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Department of Building Construction and Design - HB 2 Prof. Gerhard Steixner

Studio directed by Dr. Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger Students Aydar Günes, Kerber Sabrina, Elzahaby Mohammad, Yilmaz Gözde, Veyseloglu Emirhan, Dogan Baris, Baliuk Polina, Brock Theresa, Drageljevic Nadja, Sehi Esat, Frych Tetiana, Garber Alexander, Hofer Mathias, Imamovic Amila, Ioannou-Naoum Alexandros, Lehr-Splawinski Katharina, Klug Daniel, Koncar-Gamulin Lovro, Krhen Domagoj, Meulli Martina, Mion Marta, Mrkajic Aleksandar, Oblitcova Iulia, Palantöken Leona Asrin, Panturu Irina, Redl Bernhard, Rychtarik Patrick, Sekere Simon, Slivnjak Luka, Valente Marius, Wittek Daniel Can In 2016 Director General of ESA, Jan Wörner, introduced his idea called MOON VILLAGE about future possibilities for international cooperation for human spaceflight. This idea was the starting point for the 2018 ‚Moon Village design studio‘ at the Vienna University of Technology. During the intensive semester course, 35 master students have developed hypothetical scenarios for a future Moon Village. The studio was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA) and several space experts from space related entities have accompanied the studio with theme-specific lectures and workshops. Based on the students‘ initial political and societal vision for a future Moon Village, they developed individual architectural projects, incorporating the technical, environmental and operational requirements of building and living on the Moon.

HB2 Moon Village Design Studio SS2018

Space Architecture Design Studio 2018

HB2 Moon Village

Envisioning the Space Architecture Design Studio SS 2018 Department of Building Construction and Design Institute of Architecture and Design Vienna University of Technology


Envisioning the Moon Village

Space Architecture Design Studio SS 2018

Building Construction and Design 2 Institute of Architecture and Design Vienna University of Technology 2018


Envisioning the Moon Village Space Architecture Design Studio 2018 Published by Vienna University of Technology Institute of Architecture and Design Building Construction and Design 2 - HB2 Prof. Gerhard Steixner (Head of Department) www.hb2.tuwien.ac.at Editors Dr. Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger Editorial assistants Sabrina Kerber, Mohammad Elzahaby, Gözde Yilmaz, Emirhan Veyseloglu, Irene Schindl Original text and projects by students Proofreading by Evelyn Zünd Coverdesign Günes Aydar, Mohammad Elzahaby Copyright Department HB2, authors, students, photographers © 2018 Building Construction and Design 2 - HB2 Vienna University of Technology Print Vica Druck

This project has received funding from the European Space Agency and the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology.


Content

The Idea of the Moon Village

6

Design Studio Approach

8

Instructors / Lecturers 10 Students / Project Overview

16

The Moon Village Workshop

20

Space Architecture Workshop

26

Final Presentation and Panel Discussion

30

Projects 38


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

The Idea of the MOON VILLAGE

In 2016, Director General of ESA, Jan Wörner, introduced his idea called MOON VILLAGE about future possibilities for international cooperation for human spaceflight. This idea was the starting point for the 2018 Moon Village design studio at the Vienna University of Technology. During the intensive semester course, 35 master students developed hypothetical scenarios for a future Moon Village. The studio was supported by the European Space Agency (ESA), and several space experts from space-related entities accompanied the studio with theme-specific lectures and workshops. Incorporating the technical, environmental and operational requirements of building and living on the Moon, all projects present the multi-cultural and open concept of the Moon Village. „If I say Moon Village, it does not mean single houses, a church, a town hall and so on. No, that would be misleading. My idea only deals with the core of the concept of a village: people working and living together in the same place. And this place would be on the Moon. In the Moon Village, we would like to combine the capabilities of different spacefaring nations with the help of robots and astronauts. The participants can work in different fields, perhaps they will conduct pure science and perhaps there will even be business ventures like mining or tourism. […] A village starts with the first house.“ (ESA, Jan Wörner) The idea of the Moon Village is not yet a real project, nor an active ESA programme. It represents an intention or rather a vision for exploring the Moon on an international level. The term ‘village’ is a synonym for a community that is open to any interested parties to join forces and share interests and capabilities. In that, it includes astronaut activities, as well as robotic endeavours for scientific, technical, commercial and touristic activities. The Moon Village idea has gained momentum and led to a number of international discussions, activities and networks (cf. Moon Village Association, etc.).

6


STUDIO APPROACH

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Design Studio Approach

Discussing the Moon Village with Piero Messina 8

The Moon Village design studio took place from March to June 2018 at the Vienna University of Technology. During this time, 13 concepts based on the Moon Village idea were developed and elaborated by the students with support from ESA and various space experts. To begin with, the students had to prepare for the most important issues of lunar habitation. All lunar facilities, including habitats and transportation systems, are dependent on the lunar environment. Environmental and operational constraints include radiation, micrometeoroids, gravity, dust mitigation, temperature extremes and diurnal cycle, as well as atmospheric conditions. Other challenges related to human activities include food production, storage and recycling, hygiene and waste collection. Social constraints and challenges include intensive social interaction and isolation, personal space and territorial issues. Each student team researched and presented selected themes. Research topics encompassed: Moon Characteristics and Environmental Challenges, Lunar Missions and Science Opportunities, The Architecture of the International Space Station, Lunar Habitats and Associated Facilities and Technical Systems, Habitat Typologies and Construction Possibilities, Life Support Systems and Greenhouses, Robotics and Industrial Manufacturing, Human Factors and Habitability, as well as Lunar Bases in Science Fiction. A comprehensive list of relevant scientific papers and literature was provided in our library at the department. The 3-month course was designed to include input lectures from various space experts and professionals. The first guest lecture was delivered by Piero Messina on the ESA idea of the Moon Village. He asked the students to think of new programmes. Prof. Irmgard Marboe provided an input on space policy and space law. Austrian astronaut Franz Viehbรถck talked with the students about his life onboard the space station Mir. With Christophe Lasseur the students had the possibility to discuss their ideas on life support system, greenhouse and in-situ-resources. Gernot Groemer shared some experiences of the analog missions by the Austrian space forum and gave additional input on moon-relevant physical facts.


STUDIO APPROACH

Lecture on space law by Irmgard Marboe

Meeting the Austrian astronaut Franz Viehbรถck

Input session on moon-relevant physics with Gernot Groemer

Discussing life support with Christopher Lasseur 9


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Studio Director, Tutors, Lecturers and Guest Critics Tutors, lecturers and guest critics in alphabetical order

Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger Space Architect | Habitability Researcher TU Vienna, HB2 Studio Director Dr. Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger is senior lecturer at the Institute for Architecture and Design. Her teachings include design courses in space architecture and extreme environment architecture and a regular course on ‘Emerging Fields in Architecture’. She is an architect at space-craft Architektur and expert in habitability design solutions for extreme environments. She has worked and collaborated on several aerospace design projects. Sandra has published several scientific papers and is author of the books Architecture for Astronauts - An Activity Based Approach (Springer 2011) and Space Architecture Education for Engineers and Architects - Designing and Planning Beyond Earth (Springer 2016).

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TUTORS | LECTURERS | GUEST CRITICS

Marlies Arnhof Young Graduate Trainee ESA

Miriam Dall‘Igna Design Systems Analyst Foster + Partners

Norbert Frischauf Physicist | OffWorld

Tutor Space Architecture Workshop

Lecturer & Tutor Space Architecture

Lecturer Moon Village Workshop

Marlies Arnhof is a young graduate trainee in the field of Space Architecture and Infrastructure at ESA/ESTEC, where she is a member of the Advanced Concepts Team (ACT). She graduated from Vienna University of Technology with a MSc in Architecture. During her master’s with Dr. Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger, she focussed on architecture for extreme environments. For her paper on her diploma project Design of a Human Settlement on Mars Using In-Situ Resources she received the Best Student Paper 2016 Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics (AIAA). At the ACT her main research interests are in-situ resource utilisation for construction on the lunar and planetary surfaces and user-architecturetechnology interaction in isolated, confined, extreme (ICE) environment research-bases.

Miriam Dall‘Igna has experience in designing and researching complex structures for manufacturing and construction. She joined Foster+Partners in 2008 and has worked with additive manufacturing since then as one of her main design tools. Part of her tasks are the experimentation and implementation of state of the art software and hardware to architectural practice. She is currently focusing on the research of goal-oriented autonomous robotic systems and additive manufacturing for large scale construction in harsh environments. Her background is in architecture and computer science.

Dr. Norbert Frischauf is currently a partner at SpaceTec Partners and co-founder and chief scientific officer of Off-World, Inc. Norbert is an accomplished technologist with a comprehensive insight in diverse industrial and scientific sectors including experimental physics, electrical engineering and aerospace engineering. As such he has worked at CERN, the European Space Agency (ESA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), as well as several national government agencies across Europe and the European Commission (EC). Norbert is a leading member in various associations (such as IAA, OEWF), an active science communicator and a keen aerobatic pilot.

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foto: Voggeneder

HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

12

Bernhard H. Foing Lunar Scientist | ESA

Gernot Grรถmer Astrobiologist | Director Austrian Space Forum

David Kendall Physicist | ISU faculty member

Lecturer Moon Village Workshop

Tutor Moon Facts

Guest Critic Final Presentation

Prof. Foing obtained his PhD in Astrophysics and Space Techniques. In 1993, he joined ESA as staff scientist, where his varied roles have included being a co-investigator for missions such as SOHO, Mars Express, Expose-Organics on ISS and COROT. He has been a project scientist for SMART-1, the first ESA spacecraft to travel to the Moon. He serves as executive director of the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG), is professor at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and member of the IAA. He coordinated ILEWG design studies and field campaigns to support the preparation to future bases on the Moon and Mars.

Dr. Gernot Groemer is the director of the Austrian Space Forum; he is an alumni of the International Space University and holds a PhD in Astrobiology. He teaches at the University of Innsbruck in the field of Mars exploration and Astrobiology. Moreover, he is a lecturer at various universities and is a member of the Board of Mentors of the Space Generation Advisory Council. Gernot is an active analog astronaut at the Austrian Space Forum logging 113 simulated EVA-hours and a total of 30 min of zero-gravity. He led more 13 Mars expedition simulations and coordinates the development of the experimental spacesuit simulator Aouda.X.

Dr. Kendall is the past chair of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (2016-2017). During his career he has held senior positions with the Canadian Space Agency including as the director general of Space Science and Space Science and Technology. He is also an adjunct faculty member of the International Space University based in Strasbourg, France. He holds an undergraduate degree in Physics from the University of Swansea, UK, and masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Calgary in Atmospheric Physics. In 2002, Davidl was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal in recognition of his significant contributions and achievements to Canada.


TUTORS | LECTURERS | GUEST CRITICS

Christian Kรถberl Scientist | Director | Natural History Museum

Christophe Lasseur Head of MELiSSA project | ESA

Irmgard Marboe Professor of International Law | UNIVIE

Panelist Final Presentation

Lecturer Life Support Systems

Lecturer Space Law

Dr. Christian Kรถberl is director general of the Natural History Museum in Vienna. He is also full professor and chair of Impact Research and Planetary Geology at the University of Vienna. Christian Kรถberl is a well-known reseacher with his investigations of meteorite impact craters and the determination of extraterrestrial components in impact-related rocks. In 2006, an asteroid was named after him. He is a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and has published over 450 peer-reviewed research publications. Since his involvment, the Natural History Museum has increased the quality and visibility of scientific research at the museum.

Dr. Christophe Lasseur is the European Space Agency coordinator of life support R&D activities, head of MELiSSA project and ESA representative of the International Space Station medical board: microbial safety. He is also an ECLSS certified instructor for European astronauts and has a PhD in BioEngineering from Compiegne University of Technology. From 2000 to 2010, he chaired the International Life Support Working Group, which involved NASA, JAXA, CSA, RSA and ESA. Since 2012 he chairs the life support sessions (F4) of COSPAR. He regularly teaches in several European engineering schools (e.g. KTH, EPFL, Agro-Paris). In March 2017, he received a Doctor Honoris Causa from Antwerpen University (Belgium).

Prof. Irmgard Marboe is professor of international law at the Department of European, International and Comparative Law at the Law Faculty of the University of Vienna. She is the head of the Austrian National Point of Contact (NPOC) for Space Law of the European Centre for Space Law (ECSL) and member of the Space Law Committee of the International Law Association. From 2008 to 2012, she was the chair of the Working Group on National Space Legislation of the Legal Subcommittee of UN Committee for the Peaceful Use of Outer Space. She authored and co-authored numerous books and articles on space law. She was a founding member and legal advisor of the Moon Village Association, which was established in Vienna in November 2017.

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14

Piero Messina ESA Director General‘s Cabinet | ESA

Rumi Nakamura Physicist | IWF

David A. Nixon Space Architect | Astrocourier

Lecturer Moon Village Vision

Guest Critic Moon Village Workshop

Tutor Space Architecture Workshop

Piero Messina has been working on the ESA’s space exploration programme Aurora since its inception. In 1991, he joined the European Space Agency, where he held several positions in the field of financial and project management. He served as coordinator with the director of Industrial Matters and Technology Programmes. He was responsible for education policies and relations with European higher education institutions until 2003. He holds a degree in Political Science, International Economic Relations from the University of Florence and a Master in Space Studies (MSS) from the International Space University in Strasbourg. Currently he works in the Director General’s Cabinet and ESA’s Strategy Department.

Dr. Rumi Nakamura, a group leader at the Space Research Institute (IWF), the Austrian Academy of Sciences and a docent at University of Graz, participated in a number of ESA and NASA physics missions and is currently leading the Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) instrument for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. She is an author of more than 360 refereed publications and was awarded the Tanakadate Award in 2005 and the Julius-Bartels Medal in 2014. In 2018, she was elected the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fellow. She currently is a member of the Board of Trustees of the International Academy of Astronautics. She worked on ideas for the Deep Space Gateway, a crewed spaceship in lunar vicinity.

David Nixon was among a handful of architects to work on the early design of the Space Station in the mid-1980s. He has worked on many space and transportation projects for clients, ranging from government agencies to cities, private companies and start-up ventures in the US and Europe, including NASA, ESA, JPL, British Aerospace, Alenia Spazio, McDonnell Douglas, Spacehab, Kistler Aerospace Corp. and Rotary Rocket Company. In 2007, he designed a physics experiment kit to boost student interest in space and flew a prototype on ESA’s Foton-3 mission and a simulated zero-g Airbus flight. He has authored many technical space papers and written a book on the design history of the ISS, titled International Space Station Architecture beyond Earth (Circa Press, 2016).


TUTORS | LECTURERS | GUEST CRITICS

Additional Acknowledments

We would like to thank the following experts for supporting the work of individual students:

Manuela Aguzzi, astronaut instructor, at Space Applications Services, for her input on astronaut training activities.

Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu Cosmonaut | ASE

Franz Viehböck Cosmonaut | CEO | Berndorf AG

Panelist Final Presentation

Lecturer Life in Space

Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu is a Romanian cosmonaut and flew into space aboard the Soyuz 40 and Salyut 6 laboratory. He was a founding member of the Association of Space Explorers and was elected for a three year term as the president of ASE International. Since 1993, he has been the permanent representative of the Association of Space Explorers at the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) sessions. In 2004, he was elected as chairman. For his engagement in raising public awareness about the asteroid impact hazard and help protecting planet Earth, he was declared 1st Official Asteroid Day Ambassador. He has received several high-ranking awards, including the Social Sciences Award of the International Academy of Astronautics.

Franz Viehböck is the assigned CEO of Berndorf AG for 2020. He is also a scientist and Austria‘s first cosmonaut. Franz Viehböck studied electrical engineering at the TU Vienna and was selected to serve as the first Austrian astronaut aboard the Austromir 91 mission. Subsequently, he worked for Rockwell as programme-Development manager of the Space-Systems-Division and for Boeing as director for international business development of the Space Systems Group. Since 2000, he is also the technology consultant of the province of Lower Austria. He has been working for the Austrian company Berndorf since 2002, where he currently is a member of the board of directors.

For providing research input related to plant and greenhouse research: Don Barker, planetary scientist. Marc Cohen, spacearchitect. Vittori Rossetti, space engineer. Tomas Rousek, spacearchitect. Franz Kerschbaum, professor of astronomy at the University of Vienna for his input on astronomy on the far side of the Moon. Claudio Maccone, director for scientific space exploration, International Academy of Astronautics, for providing his papers on The Lunar Farside Telescope.

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

The Students Students in project order

Günes Aydar (p.38) Gözde Ylmaz (p.38) Emirhan Veyseloglu (p.38) Baris Dogan (p.50) Iuliia Oblitcova (p.50)

Sabrina Kerber (p.64) Theresa Brock (p.64) Mohammad Elzahaby (p.64) Katharina Lehr Splawinski (p.78) Alexander Garber (p.78)

Leona Asrin Palantöken (p.90) Irina Panturu (p.90) Marius Valente (p.90) Bernhard Redl (p.104) Marta Mion (p.104)

Martina Meulli (p.104) Simon Sekereš (p.112) Luka Slivnjak (p.112) Esat Sehi (p.122) Amila Imamovic (p.128)

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THE STUDENTS

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Aleksandar Mrkahic (p.128) Tetiana Frych (p.134)

Patrcik Rychtarik (p.134) Polina Baliuk (p.134)

More projects (p.144) Alexandros Ioannou-Naoum Nadja Drageljevic Daniel Can Wittek Domagoy Krhen Lovro Koncar-Gamulin

Two Aerospace Engineering students from FH Wiener Neustadt took part in the first workshop: Kaarel Repän César Sánchez

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THE STUDENTS

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Workshop THE MOON VILLAGE

Presenting the Moon Village idea 20

The aim of the two-day workshop was to discuss relevant issues prior to the design of the Moon Village architecture. In order to prepare for the workshop, students prepared posters on the topic of the Moon Village. Rumi Nakamura, scientist from OEAW, joined us for the preliminary presentation. Input lectures from ESA Moon specialist, Bernard Foing, and space systems specialist Norbert Frischauf enlivened the discussion among the students. Former diploma student of the TU Vienna and current YGT at ESA, Marlies Arnhof, supported the students with valuable input. Additionally, space engineering students from the FH Wr. Neustadt joined the workshop. During the workshop, the students teamed up to produce reports on five key topics, which are summarised below.


THE MOON VILLAGE WORKSHOP - WORKGROUP REPORTS

Working Group 2: Resources

Working Group 1: Explore Together

This working group highlighted the importance of cultural diversity, tolerance and equality. Open questions include the form of responsibility and universal laws. The group proposed multifunctional shared spaces, which would not only save resources and physical space itself, but also create new lifestyles that could change the way we live our lives.

the

Technische Universität Wien Master programme Architecture Coming soon S.S. 2018

This working group summarised resources available on the Moon, such as solar power or substances contained in the lunar soil, like oxygen, hydrogen, helium-3, aluminium. In particular, they highlighted potential in-situ-resource utilisation processes. In addition to open technical questions, the group was concerned about future stakeholders, environmental damages and ethical consequences of moon-mining. Considerations comprise the impact on future generations, importance of the moon’s role in human culture, stakeholders in lunar heritage and the visual impact from Earth.

Design Studio Space Architecture: Envisioning the “Moon Village”

MOON VILLAGE

MOON VILLAGE

Professor: Häuplik-Meusburger, Sandra

MoonNET from Digital to Analog

2020

DANIEL CAN WITTEK ALEXANDROS IOANNOU-NAOUM IVAN MATAS MARTINA MEULLI MARTA MION ESAT SEHI

solar panel

6 months

30 years

100 years

First test-roboters and cameras (NASA)

2025 2024

Lunar Base timeline

10 years

When?

Material tests + machine test

MARS:

Moon Village development

The moon village concept is a common shared ownership concept. The program that is used has to be open sourced everybody is able to connect with the robots and other given facilities.

TEST ROBOTER with on board energy harvesting

Moon Village vs Moon Base

MOON VILLAGE FACTS

moonNET

CARGO First Phase

It is set in the near future to be the test labartory for the Mars mission and others.

MOON:

Why?

It will be a Test for Missions to other Planets like Mars. We can test the procedure of colonizing other Planets without the risk having long distances. After this stage the Moon can be used as a location for a space industry.

Next big solarstorm in 2018-20

How?

POTENTIAL ISS SHUTDOWN

First only colonised digitally with robots. Humans will come to the moon 10 years later or only for mending.

CARGO Second Phase

Elements for first ONsurface station prefabricated on earth First hub with inflatables Regolith cover made by robots and 3D printer ORION Missions Manned missions for mending

2 Weeks

Inflatable hub

https://www.welt.de/mediathek/dokumentation/space/spacetime/sendung158326591/Spacetime-Aufbruch-zum-Mars-N24.html

Inflatable hub

deployable lunar habitation design; sandra häuplik-meusburger kursad ozdemir; 2012

4 - 6 COMPLETED SURFACE STATION

2030

Regolith cover + habitat structure

CARGO Third Phase

Life support system modules: OXYGEN Production WATER Production INTERNAL Climate Control ENERGY: Solar Panels Nuclear Reactor

2045

2040

Orion First engineers to stay on moon

Moon Village Postcards

x25

Scetch of a possible surface station Screenshots: Mars

6 months

Before the next big SOLAR STORM: Tube system research finished Tube based moon station + on surface entrance module More space for residents

x50

SELF SUSTAINABLE STRUCTURE Producing enough oxgen/co2 and water Independent foodproduction Balanced recycling circle

Tube based Moonstation Studentenarbeit: „Destination Moon“, 2012

Large tunneler

Lunar Base and Space Activities of thr 21st Century. Author W.W. Mendell, 1985 Lunar and Planetary Institute

LAGRANGIAN LAUNCHBASE

2050

A new orbit station

Constant solar energy Protection from lunar dust Gravitation simulation Stop for other space travels (mars moon)

MOON

Developping of a industry for marsian missions

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrange-Punkte#/media/File:L2_rendering_de.jpg

MARS:

Start of the Mars Base Mission Mining Processing

Tourism and Leisure

Artificial Ecosystem

Space Research

Transports 253.B92 Großes Entwerfen Space Architecture: Envisioning the ‚Moon Village‘

Leona Asrin Palantoeken; Marius Valente; Irina Panturu; Patrick Rychtarik; Günes Aydar; EmirhanVeyseloglu

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Working Group 3: Humans and Robotics

Working Group 4: Resilience and Sustainability

This working group dealt with the mission timelines, production processes, new technologies, robot and human relations and activities. Important considerations concern the production and storage of energy and its reliability, as well as the use of new technologies for human wellbeing. Human-robot activities include transportation systems, maintenance, life-support, wearables and medical applications. Open questions are considerations on constant monitoring and privacy requirements as well as to what extent machines should be included into the societal processes. Moonbase

Moonvillage

The members of this working group discussed the key components for an open modular, dynamic and flexible framework. Those included space transportation and surface systems, the technical framework and infrastructure development, power systems and waste management. Key components, discussed for achieving social resilience, comprised knowledge exchange, typologies of networks and communication, public and private partnerships and an output and share ratio.

A RADICALLY HUMAN CENTERED APPROACH

Results of the Past

The Visions of the Future

04

THE IDEA OF THE MOONVILLAGE

Purposes

05 Divided by Nations

Space Tourists Robots for Research and Production Goods from Earth

“The Moon Village is open to any and all interested parties and nations. There are no stipulations as to the form their participation might take: robotic and astronaut activities are equally sought after. You might see not only scientific and technological activities, but also activities based on exploiting resources or even tourism.“

Research / Scientific Center

Space Tourists Robots for Research and Production Moon-produced goods

Johann Dietrich Wörner

01 01.

02

03

06

02. Multiple Purposes

Moon Nation

07

03. Private Business

08

Funded by the Government

04. Long Term Missions

the mission should overcome the

from mining to testing living in

investment from private

creating a new kind of

“leadership in space” as a

space & space tourism

companies and “non-profit”

environment for working and

based organisations

living together

purpose of the journey

ARCHITECTURE

Short Time Missions

„Wie die Räume ohne den Menschen aussehen, ist unwichtig, wichtig ist nur, wie die Menschen darin aussehen.“ ~ “How spaces look without humans ist not important. It is important how people look in it.”

Full Earth Support

Bruno Taut

05. Producing

06. Recreation

07. Recycling

PREMISE

08. Robotic Missions

self-sustainable village: produces

human scale is taken into

lets think about tomorrow and

Human controlled Robots to create

and recycles most of the needed

consideration: recreation,

how to make it better

and build.

supplies

meditation and social aspects

Science Base

Space Tourists Robots for Research and Production Moon-produced goods Exploration to Mars

Human Missions

Being on the Moon is dangerous for human beings.

Robots for Research and Production Exploration to Mars

The presence of human beings on the moon has become obsolet as modern technology becomes ever more sophisticated.

Robots for Research and Production Exploration to Mars

Activities on the moon - such as research, mining or production - can be handled solely by machines.

p

03

Infrastructure

CONCLUSIO

phase II: Arrival - Leisure/Preparation/Transfer - Departure

Which structures do we need on the Moon

Ste

Ste

Ste

What does the Moon have to offer

p

01 p

02

Space Tourists Robots for Research and Production Moon-produced goods

Architecture

phase I: Arrival - Leisure/Business - Departure

As architects we are interested in structures for humans rather than robots.

Space Junk

ity

p

nc

ce

oo

id

M

/D

es

ge ra

R

str on c ob

oti

“I am just an example of how a leisure activity could look like...”

R

Restricted Areas

TWO. As a stop-over to other destinations in our solar system. Transit.

Resources

QUALITATIVE SPACIAL RESEARCH

Mining

Social Life

Energy

Step 01

Areas divided by activities and interests

Long Term Relationships ‘’Comfort making‘' architectural

Grey Areas Current residents decide what

ONE. To serve the natural human curiosity. Tourism.

Laboratories

Sto

C

en

am

n tio uc

in M

R

es

ea

rc

in

h

g

We see two possible rational reasons for human beings to be on the moon. Research

Science

Nuclear

Research on materials : volatiles for human exploration, gas, energy supplies

We are interested in examining fields that focus on human experience rather than technical feasibility:

Gastronomie

Entertaiment

approach

Common Areas

8

Construction Area Recycling and 3D printing

Life Support, Green Houses, Energy.

Ideas

facilities

Arriving on & Leaving the Moon And the Inbetween Psychological Aspects Recreational Activities Prospects for Health Resorts Preparation for further Traveling

Sport

Step 02

Facilities

Library

Potential starting point / space base / stop for deep space exploration

Education Workshops Houses

Habitations

Ipsum is not simply random text.

different scale : add-on modules and replaceable parts.

Adaptable Structures International Development of the Project

Step 03

Uneven terrain

moon village location

Private Areas

Reduced gravity research: human body, growth, potential permanent residence in space or on other planets in the Galaxy

The south pole contains mountains such as Epsilon Peak which is taller than any mountain found on earth.

Personal Lockers

Working Communication

+

Moon missions

Solar winds

Where do we build the Moonvillage Shaded Areas The bottom of the craters are in instant shadow, this saves volatiles and lunar ice from evaporation.

Poles are exposed to radiation from the Sun and the solar winds can cause electrical charges on the surface of the crater rims

Meteorites and comets

Equator Rima Bode

Not protected from asteroids and other cosmic objects.

Solar Illumination The rim of the craters are nearly constantly illuminated, this provide sustainable solar power supply and stable temperatures of -50°C.

Lava Tube Marius Hills

Under the ground

Lunar Map

The regolith layer creates a shield against radiation, solar winds and small meteorites. It would also help provide access to geology that would otherwise require some digging to reach.

Lunar Poles

Far side of the Moon + Protected from the Earth magnetic field which gives a lot of freedom to magnet based research and technology

They are shielded from the variations in temperature at the lunar surface with a temperature of approximately -20°C.

— No visual connection to Earth, communication might be complicated

staff

The timeframe of stays range from a few days for the crews to up to a year for the staff maintaining and living on the station. Therefore different spacial solutions are necessary.

emigratns

Short term visits: Tourists, visitors of the residents

CHALLENGES

Activities: mining and production on the Moon,

maintenance of the factories, robots, post production

3-6 months transit

3-6 months transit

No / little continuous population leads to problems of social group behaviour and knowledge transfer. Interaction between distinct groups like tourists, emigrants (transit) and staff could lead to social tensions.

residents, astronauts

Skylights are not only providing natural sunlight to the tubes but also can help finding and mapping the location of the lava tubes.

6-12 months moon day ~ 28 earth days

Long term training: deep space explorers, potential space

+

Skylights

— Not well researched yet

1-5 months

TIMEFRAME tourists

Short term scientific missions: Scientists

Short or long term production missions: Unstable structure

1-2 weeks

crews, pilots

a Lunar Hotel

Short term maintenance missions: Technical support or special assistance

Due to the shape and the pressure the lava caves could collapse and may require additional structural support.

vacation, rich, exploring

workers, engineers, mars crews

a Space Haven

+

Complexity

Activities: Education and experience sharing with

Placing a moon village underground is desired but searching for a perfect position of a big enough lava tube might be a problem.

+

Lava Tubes

tu wien / ss18 / Grosses Entwerfen Space Architecture: Envisioning the Moon Village / Betreuerin sANDRA Hauplik-Meusburger jULIA oBLITSOVA & baris dogan

22

Activities: Getting used to hard physical and psychological conditions and isolation, adopting to new environment

observation

transit, emigration to mars, new live

Activities: Collecting samples, research data, air, water, ice, ground to test the samples back on Earth

+

Human friendly temperatures

Equatorial Areas + Equatorial areas are said to have higher concentration of Helium-3 and other volatiles because the solar wind is less strong due to the angle. —There is no constant sunlight and the temperatures are unstable because of the lunar day and night cycles.

What do we do on the Moon

TYPOLOGY As assisting agents for our spacial research we identified two possible structures:

Activities: Exploration, Learning

South Pole Shackleton crater

selfconsciousness meditation exploration

What are we space tourists to do with our time? Why did we go up there? What do we want to achieve while there? (Oberservation, Meditation, Selfconciousness, Exploration...)

Short-term training: Pilots, Astronauts, ScapeExplorers, Crews

+

North Pole Peary crater

Shelters

imagine 1/6 of earths gravity on a trampoline

Suitable for all category, Lorem

Different areas develop in

DEPARTURE

free time: leisure or preparation

Dormitories

Tourism Multifuncitional Spaces

INBETWEEN

ARRIVAL

Hobby

to do with the space

the previous participants

Long-term research mission: Scientist

Activities: Data and research based and tested directly on the Moon

Katharina Lehr Splawinski, Bernhard Redl, Alexander Garber


THE MOON VILLAGE WORKSHOP - WORKGROUP REPORTS

Working Group 5: Masterplan

The last working group addressed the potential aspects of a master scenario, which requires consideration of steps, such as finding a suitable starting point, transportation and the question of the first module and infrastructure. Furthermore, the topics of scouting, analysation and preparation, stabilisation and initialisation, as well as selfsufficient systems and potential for expansion were approached.

Lecture by ESA Moon specialist Bernard Foing

A Hypothetical Moon Village Scenario After the first workshop, students started to develop a vision for a future settlement on the Moon and began to work on a hypothetical scenario, addressing the questions of what would happen and who would be involved. Each student team, which consisted of two to three people, developed their individual scenario and a timeline as part of the Moon Village. In addition, the teams tried to connect to neighboring facilities, in order to live up to the Moon Village idea.

Input lecture with Norbert Frischauf 23


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

North Pole 7 LUNAR PEARL Simon Sekereš, Luka Slivnjak

11 MOON OBSERVATORY Alexandros Ioannou-Naoum, Daniel Can Wittek

3 KRATERHAUSEN 11

RESEARCH OF THE CRATER-BASED RESOURCES Theresa Brock, Sabrina Kerber, Mohammad Elzahaby

12 MATERIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH MODULE Nadja Drageljevic

7 3

12

24


THE MOON VILLAGE SITEPLAN

South Pole 8

1 SUNDIAL EXPLORER THE HABITAT THAT FOLLOWS THE SUN Günes Aydar, Gözde Ylmaz, Emirhan Veyseloglu

6

8 MOBILE SCOUTING Esat Sehi

9

10 LUNAR PORT Polina Baliuk, Tetiana Frych, Patrick Rychtarik

10 9 SOCIALIZER LUNAR SOCIAL NETWORK Amila Imamovic, Aleksandar Mrkahic

2 13

2 ASTRO-SCIENTIST TRAINING CAMPUS Baris Dogan, Julia Oblitcova

5

4

6 LUNAR GRAVITY RESEARCH CENTER Bernhard Redl, Marta Mion, Martina Meulli

1

4 RESEARCH FOOD LAB Katharina Lehr Splawinski, Alexander Garber

5 PACLINGS LUNAR FACILITY Marius Valente, Irina Panturu, Leona Asrin Palantöken

13 SPIRAL Domagoj Krhen, Lovro Koncar-Gamulin

stationary mobile

25


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Workshop SPACE ARCHITECTURE

Based on the students‘ initial political and societal vision for a future Moon Village, they developed individual architectural projects, incorporating the technical, environmental and operational requirements of building and living on the Moon. The three-day space architecture workshop took place from the 23rd to the 25th of May. Miriam Dall‘Igna, design system analyst at Foster + Partners, provided a lecture on the 3D printing projects and research of Foster + Partners. The following two days consisted purely of 1-to-1 project discussions accompanied by Miriam Dall‘Igna, David Nixon, space architect, and studio director Sandra HäuplikMeusburger. The goal of the workshop was to foster an idea and strengthen the individual concepts of the students. A checklist of typical design issues was provided to the students as a reference.

26


SPACE ARCHITECTURE WORKSHOP

Checklist of Typical Space Architecture Design Issues

Basic Concept Lunar Location

Geography, topography, latitude, longitude

Human Population

Size, gender, role, permanent, temporary

Overall Configuration

Functional layout, accommodation range, total volume, per-person volume, ingress/egress

Habitable Elements

Architectural shapes and sizes, berthing techniques, foundation techniques

Construction Methods

Prefabrication, deployment, assembly, manufacture, hybrid methods

Payload Schedule

Number of payloads, payload types (elements, components, equipment, materials, consumables)

Security and Safety

Pressure containment, radiation shielding, thermal range, contamination exclusion

Life Support

Atmospheric revitalisation, power supply, water recycling, waste management, ecological control

Phasing

Crew visited, intermittent occupation, permanent occupation

Table 1. Checklist of typical space architecture design issues (D. Nixon, 2018)

27


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

28

Workshop with David Nixon and Miriam Dall‘Igna

Project discussions between students and guest critics

Discussing preliminary design ideas

Discussion about space architecture with David Nixon


SPACE ARCHITECTURE WORKSHOP

29


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Final Presentation The final presentation and concluding panel discussion took place on the 26th of June in the Festsaal of the Vienna University of Technology. David Kendall, past chair of the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and adjunct faculty member of the International Space University provided valuable and straight-forward comments on each of the projects presented. After the presentations, a walkabout through the exhibition allowed a closer look on the projects.

Festsaal, Vienna University of Technology

Students presenting the Moon Village designs 30


FINAL PRESENTATION AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Each group was given fifteen minutes to present ...

... followed by questions from the audience.

Exhibition of the models and design posters

Walkabout through the exhibition 31


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Panel Discussion A panel discussion by several space experts concluded the last day of the Moon Village design studio. Each panelist started with a fifteen minute presentation of a relevant lunar topic. Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger, space architect, senior lecturer and studio director introduced the design studio and led the panel discussion. The first short lecture was held by Piero Messina, a member of the Director General’s Cabinet and ESA’s strategy department. He talked about how the idea of the Moon Village developed and what it strives to achieve. Christian Köberl, director general of the Natural History Museum in Vienna, covered the subject of lunar exploration by giving an overview of the scientific rationale. Cosmonaut and founding member of the Association of Space Explorers, Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu, presented the history and future outlooks of of human exploration of the Moon.

Festsaal, Vienna University of Technology

The last panellist was Irmgard Marboe, professor of international law at the department of European, International and Comparative Law at the Law Faculty of the University of Vienna and member of the Space Law Committee of the International Law Association. She approached the topic of legal and ethical aspects of the Moon Village. After the presentations, the panelists were joined by Irina Panturu, a student of the design studio, for the panel discussion. Subsequently, the discussion was continued at a reception with drinks and animated conversations.

Arriving guests at the Festsaal, Vienna University of Technology 32


FINAL PRESENTATION AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Piero Messina on the idea of the Moon Village

Christian Köberl on the subject of space exploration

Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu on the Moon‘s history

Irmgard Marboe on the topic of space law 33


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Panel discussion following the presentations, moderated by Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger from the department HB2

Christian KĂśberl on the scientific rationale of lunar exploration 34

Discussing astronautics with Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu


FINAL PRESENTATION AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Questions from the audience completed the discussion

After the panel discussion the exhibition continued ...

A reception concluded the day 35


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

36


FINAL PRESENTATION AND PANEL DISCUSSION

Group picture of the students and panelists

37


SU ND I A L

THE HABITAT THAT FOLLOWS THE SUN Project by Günes Aydar | Emirhan Veyseloglu | Gözde Yilmaz

CREW

three to four astronauts

MISSION LENGTH

28 days, up to three months

MISSION OBJECTIVE

scientific research robotic operation research

LOCATION

South Pole Aitkin Basin and cold traps on South Pole

CONSTRUCTION

aluminium frame covered with protective materials


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary The Sundial Explorer is a mobile habitat, which is designed to perform early scientific research on the lunar surface. According to NASA papers, those lunar missions require human fieldwork. The Sundial Explorer shall make EVA missions with astronauts and the mapping of the lunar surface easier and safer. Prior to concept development, the following mission goals were determined: The first goal was to optimise the design for safe and efficient scientific research. While the Sundial Explorer follows a dedicated path, small autonomous rovers can be released for sample collection. The habitat includes a laboratory, in which collected samples can be researched further. The Sundial Explorer also has suitports, providing space suits for every astronaut. The second goal was to optimise the use of energy and resources. The rover is designed to be self-sufficient while travelling. The Sundial Explorer is a mobile infrastucture. It will move between outposts to get life supporting resources for itself and also transport resources (e.g. water) from one outpost to another.

Main Concept Ideas

SCOUTS EXPLORATION ON LUNAR SURFACE

NOMADS MOBILITY AS INFRASTRUCTURE

The third concept idea was the aim to constantly stay in sunlight in order to gather energy. In addition, the thermal tension on materials of the habitat can be reduced, which extends the operational time of the habitat.

SUNDIAL CONSTANT SUNLIGHT 40


SUNDIAL EXPLORER

Choosing Locations & Creating the Path

SPA BASIN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

ELLIPTICAL PATH MALAPERT M. WATER GATHERING 1. The first intention was to create a circular path, which would lay between the South Pole and the equatorial regions. But this would have prevented research on equatorial regions.

3. The Sundial Explorer will start with an elliptical path around the South Pole Aitkin Basin and Malapert Mountain, as they are seen as optimal locations for scientific research and water gathering.

MALAPERT M. WATER GATHERING

2. By creating an elliptical path that extends to the equatorial regions, research on equatorial regions is enabled. Furthermore, water for life support can be extracted from the Malapert Mountain.

4. By rotating the elliptical path for further scientific research on different areas around the South Pole (water gathering station on Malapert Mountain), a pattern of a lotus flower is created. This way, a large area of the lunar surface is researched while staying in constant sunlight. 41


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

What is the Travel Speed?

HABITAT

8.125 km/h

11.04 km/h

12.88 km/h

5.76 km/h

5.67 km/h

10.89 km/h

10.89 km/h

9.91 km/h

9.73 km/h

6.3 km/h

5.67 km/h

6.3 km/h

Return to the outpost with a spare time of 5 days 9.91 km/h

A basic simulation on the optimal speed has been conducted, which resulted in a maximum of 10 km/h. This includes a spare time of five days that can be spent on additional EVA or maintenance missions.

42


SUNDIAL EXPLORER

Main Design Features of the Skeletal Shell SOLAR PANELS

At least 30 m2 of solar panels ensure that the habitat will have sufficient energy. A 200 kWh power storage is installed for an 48 hour emergency or in case the habitat crosses to the dark side. The surface of panels can be configured and rotated into the direction of the sun to get sunlight in 90 degrees.

LIVING MODULE

Dimensions: 8,14x4,58x3,67 m The hatch door has a big glass panel in order to give the crew the opportunity to observe the lunar surface and space.

RADIATORS

STRUCTURAL SKELETON

Radiators underneath the solar panels prevent the solar panels to overheat and are also responsible for cooling of the habitat.

The skeleton works as the carrier of all infrastructural elements, including the mobility and solar energy system. The skeleton is made of aluminium trusses, with a thickness of 40 cm (at least 28 cm)

ENGINE FORCE

The habitat is able to travel up to 15 km/h. A vehicle of 15 tons must have at least an engine with 1,75 horsepowers to ensure its mobilisation. Emergency situations in mind, every engine (8 seperate engines, one for every wheel) will have 1 horsepower (in total 8 HPs)

SUSPENSIONS & ROTATION

The suspension system is inspired by the Rocker Boogie suspension system of the Curiosity Rover. The Rocker Boogie system has been adapted to reduce the tension load on the skeleton.

43


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Assembly on the Lunar Surface

44


SUNDIAL EXPLORER

Life Support System WATER FROM COLD TRAPS

WATER TANK

CREW (28 days Report)

The water obtained by the outpost on Malapert Mountain will be transfered to the Sundial Explorer every 28 days.

Water for crew: 1197 kg Water for electrolysis: 445 kg 80% recycling potential, tank must hold 1110 kg

Oxygen consumption: 210 kg Water consumption: 1197 kg Nitrogen need: 210 kg

CO2 Scrub Tank 530 kg

H2O Tank

Grey Water

ELECTROLYSIS

+

-

performed by solar energy

O2

H2

RECYCLING

HYDROGEN FUEL CELLS FOR ROVERS

The grey hygiene water, urine, respiration steam from the crew and waste water from fuel cells of rovers are recycled. Recycling efficiency is 80%.

The hydrogen and oxygen, which are produced by electrolysis, will be delivered to the rovers, to be used in fuel cells, which are more efficient than batteries. Fuel cells produce water as a waste product, which can be used further. 45


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

installations

installations glove box

glove box

life support systems life support systems WC

WC

5

5

running mil

folding table

water dispenser

water shower microwave microwave dispenser

running mil

folding table

shower tool box

installations

tool box

fold

installations

LIVING LIVING HYGIENEHYGIENELAB

LAB

EVA

EVA

h

installations

Detail 2

8

life support systems

8

glove box

Detail 3

WC

5

running mil

la

folding table

4

4 water dispenser

microwave

Detail 1

shower tool box installations

8 8

46

8


SUNDIAL EXPLORER

Sections

LIVING

HYGIENE soft ceiling

exchangable seperator lighting foldable screens food storage

water tank life support system racks

cooking equipment folding chair

algae bags personal item storage lightning

personal item storage lighting aluminium composite panel toiletries storage

hygiene products storage

folding chair

hydraulic table

urine recovery

EVA

LAB lighting lab equipment storage experiment racks

projector curtain hydro farm experiment

spare space suits lab equipment storage tools panel experiment racks suit ports tool box entry

CO2 N2 H2 tanks

H cell charge glove box entry

exchangable rack system

47


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Details of Ramp D1 Formation Departure of Rovers

Window D2 The Sleeping Quarters

D3 Around the Living Module The Protective Shell

pyramid textured blanket aluminum bumper 0,2 mm kevlar composite 0.64 cm nextel fabric 0,3 cm spacer 0,5 cm MLI 0,5 cm

Aluminium Composite Panel 45°

ALU pressure shell 0,2 mm polyethylene 15 cm ALU inner shell 0.1 mm

OUTER SHELL 1/10 48


SUNDIAL EXPLORER

Comments by David Nixon + Compact and well-planned habitat accommodation. + Clever chassis unfolding methodology. + Good life support system approach (though harvesting water from lunar cold traps presents another set of difficulties). - Hexagonal cross-section of habitat is not ideal for efficient pressure containment and would incur a weight penalty. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Great and sustainable idea. + Clear diagrams help to understand the concept. Open questions: If the solar panels adjust to capture the best sun angles, how could the design enable that? How does the habitat connect to the chassis? It would be interesting to explore some design ideas.

49


Mooncampus Astro-ScientistTrainingcenter


Project by Baris Dogan | Iuliia Oblitcova

CREW

between 6 to 20 AstroScientist in two phases

MISSION LENGTH

phase 1 : 30 days phase 2 : 60 days

MISSION OBJECTIVE

astronaut training for deep space exploration

LOCATION

South Pole, Shackleton Crater

CONSTRUCTION

in-situ built dome, concrete-like structure made from regolith


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary MoonCampus is the first astronaut training center on the lunar surface. The concept of the Moon Campus is to train highly professional specialists to become “Astro-Scientists� - astronauts and scientists at the same time, able to perform complicated EVA missions, perform advanced research in the conditions of reduced gravity and other surface operations. The goal is to learn new skills, to retrain skills learned before in the real lunar environment and to prepare to go for further deep space exploration in the future.

S T O R Y B O A R D 52

2018

The surface part of the MoonCampus is placed under a dome to protect Astro-Scientists in training from radiation and meteorites. The campus itself consists of training and workshop areas, living areas, sport facilities and VR training areas for learning new skills. Living together in the provided spacial conditions is considered to be part of the training as well. The open design of the MoonCampus allows every future Astro-Scientist to have access to maintenance and life support systems, in order to be able to control complex lunar bases themselves after the training. In general, a maximum of seven people will begin training to be able to perform simultaneous surface and research missions with three to four trainers supporting them.

2032

2035

Seeds

Planting

Roots

Destination on the Moon Scouting

Choosing the location First contact with the surface

Establishing the base Starting expansion Making it self-sustainable


MOOONCAMPUS

Location It is very important to use the energy resources provided on the Moon and in space, especially exploiting the maximum of sunlight and solar energy. This and other benefits led to the decision to start the journey at the South Pole near Shackelton Crater.

2041

2051

To infinity and beyond

Sprout

Tree

Fruits

Connecting with new infrastructure Continuing expansion Gaining new sources

Growing into a Moon Village Looking into deep space

Using the gained knowledge Producing and storing Setting new goals Preparing to go further

53


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Laboratories

Training Areas

Spaceport

C/P Areas

For

Experiments Research Life support

Field training Simulations Education

Robot control Observation Factory

Residents Common Private

Who

Scientists

Trainers

Technicians

All

Access

S

Te 6

Stage 1

Stage 2

54

Astronauts after Earth training // Engineers

Astro-Scientists Trainers Technicians

T

Te 8

Assembling Robots 3D Printing Machines Drones Experimenting Researching Discovering Observing Expanding

Te

S

T

Te

6

24

8

30

20-25

60-120


Restricted Areas MOOONCAMPUS

Private Areas Common Areas Meeting Lecture

Spacial Connection Storage

Required Connection

Workshops Technologies 3D Printing Life Support Vehicles

Life Support

Part of Astronaut Training on the site

Campus

Living

"Lobby" Common Areas

WC

Restrooms

Bedroom

Storage Load

Kitchen Dining

Maintenance

VR Areas

Laboratories Leisure Hobby

Space Port Arrival / Departure

Gym

Storage Labs

Common Areas WC Research

Fuel Storage

WC

Medical Facilities Storage

Meeting

Field Training

Maintenance Storage Recycling Liquid Oxygen Storage LSS Greenhouses O2 / H2O

Industrial Zone Production Reactor Cooling Facilities

Research Power Fuel

Solar Panels

Manufacturing Mining

Food Supply

55


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Level -4 Suit Port

Surface Training Pit 1

Handle Astronaut Suit

Sulfite Dome Protection against micro meteorites, radiation shielding Opening in the dome for EVA missions Surface Training Pit 2

Rover Dock

Hatch

Level 0 Cupola Glass

Fused Silica and borosilicate glass

Portable Greenhouse

Donning Area

Aluminium Joints Coated Multi-Layer Insulation

Life Support Pipes: water / electro

Air Pipes

Fireman´s Pole for fast connection

Crew Capsules

Lounge

Level -4 Guest Capsule

Shelf

View Point Workshops Door with blinders

Foldable table Foldable bed

56

Workshop Areas / Med Capsule 3D Printing / Scientific Gloves Level -3 / -4

Hygiene / Kitchen / Dining Lounge

Private Bubble

Level 0 / -3 Optic Fiber Pipe


MOONCAMPUS

Arrival The first modules are transported from Earth to the crater rim. Robots/ excavators/machines and food supplies are delivered from Earth.

Placement They are placed underground to protect them from radiation. Connection to the surface and to the crater bottom is organised.

Expansion The modules are assembled on the Moon and are ready to expand to the surface, while the usage of regolith as a raw material is researched.

57


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Surface Level EVA missions Control tower

16

58


MOONCAMPUS

Level 2 Working area Life support system Laboratory

18

59


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Level 3 Crew capsules C/P areas Gym Capacity: 6

60


MOONCAMPUS

Level 4 Guest capsules C/P areas VR area Capacity: 8

61


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

-2 Level // Workshops

Surface Level // EVA Missions Outside Skin Concept

Rover rides on the uneven terrain Robot manipulation on the surface Cleaning dust from solar panels, suits, rovers, robots Portable greenhouse observation EVA suit walking training

Carbon Panels

Aluminized polyimide Multi Layer Insulation Graphite-ďŹ ber reinforced epoxy

-1 Level // Meeting

Sintered Regolith

Trainees / Crew / Visitors Maintaince

-4 Level // VR training Learning new skills in VR Practising learned skills in VR

GSEducationalVersion

62

Repairing robots / drones / system LSS maintenance Medical operations Scientific training 3D Printing in low gravity conditions Geological test training


MOONCAMPUS

Comments by David Nixon + Sensible adjacencies organization. + Accommodation areas providing both communal and private facilities. + Architecturally interesting multilevel accommodation approach. - Excavating those underground volumes would be a major challenge and assumes the subsurface geology is soft enough for Earth-style mechanical diggers. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Great architectural programme. + Clear diagrams and graphics help to understand the ideas. Open questions: Considering energy, how much electricity would be necessary to maintain the campus facilities? What is the strategy to bring in or simulate natural light? In terms of modularity and resilience, it would be interesting to detail how parts of the structure can be replaced.

63


RESEARCH FACILITY FOR CRATER BASED RESOURCES Project by Theresa Brock | Mohammad Elzahaby | Sabrina Kerber

CREW

first base for two astronauts research base for six astronauts

MISSION LENGTH

minimum six months maximum theoretically indefinite

MISSION OBJECTIVE

research of the crater’s natural resources using the crater from top to bottom

LOCATION

Philolaos Crater, North Pole

CONSTRUCTION

regolith sintering and on-site additive manufacturing to adapt the existing lava tubes


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary The crater research facility ‘Kraterhausen’ is located in a crater near the North Pole. Here, a lot of natural resources can be found – including ice water in the lava tubes at the bottom and eternal sunlight at the crater rim. A mixed team of humans and robotics research the possible uses of those resources. The research base is located in the natural lava tubes in the crater wall, so that the rock provides constant shelter from radiation and extreme temperature. On the rim, the first habitation and surface base is located. Farther down, still in the sunlight zone, lies the research and human habitation base. Here, existing caves are made habitable by 3D printing layers of solid regolith to maintain the pressure inside the base. A coating of silicon sintering separates the regolith layer from the habitation areas.

66

Farther down lies a second, mainly robotic, research base, where bigger scaled projects are manufactured. At the bottom, ice water is harvested from the lava tubes and transported to the upper research bases via funicular rovers. Here, it is filtered and converted to drinkable water and oxygen. Using a whole slice of the crater wall, the crater’s resources are researched from top to bottom. The infrastructural route, which connects the various bases, is depressurised and requires the use of rovers or spacesuits. ‘Kraterhausen’ strives to provide well-funded research and a better understanding of the lunar craters for future generations, combined with a conscious handling of the sensitive lunar environment.


KRATERHAUSEN

Overview - Crater Bases

lunar lander/first habitation/surface base

habitation and research base

peak of eternal light permanently shadowed

top to bottom and inside out direction of construction, due to rubble and bed rock

robotic base

lava tubes with ice resources

67


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Timeline PHASE I

PHASE II

6 months

PHASE III

1 year

1 year

PHASE IV

PHASE V

5 years+

PHASE I

PHASE II

PHASE III

PHASE IV

6 months

1 year

1 year

5 years+

EXPLORATION

ROBOTIC CONSTRUCTION

HUMAN CONSTRUCTION

HABITATED RESEARCH

PHASE V

FUTURE ASPECTS

Robotic exploration of Start of construction Completion of the Habitated crater rePossible expansion to by a purely robotic habitation area and search by an extended different nations the chosen crater area and existing lava tubes workforce: adaption research facilities by a team of humans and and projects as to analyse the site of the caves through small human workforce robotics with a top-tocooperation with situation and adapt the drilling and additive in cooperation with bottom utilisation of the the crater research plan. This helps avoid manufacturing as well robotics. crater face. as funded base for planning and sending as preparation of the peaceful and ecoEXPLORATION ROBOTIC CONSTRUCTION HUMAN CONSTRUCTION HABITATED RESEARCH FUTURE ASPECTS bigger missions before site for the first human conscious co-existing in habitat. the crater. suitable lava tubes are Robotic exploration of the Completion of the habitation Habitated crater research by an Possible expansion to diffenStart of construction by a chosen crater area and exisitng area and research facilities by a extended team of humans and rent nations and projects as purely robotic workforce: adapfound. TIMELINE lava tubes to analyse the site situation and adapt the plan.

68

tion of the caves through drilling and addetive manufacturing as well as preparation of the site for the first human habitat.

small human workforce in cooperation with robotics.

robotics with a top-to-bottom untilisation of the crater face.

cooperation

2

15

15

20

0

0

2

6

1

2

2

1


KRATERHAUSEN

layered inflatable:

Phase III

flame resistant nomex 3 pressure bladders (kevlar) 15 vectran 3 thermal protection (mylar) 15 meteorite-safe kevlar 15 docking

possible rover docking

lunar lander engine, storage

Step 1: Lunar lander lands on crater rim with 2-man-crew

hatch for tunnel connection

Step 2: Inflatable habitat for first habitation phase during human construction 139m² (23m²/ P)

connection of inflatable habitat to crater base

The concept strives to create as little waste as possible. Everything that is brought up to the Moon’s surface is used in all phases of the project, thus no payloads are wasted and nothing is left behind. Therefore, the lunar lander acts as first base and is later connected to the crater bases as surface base. A funicular rover is used as means of transportation between those different areas.

transportation to underground bases via funicular rover

Step 3: Early habitat turns into surface base --> connected to tunnels, permanent use of lunar lander and inflatable 69


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Lunar Rover & Athlete

For human exploration of the unpressurised zones, lunar rovers (concept based on NASA‘s Desert Rats) are docked at the airlocks. 70

An athlete type rover (concept based on JPL‘s Desert Rats) is used to transport material through the tunnels. This six-legged robotic vehicle can be used for multiple purposes in uneven territory.


KRATERHAUSEN

Suitport & Glovebox

hatch cover hand hold

portable life support system entry hatch pressure bulkhead wall

entry hatch suitport interface receptable joystick pressure vessles

portable life support system

hatch cover supports

female/male adapters

polyethelene gloves

handling compartment

needle velve gas/vacuum outlet/inlet

transfer compartment

To avoid any dust inside the habituated zone, suitports (concept by Marc M. Cohen) and glove boxes are positioned at the airlocks.

Suitports furthermore bring the advantage of a shorter pre-breathing and no oxygen loss through opening the airlock doors. 71


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Phase IV - Habitation Level | 71 m² sect B

lounge platform

fitness platform

level-overlapping greenhouse ...and spends his leisure time in the lounge. storage

Scotty uses the hygiene unit.

seating accomodation

sleeping quarters

...while Uhura sleeps on the other side of the privacy-partition.

sect A

...eats... Kirk takes pictures for his family on Earth through the crater-viewing window.

sleeping cubicles for two, seperable airlock Diana takes a book from her private storage and reads...

1m

Wesley prepares dinner...

3m

The main area of ‘Kraterhausen’, the habitable base, is split into two levels – a habitation level and the research level. Those two levels are connected through a two-story chamber, containing a greenhouse, which acts as a spatial buffer zone between work and leisure time and provides fresh vegetables but also has great psychological value. 72

crater


KRATERHAUSEN

Phase IV - Research Level | 68 m²

...is postprocessed, decontaminated; dust is blown out...

airlock

robotic base/ surface base

sect B

storage

Material is transported from the robotic base...

storage

...parts are assembled and used.

storage

research area

level-overlapping greenhouse filtration

airlock

crater

Uhura 3D prints a replacement part... sect A

technic area ...and fixes the robot.

airlock Kirk experiments in the depreassurised chamber... ...while Spock assists him through the glove-box. depreassurised chamber

1m

3m

73


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Section A private storage

...while Spock watches something on the media screen.

The greenhouse robot moves vertically/rotates...

Diana sleeps behind the privacy-partition...

sleeping quarters

... and tends to the plants/ harvests.

10,15

10,80

lounge platform 9,00

The elevation difference can be overcome either by using the lunar stairs or the climbing wall, which acts as an exercise motivation in 1/6 g.

... and works out on the bike in 1/6 g in the greenhouse for optimal oxygen regulation.

6,00

Wesley climbs to the exercise platform...

filtration

depressurised chamber

0,00

airlock

crater 1m

74

3m


KRATERHAUSEN

Section B The research level accommodates various robotic machines, a filtration station and a large 3D printer. Here, the crater material is researched and processed.

sleeping quarters Spock enjoys the view of the greenhouse...

kitchen

lounge 10,15

lounge platform ...from both sides.

In order to limit the payloads brought up from Earth, additive manufacturing is used. The main inner structure of sleeping accommodations, hygiene units, storage and food preparation are 3D printed on site.

9,00

Kirk transfers to the habitation level via the climbing wall in 1/6 g.

exercise platform 6,00

Diana takes a sample from the filtred ice water...

depressurised chamber

1m

...and controls the purity.

0,00

3m

75


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

76


KRATERHAUSEN

Comments by David Nixon + Efficient combination of a lunar lander with an inflatable habitat in Phase III. + Novel approach to the use of crater sides for facilities siting. + Fascinating interior ‘cave’ architecture formed from lava tubes. - Penetrating steep crater sides might result in rock falls. - Ability of sintered tubes to function for pressure containment is optimistic and internal bladder linings would be wise. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Great spatial arrangement. + Diagrams and drawings are clear and consider user routines and flows. Open questions: Concerning toxicity, would pressurised areas need special wall treatment? Consider light strategy on deep crater area.

77


a Botanical Garden a Walkabout a familiar counter-part in a harsh and inhuman environment a translation of earth’s nature an escort of cultural development a research facility for food production on the moon

TUBE OF EDEN - FOOD RESEARCH LAB Project by Alexander Garber | Katharina Lehr-Splawinski

CREW

three individuals in phase I; successive growth

MISSION LENGTH

6 months per individual mission end not defined

MISSION OBJECTIVE

research on plants, fungi, algae, insects and cooking methods

LOCATION

lunar South Pole near Shakelton Crater

CONSTRUCTION

pre-fabricated deployable elements in phase I; isru for radiation protection


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary FUNCTION The Tube of Eden concentrates on food production and cooking. Cooking is a unique cultural feature of mankind. Eating is an activity that everyone has to do. Of course it is not only a must - it is also a pleasure and a social activity. The project creates a research facility that offers possibilities to research the following: establishing a life-friendly environment; growing plants, fungi and algae; breeding insects; recycling, processing and preparation methods; recipes; creation of new plants; storing of terrestrial seeds for possible emergencies; as well as psychological effects of plants on humans in space. ACTORS The food lab is located on the lunar South Pole, near the Shackleton crater. It accommodates five to ten individuals, each of whom will stay for approximately six months. The individuals will be chosen from the following fields: biology (botany, microbiology, life sciences), engineering (life supporting systems, mechanical engineers),‌ There will be cooks, grandmas and other individuals with culinary background. In addition, several helpers will work along with human inhabitants. These will be natural helpers as we know from Earth (bees, earth worms and microorganisms), semifuturistic devices such as farming robots as well as life supporting systems sustaining a livable atmosphere and providing water, electricity, light, etc.

80

UTOPIA The function of the ring-shaped lab could change over time. From the research facility itself it would progress to a mere garden with attached production units. The food lab could turn into a restaurant for visitors.


FOOD RESEARCH LAB

REGOLITH

WATER

CO2

SUNLIGHT ENERGY

ATMOSPHERIC CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

BEES

POLINATION

WATER CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

THERMAL CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

BREATHING

O2 SEEDS DATABASE

FUNGI

BACTERIA

RESEARCH

NITROGEN

HARVESTING

FARMING ROBOTS

RESTAURANT

FOOD PRODUCTION WASTE

PRODUCTS HELPERS

FOOD SOURCES

LIGHT CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

VEGETABLES

STRUCTURE RECYCLING

PLACES

ENJOING VISUALLY

LIGHT

ALGAE

INSECTS

EARTH WORMS

PROCESSES

SEEDS

ASH FERTILISER

CO2

FOOD LAB

FOOD COOPERATION AS LEISURE

RECYCLING FOOD 4 FOOD

EATING

WATER HEAT

81


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Construction A foldable origami-like structure allows for densely packed transport. It furthermore allows to generate spaces with long distances while ensuring flexibility to shape it in the desired way. The rigid elements of this foldable structure have integrated sufficient shielding and serve as a safe haven. The complex foldable elements are complemented by inflatable structures that offer bigger spaces. A covering with local regolith protects the structure from solar storms as well as radiation and minor impacts.

82


FOOD RESEARCH LAB

Payload Distribution and Robotic Construction

NASA Tri-Athlete

13,1 m

cargo cargo

soil work robot

soil work robot

NASA Tri-Athlete

5,2 m

Space X Falcon 9 v1.2 (FT)

83


PROJECT PHASES

MOON VILLAGE INTEGRATION & CONTRIBUTION

HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Project phase I: 1 single unit + 1 double unit + 1 airlock for 3 people Project phase II-III: continuous growth with existing and new arriving units Project phase IV: Ring completed, increasing density of functions

INPUT

OUTPUT

humans plants seeds waste carbon dioxid

food for MV oxygen for MV seeds for MV waste for recycling research knowledge

Project phase I: research focused experimental phase Project phase II-III: continuous growth with existing and new arriving units Project phase IV: full moon village integration with contributions to food and oxygen supply

PHASE IV

food lab

84 living quarters


FOOD RESEARCH LAB

The spatial arrangement of the facility is in the geometry of a ring which allows for certain qualities. Movement and Distance. The circular structure allows long and varied strolls. This shall encourage inhabitants to exercise physically. It also creates a certain sense of wideness in an enclosed structure.

85


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Phase I

PHASE I have dinner and enjoy the view

stowage ventilation

climb these special moon stairs

snacks quick lunch

stand here

LIVING QUARTERS

EXPERIMENTAL FOOD LAB

chill

stowage platform

lay down here anywhere its flexible space

stowage

step

step

step

AIR LOCK & SAFETY HAVEN

stowage

RESEARCH GREENHOUSE & LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS

stowage

stowage stowage

stowage

experimental cooking zone

sit

listen to “fly me to the moon” in private

stand here systems

life support systems beneath

safe haven chilling

pull out your emergency beds from sofa

step up

stand here

multifunctional store-away space

chill

stowage beneath platform temporary zone

life support systems beneath

moon apple tree

step

insects live here

little helpers live here step up

bathe step up

stowage beneath

first step to everything

work out balcony

insects live here

experiment with food

suiteport

go on an adventure potato-carrot breeds

refresh yourself

experimental greenhouse full of experimental plants in varous conditions

water closet

systems

FLOOR PLAN PHASE I 1:50

GREENHOUSE & LIFE SUPPORT

86

EXPERIMENTAL FOOD LAB

LIVING QUARTER


FOOD RESEARCH LAB

87


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE suitport multi-functional laboratory

Section fold-out stairs

ant systems

SECTION C 1:50

SECTION D 1:50

SECTION

OUTSIDE 1,5 m

regolith covering + synthetic 3d printed supportive structure

0,3 m

empty puffer layer

regolith serves as solar radiation protection the synthetic 3d printed structure serves as meteoroid protection

circular sun collector element: fresnel lenses split up sun beams for heat energy, electric energy (pv) and indirect natural light junctions every 10 m via a connection pipe

serves as shock absorbant for meteoroid impacts

uses a temporary inflated membrane as a lost formwork

0,3 m

pressurised inflatable 3 cm

debris protection

15 cm thermal protection 1 cm

restraint and structure

10 cm airtight pressure bladder

outgoing air

suspended hideaway

1 cm

puncture and flame-resistant innermost layer

INSIDE

daylight dispenser 40° slope

40° slope

acustically and visually shielded chamber for temporary privacy ingoing air flexible function elements see diagram

low maintenance systems

stowage + exceptional manhole

pictured manuals + special tools

88

installations + service openings integrated in flooring

SECTION


FOOD RESEARCH LAB

Greenhouse and Life Support

Living Quarters

Comments by David Nixon + Food production and cooking are understudied and ignored aspects of human spaceflight, the assumption being that eating processed food out of cans is acceptable, so it is valuable to focus on this subject. + Toroidal segmented greenhouse design unfolding and inflating from an accordion-fold payload is an excellent concept. - Sharply-creased inflatable fabric can lose strength along the crease and joint lines but potential lower ambient pressure inside greenhouse segments may alleviate. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Extremely relevant theme and concept idea. + interesting design ideas for compact transportation and deployment by utilising origami structures. + Shape configuration contributes to maximise scientific experimentation. Open questions: Further information on what species would benefit from pragmatic necessities, such as air purifying, would be interesting.

89


THE PAClings Providing Awesome Conversion

Project by Asrin Leona Palatรถken | Irina Panturu | Marius Valente

CREW

starting with 3 PAClings, the crew will grow gradually up to 8 or 10 PAClings

MISSION LENGTH

the crew will change every few months.

MISSION OBJECTIVE

recycling of human and green waste from all of the lunar facilities

LOCATION

close to the other main facilities, like the Food Production Lab

CONSTRUCTION

ISRU fabrication


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary Where? The PAClings are a team of scientists who want to improve the lunar settlements.

Near Shakelton Crater

The PAClings Lunar Facility will be in charge of the waste management for all the other facilities and thus improve the living standards on the Moon. By collecting the human and green waste, the facility will recycle these organic materials through different processes. At the end of the recycling cycle fertilizer for the greenhouses will be produced, in order to make the lunar settlement more independent from Earth. The by-product of this process is gas methane, which will be stored in tanks to later be used for heating. The architecture will consist of two different types of inflatable modules, which are connected with airlocks. It will be very much influenced by the different processes that are taking place inside. An important aspect of the architecture is the biosafety level 4, which consists of multiple decontamination showers, air and water recycling needs for every laboratory. The living modules are strictly separated from the rest of the laboratories and can only be entered after a decontamination process. The habitat will provide enough space for three people. Each habitat is equipped with all main and sublife support systems and even has a special mechanism for collecting condensed water.

92

... more exactly: near the Greenhouse Facility


THE PACLINGS

Timeline

When?

The PAClings First cargo and habitat

First crew

First expansion

Robotic mission and preparing the first habitat for the crew.

Habitat and laboratory with a composter and heat reactor in testing

First testing lab Facilities grow and becomes the bioreactor produce more waste chamber. Additional and so does the inflatables for composter PAClings facility. and heat reactor. Biosafety Level 4 Biosafety Level 4

Biosafety Level 2

+

Waste production grows

+

Future Architecture can expand; more recycling possibilities, like polymeres and metals. Biosafety Level 4

+

Moonlings Second phase with first working lunar station. Missions for mending every few weeks.

x4

Habitats have increased in safety for the crew. Solar and nuclear energy production grows. Mission for a few months.

x6

Transportation systems between the facilities have improved.

x15

Self-sustainable habitat producing enough oxygen, water and food. Food production from the greenhouses for the crew.

x30

Development of industry for futher missions to Mars. Lagrangian launchbase. Possible orbital stations for energy production. Gravity simulations. x50

93


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Payloads

1. One main airlock and a suitlock for EVA.

First stage

2. Two inflatables of different sizes for one habitat and one laboratory.

4. Crew with the first three PAClings.

94

3. One lunar rover and a smaller docking-airlock.


THE PACLINGS

Payloads

1. One main airlock and a suitlock for EVA.

4. Third main airlock with an additional mini airlock.

Second stage

2. Two inflatables of different sizes for one habitat and one laboratory.

5. and 6. Two additional rockets, each with one inflatable and additional free space for scientific equipment.

3. One lunar rover and a smaller dockingairlock.

7. Crew with the first three PAClings.

95


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

E ID

H AT E O PH

P

N

H 2 A M

SP

M O

N

EN G

H 2 H

YD RO

YD RO H

H 2S

IA

SU LF EN G

EN G

EN

N 2 N IT RO

H 2O

O 2 O XY G

W AT ER

W AS TE EN RE G

PO

O

BA G

S

BI O W AS TE

Chemical processes

LUNAR HABITATS

LUNAR GREENHOUSES

COMMODE

URINAL 144kg per month

9,83kg per person per month

45L per person per month

URINE COLLECTOR

COMPOSTER

BIOREACTOR 10% SLUDGE

CH4 MOLECULE SEPARATION PROCESS

K+

N2

P

H2O

BIOGAS CH4 CO2 N2 O2 H2S H2 NH3

ELECTROLYSIS STATION TANK H2O+ electricity

O2

2H2

SABATIER REACTION 4H2+CO2 ---> 2H2+CH4

CH4

HEAT REACTOR

FERTILISER 0,334L per month

96

HEAT

ROCKET FUEL

FERTILISER 40,16L per month


THE PACLINGS

Level 0

ERZEUGT DURCH EINE AUTODESK-STUDENTENVERSION

97


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Bioreactor

1m

1m

98


THE PACLINGS

Composter

Composter Rack

URIN AND N WATER R 191m†

Composter te er Element 2m‡

Controlling C Pad

COMPOSTER 191m†

Gastank Opening

BIOREACTOR

DELIVERY COMPOSTER

Delivery Module D

DELIVERY BIOREACTOR

Groundfloor Composter 1:100 1m

5m

10m

99


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Habitat

Air fountain for collecting condensed water with small house plant racks

1m

Water and oxygen generator

Eating area 3 sleeping capsules

Control station

Laboratory station

100


THE PACLINGS

Axonometry Methane, oxygen and hydrogen tanks

Outer shells

Water shells for safe haven

Connecting elements

Habitats

Complete structure

101


A Detail Cargo HB2 | ENVISIONING 1:50

THE MOON VILLAGE

2m Details

1m

3m

11 1 2 3 B

4

A

Outside 5 8

er Plexiglass 10mm

9

6

anel, Connected to ning System 25mm

10

7

1m² Total V 2,96m³

Two Pressure Panes Borosilicate Glass 25mm

1Element Total V 0,9129m³ A B

h High-GlossFront SilverView Coating

Regolith 1000mm

Section AA

Section BB

Groundfloor Cargo Docking Module

Cargo Package Dock

A

Spacer Ø10 H120mm

Buffer Zone 800mm

Element

Two Pressure Panes Borosilicate Glass 25mm

Connection 10x124x10mm

B

anel, Connected to ning System 25mm

B

Waterbag 300x300x150mm

Inflatable 30mm

er Plexiglass 10mm A

Safe Haven Water Wall 30mm Detail Suitlock 1:50 1m

Inner Layer 3mm 2m Wall construction detail

3m

Suitlock detail Inside

Detail Safe Haven 1:20

EINE AUTODESK-STUDENTENVERSION

102

0,5m

1m

1,5m


THE PACLINGS

Methane Oxygen Hydrogen Carbon dioxide Atmosphere

80-90 Pa

Comments by David Nixon + Another subject – biodegrading and recycling human waste – that deserves a lot more research and development among space nations, and a very worthwhile subject to study. + Rational approach to payload stowage and manifesting. - Burning methane with oxygen for heating would add more carbon dioxide to the crew respiration life support load and may not be the best way to heat the lunar base. Methane could be converted into something useful. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Extremely relevant theme. + Well structured work – concept, programme, payload schedule and phasing are well explained and illustrated. + Good distribution of facilities, great diagrams facilitate an understanding of the flow.

101 Pa

19-24oC 15-19oC under 10oC

high risk moderate risk low risk

103


I

orbiting satelLite.

LUNAR gravity research centre

GReENHOUSES

Rover misSion.

x

airlock

20

South pole.

pv

4

x

x

airlock x

1

1

Amundsen

SHORTLY LATER...

Crater.

bigelow b 330 x

x

6

1

2021

LANDING.

ROVER x

DEFLATED...

...INFLATED...

...WITH AIRLOCK.

1

4 YEARS LATER.

JUMBO DRIlLING MACHINE

x

2 ...DRIlLING...

...IN FEW MONTHS.

...MOVING

MEANWHILE...

B 330 INSIDE...

Life on

the MoOn...

...E

1/


INFLATABLE AND DEPLOYABLE!

LUNAR gravity

GReENHOUSES x

20

research centre

Conclusion.

LATER...

The first children in low gravity! 2025: NEW FAMILIES!

OVER

GARAGE GATE...

1

...FOR ROVER TRIPS.

by SPACEProject ARCHITECTURE: ENVISIONING THE MOONVILLAGE

Martina Meulli | Marta Mion | Bernhard Redl TU Wien Summer Semester 2018

CREW

Professor: Sandra Häuplik-Meusburger

S LATER.

n

n...

the end ...Experiencing 1/6 gravity.

up to 5 families 6 people

Martina Meulli initially Marta Mion Bernhard Redl

MISSION LENGTH

for many years!

MISSION OBJECTIVE

scientific research first children born on the Moon

LOCATION

South Pole Amudsen Crater

CONSTRUCTION

use of lava tubes


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary

Main Concept Ideas

The Lunar Gravity Research Centre focuses on the long term effects of the low gravity on humans and especially children. In this project, five pioneer couples build a base in multiple phases and will give birth to the first extra-terrestrial children. The proximity to Earth, which allows for a possible fallback, should not trivialise the enormous personal dedication these explorers will need to have. With only the bravest scientists and future Moon-parents, daily life on the Moon will be organised by themselves, resulting in a commune style research facility. Humanity has reached the point where a exploration of deeper space and other celestial bodies has become important. This goal requires the performance of generation spanning space journeys. Distance and time ultimately require human reproduction on the journeys, for which the Moon can serve as first testing area. WHO?

The facility is deep inside the lunar rock, which shields the habitats COMMUNE from any form of external radiation, preventing degeneration of stem cells. Additionally, the interior of the base is organised in a WHO? of way that encourages physical education and make advantage COMMUNE the reduced gravity on the Moon. The base is self-sufficient regarding food, oxygen and water, but will be supplied from Earth with essential goods. Humanity 5 families already has proven that it can settle in harsh environments on Earth. Now it needs to be proven that this can be done on the Moon as well. 5 families

WHERE?

WHO?

WHY?

COMMUNE

LOW-GRAVITY RESEARCH

5 families

COUPLES

BECOMING MOON FAMILIES WHERE?

HOW?

SOUTH POLE

WHY? LOW-GRAVITY RESEARCH Bigelow B330

WHY? LOW-GRAVITY RESEARCH Amundsen Crater

Jumbo drilling machines

1/6 g

GRAVITY EFFECTS ON HUMAN BODY 1/6 g

HOW?

SOUTH POLE

WHERE? SOUTH POLE

Amundsen Crater

Amundsen Crater

HOW? Bigelow B330

Jumbo drillingB330 machines Bigelow

Jumbo drilling machines

CAVE

FOR RADIATION PROTECTION 106

1/6 g


LUNAR GRAVITY RESEARCH CENTRE

WHEN?

Time Frame & Payloads 2021

2021

2021 2023

2025 2025

22 jumbo jumbo drilling drillingmachines machines

2020inflatable greenhouses inflatable greenhouses

66people people++cargo cargo++rover rover

2021

4 4people airlocks + PV people ++ 22 airlocks panels B330 +inflatable + PV +panels B330

The time frame begins with the first crew of four people bringing airlocks, PV for energy and an inflatable to the Moon. Additionally, the equipment for drilling the cave is brought to the surface of the Moon.

The inflatable greenhouses are brought shortly after the cave has been excavated, which is an autonomous task. Finally, when the cave is pressurised and the greenhouses are ready, six people arrive. Drilling / Deployable Operation For the drilling process, two mechanical jumbos are used. These machines are used on Earth in mining operations by deploying explosives into small drilled holes.

MOON VILLAGE

Machine designs and dimensions from Sandvik are used as a reference.

SATELLITE NAVIGATION

The excavated material of the artificially built cave can be used as additional shielding for the entrance area, which consists of a suite board module acting as an airlock. Visitors

ROBOTI C OPERATION

LUNAR PORT Landings

Extra oxygen

Human waste

PAC LINGS General waste

RESEARCH FOOD Extra LAB food Food waste

Integration to the Moon Village Although independent and resilient, the Gravity Research Centre integrates with the rest of the Moon Village and uses services like transportation and enrichment of the diet by getting extra food from the food research lab. The lunar port is used to enable scientists to visit the commune and to bring essential goods to the research centre. 107


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Floor Plan

The greenhouses are stacked on multiple levels to create food and oxygen for the commune. In total, there are 18 greenhouses to cover the basic needs of the inhabitants. They are inflated once placed in the tunnels, which are drilled for them.

secondary emergency exit

greenhouses with attached life support system

garage kitchen

entrance with Bigelow module for research main sleeping area

public living room, gravity experimental area

108


LUNAR GRAVITY RESEARCH CENTRE

Section of the Habitat The main sleeping area consists of cones with a textile surface, which are hanging in the cave. The cones are of variable sizes to fit different family sizes and needs.

The main space is the highest part of the artificially created cave and is used to ensure physical health by using the lower gravity of the Moon to encourage the inhabitants to climb.

Smaller cones can be attached to bigger cones and allow for variable living situations. All the cones can be easily lowered to the ground by using a rope for easy maintainability and flexibility. Most of the cones are dedicated to the members of the commune, however, some can be used to accommodate visitors.

mirror system to get sunlight into the cave

109


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Section of the Habitat

This section shows the entrances to the greenhouses, which are inside the tunnels. The greenhouses can be reached by special ladders that assist in the climbing process. To hide the pipes and technical infrastructure for venting and life support, an artificial floor is created on top of the cave’s natural surface.

110


LUNAR GRAVITY RESEARCH CENTRE

Comments by David Nixon + Study of human adaptation to one-sixth gravity as the defining phenomenon of a lunar settlement rather than a by-product of it. + Designing the facilities around one-sixth gravity as an innovative experience. - Not a design weakness but rather a moral and ethical dilemma of raising children in a partial gravity environment and its potentially irreversible effect on human physiology – something that deserves some discussion.

This section shows the use of the suitport and the connection to the excavated cave. The suitport keeps the dust outside the habitat and provides the transition from the pressurised interior zone to the outside zone. The module is covered with lunar regolith for protection.

Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Interesting concept, especially when considering its placement within the Moon Village and the interdependence with other projects. Open Questions: Furhter exploration of the interaction, which the desgin could cause between families, would be interesting, for instance isolation versus interaction. What are the best facilities to experiment with lower gravity?

111


LUNAR PEARL Project by Luka Slivnjak | Simon Sekereš CREW

3 astronauts

MISSION LENGTH

28 days, up to 3 months

MISSION OBJECTIVE

lava tubes scouting, geological research and human factors research

LOCATION

North Pole (Philolaus crater)

CONSTRUCTION

prefabricated and deployable modules for the first phase; use of lava tubes


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary

Lava Tube Rational

The design concept of the exploration centre follows the idea of a pearl in a shell, because the main goal is to make a module that can be later moved from the surface to the inside of the lava tubes. In the beginning, the module has to be located on the surface, because the topography and structural stability of the lava tubes is not known.

The Lunar Pearl concentrates on the topic of lava tube exploration. Lava tubes provide a sheltered environment that has a huge potential for human habitation. The protection against micrometeoroids (1) and radiation (2) along with constant temperatures (3) are some of the advantages that lava tubes provide. However, there are a lot of things that we do not know about lava tubes, for example the topography, their structural stability and the mineral composition of the bedrock. Detailed research would provide evidence of the lava tubes suitability for human habitation. Geological research of the lava tubes could also provide evidence of a pristine, undisturbed lunar bedrock mineral composition. Lava tubes research is the key to understanding the history of volcanism and seismic activity on the Moon.

1 3

1 114

Shelter from micro-meteoroids

2 Shelter from radiation

3 High temperature differences on the surface versus constant temperature in the lava tubes


LUNAR PEARL

Location Philolaus is a lunar impact crater that is located in the northern part of the Moon’s near side. It lies east of the crater Anaximenes, and west of the smaller crater Anaxagoras. Philolaus retains a well-defined form that has not changed significantly since it was originally created. + Enables diversity of habitat construction (on surface, inside lava tubes,...) + Near the North Pole (relatively constant temperatures) + Possible ice water resources + Access to underground lava tubes and cave networks + Peaks of eternal light + Relatively young crater + Possibility for a good communication with Earth + Practice for Mars - Not enough research done

PHILOLAUS

115


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Storyboard

Observation

Arrival of module

Module transportation

Underground station

Robots build shelter

116

Module expansion

Robots research lava tubes


LUNAR PEARL

Construction Using robots for early lava tube exploration seems to be a reasonable way, because it could be too risky for humans. With robotic assistance, a suitable place for the underground module’s placement could be determined to ensure further lava tube exploration and research. Facing the challenge of how to create a multi-usable research module that is protected from all sorts of dangers that come along with constructing on the Moon (SPE, micrometeoroids, ...), the idea of having a fixed shielding system (1) that functions like a shell to protect the pearl (the habitable module) was developed. Regolith is available on-site and is used as main material for the shielding. After the construction of the outer shell, the inflatable modules are deployed from the main cylindric core. The core houses most of the technical systems (life support system, hygiene, food preparation, work ...). The inflatable volumes serve as extension of the habitable space. Those can be deflated later, in order to be transported underground.

1. Shield

+

2. Module

=

Inflatable module Core module

3. Protected lunar surface base GSPublisherEngine 0.9.100.100

Inflation system scheme 117


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

B

Floor Plan

medical and exercise extension storage

medical

sleeping/private storage

storage

sleeping/private

A

sampling

A

sleeping/private exercise

scanning electron microscope

polarising microscope work space

suitport

B

100

118

private sleeping

infrared spectroscopy

kitchen area

storage

suitport

1m

2m

5m


LUNAR PEARL

Sections

systems

systems

1m

2m

5m

A-A

GSPublisherEngine 0.9.100.100

docked rover

suitport

life support

water management

1m

2m

environmental monitoring

atmosphere management

5m

B-B 119


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Life support system scheme

120


LUNAR PEARL

Comments by David Nixon + Using robots to build the shelter and then explore the lava tubes in advance of human arrival is definitely a sensible approach. + Modest initial size of the habitat with just three modules and suitport is also a sensible first step - Need to avoid venting any waste gasses such as acetylene into the lunar environment to avoid contaminating it (consider the Bosch system). - Hemispherical shield construction needs definition. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Very clear definition of the intent, giving background of the lava tube relevance. + Phasing well demonstrated.

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LUNAR

SCOUTING UNIT Project by Esat Sehi

CREW

2 - 3 astronauts

MISSION LENGTH

7 to 30 days

MISSION OBJECTIVE

scouting for new areas, preliminary research

LOCATION

various scouting locations

CONSTRUCTION

double layered sandwich aluminium shielding with kevlar fabric & Nextel in the intermediate bumper. Carbonfibre membranes, Nextel ceramic & foam, Nomex fireproof material.


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary On December 11th, 1972, Apollo 17 landed on the Moon. That was the last mission that saw a human presence on our closest celestial neighbour. The Lunar Scouting Team consists of explorers who research the Moon’s environment to better understand its features in order to ease future human presence on the Moon. The teams travel along the lunar surface and its natural cavities such as caves, lava tubes, pit holes etc.

It is important to research and explore the unknown and to provide humanity with all information about the Moon. Research questions include: What are possibilities for building, how and for what can we use ISRU such as regolith, where are places for a safe stay, and how can we best extract water for future breeding and cultivation etc.

The mobile habitable rover is designed to fit in today’s modern rockets (Falcon) and enables missions for 15 - 40 days.

Exploring natural and artificial openings. The openings are closed with deployable airlocks, providing short term habitation and a research facility.

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Multiple different parametric deployable units cover the initial openings and transform the space between the unit and the hatches into short term protected ‘garden‘.


safe/protected environment s,researches, skylights,researching caves.

e/protected environment kylights, caves. er

Crew and equipment are transported to the surface for scouting missions landing the Moon, but the designand process feasible today’s rocket technology. For the duration of on mission, the orbiter is tethered it orbitsisalong with with the Moon After the mission, Orbiter is relocating or moving back to park on L1 or L2 until the next mission. This is the approach for landing on the Moon, but the design process is feasible with today’s rocket technology.

LUNAR SCOUTING UNIT

Exploring natural and artificial openings.

e airlocks, providing short term habitat and research facility gs Unitsairlocks, (PDU) covers the initial openings and creates the space between able providing short term habitat and research facility the PDU and the hatchet into short term protected ‘garden‚. ble Units (PDU) covers the initial openings and creates the space between the PDU and the hatchet into short term protected ‘garden‚.

Psychological aspects play an important role in

with each other. In addtion, an inflatable structure can crew to comfortably live in an

underground and/or other naturaly protected cavities / openigs from hazards Lunar features. rover design. Deployable and inflatable units provide be deployed, allowing the over design. Deployable and Inflatable units provide comfortable conditions in extreme enviroment. comfortable habitable conditionshabitable in extreme environment. extreme environment. establish the perfect location for future Lunar Village

Two pressurised lunar scouting units can be connected

+ Deployable), each with 2 crew members connect with each other through the airlocks of the deployable and/or through the Inflatable. ng underground and/or other naturaly protected cavities / openigs from hazards Lunar features. achute like packed membrane that is being inflated for longer duration missions (> 7 days), thus allowing the crew a comfortable habitat in extreme enviroment. n Rover design. Deployable and Inflatable units provide comfortable habitable conditions in extreme enviroment. To establish the perfect location for future Lunar Village

GADGETS & TECHNOLOGY

125

ell + Deployable), each with 2 crew members connect with each other through the airlocks of the deployable and/or through the Inflatable. parachute like packed membrane that is being inflated for longer duration missions (> 7 days), thus allowing the crew a comfortable habitat in extreme enviroment.


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE 3

14

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3

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LUNAR SCOUTING UNIT

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Comments by David Nixon + Scouting implies full mobility, which this scheme begins to develop with a detailed drawing of an adaptable vehicle that divides and transforms into an inflatable structure of some kind. - The inflatable structure has a complicated and irregular form that is incompatible with the high internal pressurisation required (i.e. concave depressions will billow out). .

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A

7 2

6

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1

FLOORPLAN

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4

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Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Very interesting mobile exploration unit idea. 1:50 Open Questions: The system parts and system itself could be explored in greater detail. 1:25

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1

12 4

7

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127 SECTION A

1:25

SECTION 1

SECTION 2


LUNAR SOCIALISER

Project by Aleksandar Mrkahic | Amila Imamovic

CREW

2-6 people

MISSION LENGTH

max 14 days

MISSION OBJECTIVE

connecting the Moon village, relaxation and exchange

LOCATION

moving over the Moon

CONSTRUCTION

prefabricated module


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary One of the crucial issues of the whole Moon Village experience are social aspects and challenges the inhabitants will be confronted with. The Lunar Socialiser stimulates people to engage and spend more time with their fellow villagers, and offers activities and content for which they would not necessarily have the time, or the means at their base. Because everyday life on the Moon would be very psychologically demanding and monotonous, the project aims to give the inhabitants the opportunity to physically connect with people from other Moon units. The lunar social network isn’t tied to one specific location. In order for it to function the assumption is made, that there are already several Moon bases populated with

130

people. Once this is achieved, the lunar social network can start to develop. Its use is intended for everyone living and working on the Moon. The main concept of the lunar social network are the Lunar Socialiser vehicles, which would connect different Moon bases and also transport people from one base to another, offering them a completely different experience during the voyage. Analogies from Earth helped develop the concept for the Moon. One of the examples are semi-nomadic societies like the Tuareg people, who inhabit the Sahara desert since the 5th century. Their voyages through the desert in caravans, riding on camels, facing all the environmental difficulties have a lot of similarities with what Lunar Socialisers are trying to accomplish.


SOCIALISER

1 2 3 4 5 6

Transportation from Earth to Moon

Zoom in

Socialiser’s path

Docking

Travelling / Exploring mode

Charging mode

Another aspect of our project is the charging/docking stations which would be located on the paths between the moon bases. One of our proposals for the location of the stations is the trio of craters Ptolemaeus, Alphonsus, and Arzachel, north-east of Mare Nubium. This is a very interesting area carved with long valleys and would provide an excellent opportunity for sightseeing and retreat from the base. The Socialiser weights about three to four tons, which means that the 16 t Falcon 9 heavy payload would be enough to carry up to four vehicles in one trip. 131


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

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SOCIALISER

One Lunar Socialiser vehicle would be able to carry between 2 to 6 people and it would be operated from a fixed control deck at the front of the vehicle. It is called The Socialiser because the idea is that the vehicle is not just a transportation system, but that it also offers enough space and content to make the trip between the bases interesting and stimulating.

Comments by David Nixon + Another scheme with the emphasis on mobility that is handled well with a flexible docking station approach to enable crew contact and interchange. + Expandable/retractable module volume is a clever solution to increased habitat volume on an intermittent basis. - More definition of the vehicle design and construction would have been a valuable addition. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Clear concept of increasing human interaction in the context of isolation and confinement. + Great sketches. Could develop the detailing of the units a bit further. Open Questions: The units could be developed with greater detail.

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LU NA R P ORT

Project by Polina Baliuk | Rychtarik Patrick | Tetiana Frych

CREW

2 astronauts 3 guests

MISSION LENGTH

astronauts: 6 months guests: up to a few days

MISSION OBJECTIVE

lowering the threshold for space access

LOCATION

South Pole

CONSTRUCTION

prefabricated module and in-situresource-utilisation for radiation protection


HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Summary The ‚Lunar Port‘ is a joint project, bringing independent parties from the fields of science, tourism, mining and further economical areas together. The idea is to establish a transportation system between Earth, Moon and later on Mars and other celestial bodies. The project itself is meant to be open - everybody with an interest of getting into space is invited to take part. The final goal is to give all its participants an easy access to space. This can happen with the benefit of sharing technology and hardware in addition

to generating rocket fuel in form of hydrogen directly on the lunar surface. In the future, there will be several moon bases for different uses. Most likely, the majority of moon exploration will take place around the South Pole. The idea is to establish a central landing and starting point in the area. People and goods from different institutions could get there, have a short term stay and then move forward to their destination.

Transportation Earth-Moon

1

4

2 3 The Lunar Port is located at the South Pole, close to other bases and the frozen water deposits. From frozen water rocket fuel is produced and brought to the port.

1 Rocket starts from Earth, fully fueled with hydrogen. Energy required for a rocket launch from the surface of Earth: 32,9 MJ/kg

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2 Controlled landing at lunar port. Approximately 20% of the hydrogen is left.

3 Maintenance and refueling the Rocket with oxygen. Ready for restart to Earth. Energy required for a rocket launch from the surface of Moon: 2,9 MJ/kg

4 The rocket goes back After its to Earth. landing still more than 90% of its tank is full.


LUNAR PORT

Transportation Earth-Deep Space

Next stop Mars! 4

1 3 Orbital Gateway at Lagrange Point EML1 (approx. 54.000 km from Moon‘s centre of mass). A satellite or a space station can stay here for years almost without traction.

1 A space ship starts from Earth to Lagrange Point EML1 and stops at the Orbital Gateway.

2 A ‘tanker rocket‘ is coming from the Lunar Port also to the Orbital Gateway.

2

3 The ‘Tanker rocket‘ is refueling the space ship.

Furthermore, several craters on the South Pole are known to contain water deposits in minable quality. By electrolysis, water can be decomposited into hydrogen and oxygen. Amongst others things, these elements can be used as rocket fuel.

Mining H2O at the South Pole for Hydrogen as rocket fuel.

4 The space ship takes off for its final destination into deep space.

Because of the lower Moon gravity, it is possible to launch rockets and bring them back to Earth nearly fully fueled. With the help of reusable rockets, it is possible to establish a transportation system without consuming large amounts of resources from Earth.

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Phase 1

TERMINAL / CONTROL CENTER

LAUNCH PAD 1

Phase 2

ROCKET MAINTENANCE

ROCKET MAINTENANCE

HYDROGEN-/OXYGEN STORAGE

HYDROGEN-/OXYGEN STORAGE

TECHNOLOGY CENTER LAUNCH PAD 2

GREENHOUSE

ACCOMMODATION

CONTROL CENTER

LAUNCH PAD 1

ROCKET MAINTENANCE

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HYDROGEN-/OXYGEN STORAGE


LUNAR PORT

ROCKET MAINTENANCE

HYDROGEN-/OXYGEN STORAGE

TECHNOLOGY CENTER LAUNCH PAD 2

LAUNCH PAD 4

GREENHOUSE

ACCOMMODATION

CONTROL CENTER

LAUNCH PAD 1

OPERATIONAL TRAINING

LAUNCH PAD 3

LABORATORY ROCKET MAINTENANCE

GREENHOUSE

HYDROGEN-/OXYGEN STORAGE

Phase 3 The final phase of the Lunar Port consists of four different launch pads and two rocket maintenance facilities. These are connected to the hydrogen and oxygen storages. There will also be a laboratory, technology centre, operational training area and accommodations. The whole area is supported by two greenhouses and several nuclear energy facilities.

The typical process at the port starts with a successful landing and transportation of the people by rover to the control centre, which also acts as a terminal in the first phases. From there on, people are brought to their final destinations by a cable car system.

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Floorplan ground floor // Scale 1:200

813

105

979

1

Athlete (NASA) for transportation of cargo

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kitchen hygiene unit

storage

security check

2

105

979

2

sleeping unit (guests) storage 566

administration SEV (NASA) transportation of people from the rocket to the base air lock

1

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LUNAR PORT

Floor Plan upper floor // Scale 1:200

1 greenhouse hygiene unit

WM

2

276

2

sleeping unit (crew) working space controlling of other facilities

1

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

Section 1-1 // Scale

76

200

584

720

60

CABLE CAR SYSTEM brings the passengers to their final destination

Section 2-2 // Scale 239

LAYER OF REGOLITH 2,00 m, 3d-printed 142

CUPOLA for observation and launch control

ADDITIONAL INFLATABLE as support structure

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265

480

142

720

595

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INNER INFLATABLE pressurised and decoupled from the outer shell for meteorite protection


LUNAR PORT

Comments by David Nixon + Incremental build-up through a three-phase master plan would fit well with a stretched-out budget that will be inevitable with any lunar base. + Interconnected modules shielded by lunar regolith shell is a straightforward solution. + Projecting control tower is an innovative addition. - Earth-Moon transportation trajectories are more complicated than shown and low energy trajectories that use less propellant are applicable for non-crewed payloads. Comments by Miriam Dall‘Igna + Great connection and link to other projects. Open Questions: It would be interesting to see more details on the landing pad design. What are the basic requirements of current rocket landing technology?

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

More projects ...

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MORE PROJECTS

MOON OBSERVATORY Alexandros Ioannou-Naoum | Daniel Can Wittek The main part of the lunar farside shall be defined by the UN as protected area in order to explore the universe in the interest of mankind (reference to a paper by Dr. Maccone). The Moon Observatory project uses the natural shielding of the lunar far side from radio interferences, light pollution and infrared waves from the Earth. The Lofarantennas and infrared telescopes are placed on the farside of the Moon - in a semi-protected area. The Moon Observatory is situated on the near side of the Moon, close to the North Pole.

No building construction - No interferences Only scientific research Minimal interferences

The Moon Observatory consists of a hybrid central truncated cuboctahedron structure, to which inflatables can be docked. The observatory has been designed for 4 scientists. The concept allows the exchange of a variety of inflatables over time, which enhances the variability of space and function.

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HB2 | ENVISIONING THE MOON VILLAGE

SPIRAL Domagoy Krhen | Lovro Koncar-Gamulin The idea is to establish a mining facility that would utilise lunar resources by harvesting lunar soil and rare Earth minerals for further development such as building materials, scientific research and new electronic services. The spine of the structure consists of a cargo elevator, personel elevator and spiral functional floors.

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MORE PROJECTS

MATERIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH MODULE Nadja Drageljevic The Material Science Research Module will research and evaluate lunar materials to push the development of the Moon village. Material research will help to provide sustainability on the Moon and prevent any kind of material-caused pollution.

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Profile for Hochbau 2, TU Wien

Envisioning the Moon Village - Space Architecture Design Studio SS2018  

In 2016, Director General of ESA, Jan Wörner, introduced his idea called MOON VILLAGE about future possibilities for international cooperati...

Envisioning the Moon Village - Space Architecture Design Studio SS2018  

In 2016, Director General of ESA, Jan Wörner, introduced his idea called MOON VILLAGE about future possibilities for international cooperati...

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