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STOCKTON - SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY BRANCHES

Mobile Library Central Chavez Library Serving San Joaquin County

Mountain House 579 Wicklund Crossing Mountain House, CA

Thornton 26341 N. Thornton Road Thornton, CA

Ripon 333 W. Main Street Ripon, CA

Linden 19059 E. Main Street Linden, CA

Lathrop 15461 7th Street Lathrop, CA

Weston Ranch 1453 W. French Camp Rd. Stockton, CA

Troke 502 W. Benjamin Holt Dr. Stockton, CA

Cesar Chavez 605 N. El Dorado Street Stockton, CA

Angelou 2324 Pock Lane Stockton, CA

Fair Oaks 2370 E. Main Street Stockton, CA Escalon 1540 Second Street Escalon, CA Manteca 320 W. Center Street Manteca, CA Tracy 20 E. Eaton Avenue Tracy, CA Training Wheels Central Chavez Library Serving San Joaquin County

www.stockton.lib.ca.us

Be an exciting page in the Library’s book of the future! STOCKTON - SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY


MISSION STATEMENT

The Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library creates an environment for connecting people and ideas by providing residents of all ages with resources to pursue their educational, civic, business and personal interests.

Stockton - San Joaquin County Public Library Administration 605 N. El Dorado Street Stockton, CA 95202 (209) 937-8362 T (209) 937-8683 F www.stockton.lib.ca.us


ECONOMIC PLAN ECONOMIC PLAN The richest person in the world, in fact, all the riches in the world couldn’t provide you with anything like the endless, incredible loot available at your local library. – Malcolm Forbes, Publisher of Forbes Magazine

THE VALUE OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES What is the economic benefit of public libraries? Many people know that public libraries add great value to their communities. After all, anyone can walk in, check out a book to read, borrow a DVD, browse the internet on a public computer, locate needed information in reference books, or participate in programs like family storytimes or adult literacy workshops. All of these services have value and are provided for free to the public. At the same time, libraries improve community life in many ways. They provide a safe place for children and teens to go after school. They offer services that bring families together and enhance children’s early reading skills. They promote adult literacy necessary for an informed electorate. They are centers of social and cultural activity, a role that can be particularly important in developing communities. Libraries are also important for the economic health of communities. According to our San Joaquin County research, they promote local economic development and make communities attractive to young families. Established companies use them to get information in trade journals or magazines and to review industry reports. Startup businesses use libraries to conduct product development research and obtain marketing or sales information. Small businesses use libraries to build their knowledge regarding marketing strategies, local demographics and legal compliance issues. In deciding where to live, the availability of high-quality libraries is an important consideration. How Much Value Does the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library Deliver to Local Residents? Local taxpayers, as well as public and private funders, are increasingly interested in understanding the economic

benefits of libraries. While many types of library benefits – such as their contribution to community quality of life and local economic development –are difficult to measure and quantify, Harder+Company Community Research has calculated the value of library collections as well as the value of library services provided directly to individuals who use the library.

THE VALUE OF LIBRARY COLLECTIONS Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Libraries have large and diverse collections that have a significant market value. Preliminary results of the analysis conducted show that the collections of local libraries are valued at more than $23.9 million. San Joaquin County spends less per capita on library materials than most other Central Valley counties and substantially less than the state average.

THE VALUE OF LIBRARY SERVICES Beyond the worth of library collections, libraries provide great value to users through: zz Circulation of books, music, videos and other materials; zz Reference transactions performed by librarians (i.e., information requests); zz Provision of library programming for children, teens and adults; and zz Access to electronic services, including the Internet.


In the analysis, each of these services was assigned a market value. The assigned value, which was based on established studies within the field of library valuation, was then multiplied by the number of uses of each of these services by local residents. Preliminary results of the analysis conducted show that the market value of library services provided in 2007 exceeded $49 million.

WEBSITES OF INTEREST

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

Public Agenda

Public libraries are primarily funded with local and state tax dollars. As a result, it makes sense to ask “How much value does the library deliver to local residents relative to the local tax funding it receives?” In fiscal year 2007, Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Libraries received state and local tax revenues totaling $12.9 million. Preliminary results of the analysis conducted show that this public investment generated library services valued at $49.3 million. Each tax dollar generated an estimated $3.81 in services, an almost 4-to-1 return on public investment. While this is an excellent rate of return for any investment, statistics show that San Joaquin County still lags behind in literacy rates, ranked 42 out of 58 in California.

CONCLUSION Libraries are a good investment. Our findings show that county investment in public libraries generates significant returns. Libraries also provide economic benefits beyond services to direct users that are important but difficult to quantify, such as community quality of life and economic development. Interviews show how local businesses and policymakers use the library and what the library can do to further enhance its value for local communities. Based on what we have learned so far, increased investment in SSJCPL will produce even greater economic benefits. It will also support the county’s vital and diverse communities and contribute to the county’s ability to attract and maintain a thriving workforce.

International City/County Management Association (ICMA) “Libraries Included in Managers’ Sustainability Plans” http://www.icma.org/main/sc.asp?t=0

Long-Term

“Long Overdue: A Fresh Look at Public and Leadership Attitudes About Libraries in the 21st Century” http://www.publicagenda.org/research/research_ reports_details.cfm?list=99 The Engaged Library: Chicago Stories of Community Building http://www.urbanlibraries.org/files/ULC_PFSC_ Engaged_0206.pdf

Urban Libraries Council (ULC)

“Making Cities Stronger: Public Library Contributions to Local Economic Development” h t t p : / / w w w. u r b a n . o r g / f i l e s / U L C _ P F S C _ Engaged_0206.pdf


FACILITIES PLAN STATE OF THE LIBRARIES

Historic and projected library service in San Joaquin County

The Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library currently operates 13 libraries, many of which were built in the 1970s and 1980s. Since then, these library facilities have not been able to keep up with strong growth in the San Joaquin County population. In 1980, San Joaquin County residents had access to nearly 0.5 square feet of library space per person. Today, despite new libraries recently opened in Stockton, Lathrop, and Mountain House, there is less than 0.3 square feet of library space per person.

Shelves filled to capacity in Manteca

Crowded conditions in Linden

Deterioration at Margaret K.Troke

At the same time, community library use has been on the rise. Predictions that the Internet would render the public library obsolete have proven to be unfounded. In fact, there is growing demand in San Joaquin County for an ever-widening range of services, programs, technologies, and materials that libraries are uniquely able to provide. However, the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library’s current facilities significantly limit its ability to meet the community’s library needs. zz Analysis of library use patterns in San Joaquin County reveals that some geographic areas lack sufficient access to a public library. zz Although they have been well maintained, the older library buildings are starting to show their age. Some, such as the Troke Library in Stockton, are showing marked wear and tear. zz Many of the libraries were designed without the power and data capacity needed for computers and other modern technologies. zz Infrastructure and design limitations prevent the use of highly efficient, customer-oriented service models and technologies that would provide more library services per operational budget dollar. The amount of library space in San Joaquin County is already below generally-accepted library planning guidelines and best practices in library systems in other northern California communities. Without improved and expanded facilities, the overall library space deficit in the county — and challenges to the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library’s ability to provide service to the community — will continue to grow as the population increases.


BUILDING THE LIBRARY

Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library current and planned service levels

The Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library needs improved and expanded facilities in order to meet the community’s vision of excellent library service in San Joaquin County. The Library’s new facilities master plan sets a target of 0.4 to 0.6 square feet of library space per capita by the year 2030. This target is based on generally-accepted library planning guidelines as well as best practices in other northern California communities committed to excellent library service, such as Sacramento County and the City of San Jose. Libraries will be added or expanded based on the projected population of each of six new library service areas in order to make library services more accessible and equitable throughout the county. New resource libraries will be established in each region to support local community branches with additional programs, services, and materials. The Chavez Central Library in Stockton will continue to serve as the system’s flagship — the heart of the Library System. The next step in the facilities master plan process is the development of strategies for implement ting the recommendations, including funding and phasing options as well as locations and partnership opportunities for building new libraries.

A VISION OF THE FUTURE The library improvements proposed in the facilities master plan support the service priorities recommended by the Library’s new strategic plan, including the creation and empowerment of readers through expanded programs, services, and collections. New and renovated libraries will all feature a modern operational model that maximizes public service within the Library’s operational budget. New libraries will be sustainably designed for energy efficiency as well as environmental stewardship. The facilities master plan envisions libraries as dynamic, welcoming places for community members of all ages. Families will use the library together, with something for everyone. Children will enjoy storytelling and other programs. Students will have space and resources for working on homework and group projects. Teens will have space of their own for studying and socializing. Adults and seniors will find comfortable places to sit and enjoy a book or conversation with a friend. Meeting rooms will accommodate library and civic programs as well as a wide variety of cultural, social, and community events. Users’ personal technologies will be supported, as will the Library’s ability to implement new technologies over time. The new libraries will serve the population of San Joaquin County well into the future.

Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library proposed new service areas


WELCOME TO THE SUMMIT THE STOCKTON-SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY SUMMIT 2008 The Stockton-San Joaquin County Library’s firstever Library Summit is about being proactive, totally embracing long range visioning and strategic planning. The Library Summit is an opportunity for the Library to involve the community in the development of the Library’s goals for the services it provides to its residents. The Library staff’s intent is to transform a philosophy of service and advocacy that is firmly rooted in a keen understanding of regional needs. The Library Summit is a forum for the Library to take the initiative in using the community’s opinions to develop creative solutions to address city and county issues and concerns through partnerships and collaboration. In Community Economic Development, the public library is often viewed as an institution that does not bring economic benefits. There is no doubt that public safety, housing, transportation, employment, and education are often the priority. Being considered as a non-economic force is very challenging; this is why hosting a Library Summit on the status of public libraries is vital. continued on back

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE DAY

Welcome to the Summit Introductions of Elected Officials Visioning Presentations Lunch Served

Discussion of Library Trends Escorted Tour of the Library Experience


The Library Summit is about bringing people of diverse viewpoints together for the purpose of dialogue between and among broad constituencies. Libraries must elicit support and input from everyone, library staff, elected officials, city/county staff, and most importantly the public. The findings and recommendations of the Library’s Strategic Initiatives: Strategic, Facilities Master Plan, Marketing Plan, and Economic Benefit Assessment Study will provide a framework to leverage future library resources and garner support for the public library that will enhance the economic well-being of our city and county. Thank you for your participation in the Summit and for rediscovering the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library as an important asset for the entire community! Natalie R. Rencher Director of Library Services


STRATEGIC PLAN STATE OF THE LIBRARIES Everyday, throughout the Stockton-San Joaquin County Library system, questions are answered, books are checked out, and programs are held. But, we don’t always have time to ask customers how we are doing. For the past two years, through a series of community meetings and listening sessions, we have taken the time to talk to the community and staff to learn how they view the library and the services provided. Here is some of what we learned: zz People applaud the work of the library staff and are very much aware that the staff is stretched thin trying to meet all the demands and needs of current library users. zz Customers and staff are concerned about the unattractive, unappealing, and sometimes dysfunctional libraries that are characteristic of the system. zz Customers and staff are dismayed at the aging technology available in the library and are pessimistic about the library’s ability to keep up with technological innovations. zz The community has changed tremendously and the library is either not aware of the changes and needs or has not responded. zz Many community members who could benefit from current library services are not aware of the services and help the library can provide, have difficulty getting to the library when it is open, or do not believe the library welcomes them.

VISION OF THE FUTURE When we engaged the community we heard the following hopes and concerns: Families are the fabric of community life and families need help. Parents need to help their children develop reading and writing skills for success in school. The youth and children in our communities are underserved and need attention. We need to engage them in community life, and provide opportunities for them to learn, grow, and enjoy life in their own way. The community’s well-being depends on an educated work force that values continuous learning. Adults, young people, and seniors need help in adapting to and thriving in the dominant knowledge and service economy.


The community’s diverse languages and cultures improve the quality of life for all and are a great resource for learning about the world’s culture and values. These needs and concerns will drive the library’s services, attitudes, and perspectives for the next 3-5 years. To help the community achieve its vision, the library will concentrate its resources and efforts on achieving three goals: 1. Creating and Empowering Readers and 2. Creating a Comfortable Place 3. Connecting to the Online World

THE PLAN FOR BUILDING THE LIBRARY To keep us on track, we will continue to ask ourselves and the community: Are we making a difference? How well are we meeting the needs of the people we serve? Engaging the community will be a continuous process for us, but we need you to tell us what you need and want. Encourage your family and friends to connect with the library again.


STOCKTON-SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

FROM HERE TO THERE - WE HAVE SUCCESS TO SHARE Nov 2006 NEW Ripon Branch

May 2006 NEW Mobile Library

10/9/06 thru 11/6/06 Print Online Surveys 2/1/06 Library Strategic Plan “Kick Off” CA State Librarian, Susan Hildreth, General Staff Meeting

11/6/06 The 1st Community Planning Meeting

10/16/06 thru 10/31/06 Community Forums

Jan 2007 NEW Weston Ranch Branch

2/8/07 The 3rd Community Planning Meeting

12/7/06 The 2nd Community Planning Meeting

2/6/07 General Staff Meeting 11/23/06 The 1st Staff Planning Community Meeting

1/17/07 The 2nd Staff Planning Community Meeting

Oct 07 NEW Mountain House Branch

July 07 NEW Library Hours

5/21/07 The 4th Community Planning Meeting

4/20/07 Library Re-Org 3/7/07 The 3rd Staff Planning Community Meeting

7/9/07 2nd Facilities Stake Holder Meeting Mtn. House Lathrop Tracy

7/5/07 1st Facilities Stake Holder Meeting Stockton Linden Thornton

7/23/07 thru 7/25/07 Community Marketing Interviews 7/19/07 3rd Facilities Stake Holder Mtg Manteca Escalon Lathrop

Jan 08 Stockton San-Joaquin County Public Library SUMMIT

10/3/07 Economic Benefit Assessment Presentation to Staff

8/20/07 Library Advocacy Meeting Stockton 20/20

10/9/07 Funding & Financing Meeting with Management

11/13/07 thru 11/15/07 Marketing Messaging Focus Groups 11/7/07 The 2nd Library Advocacy Meeting

11/15/07 Meeting with Consultants to Plan Library Summit

11/14/07 The 3rd Library Advocacy Meeting

YOU DECIDE VOTER INITIATIVE 2010


YES

Street Address City


YES

Street Address City


THANK YOU

THANK YOU

To the members of the 2006-2007 City and County Community Planning Groups

To the members of the 2006-2007 City and County Community Planning Groups

Amelia Adams Shani Adams Don Aguillard David Aldis Robina Asghar Dianne Barth Joni D. Bauer Anita Bautista Tom Bowe Steve Carrigan Dr. Mary Ann Cox-Martin Adolfo Cruz Steve Escobar Jacqueline Flowers Kathy Franco Lindy Turner Harden Beverly Hine Dr. Patricia E. Holder, Ed. D Sovanna Koeurt Dennis Lee Brigitte Long Stuart Long Bobby Magee William L. Mather Kathy Miller Nancy Mitchell Steve Morales Peggy Morgan Oletha Murry Chris Noll Gloria Nomura Carol Ornelas Vince Perrin John Reynolds Kim Scarlata Lani Schiff-Ross Mario Supnet Evelyn Tolbert Terry Torres Fred Walkover Philip West Carrie Womack

Amelia Adams Shani Adams Don Aguillard David Aldis Robina Asghar Dianne Barth Joni D. Bauer Anita Bautista Tom Bowe Steve Carrigan Dr. Mary Ann Cox-Martin Adolfo Cruz Steve Escobar Jacqueline Flowers Kathy Franco Lindy Turner Harden Beverly Hine Dr. Patricia E. Holder, Ed. D Sovanna Koeurt Dennis Lee Brigitte Long Stuart Long Bobby Magee William L. Mather Kathy Miller Nancy Mitchell Steve Morales Peggy Morgan Oletha Murry Chris Noll Gloria Nomura Carol Ornelas Vince Perrin John Reynolds Kim Scarlata Lani Schiff-Ross Mario Supnet Evelyn Tolbert Terry Torres Fred Walkover Philip West Carrie Womack

Community Partnerships for Families Health Plan of San Joaquin Mayor’s Task Force,People with Disabilities Friends of the Tracy Library Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin Stockton Unified School District Community Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired Filipino American National Historical Society—Stockton Wenell, Mattheis, Bowe City of Stockton, Economic Dev. Dept. Passport to College, Delta College City of Stockton, Parks and Recreation City of Stockton, Community Dev. Dept. County Operated Schools & Programs, SJCOE Retired Library Employee Child Abuse Prevention Council Stockton-San Joaquin County Library University of California APSARA Central Valley Asian American Chamber of Commerce Friends of the Ripon Library Friends of the Ripon Library San Joaquin County Administrator’s Office Friends of the Tracy Library Downtown Stockton Alliance Coldwell Banker Crossroads Real Estate Mayaco Marketing Friends of the Ripon Library Family Resource & Referral Noll & Tam Architects Former Stockton City Council Visionary Home Builders Friends of the Stockton Public Library Stockton Shelter for the Homeless City of Tracy, Parks & Recreation Dept. First 5 San Joaquin Charterhouse Center for Families City of Tracy, City Council Filipino American National Historical Society—Stockton Chp. COMCAST Stockton Symphony Association N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility

Community Partnerships for Families Health Plan of San Joaquin Mayor’s Task Force,People with Disabilities Friends of the Tracy Library Community Partnership for Families of San Joaquin Stockton Unified School District Community Center for the Blind & Visually Impaired Filipino American National Historical Society—Stockton Wenell, Mattheis, Bowe City of Stockton, Economic Dev. Dept. Passport to College, Delta College City of Stockton, Parks and Recreation City of Stockton, Community Dev. Dept. County Operated Schools & Programs, SJCOE Retired Library Employee Child Abuse Prevention Council Stockton-San Joaquin County Library University of California APSARA Central Valley Asian American Chamber of Commerce Friends of the Ripon Library Friends of the Ripon Library San Joaquin County Administrator’s Office Friends of the Tracy Library Downtown Stockton Alliance Coldwell Banker Crossroads Real Estate Mayaco Marketing Friends of the Ripon Library Family Resource & Referral Noll & Tam Architects Former Stockton City Council Visionary Home Builders Friends of the Stockton Public Library Stockton Shelter for the Homeless City of Tracy, Parks & Recreation Dept. First 5 San Joaquin Charterhouse Center for Families City of Tracy, City Council Filipino American National Historical Society—Stockton Chp. COMCAST Stockton Symphony Association N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility

SSJCPL 2008 Library Summit  

These are all the materials that were contained in a 9x12 folder. The set includes the 9x12 press printed folder, the four inserts, and the...

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