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VOLUME 27 • NUMBER 7 APRIL 2017

Let’s Discuss: Immigration AN OPEN LETTER ON BEHALF OF UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS Spotlight On: Psychology COMBATTING STEREOTYPES: HOW TO TALK TO YOUR CHILDREN Honors and Ovations

Top 25 Graduate Schools for hispanics 2017

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Transformation in progress This is a time of tremendous change at the University of Kentucky. It’s not just our nearly $2 billion in construction of new research and teaching space, student housing and a student center. We’re also ensuring our vibrant campus is a safe and healthy place to work, learn and live. We strive every day toward an environment of openness and acceptance. Where people of all backgrounds, identities and perspectives feel secure and welcome.

Visit ukjobs.uky.edu to join us An Equal Opportunity University


THE HISPANIC OUTLOOK ON EDUCATION MAGAZINE VOLUME 27 • NUMBER 7

FEATUREDARTICLE Comprehensive immigration reform has social, cultural and economic implications for America’s future that most of us cannot foresee.

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PUBLISHER JOSÉ LÓPEZ-ISA EDITOR IN CHIEF MEREDITH COOPER WASHINGTON DC BUREAU CHIEF PEGGY SANDS ORCHOWSKI CONTRIBUTING EDITORS MICHELLE ADAM, CARLOS D. CONDE, GUSTAVO A. MELLANDER EDITORS EMERITUS MARY ANN COOPER, MARILYN GILROY CHIEF OF HUMAN RESOURCES & ADMINISTRATION TOMÁS CASTELLANOS NÚÑEZ RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR MARILYN ROCA ENRÍQUEZ ART & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR RICARDO CASTILLO DIRECTOR OF ACCOUNTING & FINANCE JAVIER SALAZAR CARRIÓN SALES ASSOCIATE SERGIO LUGO ARTICLE CONTRIBUTORS STEPHEN BALKARAN, SYLVIA MENDOZA, MARJORIE RHODES, GARY STERN

PUBLISHED BY “HISPANIC OUTLOOK PUBLISHING” Editorial Policy The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine® (ISSN 1054-2337) is a national magazine. Dedicated to exploring issues related to Hispanics on education, The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine®is published for the members of the education community. Editorial decisions are based on the editor’s judgment of the quality of the writing, the timeliness of the article and the potential interest to the readers of The Hispanic Outlook Magazine®. From time to time, The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine® will publish articles dealing with controversial issues. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and/or those interviewed and might not reflect the official policy of the magazine. The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine® neither agrees nor disagrees with those ideas expressed, and no endorsement of those views should be inferred unless specifically identified as officially endorsed by The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine®. Letters to the Editor The Hispanic Outlook on Education Magazine ® email: info@hispanicoutlook.com Editorial Office 299 Market St, Ste. 145, Saddle Brook, N.J. 07663 TEL (201) 587-8800 or (800) 549-8280 “‘The Hispanic Outlook on Education’ and ‘Hispanic Outlook’ are registered trademarks.”

4 • April 2017

on the cover PHOTO LICENSED BY INGRAM IMAGE


THE HISPANIC OUTLOOK ON EDUCATION MAGAZINE APRIL 2017

Table of

CONTENTS 6

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Innovations in Education How Freed-Hardeman Will Bring the Future to Today’s Grad Students by Sylvia Mendoza Career Counseling A University of Maryland Graduate School Program Prepares Doctoral Students for Life Outside of Academia by Gary Stern 100 Percent of Its New Ph.D.s in Business Disciplines Found Professor Jobs in 2016, The PhD Project Reports

Honors and Ovations Top 25 Grad Schools for 2017 Let’s Discuss: Immigration An Open Letter on Behalf of Undocumented Immigrants by Stephen Balkaran College Prep Kaplan and Boys & Girls Clubs of America Launch Campaign to Provide $125,000 in Test Prep Scholarships for Aspiring College and Graduate School Students Kaplan Test Prep Survey: College Admissions Officers Say Social Media Increasingly Affects Applicants’ Chances

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School Newspaper Graduate Schools Report Strong Growth in First-Time Enrollment of Underrepresented Minorities

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Students Get Education in Air Quality by Making Monitors

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WVU Tech Campus Could Become College for Former Foster Kids

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Spotlight On: Psychology Combatting Stereotypes: How to Talk to Your Children by Marjorie Rhodes, New York University

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School Library: Book Reviews This month, Hispanic Outlook is proud to feature the 31st annual Ezra Jack Keats Book Award winners

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Also this month, we take a look at titles exploring higher education and Hispanic culture www.HispanicOutlook.com • 5


INNOVATIONS IN EDUCATION

How Freed-Hardeman Will Bring the Future to

Today’s Grad Students Written by Sylvia Mendoza

6 • April 2017

Armed with a Ph.D. in educational administration from Auburn University, he worked in K-12 education for 26 years before moving to Freed-Hardeman University (FHU)

in Tennessee in 2006. As an associate professor of education in the college of education & behavioral sciences, he started dabbling in online classes, served as director of “iLearn: Inte-

Dr. Monte Tatom, associate professor of education at Freed-Hardeman University. Developed the Master of Education in Instructional Technology Program, set to launch in Summer 2017.

PHOTO COURT ES Y OF F REED-HA RDEMAN UNIVERSITY

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erhaps it was taking his first computer course at the University of South Alabama in 1983—Micro-computing Systems in Education—that made Dr. Monte Tatom see his future. Or maybe it was that time in 1999 when PDAs looked pretty futuristic to many, but Tatom, then a high school principal, saw at his fingertips all the possibilities technology could bring to educators. He stretched his teachers a little bit, he readily admits, but wanted to make sure they were ready for the 21st century. “If we don’t embrace technology, we’ll be left behind,” Tatom told them. Every class at their school had Ethernet connections and several computers, including one for each teacher. “I didn’t want pencil and paper communication with me,” he said. He wanted emails. It was a difficult transition and concept for many of his teachers back then. But Tatom jumped into the field of instructional technology and embraced it— learning it, teaching it, living with it—and has ever since.

~


PHOTO COURT ES Y OF L EAH KAY PHOTOGRA PH Y

grating Student Learning and Collaborative Technology” and became a member in the Tennessee Educational Technology Association. Once he started teaching advanced technology for administrators, more and more students, educators and administrators saw the ripple effect value of such classes. He was asked to make the class applicable for counselors and then for educators. He did. In 2014, he started developing the online Master of Education in Instructional Technology Program. Approved in 2016, he and his colleagues created the syllabus and Blackboard portion of the program. Set to launch this Summer—2017—

it seems he has brought the best of his expertise, experience and excitement in the field of instructional technology to the table. The program shows how technology is interwoven with our way of life and can enhance the way education is taught and students can learn. “It’s an important fact that for K-20, technology is not going to go away,” Tatom said. “It’s going to continue to have an impact. Take that new piece of technology to develop the learning in a preschool. How am I going to take that to help a young learner in fifth grade? It will keep evolving—but without textbooks because they go out of date six months after they’re published.”

The four-term master’s program is entirely online, cohort based and designed to provide students with the skills to effectively use instructional technology within teaching and learning for Pre-K through 20. It is also designed to provide the needed skills to develop up-to-date online system and professional training and continued learning for the 21st century employee. The 31-unit program, at $570 per unit, can be completed in 14 months. Once completed, educators can have an edge when applying for jobs. “This credential will help teachers distinguish themselves as leaders in their schools,” said Leah Shull, one of Tatom’s former students.

“As our world becomes more global, it’s more important than ever that all students are able to compete on a global stage. Technology, when deployed well, can help bridge some of the gaps that traditional instruction has left.” Ms. Leah Shull, doctoral student in educational technology leadership at New Jersey City University. She currently teaches sixth grade reading and language arts in Chester County, Tennessee. 

— Leah Shull, sixth grade language arts teacher

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 7


“Our online programs provide greater access to affordable advanced degrees for nontraditional and diverse populations that are well beyond the University’s traditional service area and service sectors.”

PHOTO COURT ES Y OF F REED-HA RDEMAN UNIVERSITY

—Dr. C. J. Vires, provost and vice president of academics

C.J. Vires, Ph.D., provost and vice president for academics

8 • April 2017

“Many teachers shy away from technology, but teachers who embrace it will find that it can infuse life and even joy into their classrooms.” A big plus of the program is that prior learning experience (PLE) can apply toward the degree and competency. The candidate may qualify to submit PLE by building and delivering a portfolio of evidence to prove s/he has the experience. Up to five courses of credit can be earned. “The M.Ed. in Instructional Technology program continues the University’s strategic efforts to provide increased access to quality online programs that meet workforce needs and demands,” said Dr. C. J. Vires, provost and vice president for academics. “Our online programs provide greater access to affordable advanced degrees for nontraditional and diverse populations that are well beyond the University’s traditional service area and service sectors.” For educators, the challenge is to guide them to the resources and have them teach students how to use technology—and integrate it in lessons, Tatom said. “Unfortunately, the importance of technology has widened the ‘digital divide,’ a term for the division between tech haves and have-nots,” said Shull who is currently a technology integration specialist, a doctoral student in educational technology leadership at New Jersey City University and a sixth grade language arts teacher in Chester County, Tennessee. “As our world becomes more global, it’s more important than ever that all students are able to compete on a global stage. Technology, when deployed well, can help bridge some

of the gaps that traditional instruction has left. By enabling teachers to target instruction to each individual child, technology offers real hope for overlooked minorities.” Tatom’s former students like Shull have firsthand knowledge in how instructional technology can impact their teaching and students’ learning for the better. “Gone are the days where a teacher can stand at the front of the room lecturing while students dutifully take notes,” Shull said. “Today’s well-prepared educator should be aware of the tools that are available to support student learning and should know how to integrate them into the classroom. As our society becomes increasingly reliant on technology, it is vital that educators prepare their students for their role in a technological world.” That world includes people from all walks of life, any age group, to fill in any industry, with current and future technology, Tatom explained. It will give many a voice and a platform and a way to improve the world as we know it. “You can teach junior high students, people in nursing homes and business outreach on how to put together programs,” Tatom said. “You’ll want to think outside the box—and sometimes even throw that box away.” For more info on the M.Ed. Instructional Technology at FHU, visit: https://www.fhu.edu/academics/graduate/education/ med-instructional-technology •


CAREER COUNSELING

A University of Maryland Graduate School Program Prepares Doctoral Students for

Life Outside of Academia Written by Gary Stern

10 • April 2017

Dr. Susan C. Martin

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ecognizing that 50 percent of Ph.D. graduates are finding work outside of academia, the University of Maryland Graduate School (UMD) is training its doctoral students to expand their job horizons. Launched in March 2016, the professional development program prepares students for careers outside of colleges via targeted workshops, career fairs, panels and online services. Professional development includes such activities as day long events with targeted workshops and mini-conferences that encourage career success. But many of these workshops revolve around how students can manage their career, navigate their online presence and tap networking tools such as LinkedIn. For example, career workshops included: “How to Manage Your Professional and Career Development,” “Job Search Techniques in Industry, Nonprofit and Government,” “Career Fair Preparation” and “Writing an Effective Resume.” The program trains students to be adaptive by using the skills learned in academia and transferring them into different industries or non-profit groups.


PHOTO CREDIT: MARY CARROLL-MASON

“This is a national issue. The University of Maryland is responding to that need. Many students want and are interested in careers outside of academia, and many of them are unsure of how to manage their own career.” — Dr. Susan C. Martin, program director for career and professional development at the University of Maryland Graduate School Dr. Susan C. Martin, the program director for career and professional development at the University of Maryland Graduate School, said, “This is a national issue. The University of Maryland is responding to that need. Many students want and are interested in careers outside of academia, and many of them are unsure of how to manage their own career.” In fact, Charles Caramello, dean of the University of Maryland Graduate School, has stated that “Graduates from a variety of fields are going into professions other than the academy as their first choice.” Job opportunities are increasingly limited in academia as budgets are cut. But Martin pointed out these graduate students often go through a career transition during their advanced studies. “As they progress in their studies, they may be exposed

to other opportunities that attract them,” she said. Furthermore, the job market is in constant flux. But many of the skills that post-graduate students master in research, analytical thinking and data skills are “transferrable,” she noted. These transferrable skills cover an ability to conduct extensive research, synthesize a large amount of information and demonstrate teamwork skills that easily blend into project management at a variety of businesses. Most graduate students often overlook that the skills they’re mastering—writing dissertations, thinking critically, educating others as teaching assistants— resonate in the business world. “They don’t realize the depth and experience they have,” Martin observed. Making the adjustments into business and non-profit careers happens naturally for many doctoral stu-

dents. Ph.D. students, Martin said, “are able to understand and apply new information quickly.” Much of what Martin does is provide a roadmap for managing their careers. She also encourages “informational interviewing,” and tapping their network of alumni, acquaintances and LinkedIn colleagues, to elicit information about how industries work, what jobs they’re looking to fill, how their skills apply and what gaps exist. Martin compiled a list of competencies regarding informational interviewing that includes: 1) Know yourself, 2) Identify the specific job you’re pursuing, 3) Keep up with industry trends, 4) Tap your professional network, 5) Manage an online presence. For example, she cites a history major that landed a communications job with a defense contractor. www.HispanicOutlook.com • 11


Most graduate students often overlook that the skills they’re mastering— writing dissertations, thinking critically, educating others as teaching assistants— resonate in the business world. 12 • April 2017

Dr. Susan C. Martin

PHOTO COURT ES Y OF T HE UNIVERSITY OF MARYL A ND’S WEBS IT E

Moreover, the UMD program uses online tools such as Versatile Ph.D., which all UMD graduate students can tap. It offers online seminars, resources and networking capabilities, so they can explore and dig deeper into other professions to see where they fit on. Graduate students respond strongly to the section on Versatile Ph.D. where doctoral students describe their successful job searches and what enabled them to nab a job. Martin works in concert with 84 doctoral programs. In fact, the doctoral programs at the University of Maryland enrolled 4,118 students in fall 2016 and that included 1,548 foreign students. Excluding the foreign students and about 300 unclassified students, the remaining doctoral candidates were 1,704 white, 133 Latino, 268 African American and 225 Asian. Issues faced by Latino and minority graduate students overlap with that of majority students, except minorities, likely place more emphasis on identifying the corporate and organi-


PHOTO CREDIT: MARY CARROLL-M ASO N

zational culture to determine whether or not they fit in, Martin said. Minority students grapple with a variety of questions including: How will the culture fit my values? What will my day-to-day life at the company be like? What kind of mentoring is available to navigate the corporate culture and advance? Is the culture open to diverse and divergent viewpoints? Many Latino and minority students may have an edge in getting hired by businesses. “Some organizations have a strong commitment to diversity in hiring and recruitment,” Martin asserted. Many companies depend on global sales, and bringing in Latino and other minority viewpoints enable firms to better attract a multi-cultural clientele. One University of Maryland Ph.D. student, Alex Quinones, a 36-year-old Miami native, spent 10 years as a reporter at Gannett and as a digital news producer at Fox and

CBS affiliates. He returned to UMD to pursue his doctorate to become a professor “to offer the greatest amount of knowledge possible to future students of journalism.” Despite hearing that half of all doctoral students don’t end up in academia, he is undeterred. “I’ve never made a career decision based on availability of jobs. I became a newspaper reporter when newspapers were on the decline,” he said. Quinones who is co-president of the Latino Graduate School Association participated in several professional development workshops on giving better presentations, managing time better and managing stress. He found them useful and concentrated on offering specific tips. The college of journalism has only four students in their doctoral program and in the past few years has been very successful at placing all of them, Quinones suggested. As

a Latino, he thinks that he’ll find a university journalism program interested in recruiting a minority doctoral graduate. A positive thinker, he’s dedicated to becoming one of the 50 percent of doctoral students who gets hired, rather than moves on to other fields. The professional development program is just starting and is evolving, Martin suggested. She’s aiming to “strengthen collaboration and partnerships with the other departments, leveraging the work happening with many departments and create a network of professors and career development across campus.” Underlying this complex process, Martin concludes, “The most important thing a Ph.D. student really needs to learn is accepting responsibility for their own career development and maintaining a positive mindset as they move through their own career.” • www.HispanicOutlook.com • 13


CAREER COUNSELING

100 Percent of Its New Ph.D.s in Business Disciplines Found Professor Jobs in 2016

The PhD Project Reports PHOTO COURTESY OF VIDEO FROM THE PHD PROJECT’S YOUTUBE CHANNEL

RESULTS EXPLODE THE MYTH THAT “THERE ARE NO JOBS FOR NEW PROFESSORS”

New PhD Project professors from the class of 2016

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ONTVALE, N.J. – A full 100 percent of the minorities who completed Ph.D. degrees in business in 2016 as participants of The PhD Project found faculty employment by year’s end – countering the mistaken popular belief that job opportunities for new professors are hard to find. “Employment prospects are extremely bright for new professors coming out of doctoral studies in business,” said Bernard J. Milano, president of The PhD Project. “That 14 • April 2017

is certainly so for the African-Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in The PhD Project.” The PhD Project reported that all 46 of its doctoral graduates seeking full-time tenure track business faculty positions had obtained them by the close of 2016.1 “The job market for business professors is vibrant,” Milano said. “People who are contemplating a career switch to become a professor but who have heard somewhere that jobs are scarce in academia, should know

that opportunities abound for new professors of business.” In addition, business professor jobs pay well: “It is common for business professors to earn six-figure salaries,” Milano said who is also president of the KPMG Foundation, as well as founder and lead sponsor of The PhD Project. Milano noted that many factors, including a faculty shortage in some business disciplines like accounting caused by wide-scale retirement of boomer-generation professors, have


PHOTO COURTESY OF VIDEO FRO M THE P HD P R OJECT’S YO UTUB E CHANNEL

“Employment prospects are extremely bright for new professors coming out of doctoral studies in business. That is certainly so for the African-Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans in The PhD Project.” Dr. Nicole Jones Young, one of the new PhD Project professors from the class of 2016

resulted in demand outweighing supply in business academia. Further, with many colleges and universities actively seeking to increase faculty diversity, this presents additional opportunities for doctorally-qualified minorities in all disciplines. The PhD Project is an award-winning program whose ultimate goal is to create a more diverse corporate America. It works to do this by increasing faculty diversity at hundreds of colleges and universities, creating role models and mentors who can attract more minority undergraduates to study business. It is the only nationwide program aimed at diversifying university faculty. It attracts and enables African-, Hispanic and Native Americans to choose college teaching as a career and succeed in the rigorous process of obtaining a Ph.D., which qualifies them to be professors. The PhD Project prepares its participants to succeed first in their doctoral studies and then on the job

market through extensive enrichment, mentoring, networking and development. Senior doctoral students are coached and mentored by veteran faculty members before they begin interviewing for professor positions. Since its inception in 1994, The PhD Project has been responsible for the increase in the number of minority business professors from 294 to 1,358. An additional 270 minorities are currently enrolled in doctoral programs and will take a place at the front of the classroom over the next few years. “Although the increase has been significant, minorities are still seriously underrepresented on business school faculties,” Milano noted. “There is still a long way to go.” The PhD Project receives ongoing support from its sponsoring companies, participating universities and organizations and supply alliance members. Its founding organizations in addition to KPMG Foundation are the Graduate Management Admission

— Bernard J. Milano, president of The PhD Project Council, Citi Foundation, AACSB International. Leading corporations, foundations and associations funding it include: more than 300 participating universities; AICPA Foundation; DiversityInc; Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP; Rockwell Collins; Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.; American Marketing Association; John Deere Foundation; CIGNA; Edison International (on behalf of the California State University System); Lincoln Financial Group; Aerotek/ TEKsystems (operating companies of Allegis Group); American Accounting Association; The Hershey Company; Academy of Management; NASBA; OCWEN and Thrivent Financial. • 1

A 47th doctoral graduate chose to take a position as CEO of a business rather than an academic appointment at this time. Video: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=KN_rVl5sKA4 Source: The PhD Project

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 15


HONORS AND OVATIONS

2015 TOTAL MASTER’S DEGREE FIRST MAJOR 2015 GRAND TOTAL MASTER’S DEGREE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Florida International University University of Southern California Nova Southeastern University Grand Canyon University The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley National University The University of Texas at El Paso Walden University The University of Texas at San Antonio Webster University New York University Columbia University in City of New York California State University-Long Beach University of New Mexico-Main Campus University of California-Los Angeles Azusa Pacific University California State University-Fullerton University of Florida Liberty University The University of Texas at Austin California State University-Northridge University of South Florida-Main Campus San Jose State University The University of Texas at Arlington California State University-Los Angeles University of La Verne CUNY Hunter College Ashford University

State

Total

Hispanics

Latino

Latinas

% Hispanics

FL CA FL AZ TX CA TX MN TX MO NY NY CA NM CA CA CA FL VA TX CA FL CA TX CA CA NY CA

3,187 7,710 3,519 6,588 899 3,081 1,024 8,237 1,174 5,027 8,489 7,522 1,627 1,258 2,992 1,423 1,667 3,630 7,935 3,188 1,868 2,893 2,631 2,986 906 1,146 1,916 3,548

1,456 960 827 695 674 634 569 483 432 428 420 398 393 365 332 328 326 326 325 319 315 315 311 309 308 298 298 290

581 322 235 161 225 222 222 109 162 203 120 148 125 138 133 77 107 171 151 152 90 107 88 98 83 96 70 97

875 638 592 534 449 412 347 374 270 225 300 250 268 227 199 251 219 155 174 167 225 208 223 211 225 202 228 193

46% 12% 24% 11% 75% 21% 56% 6% 37% 9% 5% 5% 24% 29% 11% 23% 20% 9% 4% 10% 17% 11% 12% 10% 34% 26% 16% 8%

For the first time, Hispanic Outlook readers can purchase the extended version of the list featured in this article. We are also taking special purchase requests for the 5- to 10-year archived version of this list. For more information, call (201) 587-8800 or email meredith.cooper@hispanicoutlook.com The above list is from the Department of Education’s IPEDS database that base their data on information provided directly by schools across the country.

16 • April 2017


LET’S DISCUSS: IMMIGRATION

An Open Letter on Behalf of Undocumented Immigrants Why Comprehensive Immigration Reform Matters to All of Us

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hile returning from a recent trip to Ellis Island, I had an opportunity to reflect on the 12 million immigrants that shaped and continue to define this great nation we call America. Yet, despite the notion of being a nation built by immigrants, America has always had a love-hate relationship with a nation that was built by immigrants. The 21st century love-hate version of this relationship is no different and has become a divisive political issue. I am always disappointed when critics question why comprehensive immigration reform matters. Seldom, do I argue with such critics, but given the interrelatedness of immigration and our nation, I do feel compelled to discuss the sad history of the treatment of immigrants. The national dilemma of how to secure our borders has been one of our fundamental policy challenges for the last 20 years, not only for our national security interest and the war on terror but to also reduce the inflow of immigrants whom we often deem “illegals” or “undocumented.” The conclusion of the 44th and the 18 • April 2017

Written by Stephen Balkaran commencement of the 45th presidency have again left a nation of immigrants scrambling to come to terms with comprehensive immigration reform and its ramifications. The American values and rich tradition in welcoming immigrants has been tested as our democracy now seeks to come to common ground on this ever important but controversial public policy. Yet this debate threatens to take away the best of who we are and fuel the ambivalence of what we can become as a society. Comprehensive immigration reform has social, cultural and economic implications for America’s future that most of us cannot foresee. The status of some 12 million undocumented immigrants who have already shaped and defined a new American landscape remains in limbo as our politicians try to reach a compromise on how we address immigration reform. The question remains: how do we address this issue without incurring the backlash from human rights activists, American citizens and politicians. Also, can Congress pass legislation that is both constitution-

al and humane? There hasn’t been a time our country’s great history that a debate on immigration divided the nation as it has recently, leaving us searching for an American identity as to who we are and what we stand for as a nation of immigrants. This debate has left the United States of America divided along racial, ethnic, political lines never seen before and has touched the conscience of the nation. The debate has become such a divisive issue that policy-making has been defined by politics in the 2008, 2012 and 2016 presidential elections. As history reminds us, undocumented immigrants have become the most convenient scapegoat for America’s social problems, thus anti-immigrant rhetoric has become prevalent and the norm throughout our political spectrum. Center to the immigration debate is amnesty as a pathway to citizenship for the 12 million human beings who are often referred to as “illegals” or “undocumented immigrants.” Yet despite this abrasive terminology, no human being is illegal. The issue of comprehensive immigration reform is aimed at


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all immigrants and Americans alike but focuses specifically on America’s flourishing Hispanic population and their socio-economic-political importance. The “Browning of America” and the continuing reshaping of America by Hispanics continue to define who we are and illustrate the best of what we can become as a nation of immigrants. The comprehensive immigration reform debate goes far beyond the typical immigration debates on the loss of jobs, drain on our social system, criminality etc.; it now includes the debate “Building a Wall.” The economic, political and social clout of current immigrants is far more beneficial to the nation than our media, immigration critics and poli-

ticians point them out to be. Whatever the debates are, our American values, tradition of welcoming immigrants and our Americanism will be tested on how we approach and legislate new comprehensive immigration reform laws. This complicated but imperative public policy must be achieved by the new presidential administration for a number of reasons. It is imperative that this legislation be done in a humane, sensitive and compelling way that reflect the American values of embracing diversity and inclusion of all. Embodied in this reform legislation, one must be cautious, compassionate and not forget the watchwords of our immigrant history and our nation: “Give me your tired, your poor, your hud-

dled masses yearning to breathe free.” First and foremost, comprehensive immigration reform must be done in a way that defines us as a nation that still champions human rights and diversity. As the leader of the democratic free world, history reminds us of our human rights violations: slavery, the Trail of Tears, the Mexican Repatriation Act and last but definitely not least, Japanese Internment. Hence, can we conclude that American history is doomed to repeat itself? Human rights become the center of the debates. How do we address families who have lived here undocumented for decades, their children who grew up in American communities who have established friends, loyalty and community relawww.HispanicOutlook.com • 19


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tionships? We must be cautious and vigilant on how we plan to address America’s greatest resource—immigrants; it must be done with an approach filled with love and compassion. The breaking up and removal of families who have solidified their roots here is un-American, unconstitutional and it is not what we stand for as a country that professes tolerance, diversity and acceptance. As we delve into the deep waters of American patriotism, the cultural backlash is based on the philosophy that many of the undocumented immigrants are unpatriotic towards America’s culture and refuse to be American. Hence, one would question what it is to be an Amer20 • April 2017

ican; is there a threshold to gauge our Americanism? This debate has not only generated dialogue about the continued role that Americanism plays in our society but has also posed the question of whether undocumented immigrants are truly committed to the “Land of the free and the home of the brave.” The issue should NOT be whether undocumented immigrants are loyal to America. That question was answered when undocumented men and women signed up and served in America’s military, fighting to protect and promote democracy throughout the world for a country that has remained uncommitted to them. It must be noted that some

38,000 military officials serving in both Iraq and Afghanistan wars were not American citizens. In fact, history has forgotten that Lance Cpl. Jose Gutierrez became one of the first casualties in Iraq; even though he did come to America illegally and died serving America’s cause. Hence, the question is not whether undocumented immigrants are loyal to America but whether America has lived up to its rich tradition of welcoming immigrants in a fair and impartial way. Secondly, the debate has turned to the economic impact of these undocumented immigrants on American society. These economic arguments have been debunked by many


economic pundits on the grounds that undocumented immigrants do not undercut wages nor are they a drain on social services. They, in fact, don’t take jobs that would otherwise go to Americans. The majority of undocumented immigrants are unskilled and thus never pose any economic threat for skilled jobs that are secured by legal residents or American citizens. In fact, economists have stated that undocumented workers actually compliment the economy and are the driving force behind our nation’s economic growth and prosperity. In an interesting report released by the Social Security Administration in 2013, Stephen Goss, Chief Actuary for the Office, claimed that undocumented workers contribute about $15 billion a year to Social Security through payroll taxes. On the flip side, Goss also commented that these undocumented immigrants only receive about $1 billion in benefits since many of them are not eligible to receive these benefits that they paid into through payroll taxes. What is more astonishing, Goss noted in an interview for the New York Times that undocumented immigrants have contributed up to $300 billion, or nearly 10 percent, of the $2.7 trillion of the nation’s Social Security Trust Fund. In other words, their economic contribution and benefits to society far outreach many of the criticism undocumented immigrants face. The need to reach a humane solution on this immigration nightmare will ultimately benefit all Americans. Hence, there is a need to create a legal path to 12 million residents enabling them to come out of the shadows of despair and

allow them to continue contributing to the American economic pie in a fair and just way that’s benefits all. Thirdly, the immigration debate has now generated so much division in our society that it has become the “civil rights debate of 21st century.” Whatever the arguments are, many Americans have forgotten their commitment to the watch words of this great nation “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Immigrants who graced our country have played and will continue to play an important role in our country’s rich diverse culture. Yet we still forget about this contribution many immigrant groups make to this great country. Despite this success, many other immigrant groups have failed to step up to support our Hispanic brothers and sisters with the recent immigration debate. What differentiates Hispanics from other previous immigrant groups is their economic, social, political power to change and define a new America. Last and by no means least is the argument that illegal immigration represents the breaking and outright disregard of American laws. We are a nation of laws. I do agree that our laws are to be respected, acknowledged and obeyed by all. As American patriot, reverend and civil rights activist Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. noted, there are two types of laws: just laws and unjust laws. King further elaborated one has not only a legal but a moral responsibility to obey just laws, “but conversely, one has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws.” Remember, that slavery, racism, removal of Native Americans from their land and Jim Crow

segregation in American society was LEGAL, and King’s non-violence movement for civil rights and the Abolitionist movement in southern states were considered ILLEGAL in the eyes of the law. Seldom do I ever pause and critique our legal process, but Americans openly voiced their disgust on undocumented immigrants’ willingness to break our laws. Yet we refused to critique unjust laws and customs that haunt our national history. It becomes paradoxical in our society when many of our laws that have perpetuated many of our ignorant views and hatred towards others are obeyed and respected throughout our history. When we openly advocate obeying and disobeying laws that are there to maintain law, order and stability but at the same time fail to question the validity of those laws, we ultimately become immune to the hatred we create. As an example, as long as there is criticism on undocumented immigrants for not paying their fair share of taxes, but at the same time Americans remain silent as the rich exploit “legal” loopholes to avoid paying federal taxes, we have the right to question the integrity of our laws. America is only as great as the doors and opportunities we open to others. Success in America is not determined by our ethnic background or our native language but our commitment and dedication that are so much part of our past and present immigrants. • Stephen Balkaran is an Instructor in the Department of Philosophy at Central CT State University.

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 21


COLLEGE PREP

KAPLAN AND BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF AMERICA LAUNCH CAMPAIGN TO PROVIDE $125,000 IN TEST PREP SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ASPIRING COLLEGE AND GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENTS

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ew York—Kaplan Test Prep, a subsidiary of Graham Holdings Company (NYSE: GHC), has partnered with Boys & Girls Clubs of America to provide up to $125,000 in test prep scholarships. The scholarships will help students get ready for the SAT® and ACT® for college admissions, as well as exams like the GRE®, GMAT®, LSAT® and MCAT® for graduate school-level admissions. The “Practice with a Purpose” campaign will award Boys & Girls Clubs of America with a Kaplan test prep course for every 1,000 free test prep tools—including pop quizzes, 20-minute workouts or practice tests—used at www.kaptest.com/ purpose (for college admissions exams) and www.kaptest.com/practice (for graduate admissions exams). Recipients selected by Boys & Girls Clubs of America can choose from one of Kaplan’s live, on site classes or live, online classes to help them advance their educational goals. “Kaplan and Boys & Girls Clubs of America share a common mission of improving the lives of underserved students, which is fundamental to our nation’s economic and social success. We are excited to provide so many students with live instruction from Kaplan experts who are caring, 22 • April 2017

motivating and dynamic,” said Lee Weiss, vice president of college admissions programs, Kaplan Test Prep. “We need everyone’s help to do this right. By simply going to the campaign’s landing page and signing up for one of our free practice exercises, you can boost someone’s confidence, aid them in achieving their goals and help them seize the moment. It’s a free and easy way to give back and help yourself too.” “Boys & Girls Clubs play an important part in helping millions of kids and teens succeed academically with year-round programming designed to help them graduate high school, college or career ready,” said Dr. Damon A. Williams, chief educational and youth development officer at Boys & Girls Clubs of America. “Thanks to support from Kaplan and other teens who utilize resources on Kaplan’s website, more Boys & Girls Club teens will have access to test prep courses to help them pursue their dreams after graduation.” Test names and other trademarks are the property of the respective trademark holders. None of the trademark holders are endorsed by nor affiliated with Kaplan or this partnership. • Source: Kaplan Test Prep

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COLLEGE PREP

KAPLAN TEST PREP SURVEY: COLLEGE ADMISSIONS OFFICERS SAY SOCIAL MEDIA INCREASINGLY AFFECTS APPLICANTS’ CHANCES

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EW YORK—Kaplan Test Prep’s latest survey of more than 350 college admissions officers from across the United States finds that while the percentage of admissions officers who check applicants’ social media profiles has dipped (35 percent versus 40 percent last year), a greater percentage of those who do check say social media has influenced their views on applicants. Of the 35 percent of admissions officers who say they check social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to learn more about applicants, 47 percent say that what they found has had a positive impact on prospective students – up from 37 percent last year. On the flip side, 42 percent say that what they found had a negative impact, up from 37 percent last year. Kaplan’s survey also found that of the admissions officers who use social media to help them make decisions, 25 percent do so “often” – more than double the 11 percent who said they did it “often” in last year’s survey. What exactly are the kinds of things admissions officers say they have found that positively impacted applicants’ admissions chances? It ranged from community building to winning awards: One admissions officer said, “One student described on Twitter that she facilitated an LGBTQ panel for her

school, which wasn’t in her application. This made us more interested in her overall and encouraged us to imagine how she would help out the community.” Another admissions officer shared, “There’s such a negative stereotype of social media that people often forget about the positive effects of it. One student had won an award and had a picture with their principal on their personal page, and it was nice to see.” “One young lady started a company with her mom, so it was cool to visit their website,” another admissions officer added. Some of the things college admissions officers found that negatively impacted applicants’ admissions chances ranged from bigotry to illegal activity. “We found a student’s Twitter account with some really questionable language. It wasn’t quite racist, but it showed a cluelessness that you’d expect of a privileged student who hadn’t seen much of the world. It really ran counter to the rest of her application,” one admissions officer said. “A young man who had been involved in a felony did not disclose his past, which is part of our admissions process. His social media page shared his whole story. If he had been forthcoming, we would not have rescinded his acceptance offer, but we had to.”

One admissions officer said that pictures of a student “brandishing weapons” gave him pause when deciding whether to admit the applicant. “To be clear, the large majority of admissions officers do not visit applicants’ social media sites. However, a meaningful number do, as many note that social media can provide a more authentic and holistic view of applicants beyond the polished applications. And in fact, past Kaplan surveys have shown that a majority of students themselves consider their social networking sites to be ‘fair game’ for admissions officers,” said Yariv Alpher, executive director of research, Kaplan Test Prep. “That said, college applicants need to be aware of what others can find about them on social networks and make sure it reflects well on them. For better or worse, social media has become an established factor in college admissions, and it’s more important than ever for applicants to make wise decisions. If you’re not sure what to post, ask a parent or high school counselor. If you’re still not sure, then the best course of action might be to not post it at all.” For the survey, 365 admissions officers from the nation’s top national, regional and liberal arts colleges and universities – as compiled from U.S. News & World Report – were polled by telephone between July and August 2016. Kaplan is a subsidiary of Graham Holdings Company (NYSE:GHC) • Video: http://www.businesswire.com/news/ home/20170210005348/en/ Source: Kaplan Test Prep Copyright Business Wire 2017

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 23


SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

GRADUATE SCHOOLS REPORT Strong Growth in First-Time Enrollment of Underrepresented Minorities OVERALL FIRST-TIME GRADUATE ENROLLMENT INCREASES BY 3.9 PERCENT

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IMAGE COURTESY OF OKLAHANA, H., FEASTER, K., 7 ALLUM, J. (2016)

ashington, DC — The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) reported modest growth in first-time enrollments for a number of key demographic groups enrolling in graduate school. Notably, all underrepresented minority (URM) groups monitored by the survey saw greater increases in first-time graduate enrollment than their white, non-Hispanic counterparts, although their overall representation in the graduate student body still remains relatively low. Among first-time U.S. citizens and permanent resident graduate students in fall 2015, at least 22.5 percent were underrepresented minorities, including American Indian/Alaska Native (0.5 percent), Black/African-American (11.8 percent), Native Hawaiian/Other Pacif-

24 • April 2017

ic Islander (0.2 percent) and Hispanic/ Latino (10 percent). CGS president Suzanne T. Ortega responded to the growth in URM graduate enrollment with cautious optimism. “The sizeable increase in overall first-time enrollments for underrepresented minorities, particularly seen among URM women, is great news, but the share of underrepresented minorities among U.S. citizens and permanent residents is similar to previous years. URMs remain proportionally underrepresented, and we must sustain this trend for several years to ensure a larger impact across graduate programs and a more diverse workforce.” Survey results also showed increases in domestic and international enrollments. Between fall 2014 and fall 2015,

First-time graduate enrollment of international students rose by 5.7 percent, a rate considerably lower than in recent years, though international students still constitute a robust share (22 percent) of first-time graduate students. there was an increase (3.8 percent) in first-time enrollments for U.S. citizens and permanent residents, the largest one-year increase since 2010. These gains contributed to a 3.9 percent oneyear increase in all first-time graduate enrollment between fall 2014 and fall 2015—the largest since 2009. First-time graduate enrollment of international students rose by 5.7 percent, a rate considerably lower than in recent years, though international students still constitute a robust share (22 percent) of first-time graduate students. At research universities with very high research activity (RU/VH), three out of 10 first-time enrollees (30.4 percent) were temporary residents. Shares of international students among first-time enrollees were particularly high for fields of mathematics and computer sciences (63.2 percent) followed closely by engineering (58.5 percent). Institutions responding to the CGS/ GRE Survey of Graduate Enrollment & Degrees for fall 2015 again set new highs for the admissions cycle, receiving more than 2.18 million applications, extending over 877,000 offers of admission in fall 2015 and enrolling nearly 507,000 incoming, first-time graduate students in graduate certificate, education specialist, master’s or doctoral programs. Other report findings are summarized as follows:


IMAGE COURTESY OF OKLAHANA, H., FEASTER, K., 7 ALLUM, J. (2016)

Among first-time U.S. citizens and permanent resident graduate students in fall 2015, at least 22.5 percent were underrepresented minorities, including American Indian/Alaska Native (0.5 percent), Black/African-American (11.8 percent), Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (0.2 percent) and Hispanic/Latino (10 percent). Findings by field • Engineering, business and health sciences saw the largest number of total applications for fall 2015. Together these broad fields of study accounted for 39.3 percent of total applications. • The largest share of doctoral-level applications was seen in the social and behavioral sciences, which saw 18.7 percent of all doctoral applications reported. Social and behavioral sciences was also the second most competitive in terms of acceptance rates (14.7 percent), trailing only business (13.4 percent). • Consistent with previous surveys, business, education and health sciences were the three largest broad fields of study in fall 2015 for first-time graduate enrollments. • Roughly one-third (33.4 percent) of all first-time graduate students were enrolled in master’s degree or graduate certificate programs in business and education. Findings by degree level • The large majority of first-time graduate enrollment in fall 2015 was in programs leading to a master’s degree or a graduate certificate (83.6 percent).

• Applications for admission decreased for doctoral programs (-4.3 percent) and increased for master’s/other programs (3.8 percent) between fall 2014 and fall 2015. • At the doctoral level, education (4.0 percent) had the largest one-year increase in the number of applications of all broad fields of study. At the master’s/other level, mathematics and computer sciences (11.2 percent) reported the highest one-year percentage increase. Student demographics • The majority of first-time graduate students both at master’s degree and certificate level (58.2 percent) and at the doctoral level (51.3 percent) were women. • According to survey respondents, women earned nearly two-thirds (66.4 percent) of the graduate certificates, 58.4 percent of the master’s degrees and 51.8 percent of the doctorates. Academic year 2014-15 marked the seventh straight year women earned a majority of doctoral degrees. • Overall among first-time enrollees in fall 2015, men were more

likely to be enrolled full-time than women (72.8 percent and 66 percent). • All underrepresented minority groups experienced larger increases in first-time graduate enrollment than in the prior year. About the report Graduate Enrollment and Degrees: 2005 to 2015 presents the findings of an annual survey of U.S. graduate schools, co-sponsored by CGS and the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) Board. It is the only annual national survey that collects data on graduate enrollment by all fields of study and is the only source of national data on graduate applications by broad field of study. The report, which includes responses from 617 institutions, presents statistics on graduate applications and enrollment for fall 2015, degrees conferred in 2014-15 and trend data for one-, five- and 10-year periods. • Image in Table of Contents Courtesy of Oklahana, H., Feaster, K., T Allum, J. (2016) Source: the Council of Graduate Schools

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 25


SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

STUDENTS GET EDUCATION in Air Quality by Making Monitors

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LT LAKE CITY (AP) — Students in northern Utah are getting a chance to build air quality monitors out of toy building blocks to help the University of Utah get readings from the schools. These students are sometimes kept indoors for recess because of poor air quality, and this program allows them to learn more about the issue, KSL-TV reported (http://bit. ly/2kh86HG). “(It furthers) our knowledge of what can be done about air pollution, especially because ours is so bad,” said Alexandra Feliz, a junior at the school.

“The pollution downtown is very, very bad,” said Mason Henrie, a senior at East High School. “You can just feel it with heavy breathing.” University of Utah chemical engineering professors Kerry Kelly and Tony Butterfield intend to bring the lesson to 50 Salt Lake Valley schools. “I think it can help you take a little bit more ownership of what’s going on in your school, what’s going on around your school,” Kelly said. Devices are made of blocks, a computer board and other elements. “They basically have a light source,” Butterfield said. “We give them polluted air basically with mist,

IN DIGITAL AND PRINT EDITION

FOR LESS THAN A PENNY

26 • April 2017

and they detect how much particulate matter is in the air.” Research-grade monitors with more accuracy will also be left at the schools. “If we have sensors in multiple schools throughout the valley, we can know if it’s a red burn day in Salt Lake, what does that mean for the people in Sandy? We can also get a better idea of where our poor quality is coming from,” Butterfield said. Data will eventually go onto a website. “We end up with a real-time air-quality map of the valley,” Butterfield said. Junior Anna Smart said sensors can help “make sure that you stay safe when you’re going outside, to make sure that the air is good for whatever activity you are doing.” Information from: KSL-TV, http://www.ksl.com •

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SCHOOL NEWSPAPER

WVU TECH CAMPUS COULD BECOME College for Former Foster Kids

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ONTGOMERY, W.Va. (AP) — The West Virginia University Institute of Technology campus could become a college for former foster care children. KVC Health Systems is hoping to turn the Montgomery campus into a college for children who have aged out of the foster care system, the Charleston Gazette-Mail reported (http://bit. ly/2lH7K9s). Tommy Bailey, a lobbyist at Spilman, Thomas & Battle, has helped the Kansas-based nonprofit with negotiations to lease the campus then purchase it. “KVC has been working on a concept where we see a gap in child welfare, and that is to support foster youth as they grow up,” Bailey said.

“Since most of them don’t have a support structure like a family, they usually don’t use all those benefits that they can receive through the state when they go to college.” According to Bailey, WVU and KVC Health Systems have reached a general agreement, but no lease-purchase agreement has been signed yet. “It really makes sense to us from our experience working with this population, to have something separate and something specifically designed for their needs,” Bailey said. “There have been multiple entities interested in the campus facilities in Montgomery,” WVU said in a statement. “Of these groups, one — KVC Health Systems — has been engaged in discussions with the local commu-

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nity about their interest in the property. We hope to share more details soon, after a final contract is signed. We believe that this agreement will be a positive opportunity for the area, for this organization and for the West Virginia University system.” If an agreement is reached soon, Bailey said KVC would hope to attract a group of about 50 students to the college within a year. Once the college is totally operational, KVC hopes about 500 students will attend school there. Information from: The Charleston Gazette-Mail, http://wvgazettemail.com • Editor’s Note: According to WVU’s website, WVU and KVC have reached an agreement in principal regarding a lease-purchase of the Montgomery campus during a public meeting held in the WVU Tech Engineering Auditorium.

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SPOTLIGHT ON: PSYCHOLOGY

COMBATTING STEREOTYPES

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR CHILDREN Story courtesy of Marjorie Rhodes, Associate Professor of Psychology at New York University “These findings show that hearing generalizations, even positive or neutral ones, contributes to the tendency to view the world through the lens of social stereotypes. It is the form of the sentence, not exactly what it says, that matters to young children.”

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P as seen in “The Conversation”— How can modern parents raise the next generation to be free from corrosive gender and racial stereotypes? By the time children start elementary school, gender and race shape their lives in many ways that parents might want to prevent. As early as first grade, girls are less likely than boys1 to think members of their own gender are “really, really smart.” And by just age three, white children in the United States implicitly endorse stereotypes that African-American faces are angrier than white faces.2 These stereotypes go deeper than children’s beliefs – they can also shape a child’s behavior. By age six, girls are less likely than boys to choose activities that seem to require them to be really smart3, which could contribute to the development of long-term gender differences in science and math achievement4. Why do stereotypes develop in such young children? As a professor of early cognitive and social development, I have seen my research reveal how surprisingly subtle features of language contribute to a child’s tendency to view the world through the lens of social stereotypes. The problem of generalization Many parents try to prevent the development of stereotypes in children by 28 • April 2017

avoiding saying things like, “boys are good at math,” or “girls cannot be leaders.” Instead, parents might take care to say things that are positive, like “girls can be anything they want.” But our research5 has found that, to the developing mind, even these positive statements can have negative consequences. For young children, how we speak is often more important than what we say. Generalizations, even if they say only things that are positive or neutral, such as “Girls can be anything they want,” “Hispanics live in the Bronx” or “Muslims eat different foods,” communicate that we can tell what someone is like just by knowing her gender, ethnicity or religion. In our research, published in Child Development6, we found that hearing generalizations led children as young as two years old to assume that groups mark stable and important differences between individual people. In this study, children were introduced to a new, made-up way of categorizing people: “Zarpies.” If they only heard statements about specific individuals, (e.g., “These Zarpies whisper when they talk”), children continued to treat the people as individuals, even though they were all marked by the same label and wore similar clothes. But if they heard

the same information as a generalization (e.g., “Zarpies whisper when they talk”), they started to think that “Zarpies” are very different from everyone else. Hearing generalizations led children to think that being a member of the group determined what the members would be like. In another recent study7, we found that hearing these types of generalizations – even if none of them was negative –

Parents, teachers and other caring adults cannot control everything that children hear, and exposure to explicitly racist, sexist or xenophobic ideas can also influence a child’s view of societal norms and values. But children develop their sense of the world through minute-byminute conversations with important adults in their lives. These adults have powerful platforms with their children.


For young children, how we speak is often more important than what we say. Generalizations, even if they say only things that are positive or neutral, such as “Girls can be anything they want,” “Hispanics live in the Bronx” or “Muslims eat different foods,” communicate that we can tell what someone is like just by knowing her gender, ethnicity or religion. led five-year-old children to share fewer resources (in this case, colorful stickers) with members outside their own social group. These findings show that hearing generalizations, even positive or neutral ones, contributes to the tendency to view the world through the lens of social stereotypes. It is the form of the sentence, not exactly what it says, that matters to young children. From groups to individuals Our research means that generalizations are problematic even if children do not understand them. If a young child overhears, “Muslims are terrorists,” the child might not know what it means to be a Muslim or a terrorist. But the child can still learn something problematic – that Muslims, whoever they are, are a distinct kind of person. That it is possible to make assumptions about what someone is like just by knowing if they are Muslim or not. Language that uses specifics – instead of making general claims – avoids these

problems. Sentences like, “Her family is Hispanic and lives in the Bronx,” “This Muslim family eats different foods,” “Those girls are great at math,” “You can be anything you want,” all avoid making general claims about groups. Using specific language can also teach children to challenge their own and others’ generalizations. My three-year-old recently announced that “Boys play guitar,” despite knowing many female guitar players. This troubled me, not because it matters very much what he thinks about guitar playing, but because this way of talking means that he is starting to think that gender determines what a person can do. But there is a very easy and natural way to respond to statements like these, which our research8 suggests reduces stereotyping. Simply say, “Oh? Who are you thinking of? Who did you see play the guitar?” Children usually have someone in mind. “Yes, that man at the restaurant played the guitar tonight. And yes, so does Grandpa.” This response guides children to think in terms of individuals, instead of groups. This approach works for more sensitive generalizations too – things a child might say, like “Big boys are mean,” or “Muslims wear funny clothes.” Parents can ask children who they are thinking of and discuss whatever specific incident

they have in mind. Sometimes children speak this way because they are testing out whether drawing a generalization is sensible. By bringing them back to the specific incident, we communicate to them that it is not. Every interaction counts How much can this small change in language really matter? Parents, teachers and other caring adults cannot control everything that children hear, and exposure to explicitly racist, sexist or xenophobic ideas can also influence a child’s view of societal norms and values. But children develop their sense of the world through minute-by-minute conversations with important adults in their lives. These adults have powerful platforms with their children. As parents and caregivers, we can use our language carefully to help children learn to view themselves and others as individuals, free to choose their own paths. With our language, we can help children develop habits of mind that challenge, rather than endorse, stereotyped views of the people around us. This article was originally published on “The Conversation.” Read the original article here: http://theconversation. com/combatting-stereotypes-how-totalk-to-your-children-71929. •

1

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6323/389

2

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0956797612463081

3

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6323/389

4

https://www.nsf.gov/statistics/srvydoctorates/

5

http://www.pnas.org/content/109/34/13526.short

6

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cdev.12714/full

7

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/56d88d0c0442624b79f94337/t/582f724915d5db9bb606a9ab/1479504460875/Rhodes+et+al.+Developmental+Science.pdf 8

https://mindmodeling.org/cogsci2016/papers/0272/paper0272.pdf www.HispanicOutlook.com • 29


SCHOOL LIBRARY The late Caldecott award-winning children’s book author Ezra Jack Keats is remembered today as a pioneer who broke barriers and introduced more diversity in mainstream children’s literature. Continuing his work, his foundation each year recognizes a children’s book writer and an illustrator for their exceptional work that reflect the experience of childhood in our diverse culture. And so it is our pleasure to feature the 31st annual Ezra Jack Keats Book Award winners for new writer and new illustrator, as well as the three honor winners in this special edition of our book reviews. For lesson plans related to the works of Ezra Jack Keats, visit http://www. ezra-jack-keats.org/lesson-plans/lesson-plans/

K-12 New Writer Award

New Illustrator Award

“A PIECE OF HOME” Jeri Watts Publisher: Candlewick Press

“DANIEL FINDS A POEM” Micha Archer Publisher: Nancy Paulsen Books (Penguin Random House)

When Hee Jun moves with his family to West Virginia from Korea, it’s hard to adjust. In Korea he was a “regular” boy; now he is different. In fact, everything is different. His sister has tantrums in school; his grandmother seems older. Eventually, Hee Jun learns to speak English and makes friends. Invited to a schoolmate’s house, he spots a familiar flower from his grandmother’s garden in Korea. He brings a shoot to his grandmother, and they plant “a piece of home.” The subtle illustrations by Hyewon Yum record the gradual changes in Hee Jun as he gains confidence.

This book beautifully conveys the idea that poetry is all around us, wherever we can see it or just feel it. On Monday, Daniel sees that there will be a poetry recital in the park next Sunday, and he wants to participate. Everyday he encounters a different creature in the park—a spider, a squirrel and so on—and asks what each one thinks poetry is. Of course, each species has a different answer, and their input in invaluable because by Sunday, Daniel is ready with a poem. The rich, colorful illustrations leave Daniel’s ethnicity open to the reader’s interpretation.

New Writer Honor

New Illustrator Honor

New Writer Honor & New Illustrator Honor

“EXCELLENT ED” Stacy McAnulty Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf

“THE GIRL WITH THE PARROT ON HER HEAD” Daisy Hirst Publisher: Candlewick Press

“THE JOURNEY” Francesca Sanna Publisher: Flying Eye Books

Ed is the dog in a family full of super-talented kids, but Ed feels excluded from certain family activities, like eating at the table, going on trips and using the bathroom. But why can’t he? Could it be because he doesn’t have any special talents? Ed tries and fails to copy the family’s talents but finally discovers that he has his own—like gobbling up food dropped on the floor—and he is definitely appreciated. While any and all dog-loving children will enjoy Ed’s quest for excellence, the lively illustrations by Julia SarconeRoach reveal that his human companions are African-American.

30 • April 2017

When her best friend moves away, Isabel is lonely. Fortunately, the parrot on her head helps her deal with loneliness, fear and making new friends. And Isabel has a system: she’ll sort everything from wolves to the dark itself into boxes and push them into the corner of her room. That will work, right? The child’s perspective is clear in the witty illustrations and the blending of real life and make-believe, which leaves ample room for children’s questions and an adults’ reassurances. The kids in the book are illustrated to have rich brown skin with which readers of various ethnicities can identify.

A boy recounts his family’s travels from their war-torn home, which is a city close to the sea that is never named, to someplace that will take them in after everything he knows is plunged into chaos. Their world has been completely upended by overwhelming and mysterious forces. By illuminating that world through the eyes of a child, this book makes these experiences more accessible and bearable, if still frightening, to young readers. Yet sensitive storytelling and beautiful illustrations still leave room for hope, even without the reassurance of the typical storybook happy ending. “The Journey” has been endorsed by Amnesty International.


SCHOOL LIBRARY

HIGHER EDUCATION

“ACADEMIC PROFILING: LATINOS, ASIAN AMERICANS, AND THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP” by Gilda L. Ochoa Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press ISBN-13: 978-0816687404

“A WOMAN’S GUIDE TO COLLEGE: NAVIGATING THE TERRAIN TO A BETTER LIFE” by Carla Andrews-O’Hara Publisher: BookSurge, LLC ISBN-13: 978-1439262412

In “Academic Profiling Latinos, Asian Americans, and the Achievement Gap,” Gilda L. Ochoa, a professor of Chicana/o-Latina/o studies and sociology at Pomona College, addresses the so-called achievement gap by going directly to the source. At one California public high school where this controversy is lived daily, Ochoa turns to the students, teachers and parents to learn about the very real disparities—in areas like opportunity, status, treatment and assumptions—that lead to more than just gaps in achievement. When she shares the results of her research with the high school, the reader sees the new possibilities—and limits—of real change.

“A Woman’s Guide to College: Navigating the Terrain to a Better Life” is more than a “go back to school; you can do it” message. Rather it is an inspirational how-to guide that takes its reader from the beginning—thinking about going back to school—and addresses every concern and consideration that might be in the way of achieving goals. What makes this book truly inspiring are the dramatic yet everyday stories shared by women who were afraid to return to college and feared their ability to handle the coursework yet found the courage to move forward and change their lives.

“NICARAGUA: EMERGING FROM THE SHADOW OF THE EAGLE 6TH EDITION” by Thomas W. Walker and Christine J. Wade Publisher: Westview Press ISBN-13: 978-0813349862

“MEXICAN COAL MINING LABOR IN TEXAS AND COAHUILA, 1880-1930” by Roberto R. Calderón Publisher: Texas A&M University Press ISBN-13: 978-0890968840

“Nicaragua: Emerging From the Shadow of the Eagle 6th Edition” details the country’s unique history, culture, economics, politics and foreign relations. With historical coverage spanning from colonial times through the Sandinista Revolution and the FSLN’s consolidation of power in the 21st century, this book offers an accessible overview of modern Nicaragua. The thoroughly revised sixth edition now features a chronological organization in addition to new material that covers political, economic and social developments that have happened since 2011, including the 2011 presidential elections, the FSLN’s wide-ranging constitutional reforms, the Ortega administration’s record on gender equality and the controversial interoceanic canal project.

The years 1880 to 1930 mark the period in time in Texas’ coal mining era during which the system of mining for coal by hand was both established and eliminated, giving way to a new era of advancing technologies and methods used in mines on both sides of the Texas-Mexico border. “Mexican Coal Mining Labor in Texas and Coahuila, 1880-1930” presents a transnational comparative framework for understanding the complex matrix of mining, investment capital, labor markets, railroad construction and racial ideology in Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, during a period of economic growth and social disruption on both sides of the border.

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 31


VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

South Dakota State University is conducting a global search for its next Vice President for Research and Economic Development. The Search Committee invites letters of nomination, applications (letter of interest, full resume/CV, and contact information of at least five references), or expressions of interest to be submitted to the search firm assisting the University. Review of materials will begin immediately and continue until the appointment is made. It is preferred, however, that all nominations and applications be submitted prior to April 7, 2017. For a complete position description, please visit the Current Opportunities page at https://www.parkersearch.com/sdsu-vpr. Laurie C. Wilder, President Porsha L. Williams, Vice President pwilliams@parkersearch.com || eraines@parkersearch.com Phone: 770-804-1996 ext: 109 Fax: 770-804-1917 South Dakota State University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and has a strong institutional commitment to diversity. Women, minorities, persons with disabilities and veterans are encouraged to apply. SDSU’s policies, programs and activities comply with federal and state laws and South Dakota Board of Regents regulations prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, age, national origin, gender, gender identify and/or expression of sexual orientation. Five Concourse Parkway | Suite 2900 | Atlanta, GA 30328 770.804.1996 | parkersearch.com

Hispanic Outlook 1/4 page Issue 4-17-17 Deadline 4-10-17 $1,090 includes web and color

32 • April 2017

Pamela Maynez, Doctor of Pharmacy Candidate, 2018 KU School of Pharmacy

University of Kansas School of Pharmacy student Pamela Maynez translated our Pharm.D. Program brochure so Spanish-speaking parents like hers could take a more active role in their children’s education. Inclusivity is more than a policy.


SOUTH ORANGE COUNTY

COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR

PRESIDENT

45% OFF

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Hispanic Outlook

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OF SADDLEBACK COLLEGE

WE HERE AT THE HISPANIC OUTLOOK ON EDUCATION ARE CURRENTLY UPDATING OUR SUBSCRIBERS’ LIST

RESERVE & SAVE NOW PRINT SUBSCRIPTION Saddleback College’s new $60 million Sciences Building opened in Aug. 2016. South Orange County Community College District is seeking a proven leader to serve as Saddleback College President. The position reports to the chancellor in a large multi-college district.

THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE WILL HAVE THE FOLLOWING QUALIFICATIONS: EDUCATION:

An earned master’s degree from an accredited college or university in education, business, public administration, or related field. An earned doctorate from an accredited college or university is preferred.

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EXPERIENCE: At least five years of demonstrated and responsible administrative experience, preferably in a higher education environment, with a broad variety of instructional and student services programs, and physical, fiscal and technology resources. At least three years of experience managing a multi-million dollar budget in higher education. Experience in a participatory governance environment in higher education. Experience in and/or demonstrated knowledge of the role of the community colleges in economic and workforce development.

OUR COLLEGE, OUR COMMUNITY Saddleback College is located in Mission Viejo, California and was founded in 1968. The college serves more than 39,000 students per year offering over 300 associate degrees, certificates, and occupational awards in 190 program areas. Saddleback has a high number of career technical education degree programs to prepare students for the workforce.

FOR INFORMATION AND TO APPLY

www.socccd.edu

Please visit the district’s website for a full description of the position, qualifications, and search process. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Initial screening date is May 8, 2017.

e-mail: info@hispanicoutlook.com phone: (201) 587-8800 fax: (201) 587-9105 299 Market Street, Suite 145 Saddle Brook, NJ 07663 “‘The Hispanic Outlook on Education’ and ‘Hispanic Outlook’ are registered trademarks.”

SEARCH CONSULTANTS Dr. Dean Colli

Dr. Lisa Sugimoto

619.517.6133; dcolli@pplpros.com

562.972.8983; lisasugimoto@yahoo.com

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

www.HispanicOutlook.com • 33


Save The Date! AAHHE proudly announces its 13th Annual National Conference March 8-10 2018 Hotel Irvine Irvine, California

34 • April 2017


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"STAND OUT IN THE HIGHLY COMPETITIVE WORLD OF HIGHER EDUCATION"

36 • April 2017

The Hispanic Outlook Magazine Top Graduate Schools for Hispanics 2017  

The Hispanic Outlook Magazine Top Graduate Schools for Hispanics 2017

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