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J u s t i n H o f f m a n

Cooperative Education Student University of Cincinnati 2011 School of Architecture and Interior Design


Justin

H o f f m a n  Cooperative

Education Student

Education

5 1 3 . 8 8 4 . 0 111 h  o f f m a d4@m a i l.uc.edu

3560 Crooked Tree Dr. Mason, Ohio     45040

Activities

2006-Present University of Cincinnati School of Architecture and Interior Design Cincinnati, Ohio Bachelor of Science in Architecture, 2011 Historic Preservation Certifi cate 2011 Master of Architecture, 2013

College

Students for Ecological Design, RE|UC,  Planning Student Organization Intramural Volleyball, Soccer, Flag Football Volunteering: Habitat for Humanity, Clifton  Community Clean-Up, Relay for Life, Cincinnati  Museum Center, New Stage Collective

2002-2006 Mason High School Mason, Ohio

Work Experience

Skills

2008-Summer GWWO Inc./Architects 2009-Winter Baltimore, Maryland Co-Op Student Conceptual Design: Model Building, Rendering  Design Development: Programming, Code Compliance Construction Documents: Details, Red-lines

Computer

Adobe CS4 Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, GoLive Microsoft Offi ce: PowerPoint, Excel, Word, Frontpage AutoCAD 2010 Autodesk REVIT 2010 Autodesk Ecotect Google SketchUp Cinema 4D

2002-Present Mason SAY Soccer Mason, Ohio Referee & Coach

Hand

Model Building Digital Photography Concept Sketching Hand Rendering: Watercolor, Charcoal,  Marker, Ink, Color Pencil, Pastel, Collage

Honors

Spring 2008 Studio “Greening Over-the-Rhine”:  Cincinnati Design Award Honorable Mention Cincinnatus Century Scholarship Featured: 2006 Ohio Governor’s Youth Art  Exhibition Reached rank of Life Boy Scout

References and Portfolio available upon request


Manifesto

I am dedicated to cities. I want to live and play in the city. The sense of place that the city offers is unique. I want to be involved in projects that make the urban core more exciting and enjoyable. Historic structures ground a neighborhood in the past while it builds into the future. Architecture is a spectrum: Iconic architecture has its place, as does the lesser-known architecture. Both are needed to create communities. Architecture needs to span economies and offer better design for everyone. More care needs to be taken in creating environments for all people. Being environmentally responsible is part of creating better design, but not the only aspect. I take pride in Cincinnati and wish to see it succeed.


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Co-Op Work

Baltimore, Maryland

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A design study for a pavilion that would define the visual language for a new park. As the master plan evolved so did our iterations. 1. Wall segments form linear connections through the site. 2. Pavilion showing three materials-Stone structure, vertical wood screens, and standing seam roof. 3. Early sketch iterations. 4. Comfort station


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1. “End of Innocence” Conté Pencils. Featured in 2006 Ohio Governor’s Youth Art Exhibition. 2. “Pencils” Conté Pencils on Canson Paper. Used as the cover of 2006 Mason High School arts magazine. 3. “Self Portrait Series” Mixed Media.

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Hand Skills

The art of sketching is something I feel that is essential for any designer but sadly has taken less of an importance in architecture school. New computer programs are introduced regularly and projects are often concieved in 3D programs from the start. I pride myself on my arts foundation. I keep up my skills with the occasion side project.

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Greening Over-the-Rhine

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1. Restored Front Elevation 2. Early kitchen rendering 3. Historic horse ramp preserved and highlighted 4. Existing interior conditions

Located in Cincinnati’s oldest neighborhood, our site now serves as a storehouse but was at one time a horse stable for the dairy that was across the street. In this studio we created a design intent in response to the owner’s wishes and the most current, LEED 2.2, environmental checkpoints all while preserving the building’s historic nature. Many groups were involved in the sudio from the beginning; the OTR Foundation, structual engineers, local architects, and Cincinnati Preservation Association.


Over-the-Rhine Design Approach

We chose to focus on passive sustainable strategies to boost our already significant potential LEED rating. Bringing daylight and ventilation into the very deep interior spaces. Skylights and new fenestration on the southern elevation helped bring in light. We used the corridors and a new stair core to increase natural ventilation. Making use of the large, gently sloped roof we advocated for an extensive green roof. 3

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1. Roof garden 2. New circulation 3. Increased ventilation 4. Final plans

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Mt. Adams Studio

This past winter’s studio centered around creating a festival and permanent pavilion in the vibrant neighborhood of Mt. Adams. Our inspiration began with a ‘Slow Food’ festival celebrating fresh foods and the art of cooking. Our program included a fresh market, demonstration kitchen, cafe, formal dining space, and all surrounded by a hydroponic greenhouse.

1. Midterm exterior rendering. Our center surrounds an existing building 2. Main entrance leading to greenhouse. 3. Fresh market that would offer daily fresh fruits.

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Mt. Adams

The research phase focused around hydroponic techniques 2 that are still considered experimental. Shelf units, hanging gardens, living walls, and a unique column growing system inspired our structural system and spatial lay- 3 out. 1. Demonstration kitchen 2. Cafe surrounded by greenhouse 3. Sketch of shelf growing system and repelling harvesting technique


Housing Studio

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A site near the University of Cincinnati, the Avondale neighborhood, was selected to host a study in affordable housing. My design was inspired by the dense, canyonlike appearance of some of the built form in the area. The units were designed to plugand-play by stacking and shifting individual units to achieve the desired effect. Early site iterations were done in clay. 2

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1. Final site model 2. Early sketch 3. Model detail 4. Clay site iterations

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Clifton Library

Our first comprehensive design, a library for a site off Ludlow St. A threepart system influenced this design. A public front that gestures to the corner, a hidden gem that is the reading section, and one plane to provide shelter that anchors the rear.

1. Exterior Perspective 2. Interior Corridor Perspective. 3. Conceptual model 4. Final massing model 5. Early site panorama 6. Hand-drafted plans

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J u s t i n H o f f m a n

Cooperative Education Student University of Cincinnati 2011 School of Architecture and Interior Design

Thank you for your time


David Justin Hoffman Portfolio