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» LETTER FROM THE BOSS LADY FOUNDER VINA CRISTOBAL

Empty space brings a feeling of solitude. Most brands - Apple and Kit & Ace, to name two - have an alluring appeal to the masses because of its simplicity. As the new year approaches, many of us want to start with a clean slate. At the beginning of the year, we want to change our pace; less is more is a helpful philosophy in doing so. We want to be rid of the clutter in our minds, so we all can emerge to something better. For this issue, I was partially inspired with the countless Instagrammers who unconsciously influence others to try a simpler view in life and in photography. In the middle of the Pacific, Hawai’i embodies a similar view of austerity. Cute greeting cards and black and white designs by local artists and entrepreneurs reflect our simple laid-back lifestyle located in the middle of the great open ocean. And that’s what brings us to the lesson of this issue: remember to be appreciative the little and simple things of life. It is what makes life beautiful.


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» going into the family business TEXT ashley onzuka IMAGES jason perez VIDEO kahealani uehara

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» love and faith TEXT reina macaraeg IMAGES reese kato VIDEO vina cristobal

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» behind the economy TEXT tasha mero IMAGES clayton nelson

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» mistprint TEXT vina cristobal IMAGES jenny paleracio

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» from the classroom to the kitchen TEXT vina cristobal IMAGES jason perez

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» slowly but surely TEXT + VIDEO vina cristobal IMAGES marleen tana


VINA CRISTOBAL FOUNDER & CHIEF @VEEXC_ “Creates things by day, watches 90’s reruns by night.”

REINA MACARAEG WRITING INTERN @REINANANA_ “Just trying to find out what kind of change I want to be in the world. :)“

JENNY PALERACIO PHOTOGRAPHER @JENANPAL “Embrace each fleeting moment and let go of the anxiety in always getting somewhere.”

PETER CHENG CO-FOUNDER @PSMOOTH808 “Life goal: to visit every Disney theme park in the world.”

TASHA MERO WRITER @ITSMEETASHAAA “I’m happiest when my toes are sandy and my hair is salty.”

REESE KATO PHOTOGRAPHER @TOSHIICHI “Professional try-hard Hipster.”

ASHLEY ONZUKA WRITER @ASHKIMIE “I spend more money on work out clothes than spend time on working out.”

KAHEALANI UEHARA VIDEOGRAPHER @SHAKAHEA “Chemistry is life.”

MARLEEN TANA PHOTOGRAPHy INTERN @MAR.LEEN “If I’m not currently working on a project, chances are I’m planning my next ten.”


CLAYTON NELSON PHOTOGRAPHER @CLAYTONBNELSON “You can’t be a model and a photographer... Says who?"

MARK GALACGAC ILLUSTRATOR @MARKGHEE “Wishing i drew more”

LINDSEY GANO MARKETING INTERN @LYN_ZI “Looks like a freshman, acts like your mother.”

JASON PEREZ PHOTOGRAPHER @NEONGROWLER

AMIXA-RAY CALZADO GRAPHIC DESIGNER @AFCALZADO

“Full-time student, part-time jawa, lifetime photographer.”

“Commited designer, avid gamer, novice comic book collector.”

ROSELLE JULIAN GRAPHIC DESIGNER @R__ZL “Things aren’t always #000000 and #FFFFFF.”

KEVIN TUMBAGA GRAPHIC DESIGNER @KEVIN.TUMBAGA “World peace.”

HERE ARE OUR OTHER STAFF MEMBERS WHO WERE NOT IN THIS ISSUE, BUT HAVE GIVEN ENDLESS SUPPORT

RAELYN BATACAN ASHLEY GUZMAN BRITTANY REIS RACHEL KAMITA SAGE BATTAD


CULTURE

SHOCKA

ISLAND TIME MACHINE EP OUT NOW! DOWNLOAD AT WWW.CULTURESHOCKA.COM


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FOR AVANTI

Going into the Family Business

Stay true to yourself. Don’t let too many people influence you.


008 » going into the family business TEXT ASHLEY ONZUKA IMAGES JASON PEREZ VIDEO KAHEAlANI UEHARA Remember the old saying how we should never mix family with business? Well, that’s not entirely true. It’s not telling us that we should never mix family with business, but rather a precaution.

modern line of Hawaiian shirts was one of his greatest accomplishments. The positive feedback and great outcome of this line really pushed him to continue and do great things.

It’s like saying, “Hey, this thing is probably going to be hard, but not impossible. Good things can come.” And that’s exactly what came about Avanti Shirts. What started as a husband and wife’s small business turned into something that would carry on to their children.

Although Avanti Shirts has been a positive part of Vincent’s life, he had to face some obstacles along the way. Going back to the whole, “never mix family with business,” he did say that at times it can be difficult to work so closely to your family. Vincent explains that everyone had their own ideas, opinions, and point of views, and they all had to consider each other’s feelings.

John and Jenny Hui began their business at swap meets and our memorable International Market Place, which didn’t even start by selling Hawaiian shirts after all. John and Jenny Hui began by selling leather goods, snakeskin belts, and purses. They later included women’s workwear and eventually evolved to their silk Hawaiian shirts. Before any business, leather goods, or Hawaiian shirts, Jenny Hui sold jewelry in Hong Kong in an Avanti jewelry shop. This was the place where she met her husband, John, hence the inspiration of their business name, Avanti Shirts (and in case you were wondering, the word avanti means move forward in Italian). In 1991, the Huis transformed their small local business into a place that’s now home to beautiful silk Hawaiian shirts. John and Jenny’s son, Vincent Hui, currently takes part in his family’s business as the operation manager. Vincent explained how the designs of the Hawaiian shirts are replicas of shirts from the 1940s and 1950s with occasional change of colors. He loves the vintage look and designs, but also enjoys a fusion of old and new, vintage and modern. Inspired by that, aside from being the operation manager, Vincent has taken on another title as the creative director of the new modern line of Hawaiian shirts. He feels that starting the new

Even after all of those hardships, Avanti is still thriving. He says he feels very comfortable talking to them about business and not afraid of putting out ideas. As a final word of advice, Vincent says, “Stay true to yourself. Don’t let too many people influence you.” He also mentioned that for anyone interested in the fashion industry, fair warning, it will be difficult. The fashion industry is hard to be in and especially hard to maintain. Vincent explains that it’s not as glamorous as people may think it is. He also says that this is one of the reasons why one of his greatest inspiration is his father. “He built a company from ground up and it’s hard surviving in the fashion world. I feel like not many businesses survive. And only maybe a small handful actually make it this far. We’ve been in business for 24 years now, so it’s been quite a journey for him.” From starting at a small business to growing to what they are today, Vincent knows that whenever they succeed, they succeed as a family. Although working with family can be difficult, Vincent always appreciates the time he gets to spend with his family. The Huis’ story proves that anything is possible, and that everything has a humble beginning.


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"Simplicity will always be beautiful." - Jason Perez


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Whenever they succeed, they succeed as a family.


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@ avantishirts.com

fb fb.com/avantishirts

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DOMINION-APPAREL.COM

TWITTER.COM/4OMINION

Winter ‘15 Collection

@4OMINION

FB.COM/4OMINION


D FOR DUSTIN PACLEB

Love and Faith I'd like to encourage people to believe that there's hope.


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» LOVE AND FAITH TEXT REINA MACARAEG IMAGES REESE KATO VIDEO VINA CRISTOBAL

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Have you gone through a time when you felt alone and confused? Dustin Pacleb understands that everyone goes through tough times, so he wants his listeners to be able to learn life experiences through his songs. Pacleb, an alternative musician from Mililani, is a sweetheart who shows his sense of humor with quirky, yet lovable songs. From songs like “Candy” to “Of Love and Simplicity,” Pacleb’s songs reach out to love song fanatics, such as myself. We had the opportunity to interview Dustin and his personal journey with music, love, and God.

AT WHAT AGE DID YOU START PLAYING? I started playing the guitar at the age of 17. I remember, it was October 2006.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO PLAY THE GUITAR AT THAT AGE? I have always been a fan of music. I just love music but I remember when I was going to this church at the time, and my friend wanted me to help him lead the worship at the upcoming Sunday. I told him that I would like to but I don’t know how to play [the] guitar and I just kind of sang in the shower, you know. And so, he’s like “oh, I’ll teach you these four basic chords and that’s all you need to be ready for Sunday.” And he taught me those four chords I just kind of got started with the guitar. I liked it a lot so I just kept playing.

DO YOU PLAY OTHER BESIDES THE GUITAR?

INSTRUMENTS

Uhm, the triangle. (laughs) Oh, I can play [the] bass. A little bit of the cajon and the drums, I dabble in the drums.

WHO WOULD BE THE FIRST PERSON YOU’D SHOW YOUR COMPOSED SONGS TO? Actually, thats a hard question because there is not a specific person that I would show it to. What I like to do when I write songs is to probably show it to other musician friends, first, and get their feedback. And then, I’ll share it with friends who don’t play music at all and get their feedback so that they can tell me what it sounds like from the general public’s standpoint. And then I’ll probably talk to my producer or a producer friend of mine about the song. So I’ll show it to multiple people, multiple groups, before releasing it to the public just so I can take in all of the feedback and make it the best it can be before the public hears it.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU AND HOW DOES IT AFFECT YOUR COMPOSITIONS? Definitely life. I’m a Christian and I do believe that there’s a creator, God, that’s in control and I do believe that everything happens for a reason in life. The trials we go through and the good times we go through is what inspires me. What I’ve gone through with life and how I’ve coped and how I may have felt about it, they all inspired me. I feel like I’m inspired by everything that God puts in my life. I want to share with people just to let them know that they’re not alone in whatever they are going through, whether it’s a good thing or a bad thing. And I’d like to encourage people to believe that there’s hope.


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I UNDERSTAND HOW THAT CONNECTS TO IT KEEPS ME ALIVE BUT I NOTICED THAT YOU WRITE A LOT OF LOVE SONGS. HOW DOES GOD INSPIRE YOU TO WRITE LOVE SONGS? Love is like the number one topic in music and I think that everyone can relate to it. And I believe that, for example, in relationships, everything happens under the sovereignty of God. He orchestrates everything.

WHO IS YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE AND HOW DO YOU EXPECT THEM TO RELATE TO YOUR SONGS? I think the love songs are the surface part of it and I like to put, most times, a deeper themes within the lyrics. Like I said, I think love is just one of those topics that everyone can relate to because everyone has been through it in some way. So I would say that my target audience, as of right now and not that I planned this and from the feedback I get, it seems to be high school or early college students, that age bracket. And that’s cool, do love working with youth in general and kind of cool to have an impact on them in some way. I think my music You know them, nowadays, with their relationships and it could speak to them some wisdom, or something.

OUT OF ALL YOUR SONGS, WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY? I think my favorite song, as of right now, would be Candy. The thing with that song is that I was dating this girl last year and I was really in love with her but we ended up breaking up. So I wrote half the song when we were still together and I wrote the other half after we broke up, so it created this contrast within the lyrics. At first it was super happy and the rest is kind of poking fun and semi bitter in a playful way. And somehow, it came out good. I mean, I wrote that song as a joke cause I was trying to cope. (laughs) She told me that I wrote too many sad songs, so I was like “OK, I’ll write a happy song then.”


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I wouldn't be able to do what I do...so I really appreciate whoever listens to my music

WOW, “CANDY” WAS A REALLY GOOD SONG. YOU HID THE SARCASM WELL. (LAUGHS)

SO HOW DO YOU FIT EVERYTHING INTO VERSES? HOW DO YOU OVERCOME THAT CHALLENGE?

I think it’s catchy and I think it turned out good.

Sometimes, it just comes naturally. And other times, as a songwriter you gotta figure out what is the best way you can still convey the same message while using less words. That’s tricky for me. I’m working on it and I’m trying to get better.

IT IS. SO WHILE YOU’RE WRITING SONGS, WHAT WOULD YOU SAY IS THE MOST CHALLENGING PART? There’s two challenges for me that I can pick out. Probably one is creating the vocal melodies, like the flow of it to make it catchy to the listener. So making catchy vocal melodies, and fitting all the things I want to say into a song because I’m kind of wordy and I tend to shove words into the pockets of the verses. I’m Portuguese so I talk a lot so I try to find a way to make it all fit.

IS THERE ANYTHING YOU WANT TO SAY TO YOUR LISTENERS? Thank you for all your support. Thank you for listening to my music and I wouldn’t be able to do what I do without you guys so I really appreciate whoever listens to my music.


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@ dustinpacleb.com

fb fb.com/dustinpacleb808

ig @dustinpacleb

tw @dustinpacleb

yt youtube.com/ fallenwarrior16


HIT THE GROUND RUNNING Funded by generous contributions from the Hogan Family Foundation, this is a practical program that provides in depth learning through contact with Hawaii’s entrepreneurs. The small class size is designed to provide careful nurturing. We aim to prepare students to start and do new things-wherever their careers may lead them.

Hogan Entrepreneurs Program Features • China and India study missions • Learn the art of persuasion • Network with business leaders • Excellent mentoring and coaching • Internship opportunities • Lifelong friends, mentors and memories

website: http://www.chaminade.edu/hogan phone: 808-440-4280 email: hogan@chaminade.edu youtube: search “Hogan Entrepreneurs”


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FOR ECONOMY BRAND

Behind the Economy

The economy represents this invisible entity, but it's also physical in a way too.


» BEHIND THE ECONOMY TEXT TASHA MERO IMAGES Clayton Nelson

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Local entrepreneur Kevin Young, offers clothing that is not only appealing to the eyes, but to the mind as well. Kevin’s clothing line, Economy, is so much more than just apparel, it’s an expression of art. “The fashion industry now days is just ... printing things for people to just look at,” Kevin says. “People don’t dive into the further meaning behind each design and it’s just more like they appeal to trends.” Kevin hopes that when customers gaze at his products, that they see more than just a T-shirt. Economy strives to encourage consumers to think on a deeper level, so a lot of their designs are purposely ambiguous. “I want people to be like, ‘Oh what does that mean? What does that symbol stand for?’” Kevin explains. “I think that’s what I try to do with a lot of my designs. There’s always a story—I mean, there might be like an easy message to get off right off the bat, but I think definitely there’s more behind each design that I do.” Economy’s “Giza” T-shirt features a total of four pyramids on the back of the shirt. There are the three main pyramids along with a fourth pyramid, with the fourth one representing the economy. This fourth pyramid is also the brand’s signature logo. “So the three pyramids here, you can just kind of see, it’s physically there,” Kevin says. “But for me, I see in this world, there’s actually four pyramids. The economy represents this invisible entity, but it’s also physical in a way too.” Economy offers a variety of unisex T-shirts and jerseys. In the future, they plan to sell hats as well. Some of their items have the number 14 written on them to pay tribute to the year 2014, when the concept of the brand came together.

Kevin is very intrigued by the business world and weaves that particular interest into his brand. Economy’s clothing designs are influenced by things such as insider trading, deals gone wrong, conspiracy theories and the black market. “I just kinda draw a lot of my inspiration from those aspects of society,” notes the 20-year-old. When Kevin was still in high school, he was part of a business club and dreamed about owning something in the future. Kevin was also interested in fashion and would always put a lot of thought into what he wore to school. With a deep interest in both fashion and business at a young age, it only seems fitting that Kevin now has his own clothing line. Kevin is currently a student at UH Mānoa’s Shidler College of Business, and as a marketing major, Kevin plans to use what he learns in school to better his brand. He hopes to aim further, and appeal to consumers outside of Hawaiʻi, but for now, he’s content with starting local and growing his business in the islands. “I think the main theme of marketing is to just understand your needs and wants of your customers and the clients,” Kevin says. “I just read up some things about what’s going on and what’s new to the fashion industry, and I think from there I can ... draw my own conclusions, like what appeals to these people here.” Economy products are available for purchase online, but they also plan to sell items at Art + Flea in the coming months.


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"Owner of local brand, Economy, couldn't be more lax. WIth solid goals and plans made, Economy couldn't be more solid" - Clayton Nelson


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@ economybrand.bigcartel.com

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M FOR MISTPRINT

Mistprint

A few doodles, lots of aloha.


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Mistprint is a handmade greeting card service by local designer Mistee Uyehara. Originally used to send doodles to loved ones, Mistee decided to create a series of cards that she could eventually make a business out of. Vibrant illustrations and adorable puns are the focus of Mistprints’ cards, as seen in this photo gallery by photographer Jenny Paleracio. Mistprint can be found online on Etsy and at Bodhi Cafe, Mori by Art + Flea, Fighting Eel, Treehouse and other small shops on the island.

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" Mistee laid out some of her favorite prints and discussed why they were so special to her". - Jenny Paleracio

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@ etsy.com/shop/mistprint

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S FOR THE SUGAR HUT

From Classroom to Kitchen

Keep trying if that's what you're really passionate about.


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» FROM THE CLASSROOM TO KITCHEN TEXT VINA CRISTOBAL IMAGES JASON PEREZ

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It’s 2013. Shavone Lave, an elementary school teacher, is in her kitchen at home baking truffles, a family favorite. For as long as she could remember, baking has always been a passion of hers. Although she loves the flexibility of her teaching schedule, she comes to find that baking may be conflicting with her full-time job and vice versa, and raising a family of her own has also been a challenge. But in that moment, she knew what she wanted to do. It’s 2015. The Sugar Hut, rooted from sample sales on Lave’s personal Instagram, is thriving. Lave is two years into her pastry business -- going on three -- after resigning from her teaching position. “The reason why I moved forward with baking and with The Sugar Hut is for my kids,” Lave said. “It would allow me to go to their field trips if I wanted to, or volunteer in their classroom if I wanted to.” The success of The Sugar Hut began in Downtown Honolulu, when Lave would do regular appearances and sell goodies in her food truck, Sweetie. Lave has also vended at Eat the Street and Honolulu Night Market alongside taking phone and online orders, until she had to sell Sweetie. Regardless of Sweetie’s absence, The Sugar Hut maintains prosperity with its scrumptious sweets. The company offers a variety of goods, such as its signature macaroons, truffles and cupcakes that are on a rotation each day. “What I try to do is that I try to find flavors that are Hawaii-inspired,” Lave said. For instance, one of the company’s specialty flavors is the Hurricane Popcorn macaroon. Although an ‘awkward’ flavor for a macaroon, its furikake shell, arare and butter cream

combination create a sweet but crunchy concoction. Other unique flavors include the Rice Krispies and the Dole Pineapple Whip, but the pineapple-flavored macaroon is only sold in the summertime. “Every season has a different flavor, and we have so much flavors. We have at least over 30 flavors that are just on our normal menu all the time. We have six to eight seasonal flavors.” Lave’s favorite macaroon to make is the Almond Roca, only because of its mint-green exterior with a smooth chocolate texture, and her favorite truffle is the Oreo Peanut Butter. The presentation of her products on Instagram, with mouth-watering close-ups of macaroons and cupcakes lining her feed, has led to a following of more than 14,000 people from Hawaii and from around the world. For Lave, the customer loyalty and interaction that she brings in from social media is the greatest accomplishment, aside from her baked goods. “I’m amazed with social media and how quickly the word can spread out,” she said. “Our customer loyalty and the amount of customers that we’ve attracted is awesome. Plus, we did make the first macaroon truck in Hawaii, so that was pretty cool.” Now, Lave is taking her business from social media to a storefront. She is currently searching for a space in West Oahu, and hopes to open a stable location in January or February. “There’s a lot of small macaroon places and a lot of small home bakers, but I don’t see myself as a small home baker anymore,” she said. “I see myself in the middle.” Lave knows that the road ahead is challenging. Juggling family life and a business can tend to put a lot on pressure for successful time


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management. She also feels that developing a business in Hawaii can be difficult because of the limited exposure and high costs. However, she is thankful for the community that has been supportive of her craft and passion since the beginning. “Consistency is key…I cannot tell you how many times I tried and failed [at making macaroons].

So keep trying if that’s what you’re really passionate about. When I first started, it seems like I’ve been doing this for a long time, even though it’s only been two years. But two years ago, I didn’t even know if this was something that would last a few months. But now I can see this lasting for a long time.”

The Sugar Hut takes online orders on its website and Instagram, and can be found at the Farmers Market at Kapolei High School on Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., and Farmers Market at Waianae Mall on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.


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@ sugarhuthawaii.com

fb fb.com/thesugarhut

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J FOR JIWA JIWA PRESS

Slowly but Surely

That appreciation for the simple design led to an eventual encounter with Cherish Prado-Sherman, owner and designer of Jiwa Jiwa Press.


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» SLOWLY BUT SURELY TEXT + VIDEO VINA CRISTOBAL IMAGES MARLEEN TANA

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During Christmas time, my friend and I purchased a white printed card for our boss. The card read “So Da Kine,” in bold blue type, which was perfect, considering our boss loved to throw around pidgin vernacular every now and then.

“[The phrase] ‘slowly but surely’ kind of fits into everything I do,” she said before motioning to her large press, who she fondly names ‘Hugo’ because of its size. “Hugo is completely run by hand and foot, and slowly but surely things get done.”

That appreciation for the simple design led to an eventual encounter with Cherish Prado-Sherman, owner and designer of Jiwa Jiwa Press.

Cherish added that with the help of Hugo, she is able to make up to 100 prints in half an hour, without breaks.

Cherish, who returned to her island home from years of design schooling and apprenticing in the Pacific Northwest, opened up the design studio almost two years ago. The launch of the business was a ‘sink or swim’ moment that derived from her love of typography and letterpress, which is something that she initially found difficulty with while she was in fine arts school.

The design process works as follows:

“I remember my first day of class and we were hand setting type and organizing a type tray, and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, this is the worst thing ever and I will never do this ever again,’ because it was so tedious having to deal with such tiny type,” she said. “And lo and behold I started a business off of that . . . So in Portland, when I decided to do some things on the side, I was like, ‘Well, if I do want to open up a company later on in life, I’d want it to mean something,’ and [design] could be the founding portion.” Her creations stem from her own design style, which is usually “chaotic” since she tends to lean towards chaos. However, the results turn into simple, minimalistic and eye-catching designs. From greeting cards to business cards, Cherish has done it all. “I actually like doing greeting cards,” she said. “I think I’m at that point where I’m still in the beginning phases of creating a full line, but it’s been really awesome and fun. So my cards aren’t ideally appropriate for everyone. It’s mostly stuff that I say on a daily basis, like I think I’m a badass boss lady. That’s where I draw inspiration from.” She later found the name ‘jiwa jiwa,’ a simplified Japanese translation of the motto, “Slowly but surely, little by little.”

“So after design is created - for greeting cards specifically, I’ll actually do everything on my computer, even though I work with vintage and lead type,” Cherish explained. “I’ll find fonts that are pretty similar and mock it up in Illustrator, create a plate that can be used over and over. I do this because using vintage and lead type over and over in mass production actually wears down each piece. “I’ve had people have their vintage wood type blocks just break in half from the pressure or the lead softens so much that they don’t have crisp lines anymore. So I mock everything up, and I pull a print or proof off of my press and create a plate off of that. Once that plate comes in, I can print on that plate pretty much as long as I keep the plate in good shape. But from start to finish, design can take anywhere from one month to five months. I like to do a design, leave it, come back to it, kind of retouch, re-evaluate what I want to do with it and finalize it. “The natural printing process, if any new card I create, it takes about 50 to start off with and it takes about 10 minutes once I have it set up. It’s actually pretty quick. It’s great. I work with Art + Flea and Mori, so any of my new cards that I wanna test drive and see how they do.” Cherish can be primarily found at Lana Lane Studios, where she is a resident artist. Her designs can also be found at Art + Flea events, Mori in Ward Warehouse, The Guava Shop in Haleiwa and Green Mountain Café in Manoa. Recently, she acquired a deal with Nordstrom in Ala Moana Center to sell some of her greeting cards in-store.


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A proud Cherish stands before her workshop as she poses for the "typical instagram picture." - Marleen Tana

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She later found the name ‘jiwa jiwa,’ a simplified Japanese translation of the motto, 'Slowly but surely,' little by little.


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“Letterpress is pretty cool,” she said. “I think not a lot of people get to experience it.” Jiwa Jiwa Press is located inside Lana Lane Studios at 327 Lana Lane in Kaka‘ako and is open on Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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"Trinkets from Portland and Seattle are littered throughout the studio, hinting at Cherish's printing beginnings on the west coast." - Marleen Tana

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"She refers to her studio as another home; keeping a picture of one of her biggest supporters- her husband- to motivate herself everyday" - Marleen Tana


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@ jiwajiwapress.com

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A very big

THANK YOU to


Family and friends of Flow Fam Chaminade University of Honolulu Hogan Entrepreneurs Program University of Hawaii at Manoa Hawaii Pacific University Moanalua High School Roosevelt High School Mililani High School Mistprint Jiwa Jiwa Press Economy Brand Dustin Pacleb Avanti Shirts The Sugar Hut 4ominion Apparel Culture Shocka & most of all,

OUR READERS


A P R I L Issue 9

Stay Tune

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ISSUE 8 // LESS IS MORE [WINTER 2016]  

Based on the concept of simplicity, this issue features Oahu artists and entrepreneurs who embrace this very idea.

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