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Howard County Library System

Charles E. Miller Branch & Historical Center

Enchanted G A R D E N

FIELD GUIDE


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Contents Introduction Entrance Walls a Heron Fountain a Gathering Circle East a Rose Arbor a Pond a Rain Garden a Streambed a Demonstration Gardens a Pizza Garden a Gathering Circle West a Conifer Garden a Bioswale a Patio a Credits and Thank yous a a

Introduction If you are interested in the plants found in the Enchanted Garden, this Field Guide introduces you to their properties and beneficial uses. Located at Howard County Library System’s Charles E. Miller Branch & Historical Center, the Enchanted Garden showcases local vegetation and good conservation practices. Natalie Brewer, a Master Gardener, photographer, educator, mother, and nature-lover who served on the Enchanted Garden’s Educational Curriculum Committee, generously undertook the initial writing for this booklet. While providing interesting facts about the plants selected for the garden, the Field Guide serves as an educational tool noting the benefits of using beautiful, native plants that will keep this garden thriving for many years.

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Introduction (continued) A LITTLE GARDEN HISTORY The current garden contains more than 65 varieties of plants, nearly all native, many labeled with small signs for easy identification. The demonstration garden area fosters healthy habits as students take classes, master gardeners volunteer their time and teaching, and all may participate in hands-on activities. Raised beds have different themes each year, such as a Multisensory Garden, Herbal Apothecary Garden, Stir Fry Garden, Peter Rabbit Patch, The White House Kitchen Garden, and a Community Garden, not to mention the Pizza Garden — naturally in the shape of a pizza. SUSTAINABILITY ELEMENTS The garden design reflects the environmental sustainability goals for the project, and complements the LEED Gold certification of the branch building. Pathway materials are permeable, and the rain garden, rain barrels and bioswale slow stormwater runoff. Composting demonstrations, along with the native plantings, represent some of the sustainable components chosen purposefully for the space.

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Entrance Walls

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed

Pizza

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

Entrance Walls

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Gathering Circle East


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Entrance Walls Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Autumn Brilliance’ – Autumn Brilliance This multi-stemmed large shrub or small tree works well in any garden. In spring, © Jim Strasz @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

the tiny white flowers shroud the shrub in a blanket of

beauty, providing much-needed nectar to small pollinators. By mid-summer, red berries form, which darken to blue as they ripen. Although the berries are quite tasty to people, be aware that you may not get many, since more than 20 species of birds like them, too.

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Entrance Walls Amsonia hubrochtii ‘Blue Ice’ – blue star amsonia ‘Blue Ice’ (ALSO IN STREAMBED)

This beautiful plant, native to the Midwestern United States, is a gem for any © Missouri Botanical Garden

garden design. Needle-like

delicate leaves support light blue starry flowers in mid-summer that attract native pollinators. In autumn, the soft foliage turns a spectacular golden hue.

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Entrance Walls Dennstaedtia punctilobula – hay-scented fern Not all ferns are fragile — take a look at the hay-scented fern. At nearly three feet tall with fresh foliage the © Dennis Wood

color of ripe avocadoes, the

hay-scented fern adapts well to various light conditions and soil moisture. If healthy, it spreads above-ground rhizomes to make a soft frilly carpet of green. When brushed, its foliage gives off a perfume reminiscent of freshly mown hay. Deer do not find this plant to be palatable.

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Entrance Walls Heuchera americana – coral bells The popular heuchera appears in a variety of foliage colors, shapes, and sizes. In most climates, the © Wikipedia

foliage remains throughout

the year. Coral bells’ dark purple foliage looks beautiful in a perennial garden. Tiny white flowers loom above on three foot stalks that attract hummingbirds. The low growing foliage also provides cover for small wildlife. Marylanders will appreciate coral bells for being tolerant of mildew, insects, heat, and humidity. The foliage can tolerate full sun in moist conditions as well as partial shade.

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Entrance Walls Hipericum ‘Hidcote’ – St. John’s Wort (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST)

Used in ancient days to ward off evil spirits on the eve of St. John’s Day (hence © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

its name), today St. John’s

Wort adds a pleasing backdrop along the library branch’s walls. Golden saucer-shaped flowers bloom throughout summer and autumn on a mounding shrub that can grow to four feet tall. The dark-green foliage is semi-evergreen. Local foliage remains during mild winters, although in colder regions it often dies to the ground each winter. As the weather cools, red berries emerge. Bees, butterflies, and birds are attracted to the slightly fragrant St. John’s Wort for food, cover, and nesting material. Some species are used medicinally to treat depression, wounds, and inflammation.

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Entrance Walls Phlox paniculata ‘David’ – David garden phlox Garden phlox is a plant that has been coveted by gardeners for generations, despite its unfortunate © Missouri Botanical Garden

tendency to develop mildew. New and improved varieties

offer the beauty and grace of the old varieties, with a higher resistance to mildew. David is an angelic-white phlox, growing tall, with large panicles of flowers on healthy green foliage. Swallowtail butterflies and hummingbird clearwing moths particularly enjoy visiting the blooms.

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Entrance Walls Symphyotrichum novae-angliae ‘Purple Dome,’ New England Aster The Enchanted Garden displays a variety of asters, which are open face flowers © Jennifer Anderson @USDA-NRCS Plants Database

because they provide a landing pad and easy

access to the flower’s nectar. The ‘Purple Dome’ aster provides a welcome meal to migrating monarchs and other butterflies. The profusion of royal blue blooms illuminate the garden in September and October. The ‘Purple Dome’ is an especially hardy variety that tolerates full sun and drought conditions. It has a low growing and mounding habit. Pinching it back in July maintains a tidy appearance.

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Entrance Walls Tradescantia oheinsis – spiderwort Do not be alarmed at this native perennial’s name. The term “wort” derives from the Old English wyrt, © G. A. Cooper @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

meaning root or herb. Such a name often indicated

that a plant had medicinal qualities. The name may also come from the delicate weblike filaments that adorn the six bright yellow anthers of the blue-violet flowers. The flowers open each morning and close by afternoon on sunny days. Bees find the spiderwort attractive as do white-tail deer, turtles, and rabbits. Spiderwort adapts easily to different soil conditions, although it prefers to be moist.

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Heron Fountain

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed

Pizza

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Gathering Circle East


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Heron Fountain Chelone glabra – white turtlehead White turtlehead is a magnificent perennial wildflower. In spring, white flowers in the shape of a © Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

turtle’s head, hence the name, gracefully arch from

two-foot long stems. Hummingbirds, swallowtail butterflies, and bumblebees busily visit the flowers for nectar. The white turtlehead plays host for the Maryland state insect, the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly. Named the state insect in 1973 because they were so numerous, the Baltimore Checkerspot is now considered endangered in Maryland and has not been seen in Howard County since 1997. Planting white turtlehead promotes conservation efforts.

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Heron Fountain Cornus sericea – red osier dogwood The red osier dogwood offers year-round enjoyment to gardeners and wildlife. From May until June, small white © D. E. Herman @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

flowers adorn its green

branches. The flowers drop and small light blue berries emerge, which attract and provide sustenance to a variety of birds, such as eastern blue birds, purple finches, robins, and cedar waxwings, during summer and fall. As fall approaches, the leaves turn an attractive reddish purple, and the best show happens as winter sets in and the dogwood’s branches turn a vibrant red against the winter landscape. Early spring pruning stimulates new stems and the bright coloration.

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Heron Fountain Geranium ‘Brookside’ – hardy geranium ‘Brookside’ (ALSO IN ROSE ARBOR)

Not to be confused with the annual geranium, this hardy perennial grows for years © arrowheadlandscaping.com

and naturalizes well in a

perennial garden. The Brookside is especially desirable for its sapphire blue color and its long blooming season. Early in May and throughout June a lacy mound of dark leaves are topped with cup shaped blue flowers that attract butterflies. After the initial blooming period, more blossoms return until September, and, as temperatures cool, the leaves turn coppery. This easy to grow variety makes a great ground cover and border plant. It can tolerate sun to partial shade.

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Heron Fountain Juncus effusus – soft rush (ALSO IN RAIN GARDEN AND BIOSWALE)

Soft or common rush is a grass-like perennial plant © Dennis Wood

with cylindrical upright stems. This plant works

well in gardens that are moist or have a pond. Native to sunny, freshwater wetlands, marshes, and ditches across North America, it often helps to control erosion. The rush’s vertical stature adds architectural interest, and although it appears stiff, it is actually soft to the touch. In summer, tiny yellow to pale brown flowers appear in clumps from which seeds emerge. Plants spread by seed or by rhizomes (underground stems that produce roots). To control spread, some gardeners plant rushes in buried containers. The soft rush provides food and shelter for birds and insects.

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Heron Fountain Oenothera rosea – evening primrose The evening primrose is sometimes avoided by gardeners because it spreads quickly. To ignore this Š J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

perennial, however, is to miss its subtle beauty and sweet

fragrance that attracts bees and butterflies. The flower is pale pink with dark veins and barely an inch in diameter. Each day at sunset it welcomes the evening by opening its petals. It grows best near streams and along rivers.

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Heron Fountain Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ – foxglove beardtongue Husker Red (ALSO IN BIOSWALE)

For sunny areas, foxglove beardtongue presents a © Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

treat to behold. This unique wildflower blooms in mid-

spring, usually when it has little competition. Beardtongue starts with tall spires covered in tube-shaped blooms, which look like fingers of a glove. Native bumblebees and hummingbirds find the blooms irresistible and flock to the flowers. The cultivar ‘Husker Red’ has reddish purple foliage that remains attractive all season and may stay evergreen in mild winters.

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Heron Fountain Rudbeckia hirta – Black-eyed Susan (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE WEST)

The Maryland state flower is more than just pretty, it also benefits local wildlife. © Martin van der Grinten @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Black-eyed Susans are in the

genus Rudbeckia and operate as the larval host to the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly. They provide a nectar source sought after by many native pollinators, from bumblebees to butterflies. In late summer, keep seed heads intact and watch the American goldfinches glean seeds from stems that sometimes bend. In fact, goldfinches will eat upside down, using their weight to bend stems and reach seed heads. The American goldfinch is Howard County’s official bird.

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Heron Fountain Symphyotrichum laeve – smooth blue aster Instead of planting the annual chrysanthemum for fall color, try the perennial aster for long © Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

lasting rewards. Available

in blues, purples and a variety of pinks, asters look a little like daisies with a yellow center. They like sun and are not particular about soil. The ‘smooth blue aster’ is one of the tallest asters, reaching three feet tall in favorable conditions. The flowering stems produce many blue-violet flowers that bloom in August, September, and October. Attractive to bees and butterflies, it acts as a larval host and nectar source for the Pearl Crescent Butterfly.

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Gathering Circle East

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Gathering Circle East


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Gathering Circle East Aquilegia canadensis – wild columbine A delicate and beautiful woodland wildflower, the wild columbine’s native range spans from the warm © Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

regions of the southern United States to the cool

forests of Canada. Hummingbirds particularly like the yellow and red lantern shaped flowers. The columbine duskywing, a small brown butterfly, uses this flower as its host. Native Americans considered the columbine a good source to treat various ailments. Columbine seeds were used in pipes for their pleasant smell and taste.

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Gathering Circle East Carex pensylvanica – Pennsylvania sedge So many sedges, so little time! Even self-proclaimed experts can have a hard time distinguishing one sedge Š Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

from another. Sedges make for some wonderful garden

plants, and the Pennsylvania variety is no stranger to a pretty landscape. Tufts of thin sprays of grasses make good company for other natives, such as Christmas fern and trilliums. However, Pennsylvania sedge is not only a good landscape buddy, but also a good wildlife plant. Sedges are larval hosts to skipper butterflies. They also provide food and cover for numerous songbirds, while usually ignored by deer.

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Gathering Circle East Ceanothus americanus – New Jersey tea Forget the nonnative, invasive butterflybush that is touted as the leading denizen of butterfly gardens Š Jim Stasz @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

and go native instead. New Jersey tea is a great

selection for butterfly and flower gardens alike, for its frilly white flower panicles are showstopping in spring. Gardeners and pollinators will enjoy its blossoms for the lovely scent and nectar. Unlike most native shrubs, New Jersey tea is petite and grows to less than three feet tall and wide. New Jersey tea also plays host to the spring azure butterfly, a tiny violet blue specimen.

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Gathering Circle East Cercis canadensis – eastern redbud (ALSO IN POND)

A favorite early-blooming tree, the redbud represents a true harbinger of spring. © Gary A. Monroe @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Its pea-like blooms are a favorite and necessary

early source of nectar for native bumblebees. Once the heartshaped leaves emerge, watch for the caterpillars of the small, brown Henry’s elfin butterfly. In late summer, green pods emerge holding a bounty of seeds, which, when they turn brown and mature, become a feast for 15 species of birds in fall and winter. The flowers and seed pods (while still green) are edible for people as well as wildlife. Flowers make a good addition to salads, and green pods can be sautéed or blanched, much like snow peas. This tree is relatively small, growing to about 35 feet, and enjoys the company of other, taller native trees.

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Gathering Circle East Fothergilla gardenii – dwarf fothergilla (ALSO IN POND)

Although not a native to the Piedmont, fothergilla is a superb garden plant. © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Growing to about three feet tall and wide, fothergilla

blooms in spring with unusual creamy, white bottlebrush-like flowers, which attract small pollinators. In autumn, fothergilla’s foliage glows a gorgeous yellow, welcoming the shorter days and cooler nights.

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Gathering Circle East Hipericum ‘Hidecote’ – St. John’s Wort (ALSO IN ENTRANCE WALLS)

Used in ancient days to ward off evil spirits on the eve of St. John’s Day (hence its © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

name), today St. John’s Wort adds a pleasing backdrop

along the library branch’s walls. Golden saucer-shaped flowers bloom throughout summer and autumn on a mounding shrub that can grow to four feet tall. The dark-green foliage is semievergreen. Local foliage remains during mild winters, although in colder regions it often dies to the ground each winter. As the weather cools, red berries emerge. Bees, butterflies, and birds are attracted to the slightly fragrant St. John’s Wort for food, cover, and nesting material. Some species are used medicinally to treat depression, wounds, and inflammation.

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Gathering Circle East Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ – Annabelle smooth hydrangea A cultivated hydrangea variety, this beauty boasts large round flower panicles © Ted Bodner @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

that resemble large scoops of vanilla ice cream.

Hydrangea blooms are a favorite of bumblebees for their sweet nectar. Leave flowerheads on the plant after blooming, as they will turn first green, then tan, to continue their visual impact. This noncultivated, native species plays host to the hydrangea sphinx moth.

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Gathering Circle East Ilex ‘San Jose’ – San Jose holly This evergreen holly provides something for all throughout the year. Leaves are stiff, dark green, and shiny, and © Dennis Wood

they have an interesting texture — beware the sharp

tips. Small, inconspicuous white flowers bloom in the spring followed by berries. Berries appear as light green and ripen to an eye-catching red in the fall. Berries remain into the winter, offering food for non-migrating birds. The San Jose holly has a pyramid shape and works equally well as a specimen or in a group. The deep green foliage provides a vivid background for other shrubs and perennials. This winter, beautify your home the natural way with sprigs of holly in a bouquet or added to other greens.

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Gathering Circle East Juncus effuses f. spiralis – corkscrew rush Rushes are flowering plants with cylindrical upright green stems. The corkscrew rush lives up to its name as © Geoffrey Baker

it features tightly-spiraled green stems that uncoil in

all directions. A unique and interesting foliage in the garden, they add pizzazz to floral arrangements when the stems are cut young. Offering more than just ornamental value, the rush’s creeping roots contribute to maintaining banks of streams and ponds. It prefers wet soils or standing water, and full sun.

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Gathering Circle East Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ switchgrass ‘Shenandoah’ (ALSO IN POND)

Virginia switchgrass is a popular landscape and garden plant for good © Jeff McMillian @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

reason. It is extremely easy to grow in full sun locations

and, once established, needs almost no care. Shenandoah is an attractive cultivar with red-colored foliage that lasts all season.

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Gathering Circle East Polystichum acrostichoides – Christmas fern Easily identified by its bootshaped leaflets, Christmas fern adorns the landscape with carefree beauty. Š J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Christmas fern enjoys part shade to full shade, but is

not picky about soil moisture. Once established, it can tolerate drier soils than most other plants and tends to be overlooked by deer. Christmas fern stays small and compact, and works well as shade tolerant ground cover.

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Gathering Circle East Rhus aromatica ‘Gro-Low’ – fragrant sumac Gro-Low Not associated in any way with poison sumac, plants in the Rhus family share the common name. All similarity © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

ends there, but fragrant sumac is still underused.

An attractive shrub, its fragrant green leaves that look a bit like clover, give this small three-foot tall shrub a delicate appearance. Flowers may seem insignificant, but are used by tiny pollinators. This plant comes into its own in early autumn when seed pods turn a fuzzy red, resembling raspberries covered in frost. The pods are favored in late winter by hungry birds, such as eastern bluebirds.

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Gathering Circle East Viburnum dentatum – Arrowwood viburnum (ALSO IN POND, ROSE ARBOR & RAIN GARDEN)

Arrowwood viburnums are among the hardiest shrubs, tolerating a wide variety

Š Missouri Botanical Garden

of locations, climates, and soil conditions. A smaller cultivar of the hardy V. Dentatum viburnum, the Blue Muffin grows between four and five feet tall and wide. It spreads by underground suckers and eventually forms a low hedge, if given space. In the spring, look for small white flowers that contrast beautifully with its dark green leaves. In the late summer, small bright blue berries ripen and attract songbirds. Butterflies also appreciate this shrub for being a larval host and source of nectar.

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Rose Arbor

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Rose Arbor Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Rose Arbor Geranium ‘Brookside’ – hardy geranium ‘Brookside’ (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN)

Not to be confused with the annual geranium, this hardy perennial grows for © arrowheadlandscaing.com

years and naturalizes well in a perennial garden. The

Brookside is especially desirable for its sapphire blue color and its long blooming season. Early in May and throughout June a lacy mound of dark leaves are topped with cup shaped blue flowers that attract butterflies. After the initial blooming period, more blossoms return until September, and, as temperatures cool, the leaves turn coppery. This easy to grow variety makes a great ground cover and border plant. It can tolerate sun to partial shade.

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Rose Arbor Monarda didyma ‘Colrain Red’ – beebalm ‘Colrain Red’ A great garden plant, beebalms are becoming more popular because deer do not tolerate them. The © Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

minty foliage bursts into bloom in mid-summer,

tempting hummingbirds and native bees alike. Colrain Red is one of many cultivated varieties.

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Rose Arbor Rosa ‘New Dawn’ – New Dawn climbing rose The New Dawn demonstrates perfectly why roses grace so many paintings and poems. This showstopper © Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

climbs trellises with blush pink blooms and a sweet

fragrance well into fall. The glossy green foliage and plentiful rosehips present the grand finale as the weather cools. A hardy rose, the New Dawn resists black spot, mildew, and rust. It also tolerates poor soil and some shade. Butterflies, along with human garden visitors, are attracted to this beauty’s scent and pollen.

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Rose Arbor Viburnum dentatum ‘Blue Muffin’ – (Blue Muffin) arrowwood viburnum (ALSO IN POND, GATHERING CIRCLE EAST & RAIN GARDEN)

Arrowwood viburnums are © Missouri Botanical Garden

among the hardiest shrubs, tolerating a wide variety of

locations, climates, and soil conditions. A smaller cultivar of the hardy V. Dentatum viburnum, the Blue Muffin grows between four and five feet tall and wide. It spreads by underground suckers and eventually forms a low hedge, if given space. In the spring, look for small white flowers that contrast beautifully with its dark green leaves. In the late summer, small bright blue berries ripen and attract songbirds. Butterflies also appreciate this shrub for being a larval host and source of nectar.

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Pond

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Pond Cercis Canadensis – eastern redbud (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST)

A favorite early-blooming tree, the redbud represents a true harbinger of spring. © Gary A. Monroe @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Its pea-like blooms are a favorite and necessary

early source of nectar for native bumblebees. Once the heartshaped leaves emerge, watch for the caterpillars of the small, brown Henry’s elfin butterfly. In late summer, green pods emerge holding a bounty of seeds, which, when they turn brown and mature, become a feast for 15 species of birds in fall and winter. The flowers and seed pods (while still green) are edible for people as well as wildlife. Flowers make a good addition to salads, and green pods can be sautéed or blanched, much like snow peas. This tree is relatively small, growing to about 35 feet, and enjoys the company of other, taller native trees.

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Pond Comptonia peregrina – sweet fern A wonderful addition to the residential landscape, sweet fern looks just like a tall fern, but tolerates full sun Š University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point and Christopher Noll

and dry soils. In spring, new growth slowly unfurls in a

soft bronze hue, then turns a rich green. For wildlife, sweet fern provides a cornucopia of nutritious seeds that songbirds enjoy.

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Pond Echinacea purpurea – ‘Hot Papaya’ coneflower The Hot Papaya echinacea, or coneflower, demonstrates the best on offer for a new varietal. Striking for its hot orange color that deepens

© Flowergardengirl.com

as it matures, it also has a double bloom that looks like a pompom. Aside from its beauty, the Hot Papaya has many other benefits, such as a season that runs from mid to late summer and its spicy scent. Butterflies are attracted to blooms, and flower heads and stems provide a cold weather food source for birds.

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Pond Eupatorium rugosum ‘Little Joe’ – ‘Little Joe‘ Joe Pye weed (ALSO IN RAIN GARDEN)

With its small stature of less than three feet tall, Little © Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Joe makes a great addition to any sunny garden. In late

summer, mauve flowers appear atop thick, green, leafy stems that attract scores of hungry pollinators. It works well in a butterfly garden because it provides an important late-season nectar source.

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Pond Eurybia divaricatus – white wood aster (ALSO IN RAIN GARDEN)

A shade-loving plant, white wood aster blankets itself in dozens of pristine, white © J.im Stasz

daisy-like flowers in early autumn. Its ease of care

means that it works well in almost any garden. Leave spent flowers intact so birds may enjoy the seeds and new plants can emerge the following spring.

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Pond Fothergilla gardenii – dwarf fothergilla (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST)

Although not a native to the Piedmont, fothergilla, nonetheless, is a superb © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

garden plant. Growing to about three feet tall

and wide, fothergilla blooms in spring with unusual creamy, white bottlebrush-like flowers that are very attractive to small pollinators. In autumn, fothergilla’s foliage turns a gorgeous glowing yellow, welcoming the shorter days and cooler nights.

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Pond Ilex ‘San Jose’ – San Jose holly (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST)

Winter, spring, summer or fall, this evergreen holly provides something for © Dennis Wood

all. Leaves are stiff, dark green, and shiny. Enjoy their

interesting texture, but beware of the multiple sharp tips. Small inconspicuous white flowers appear in the spring followed by berries. Berries first appear as light green and then ripen to eye catching red in the fall. Berries will last into the winter and offer non-migrating birds a source of food. A nearby male pollinator increases berry production, but is not necessary. The San Jose holly has a pyramid shape and can be planted as a specimen or in a group. The deep green foliage provides a vivid background for other shrubs and perennials. This winter, beautify your home the natural way. Try a few sprigs of holly in a bouquet or added to other winter greens.

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Pond Iris versicolor – blue flag iris (ALSO IN STREAMBED)

This native iris hosts insects, hummingbirds, and some nectar-seeking © Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

bumblebees. The violet-blue flowers consist of three

petals and three sepals, which are larger than the petals. Their deep purple veins narrow to a white base with a yellow patch, which serves as a landing pad for insects and a signal to guide hummingbirds to the nectar. Flowers sit atop sword-like bright green leaves. According to folklore, the iris’ groups of three represent wisdom, faith and courage. Historical records suggest that Native Americans used the iris for healing purposes and the leaf fibers to spin a fine, strong twine. Blue Flag Iris often grows on lakeshores, swamps, and wet meadows, but it thrives in most gardens given plenty of sun and moist conditions.

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Pond Northern lindera benzoin – Northern spicebush If you ever wonder where all of the birds and butterflies have gone, consider adding a spicebush to your garden. © Jeff McMillan @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

This medium-sized woodland shrub provides a wildlife

haven. Tiny nectar-rich spring flowers give way to red berries in late summer, which are a favorite food for more than 20 species of birds, including catbirds, robins and tanagers. During growing season, look for ‘snake-like’ creatures munching on the underside of the leaves. These caterpillars become spectacular spicebush swallowtail butterflies, with large eye-spots to deceive potential predators. Native Americans used spicebush to treat ailments and brew spicy teas.

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Pond Lobelia cardinalis – cardinal flower (ALSO IN STREAMBED)

Cardinal flower makes for a stunning addition to any shade garden. In late © Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

summer, its tuft of basal leaves give way to strong

stems of brilliant red flowers. Blooms are frequently visited by hummingbirds and butterflies. Songbirds and small mammals eat the seeds in autumn.

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Pond Magnolia virginiana – Virginia magnolia An underused garden gem, the native sweet bay provides beauty and benefits. As an evergreen, the sweet Š Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

bay has many potential uses, including as a screen for a

home or commercial garden, as an architectural specimen, or as part of a grouping of other native trees, shrubs, and perennials. Its glossy medium green leaves stay fresh all year, creating the perfect backdrop for the cup-shaped pristine white blossoms in spring. The sweet bay plays host to the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly, and provides good space for songbirds to nest, hide, or take a rest.

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Pond Matteuccia struthiopteris – ostrich fern Named for its finely dissected fronds that resemble ostrich plumes, this fern provides excellent hiding Š Robert H. Mohlenbrook @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

places for ground feeding birds such as wood thrushes,

robins, and Carolina wrens. Frogs and toads also benefit from the protection of the long fronds. This fern offers good spreading ground cover for shady or moist sunny areas, and it thrives in wet areas near streams and ponds. When the young fern is still coiled, the fiddleheads tempt adventurous locavores, like in New England where pickeled ostrich fiddleheads are a culinary treat.

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Pond Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ switchgrass ‘Shenandoah’ (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST)

Virginia switchgrass is a popular landscape and garden plant for good © Jeff McMillian @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

reason. It is extremely easy to grow in full sun locations

and, once established, needs almost no care. Shenandoah is an attractive cultivar with red-colored foliage that lasts all season.

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Pond Viburnum dentatum ‘Blue Muffin’ – (Blue Muffin) arrowwood viburnum (ALSO IN ROSE ARBOR, GATHERING CIRCLE EAST & RAIN GARDEN)

Arrowwood viburnums are © Missouri Botanical Garden

among the hardiest shrubs, tolerating a wide variety of

locations, climates, and soil conditions. A smaller cultivar of the hardy V. Dentatum viburnum, the Blue Muffin grows between four and five feet tall and wide. It spreads by underground suckers and eventually forms a low hedge, if given space. In the spring, look for small white flowers that contrast beautifully with its dark green leaves. In the late summer, small bright blue berries ripen and attract songbirds. Butterflies also appreciate this shrub for being a larval host and source of nectar.

The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Rain Garden

Rain RainGarden Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Rain Garden Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’ ‘Hummingbird’ summersweet (ALSO IN STREAMBED)

A dwarf cultivar of the native summersweet, the hummingbird variety grows © Jeff McMillan @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

to approximately three feet tall and wide. Its claim to

fame is the beautiful elongated pannicles of blush pink flowers, which attract various winged wonders of the Lepidoptera family (butterflies). Summersweet works better in your butterfly garden than the much over-used and foreign, invasive butterfly bush.

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Rain Garden Eupatorium rugosum ‘Little Joe’ – ‘Little Joe‘ Joe Pye weed (ALSO IN POND)

With its smaller stature of less than three feet tall, Little Joe is a great addition

© Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

to any sunny garden. In late summer, mauvey-pink flowers appear atop thick green, leafy stems, attracting scores of hungry pollinators. This would make a great addition to the butterfly garden, providing an important late-season nectar source.

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Rain Garden Eurybia divaricatus – white wood aster (ALSO IN POND)

A shade-loving plant, white wood aster blankets itself in dozens of pristine white © J.im Stasz @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

daisy-like flowers in early autumn. White wood aster’s

ease of care make it a great addition to nearly any garden situation. Be sure to leave the spent flowers intact, so that birds can enjoy the seeds and so that new plants can emerge the following spring.

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Rain Garden Hibiscus moscheutos – crimsoneyed rose mallow The rose mallow behaves like a high-end bed and breakfast for small creatures. Hummingbirds, butterflies, Š Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

and other pollinators enjoy its nectar, while some native

bees prefer its pollen to other sources. As the flowers wither, birds harvest old stem fibers for nesting material. Stems left behind provide winter homes to insects. Beyond its natural benefits, the rose mallow has beautiful four to five inch wide white and pink blooms. The flowers last for only one day, but it produces enough blossoms to please summer into fall.

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Rain Garden Ilex verticillata ‘Red Sprite’ – ‘Red Sprite’ winterberry Although a member of the holly family, this variety drops its leaves at the first sign of frost. Its deciduous © Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

attributes make it even more appealing when it loses its

leaves and reveals bright red berries clinging to bare stems. The winterberry appears as a glowing scarlet beacon in the otherwise dreary winter landscape. For the best fruit production, female winterberries need gentlemen suitors, so be sure to plant male winterberry plants too.

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Rain Garden Juncus effuses – soft rush (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN AND BIOSWALE)

Soft or common rush is a grass-like perennial plant © Dennis Wood

with cylindrical upright stems. This plant works

well in gardens that are moist or have a pond. Native to sunny, freshwater wetlands, marshes and ditches across North America, it often helps to control erosion. The rush’s vertical stature adds architectural interest, and although it appears stiff, it is actually soft to the touch. In summer, tiny yellow to pale brown flowers appear in clumps from which seeds emerge. Plants spread by seed or by rhizomes (underground stems that produce roots). To control spread, some gardeners plant rushes in buried containers. The soft rush provides food and shelter for birds and insects.

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Rain Garden Nyssa sylvatica – black gum tupelo A real treasure to both gardeners and wildlife, this medium-sized tree grows to about 50 feet tall and is Š Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

both attractive and useful. In autumn, black gum leaves

turn a brilliant red color, and blue-black berries are a treat for more than 15 species of birds, including the mockingbird, cardinal, and robin.

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Rain Garden Viburnum dentatum ‘Blue Muffin’ – (Blue Muffin) arrowwood viburnum (ALSO IN ROSE ARBOR, GATHERING CIRCLE EAST & POND)

Arrowwood viburnums © Missouri Botanical Garden

are among the hardiest of shrubs. They tolerate a

wide variety of locations, climates and soil conditions. The Blue Muffin is a smaller cultivar of the hardy V. Dentatum viburnum. It grows between four and five feet tall and wide. It spreads by underground suckers and will eventually form a low hedge if given space. It is native to North America and thrives in sun or partial shade. In the spring look for small white flowers that contrast beautifully with its dark green leaves. In the late summer, small bright blue berries ripen and attract songbirds. Butterflies also appreciate this shrub for being a larval host and source of nectar.

The Enchanted Garden


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The Enchanted Garden


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Streambed

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens

Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Streambed Amsonia hubrechtii ‘Blue Ice,’ – ‘Blue Ice’ blue star amsonia (ALSO IN ENTRANCE WALLS)

This beautiful plant, native to the midwestern United States complements any © Missouri Botanical Garden

garden design. Needle-like delicate leaves support

light blue starry flowers in mid-summer, which attract native pollinators. In autumn, the soft foliage turns a spectacular golden hue.

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Streambed Clethra alnifolia ‘Hummingbird’ Hummingbird summersweet (ALSO IN RAIN GARDEN)

A dwarf cultivar of the native summersweet, the hummingbird variety grows © Jeff McMillan @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

to approximately three feet tall and wide. Its claim to

fame is the beautiful elongated pannicles of blush pink flowers, which attract various winged wonders of the Lepidoptera family (butterflies). Summersweet works better in your butterfly garden than the much over-used and foreign, invasive butterfly bush.

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Streambed Ilex glabra ‘Shamrock’ – Shamrock inkberry A member of the holly family, the shamrock inkberry keeps its luscious, glossy green leaves year round. © Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Growing to about three feet tall and wide, the shamrock

can substitute for other evergreen, non-native shrubs, such as boxwood and barberry. Its flowers are whitish-green and inconspicuous, but do not go unnoticed by tiny pollinators. In late summer, deep purple-black berries appear, corroborating the inkberry name and feeding hungry birds, such as the robin, catbird, and wood thrush.

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Streambed Iris versicolor – blue flag iris (ALSO IN POND)

This native iris hosts insects, hummingbirds, and some nectar-seeking bumblebees. The violet-blue © Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

flowers consist of three

petals and three sepals, which are larger than the petals. Their deep purple veins narrow to a white base with a yellow patch, which serves as a landing pad for insects and a signal to guide hummingbirds to the nectar. Flowers sit atop sword-like bright green leaves. According to folklore, the iris’ groups of three represent wisdom, faith and courage. Historical records suggest that Native Americans used the iris for healing purposes and the leaf fibers to spin a fine, strong twine. Blue Flag Iris often grows on lakeshores, swamps, and wet meadows, but it thrives in most gardens given plenty of sun and moist conditions.

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Streambed Lobelia cardinalis – cardinal flower (ALSO IN POND)

Cardinal flower makes for a stunning addition to any shade garden. In Š Thomas G. Barnes @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

late summer, its tuft of

basal leaves give way to strong stems of brilliant red flowers. Blooms are frequently visited by hummingbirds and butterflies. Songbirds and small mammals eat the seeds in autumn.

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Demonstration Gardens

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Demonstration Gardens Each year the majority of the raised beds are planted with different themes and annual vegetable plants. The plant labels provide details about Š Dennis Wood

the varieties of tomatoes, peppers, and herbs selected

each year. Seasonal plants such as sunflowers and pumpkins also appear in this area of the garden. We teach classes about these plantings that provide hands-on experiences for all ages to learn about local and seasonal gardening topics. Two beds contain perennials: the multisensory and herbal apothecary gardens. Howard County Master Gardeners generously donated many plants in the raised beds to support the Garden’s educational mission. We welcome volunteers to help plant and maintain these beds.

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Demonstration Gardens Lagerstroemia indica, ‘Tuscarora’ crepe myrtle Native to China, Korea and Japan, these trees are known for their colorful © Robin R. Buckallew @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

and long-lasting flowers that appear in summer and

autumn in panicles of crinkled flowers with a crepe-like texture. These trees have sinewy, fluted stems and branches with a mottled appearance that arises from bark that sheds throughout the year. They revel in full summer sun and heat, and though not native, do well in most Maryland environments.

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Demonstration Gardens Rubus “Arapaho” – thornless blackberry The Arapaho offers one of the best choices for fruit-bearing shrubs. This © Robert Potts @ California Academy of Science

thornless blackberry ripens before the intense summer

heat, usually in May and early June. Its strong, erect canes require no support, and it produces suckers that establish rows of plants. Best of all, the fruit is firm and known for its excellent taste. The Arapaho resists pests and disease, holds up well in hot, humid conditions, and tolerates drought well. Blackberry flowers provide nectar and pollen to bees and, in return, the bees act as pollinators.

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Demonstration Gardens Rubus ideaus ‘Heritage’ – red raspberry Nothing is better than home-grown fruit. This everbearing cultivar produces © Robert H. Mohlenbrock @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

raspberries in the spring

and fall. If old canes are not pruned, they bear fruit in spring and new canes produce a fall crop. Or, prune the entire plant in late winter/early spring and harvest a large crop the following August. The Heritage adapts to many areas, and develops vigorous canes and firm medium-sized berries. It tolerates dry conditions as well as humidity. It is known for attracting birds, butterflies, and kids.

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Demonstration Gardens Vaccinumcorymbosum ‘Sunshine’ blueberry Local gardeners and berry lovers used to have to rely on northern © Jeff McMillian @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

states for blueberries

because Maryland did not have the needed cold to stimulate growth. The Sunshine solves that problem, being hybridized to produce excellent fruit, tolerate heat, and adapt to various soil conditions. A compact, self-pollinating, southern highbush cultivar, this ornamental and productive shrub grows well in containers or garden beds. In the spring, bell-shaped, white to pink flowers and dark green foliage appear, then the blueberries ripen in June through August. People will vie with local birds for their fair share of tasty fruit.

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Pizza Garden

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Pizza Garden Each spring, students who participate in the Pizza Garden class series have the opportunity to design and select the plants for the Enchanted Garden’s Pizza Garden. They enjoy watching the ingredients (such as tomatoes, peppers, garlic, onion, basil, and parsley) grow in the pizza slice-shaped beds, then celebrate with a Pizza Party class to sample healthy recipes.

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Gathering Circle West

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Pizza

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed Gathering Circle West

Bioswale

Patio

Heron Fountain

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Gathering Circle West Asclepias tuberosa — butterfly milkweed This native plant should inhabit every garden. Growing to only about 18 inches tall, butterfly © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

milkweed fits neatly into the

front of a garden border. In early summer, butterfly milkweed bursts into an orange haze, and pollinators come from miles away to enjoy its sweet nectar, including native bumblebees, buckeyes, and tiger swallowtails. Adult monarch butterflies may enjoy the butterfly milkweed’s nectar, but they love the foliage to lay eggs. Butterfly milkweed hosts the monarch and queen butterfly caterpillars.

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Gathering Circle West Fothergilla gardenii — dwarf fothergilla (ALSO IN GATHERING CIRCLE EAST AND POND)

Although not a native to the Piedmont, fothergilla © J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

is a superb garden plant. Growing to about three feet

tall and wide, fothergilla blooms in spring with unusual creamy, white bottlebrush-like flowers that attract small pollinators. In autumn, fothergilla’s foliage glows a gorgeous yellow, welcoming the shorter days and cooler nights.

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Gathering Circle West Ilex cornuta ‘Burfordii Nana’ — dwarf Burford holly This holly, unlike others, sets seed without requiring a male pollinator, and the brilliant red berries are food © Rita Hamlet

for birds, including robins,

cardinals, and sparrows. Birds also consider Burford holly a choice nesting site. The evergreen shrub produces creamy white flowers in spring. The small blooms may not be very noticeable to humans, but the bees love them. There is a European oak tree that resembles the holly and it was called in Latin, Ilex, or the Holly Oak. So when hollies were being named, their leaves were like the holly oak so Ilex became their genus name even though hollies are not oaks. This variety is a dwarf form, growing to 2-3 feet.

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Gathering Circle West Ophiopogon japonica ‘Nana’ — dwarf mondo grass Few grasses are as hardy as the dwarf mondo grass, also known as monkey grass. Unlike most grasses, dwarf © R. A. Howard @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

mondo grass needs little

water and can tolerate sun or shade. It is a great candidate for a shady spot where little else wants to grow, and it never needs mowing! This evergreen ground cover grows between two and four inches high with a lush spreading habit. Tiny, white flowers bloom in the spring, followed by bright blue berries. Sometimes confused with liriope, the mondo grass has narrowleaves, small flowers, and blue fruit that birds enjoy.

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Gathering Circle West Rudbeckia hirta — Black-eyed Susan (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN)

The Maryland state flower is more than just pretty, it also benefits local wildlife. © Martin van der Grinten @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

Black-eyed Susans are in the

genus Rudbeckia and operate as the larval host to the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly. They provide a nectar source sought after by many native pollinators, from bumblebees to butterflies. In late summer, keep seed heads intact and watch the American goldfinches glean seeds from stems that sometimes bend. In fact, goldfinches will eat upside down, using their weight to bend stems and reach seed heads. The American goldfinch is Howard County’s official bird.

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Gathering Circle West Salix purpurea ‘Nana’ — purple willow Many gardeners choose the purple willow for its graceful purple stems and blue-green leaves that turn yellow in © Missouri Botanical Garden

the fall. The slender and

supple twigs make good supplies for basket weaving. On a less practical note, this willow produces catkins followed by small white flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. The purple willow provides an excellent choice for wet areas or along ponds and streams. It can be pruned to form a neat hedge, or left to grow wild and sway in the breeze.

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The Enchanted Garden


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Conifer Garden

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed

Pizza Bioswale

Conifer Garden Patio

Heron Fountain

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Conifer Garden Chamaecyparis obtusa ‘Nana Gracillis’ — hinoki cypress Although native to Japan, the Nana Gracillis dwarf cultivar suits Maryland gardens quite well with © www.hort.uconn.edu

its interesting foliage and

evergreen beauty. The dark green, glossy foliage feels soft to the touch, and its branches extend horizontally in bunches of fanlike sprays. Young trees often have branches that twist in many directions. As it matures, it takes on a loose pyramidal or conical form. This cypress grows best in full sun, but tolerates partial shade. It requires little water and, once established, tolerates drought. Nana Gracillis grows very slowly, reaching four to six feet in ten years.

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Conifer Garden Juniperus procumbens ‘Nana’ — Japanese garden juniper This dwarf juniper is an overlooked but excellent plant. It may not have showstopping qualities, but it fills © Dennis Wood

many gardening needs. Its

ground hugging habit makes it a wonderful ground cover in rock gardens and on slopes, where it can cascade. It tolerates full sun and, once established, needs little water. Needles are short, sharp, and prickly. Foliage begins bright green, but becomes more blue as it matures. In winter, the foliage takes on a slight purple cast.

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Conifer Garden Picea abies ‘Nidiformis’ — Norway spruce Nicknamed the bird’s nest spruce, the Norway spruce looks like the perfect home for one of Dr. Seuss’ flying © R. A. Howard @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

creatures. It has a broad-

rounded form and flat top with a depression in the middle that gives it a nest-like appearance. New growth begins lime green, and, with maturity, forms a neat evergreen ball made of finely textured foliage. This dwarf spruce grows four to six feet tall and wide, and it tolerates full sun to partial shade, windy conditions, and short periods of drought. The bird’s nest spruce works well in rock and formal gardens, as a specimen or in group plantings.

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Conifer Garden Pinus mugo — mugo pine The mugo pine possesses wholly unique features. Most pines regularly lose needles, but the mugo holds Š D. E. Herman @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

onto its needles for four

years. It also retains its thick bushy figure, a quality that lends itself to hedges. The mugo pine grows slowly by a shallow root system, so, given time, it can become a solid evergreen cover or background. The mugo has stiff one to two inch long needles that are bright green and grow in pairs, along with small graybrown cones.

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HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Bioswale

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed

Pizza Bioswale

Conifer Garden Patio

Heron Fountain

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Bioswale Aronia melanocarpa — black chokeberry A medium-sized shrub, the black chokeberry grows to about eight feet tall and wide. In early spring, Š J. S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

the shrub blankets itself

in a myriad of tiny, white flowers that attract tiny pollinators. Flowers give way to small glossy leaves all summer, which become reddish purple by September. Its jet black berries are a favorite of numerous birds, including cardinals, catbirds, mockingbirds, brown thrashers, and even bluebirds.

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Bioswale Penstemon digitalis ‘Husker Red’ — foxglove beardtongue Husker Red (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN)

For sunny areas, foxglove beardtongue presents a treat to behold. This unique

© Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

wildflower blooms in mid-spring, usually when it has little competition. Beardtongue starts with tall spires covered in tube-shaped blooms, which look like fingers of a glove. Native bumblebees and hummingbirds find the blooms irresistible and flock to the flowers. The cultivar, ‘Husker Red’, has reddish purple foliage that remains attractive all season and may stay evergreen in mild winters.

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Bioswale Rudbeckia hirta — Black-eyed Susan (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN AND GATHERING CIRCLE WEST)

The Maryland state flower is more than just pretty, it © Martin van der Grinten @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

also benefits local wildlife. Black-eyed Susans are in the

genus Rudbeckia and operate as the larval host to the Silvery Checkerspot butterfly. They provide a nectar source sought after by many native pollinators, from bumblebees to butterflies. In late summer, keep seed heads intact and watch the American goldfinches glean seeds from stems that sometimes bend. In fact, goldfinches will eat upside down, using their weight to bend stems and reach seed heads. The American goldfinch is Howard County’s official bird.

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Bioswale Juncus effusus — soft rush (ALSO IN HERON FOUNTAIN AND RAIN GARDEN)

Soft or common rush is a grass-like perennial plant © Dennis Wood

with cylindrical upright stems. This plant may

work well in gardens that are moist or have a pond. Native to sunny, freshwater wetlands, marshes, and ditches across North America, it often helps to control erosion. The rush’s vertical stature adds architectural interest, and although it appears stiff, is actually soft to the touch. In summer, tiny yellow to pale brown flowers appear in clumps from which seeds emerge. Plants spread by seed or by rhizomes (underground stems that produce roots). To control spread, some gardeners plant rushes in buried containers. The soft rush provides food and shelter for birds and insects.

The Enchanted Garden


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The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

Patio

Rain Garden

Demonstration Gardens Pond

Stream Bed

Rose Arbor

Stream Bed

Pizza Bioswale

Conifer Garden Patio

Heron Fountain

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Patio Cornus florida — American dogwood tree Dogwoods are noticed most for their striking display of flowers from May to June, but they Š Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Plants Database

also have interesting bark

that is deeply ridged and broken, resembing alligator hide. It grows best as an understory species in association with other hardwoods. The scarlet red fruit is choice fall and winter food of the gray squirrel, fox squirrel, bobwhite, cedar waxwing, cardinal, flicker, mockingbird, robin, wild turkey, and woodpecker. The leaves and twigs are choice food for the white-tailed deer.

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Patio Paeonia lactiflora ‘Karl Rosenfeld’ — Karl Rosenfeld peony The Karl Rosenfeld peony promises showy and fragrant red double blooms from © Missouri Botanical Garden

May to June. The peony

attracts butterflies, and many gardeners use it as a cutting flower. As each plant blooms for approximately seven to ten days, staggering it with other cultivars extends the overall peony bloom time. This peony grows in a compact shrub-like shape and reaches three feet tall. Its foliage remains attractive throughout the summer, then dies to the ground after a frost.

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Patio Tzxodium distichum ‘Peve Minaret’ — dwarf bald cypress A miniature selection of the popular Bald cypress, the Peve Minaret bald cypress is courtesy of northscaping.com

a deciduous native conifer.

It works well in many landscapes with its compact pyramid form, unique textures, and delightful color. Light green foliage emerges in the spring, darkens in summer, and culminates in a copper brown in the fall. The foliage, fine and soft as a fern, invites vistors to touch. Shaggy red bark protects the strong, central tunk. It is tolerant of dry and moist conditions, and is deer resistant.

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Thank you! The Enchanted Garden represents a true community effort, and Howard County Library System thanks the following partners and volunteers for their contributions:

Field Guide descriptions: Natalie Brewer, Master Gardener, owner Weed and Wildlife; Ann Hackeling, Enchanted Garden Coordinator Photography: Dennis Wood, Geoff Baker, HCLS multimedia specialists Design and Landscaping: Live Green Landscape Associates, Oasis Design Group, Sun’s Garden and Landscaping Compost bins and blackberry trellises: Jerry Fitzpatrick, Howard County Master Gardener Rain barrels: Girl Scout Troop 4969 donated the painted one Partners: Center for Watershed Protection; The Horizon Foundation; Howard Community College; Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks; Howard County Extension Advisory Council; Howard County General Hospital: A Member of Johns Hopkins Medicine; Howard County Public School System; University of Maryland Extension — Howard County Master Gardeners Volunteers: Greg and Robert Corrigan; Girl Scout Troop #2011; Nicole Hammond; David, Susan, Emily and Ben Hobby; Hannah Jackson; Hima Jain; Bill Kelly; Maxen Jack-Monroe; Isla Vogelsang; Nancy Sebring; Nuri Sheets; Tom Sterling; Mark and Shelley Sweeney Master Gardeners: Jerry Fitzpatrick, Janine Grossman, Kent Phillips, Anne Roy, Michele Santos, Janice Winter The Enchanted Garden


HOWARD COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM

The Enchanted Garden


Howard County Library System Administrative Offices 6600 Cradlerock Way Columbia, MD 21045 hclibrary.org

Enchanted Garden Field Guide  

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