiding the continued growth and development of SUNY Upstate Medical University’s highly respected clinical, education and research enterprises, taking full advantage of SUNY’s extraordinary faculty and resources. Upstate, the only AMC and the largest employer in Central New York, is composed of Upstate University Hospital and four colleges: Graduate Studies, Health Professions, Nursing, and the College of Medicine. University Hospital, the teaching hospital of the College of Medicine and a division of Upstate, has grown to 715 licensed beds on two campuses offering tertiary and quaternary services to patients of the 17 counties that comprise the Central New York region. The ideal candidate will have an M.D. and/or Ph.D. degree and have served in an executive role in a college of medicine or university or hospital. Korn Ferry is assisting Upstate Medical University with this important search. Please forward your CV or nominations of highly qualified candidates to: John Ferry, M.D. c/o Tricia Porter (tricia.porter@kornferry.com) At SUNY Upstate Medical University we strive to promote a professional environment that encourages varied perspectives from faculty members with diverse life experiences. A respect for diversity is one of our core values. We are committed to recruiting and supporting a rich community of outstanding faculty, staff and students. We actively seek applications from women and members of underrepresented groups to contribute to the diversity of our university community in support of our teaching, research and clinical missions.

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MAY 18, 2015 | 39


The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine and the Regional Campus of the UT Houston School of Public Health

Marketing Faculty Position

Associate Dean, MD/MPH Program

The Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School invites applications for a faculty position to start in July 2016. Harvard Business School recruits new faculty for positions entailing case method teaching at the graduate and executive program levels. Marketing encompasses understanding consumer behavior, international marketing, business-tobusiness marketing, product management, new product development and marketing organization and systems. Applicants for tenure track positions should have a doctorate or terminal degree in a field specified above, or related discipline, by the time the appointment begins, and strong demonstrated potential and interest to conduct research at the forefront of their fields.

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Medicine and the Regional Campus of the UT Houston School of Public Health seek a director for their San Antonio based MD/ MPH Program. The successful candidate will provide vision, strategic planning, and oversight for the MD/MPH dual degree program, optimizing the integration of curricula and resources for the study of medicine with a special focus on population or community health via interdisciplinary training in specialty areas. These include but are not limited to, epidemiology, biostatistics, nutrition, environmental health, and health policy. Additionally, the Associate Dean, MD/MPH Program, represents the dual degree program in the health science center, local, regional, and national task forces and forums, engages in related scholarly activities, and ensures compliance with applicable accreditation standards. The Associate Dean of the MD/MPH program reports, with other education deans to the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education, and additionally to the educational leadership for the MPH program. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer including protected veterans and persons with disabilities.

Candidates should submit CV, copies of publications and working papers, and letters of recommendation at: http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/ positions. Closing date for applications is June 30, 2015. Material that can only be sent in hard copy can be mailed to: Harvard Business School, Faculty Administration, Attn: Marketing Application, Morgan Hall T25, Soldiers Field Road, Boston, MA 02163.

Candidate Qualifications • MD (or equivalent) and MPH (or equivalent) • Evidence of scholarly activities, including teaching and administrative experiences • Impeccable interpersonal and communication skills, across a broad range of stakeholder groups • Knowledgeable about the range of benefits of MD/MPH dual degree programs and career path ways for those with both degrees Interested individuals should submit a letter of interest describing relevant experience and characteristics, and a current CV electronically addressed to Barbara J. Turner, M.D., Chair of Associate Dean, MD/MPH Program Search Committee c/o Jennifer Hernandez, Assistant to the Vice Dean of UME, at bitoni@uthscsa.edu.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

All faculty appointments are designated as security sensitive positions.

OutlooK-12 MAGAZINE

The University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio

Associate Dean for Admissions

The University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio is recruiting an Associate Dean for Admissions. The successful candidate will provide vision, leadership, and oversight for all School of Medicine outreach, recruitment, and admissions functions. The Associate Dean for Admissions leads the design, implementation and continuous evaluation of admissions-related policies and procedures, guided by medical education trends and evidence-based “best practices” as well as our specific responsibility to provide care for all Texans through education, research, and service. Along with other undergraduate medical education deans, the Associate Dean for Admissions represents the medical education program in campus, community, state, and national task forces and forums, engages in related scholarly activities, and ensures compliance with applicable accreditation standards. The position reports to the Vice Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education. The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is an Equal Employment OpportuniHispanic Outlook in Higher Education ty/Affirmative Action employer including protected Publication: veterans and persons with disabilities.

Job# 8181

Candidate Qualifications mbb of scholarly activities, Mechanical: • Appropriate higher degree (M.D, PhD., Ed.D. or equivalent) evidence including teaching and administrative experience • Impeccable interpersonal and communication skills, across a broad range of stakeholder groups • Experience in medical school admissions and LCME accreditation standards Interested individuals should submit a letter of interest describing relevant experience and characteristics, and a current CV electronically addressed to Michelle Arandes, M.D., Chair of Associate Dean for Admissions Search Committee c/o Jennifer Hernandez, Assistant to the Vice Dean of UME, at bitoni@uthscsa.edu. All faculty appointments are designated as security sensitive positions.

40 | MAY 18, 2015

Size: 2.375” x 4.75”

Continuing in the tradition of The Hispanic IO#: 8181-8181

Outlook in Higher Education Magazine, Proofreader: OutlooK-12 focuses on news, innovations and the latest trends that are impacting students from kindergarten through high school while maintaining a unique Hispanic perspective. Contact Us at Phone: (201) 587-8800 E-mail: admin@k12hispanicoutlook.com WWW.K12HISPANICOUTLOOK.COM

Note


NEW YORK CITY COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY OF THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

TENURE TRACK FACULTY POSITIONS FALL 2015 New York City College of Technology is a comprehensive college with over 16,000 students offering both Associate and Baccalaureate Programs. City Tech seeks candidates for tenure track faculty positions beginning fall 2015. SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES ADMINISTRATION African American Studies Academic Advisor Anatomy and Physiology Academic Career Employment Specialist Anthropology/Geography Academic Internship Manager Arabic/French Academic Internship Coordinator Bioinformatics Academic SEEK Student Support Specialist Chemistry Academic Transfer Specialist Communications Benefits Manager Economics Communications & College Relations Specialist English Digital Recruiter Mathematics Finance Coordinator Medical Informatics Financial Aid Assistant Director Philosophy Major Gifts Development Manager Physics Professional & Technical Writing EXECUTIVE Psychology Dean - School of Arts & Sciences Spanish Associate Dean - Student Affairs SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES Executive Director - Human Resources Accounting SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY & DESIGN Culinary Arts/Pastry Arts Advertising Design Dental Hygiene Architectural Technology Health Service Administration Computer Engineering Technology Hospitality Management Computer Systems Technology Hotel Management Construction Management Human Services Digital Publishing Design Law & Paralegal Studies Electrical & Telecommunications Nursing Engineering Technology Radiologic Technology/Medical Imaging Foundation & Graphic Design Restorative Dentistry Game Design Vision Care Technology Illustration LIBRARY Mechanical Engineering Technology Systems & Information Technology Librarian Mechatronics Engineering Technology

56176 CUNY City Tech Hispanic Outlook 1/2 pg 4.8” x 7.25” color 5.8.15 p2

To Apply: www.cuny.edu Go to Employment. These positions are anticipated vacancies. The City University of New York is an Equal Opportunity Employer which complies with all applicable laws and regulations and encourages inclusive excellence in its employment practices.

MAY 18, 2015 | 41


Bunker Hill Community College 250 New Rutherford Avenue, Boston, MA 02129-2925

www.bhcc.mass.edu

ASSOCIATE PROVOST-CHELSEA CAMPUS Position Description: The Associate Provost, Chelsea Campus, is a mission-critical executive-level leadership position with academic portfolio to ensure vibrant core program and services development, responsive local decision-making, and sustained community engagement at a senior leadership level. Reporting to the Provost/Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs, the Associate Provost provides strategic leadership and direction for the College’s academic programs and student services.

SUBMIT COVER LETTER AND RESUME ADDRESSING THE REQUIRED QUALIFICATIONS TO: www.bhcc.mass.edu/employment. Fax transcript files to (617)-228-3328.

MAGAZINE Screen:

Effective Date: To ensure consideration, all application materials must be received by June 11, 2015

Notes: b/w

Salary Range: $130,000 – $140,000

Size: 4.875” x 9.75”

Required Qualifications: • Earned doctorate and five years of senior-level management experience at the level of Dean or higher in an institution of higher education or • Master’s degree with seven years of demonstrated leadership and accomplishments in the area of academic programs at the level of Dean or higher in an institution of higher education • College-level teaching experience • Excellent oral and written communication skills • Record of successful implementation of academic programs and/or student services • Proven ability to work effectively with a diverse faculty, staff and student population • Community College administrative experience preferred

UPDATED WITH US Proofreader:

• Initiates and maintains collaborative relationships with key leaders in the City of Chelsea to ensure that College programs and services are meeting the needs of the community. Represents the College at meeting with City officials and other stakeholders. • Supervises the Dean of Nurse Education and Medical Imaging, the Dean of Science, Engineering and Health Programs, the Dean of Professional Studies and Workforce Development and the Administrator of the Chelsea Campus. • Establishes collaborative strategies with the Associate Provost, Charlestown, to ensure the College achieves its stated mission, at multiple sites, with attention to the unique focus of each. • Assumes a leadership role and works with the Provost/Vice President in the ongoing development and enhancement of learning outcomes for the College. • Provides leadership in the assessment of academic programs. • Participates in the creation of new academic programs and student services in alignment with the College’s mission and goals. • Oversees the academic affairs budget; monitors expenditures in assigned divisions. • Promotes excellence in teaching and learning and fosters an environment of continuous improvement, innovation and positive and collegial relationships between faculty, staff and students. • Responsible for the selection of new faculty and staff in assigned divisions. • Responsible for the integration of enrollment services and academic programming to improve retention and graduation rates. • Provides leadership in the development of grant proposals.

G O

HISPANIC IO#: 8423-8440

Bunker Hill Community College established a satellite site in the City of Chelsea in 1988, and a decade later, in 1998, permanently relocated the Chelsea Campus in the historic, former Post Office facility in Bellingham Square. The Campus provides educational services to the residents of Chelsea, Revere, Everett, East Boston, and surrounding communities. Four essential areas of programming for the Campus are: 1) Adult Basic Education - ABE, 2) English for Speakers of Other Languages - ESOL, 3) College Readiness programs such as TRIO and Ramp Up, and 4) College academic programs in Allied Health and associated courses in lab sciences and General Education. The City of Chelsea was recently awarded a Working Cities grant from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston to further the effort of planning and renewal. The resulting project, Chelsea Works, is a broad initiative to revitalize the neighborhood of Bellingham/Sheffield, where the Chelsea Campus is located. The City was also chosen by the American Civic League as the recipient of the 2014 All-American City award. Chelsea’s population grew 6.7% from 2010 to 2013, with 62% of its 37,670 residents being Hispanic or Latino. 55% of the residents speak Spanish at home. Chelsea Campus enrollment (headcount) grew from 3,150 in 2009 to 3,821 in 2013, showing a 21% increase. There is a pressing need for college preparation programs and high quality career-technical education programs that will pave the way for high-wage, high-demand entry-level careers.

Publication: Hispanis Outlook Job# 8423 Mechanical: dg, dg

Bunker Hill Community College is a multi-campus institution with vibrant, urban campuses in Boston, Massachusetts, in nearby Chelsea, Massachusetts, and at three satellite locations in the Greater Boston area. Recently re-certified as a Leader College by Achieving the Dream, BHCC is part of the Massachusetts public higher education system, which includes 15 community colleges. Founded in 1973, BHCC is the largest community college in Massachusetts, serving more than 14,000 students each semester across all modes of instruction. The College offers more than 100 certificate and degree programs that prepare students to enter four-year institutions or to enter the workforce prepared for better and more highly skilled jobs. Sixty-seven percent of students are people of color and more than 50 percent are women.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT US AT

ADMIN@K12HISPANICOUTLOOK.COM

(201) 587 8800

Bunker Hill Community College is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

©All Rights Reserved to OutlooK-12 Magazine Inc.

42 | MAY 18, 2015


Hispanic Outlook 03_15_Layout 1 3/12/15 1:46 PM Page 1

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Outstanding faculty are mentors for undergraduate research. Students gain real-world knowledge through internships and global experiences.

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SU offers a small-town feel within an easy ride to cities like Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia.

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Join Us! Join Us! April 10,April 201510, 2015 - 7:00pm 2:00pm -2:00pm 7:00pm CNM - Central New Mexico Community College

Brasher Hall Main Campus CNM - Central New MexicoSmith Community College

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717Main University Blvd. SE • Albuquerque, NM Smith Brasher Hall Campus 717 University Blvd. SE • Albuquerque, NM National Distinction MAY 18, 2015 | 43


Priming the Pump... Why Helicopter Parents Should Be Grounded By Miquela Rivera, PhD

Do you hear the low, continuous sound over a child droning “swoosh-swoosh-swoosh”? That’s the child’s helicopter parent making sure that everything is just right. It is easy to focus on parents who don’t do enough for their children; time to focus on those who do too much. Concerned, overprotective, anxious and sometimes very competitive, these overinvolved parents lack personal limits in what they will do for their children. “We have to go do homework now,” said one father, leaving a party early. (He had an advanced college degree; his daughter needed to complete fifth grade). “We have to apply to our list of colleges this weekend,” said another helicopter mother. (Reminder: prospective students – NOT parents – apply to college). “Juanito wrecked his car last weekend. We need to get him another.” (We do? Mi’jito may need to earn it). Helicopter parents (including Latinos) – overinvolved in their children’s lives – sometimes think being a good parent means doing everything for their children. Other times they are overprotective, wanting the child to avoid failure, conflict or disappointment. And many try to live out their unfulfilled dreams through their children. Regardless of intent – conscious or not – parents who are overinvolved in their children’s lives often end up getting what they fear: helpless, unmotivated children who rely excessively on others to provide; entitled youngsters who are tough to coach or teach because they already know everything and are above the rules; children ill-prepared to solve their own problems; and those who are compliant when young and rebellious later. Where do overinvolved parents go wrong? Those who fear their children failing in school often judge too harshly the quality of their children’s work or do some of the child’s work, expecting performance beyond the child’s developmental capability. If a parent fears that her child may not be included in certain groups, she might launch a campaign to assure her child is chosen. The parents’ inappropriate meddling gives the child the message that nothing is good enough (including the child’s efforts), so many frustrated children quit trying. When assignments are done haphazardly, turned in late or not turned in at all and the helicopter parent inappropriately tries to “fix” the situation, he robs the child of chance to live with consequences.

Benevolent parents also worry about their children’s future. The economy, global warming, job prospects and the chaotic, violent state of the world are scary for helicopter parents to consider, so they shelter the child from conflict, challenges or the unknown outside world. What a shock when that child is forced to face reality. Some helicopter parents want to assure that their children never suffer neglect or discrimination as they may have experienced, so they overdo. They buy lots of toys or games, enroll their children in many sports and activities and indulge the whims of their children – all as compensation and protection. Pressure from other parents inflames the fears and anxiety of fellow helicopter parents. Competing to be a super-parent, to have a super-spouse or an exceptional child can push efforts and the need to hover over the top. Despite herculean efforts, helicopter parents often end up with children who have no confidence in their own abilities and low self-esteem because they really can’t do much without the parent. Such children are often devastated by criticism and have trouble dealing with disappointment, mainly because they haven’t faced it before. A child’s sense of entitlement will put off and alienate teachers and friends. And the child’s inability to do basic activities of daily living (like washing the dishes) will exclude them from social situations in which they have to function independently. The overinvolved parent hasn’t done the child any favors. What to do? Help parents learn what is developmentally appropriate for children. The best (and hardest) thing a helicopter parent can do is to let things evolve and allow children to develop naturally, with time and under their own efforts. Children need a parent’s support, but it should be based on the developmentally appropriate needs, skills and abilities of the child. And help parents learn that their child’s need for their help shifts with time. An independent, successful, happy child (regardless of age) is often a reflection of the best parenting. • Miquela Rivera, PhD, is a licensed psychologist with years of clinical, early childhood and consultative experience. She lives in Albuquerque, N.M.

MAY 18, 2015 |

HO 05 18 2015 Top 100 Issue  

Top 100 Issue 2015 Visit our webpage for daily updates on the Hispanic in Higher Education World and to find jobs in Higher Education. You c...

HO 05 18 2015 Top 100 Issue  

Top 100 Issue 2015 Visit our webpage for daily updates on the Hispanic in Higher Education World and to find jobs in Higher Education. You c...

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