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2011 Official Program


1 Rodeo Office: Raffle Tickets, memorabilia & Souvenir Rodeo Programs 2 Beer Booth: Ice Cold Budweiser & Bud Light, Country Cocktails & Pendleton Whisky. 3 Scouts: Ice Cold Pepsi 4 Springville Women’s Club: Tacos, Taco Salad, Nachos w/cheese & beans, Strawberry Shortcake, Strawberries & Ice Cream, Brownies & Ice Cream, Iced Tea, Sodas, Coffee, Candy. 5 Back Country Horsemen Booth: Steak Sandwich Dinner (Chips, Beans & Sandwich), Steak Sandwich, Bowl of Beans, Chips, Water, Sodas, Ice Tea. 6 Boy Scouts/Cub Scouts: Pizza, Cotton Candy, Peanuts, Popcorn, and Bottled Water. 7 Springville 4-H: Baked Potatoes, Hot Dogs, Chili Dogs, Frito Boats,

Candy, Cookies, Lemonade, Coffee, Hot Chocolate, Bottled Water. 8 Lion’s Club: BBQ Chicken, Ribs, Tri-Tip, Beans, Burritos, CornOn-The-Cob, Ice Tea. 9 Sign Ups: for Hide Race & Silver Dollar Dig, OCS Wireless Rodeo results. 10 V.F.W. Post #9499: Hamburgers, Cheeseburgers, Chili/Cheese Burgers, Fries, Coffee, Cold Drinks, Milk. Saturday morning Cowboy Breakfast. 11 Beer Booth: Country Cocktails & Pendleton Whisky, Ice Cold Budweiser & Bud Light. 12 Pepsi Booth: Ice Cold Pepsi 13 US Smokeless Tobacco 14 VIP Hospitality Tent

SPRINGVILLE RODEO FOUNDATION A 501(C)3 Corporation

The newly formed Springville Rodeo Foundation is SEEKING YOUNG ADULTS AGED 18 – 32 years of age to participate in the production of the PRCA Springville Rodeo! This fun adventure is an opportunity to contribute youthful energy to the Springville community while learning from civic minded individuals who enjoy the sport of rodeo. Pending funding, our top volunteers may receive an opportunity to attend the PRCA Convention and the NFR! Any number of interest areas need YOUR fresh ideas such as: Civic, Contracts, Rules, Parking, Parade, Timed Events, Publicity, Entertainment, Tickets, Vendors, Grounds, Rough Stock Events, Accounting, Public Relations, Crowd Control, Queen Contest, Maintenance, Oversight. FOR MORE INFORMATION OR AN APPLICATION Please Contact Linda Prentiss (559) 906-2000 estralitasprings@ocsnet.net

Springville Sierra Rodeo 2010

The Biggest Little Rodeo in the West!


Cowboys

A Respectful Breed So What’s Wrong With Being a Cowboy? By Susie Freeman One of the accusations aimed at President Bush by his detractors is to call him a “cowboy,” as if this is some mark of shame, implying something sinister or simpleminded. I keep wondering why. Have you ever watched a rodeo? They’ve started interviewing the contestants after they compete, giving the audience a little glimpse into the character of these athletes, something like the ones conducted preceding the title fights and following basketball and football games. They go something like this: “Cody, you made a spectacular ride, which moves you into first place. How do you feel about your position as the number one bull rider in the country” “Well, Ma’am (notice the use of a term of respect, a vanishing social custom among most Americans under the age of 30), I’ve been real lucky. I’ve drawn some good bulls and everything has fallen into place for me this year. Some of my competitors have has some injuries and bad luck. I just hope I can stay healthy.” Before his closest competitor comes out of the chute, the “cowboy” then climbs up on the fence and helps him tie on his rigging. He gives that same guy

a high five at the side of the arena when he’s beaten by two points on the ride he helped him prepare for. How many times have you seen an arena full of rodeo fans take to the street following a competition and set fire to cars or hold an impromptu riot because they felt dissatisfied with the final outcome, a UCLA specialty? There is no booing of officials when scores are announced. I’ve never heard of a contested call by any competitor even when it meant the difference between winning a losing. Cowboys don’t whine. These “cowboys” regularly loan each other equipment and even horses (frequently $50,000 to $100,000 animals) when a fellow competitor’s ride didn’t arrive in time for tonight’s roping or bulldogging or whatever. When the Star Spangled Banner is played, to a man and woman they rise to their feet and put their hats over their hearts in respect. They don’t wear tee shirts bearing offensive sexual messages. When “cowboys” are injured, the rest hold fund-raisers and donate time and money to help them and their families through a rough financial time. A lifetime achievement is the day when a contestant reaches $1 million in earnings. To reach that goal, he or she has spent about 15 years practicing and suffering dozens of

injuries, traveled hundreds of thousands of miles from rodeo to rodeo, frequently with their toughest competition, who also happens to be their best friend. Headlines never seem to carry news of a world-champion bull rider or calf roper beating up his wife or being arrested for molesting underage girls. And they, too have their groupies and some even have failed marriages – sad victims of vagabond lifestyle necessary to follow the rodeo circuit. They seem to know who their fathers are and most often seem to be married to the mothers of their children. They thank their families for their success. So, I have to ask, what’s wrong with being described as a cowboy? It seems to me to be high praise in a world full of folks with questionable moral standards, Technicolor hair, bodies adorned with rings and tattoos in startling locations and no respect for anything of value or worth. It seems our cowboy president is in some pretty good company. Sure beats being a Frenchman. Ride’em.

Reprinted with the permission of the Rockdale Reporter, Rockdale, Texas

The Biggest Little Rodeo in the West!

Springville Sierra Rodeo 2010


Springville Sierra Rodeo 2010

The Biggest Little Rodeo in the West!


rodeo