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S E P T E M B E R 2 019

PMREMS newsletter

regionalresource EMSwell equipped Buying equipment isn’t an easy

task with apparatus and an ambulance fleet consistently conquering a coverage area spanning over 250 square miles. Through grant writing and year ‘round efforts Pocono Mountain Regional EMS is able to buy the latest in state-of-the-art equipment.

This edition of Regional Resource shares facts for residents to understand the what, why and how these items are acquired. Plus, the “where” to find PMREMS out there in the community as part of area events and healthcare initiatives. So download facts on the dates and comeby to meet your PMREMS pros.

Stay connected

for videos, photos and up to the minute news facebook.com/ PoconoMountainRegionalEmergencyMedicalSer vices

IN THIS EDITION 2 Seizing Technology to SAVE A LIFE 4 Up for the Challenge? PMREMS Chili Cookoff Signups 5 LVHN: Ask the Doctor Heat Related Injuries 6 Out & About in October PMREMS- A Part of Community


save a life

Grants & Contributions Seize Technology to

P

w h y f u n d i n g f o r T r u c k s & car d iac m o n it o rs matters

ocono Mountain Regional Emergency Medical Services has been very fortunate this year in securing financial support in the form of grants from a number of state, federal and private sources. So far in 2019 we have received outside funding enabling us to purchase a new ambulance, power load unit for a stretcher, cardiac monitors for our ambulances, as well as, other needed equipment and supplies.

Our ability to earn the trust and support from these outside sources is so critical to PMREMS in part because it allows us to maintain state-of-the-art emergency equipment and medical services for you, the residents and community we serve, without having to appeal to you for additional assistance to support these initiatives. We are also relieved of the financial burden of additional loans to

finance the purchase of this equipment. To date, several additional grant applications are in process for various initiatives in 2019 and through 2020. - Joyce Onstead Pocono Mountain Regional EMS Board Member/Grant Writer

CLICK HERE FOR TRUCK DETAILS

Grant Funds $172,000 2019

Express Plus Ford F450

AMBULANCE


C

ardiac Monitoring—the fundamental noninvasive Advanced Life Support skill frequently used in pre-hospital settings, screens a patient’s heart rhythm detecting potentially life-threatening changes. Integrated into cardiac/heart monitors are additional capabilities of 12-lead EKG (Electrocardiogram), defibrillation, synchronized cardioversion, transcutaneous pacing, waveform capnography, and automatic blood pressure examination. As emergency medical practices become more evolved; equipment

such as this enables professionals to provide immediate enhanced life-saving service. When seconds count, information and preparation prove to be a positive combination. Using the 12-lead EKG as a diagnostic tool, displayed readings can be transmitted directly to the hospital alerting physicians before arrival and increasing chances of survival. While evolution is a progressive expectation, as the latest in stateof-the-art technology comes to be; it’s also inevitably a difficult obstacle to overcome for

nonprofit emergency response organizations like Pocono Mountain Regional EMS. Faced with current Cardiac Monitors becoming obsolete in 2022, with no parts to be manufactured or service performed, PMREMS proactively prepared to replace machines not by choice but necessity. A community call-to-action came with positive reaction resulting in the ability to acquire five units plus cover $15,000 iin grant expenses. Thank you to all those who came through for Pocono Mountain Regional EMS and the community we serve.

Please Share Our Appreciation 2018 Regional Roundup Fundraiser

$

16,241.77

2018 Community Donations

$

2019 Regional Roundup Fundraiser

$

2019 Community Donations

$

D. Lenihan Memorial Contribution

$

Rotary Club of the Pocono Mountains

$

Todd & Shari Nelson Family Foundation

$

1,025 14,501.25

2,222 5,250 5,000 12,500


1-3PM OCTOBER 19TH AT

cookoff

Think you’ve got the best chili recipe in town? Why not compete to grab the top seat & support Pocono Mountain Regional EMS

HOW

.

SUBMIT A $35 ENTRY FEE PAYABLE TO: PMREMS MAIL: PMREMS 135 TEGAWITHA RD, TOBYHANNA, PA 18466 ----------------------------OR----------------------------SIGNUP/DROPOFF: MOUNTAINTOP LODGE 2137 PA-940, POCONO PINES, PA 18350

PLAN TO ATTEND

. . .

WHERE MORE

INCLUDE A SPICY NAME FOR YOUR ENTRY + YOUR NAME & CONTACT INFORMATION 1-3 PM SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2019 2137 PA-940 POCONO PINES,PA 18350 COORDINATOR JEANINE HOFBAUER 570.517.1792

CONTESTANTS WILL RECEIVE AN EMAIL CONFIRMATION OCTOBER 14 DETAILING ENTRY REQUIREMENTS TO PREPARE THEIR CREATIONS FOR SATURDAY’S COMPETITION


Ask the Doctor Heat Related Injuries

I work outside and during the summer it can be tough. How can I avoid heat related injuries? A: Pete Obeng, MD

Preventing heat related injuries

Heat related injuries impact many individuals who spend time outside for recreation or work purposes. There are four types of heat related disorders to understand: heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps and heat syncope.

One of the best ways to reduce heat related illness is to reduce exposure. Activities should be moved to a cool, shaded place if possible. For those who have to work in the heat, there should be work-rest cycles that allow workers to cool down and hydrate. Workers should be educated about heat injuries and instructed to work in pairs so that they can monitor each other. It is important that supervisors and managers are trained about heat injuries so that they can properly direct work activities.

1) Heat stroke: This is a medical emergency and is the most severe and life-threatening type of heat injury. In this state, the body’s cooling system has failed so the skin may be dry and hot. Signs of heat stroke: Elevated body temperature along with confusion, seizures or loss of consciousness. Care: Seek immediate medical help. Any delay in treatment can lead to death or permanent disabilities. While waiting for emergency responders, move person to a cool area and do everything possible to cool the person. 2) Heat exhaustion: This heat injury occurs after a person has lost excessive fluid and salt through sweating. Signs of heat exhaustion: Feeling very thirsty, weak, fatigued, nausea, headaches and confusion. Care: Move person to cool area and seek medical help.

Acclimatization – Those who are not used to working in the heat should be allowed time to adjust. Work should be limited to 1/5 of the usual work on the first day with gradual lengthening or work time over one or two weeks. Workers who have experience working in warmer weather should start at about half of the usual duration and gradually increase over a week. Hydration – Workers should maintain a good hydration regimen with fluids containing electrolytes, such as sports drinks. Caffeinated drinks and alcohol should be avoided as they will lead to increase loss of water.

3) Heat cramps: This is a very common condition caused by exposure to heat and relative decrease in body sodium level. This happens if a person is sweating excessively and drinking plain water. Sodium is lost through sweating and intake of water causes dilution or imbalance of sodium. The loss of sodium leads to muscle cramps as sodium is an important element in the muscle contraction process. Signs of heat cramps: Muscle spasms (commonly known as muscle cramps). Care: Move to cool area and drink sports drink with electrolytes.

Dehydration awareness – One of the easiest ways to monitor your hydration status is to observe the color of urine. Dark yellow to brown urine can indicate dehydration, while a well hydrated individual will have clear to light yellow urine. Remember that certain medical conditions, foods and vitamin supplements can change urine color so this has to be taken into consideration. In a normally functioning kidney, urine output is usually about every 2 hours, but in dehydration urination becomes less frequent.

4) Heat syncope: Refers to sudden loss of consciousness that is usually due to decreased blood pressure to the brain. A combination of factors causes this – dehydration which reduces body fluid volume and dilatation of blood vessels which is a mechanism the body relies on to cool down. This can create a lower blood pressure to the brain, and that results in loss of consciousness. Signs of heat syncope: Loss of consciousness (fainting, passing out). Care: Help person to cool area. Seek immediate medical attention for anyone who loses consciousness.

Finally, there are many available resources to help educate and guide work activities in hot conditions. Employers can find information and guides on the websites for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at osha.gov and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at cdc.gov/niosh. Heat index information is available from online weather services.

Clothing – Whenever possible, light materials and loose clothing should be worn in order to improve heat exchange.

Pete Obeng, MD, is medical director of the Occupational Medicine Clinic at LVPG Occupational Medicine–Tannersville. Obeng holds a medical degree from Howard University, as well as a master’s degree in public health from Meharry Medical College, where he completed his residency in occupational medicine. He is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine.


in ty ni u m om C e th t hou g rou th s u e Come se

OCTOBER

thursday 3 rd

pink light walk from esu to LVHN-Pocono

SATURday 5 th

Want more details...

CLICK HERE

BARRETT TWP CONCERT IN THE PARK

Want more details...

CLICK HERE

SATURday 19 th

PMREMS CHILI COOKOFF CHAMPIONSHIP Want more details...

CLICK HERE

SATURday 26 th

PMREMS HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR Want more details...

CLICK HERE Sunday 27th

BARRETT TWP HALLOWEEN PARADE Want more details...

CLICK HERE

Headquarters135 Tegawitha Road, Tobyhanna, PA 18466 WebPMREMS.org Phone570.839.8485

Profile for Hofbauer Strategies

Pocono Mountain Regional EMS September 2019 Newsletter  

Pocono Mountain Regional EMS September 2019 Newsletter