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Sensational Senior Citizens Super Seniors 2011 Issue

pictured left to right Joyce Rodgers, Ralph Easterwood, Rita Green, Eugene Edwards pictured by Picture This Studio

March / A p r i l 2 0 1 1

FEATURES: • Dr. Linda King: Healthy teeth lead to a healthy life • Associated Fuel Systems: Dean & Doug Patterson, family men & entrepreneurs • Padres Mexican Cantina: Great Food, Great Service


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table of contents

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march/april 2011

features Dr. Linda King Learn how a visit with Dr. Linda King can increase your health awareness through screenings that detect blood pressure, oral cancer, and gum health for crosslinks to other diseases............................................................. 17

Assoc. Fuel Systems Go behind the scenes and in depth with Dean and Doug Patterson to get the inside scoop on how Associated Fuel Systems is taking Diesel to new heights. ................................................ 53

Padres Mexican Cantina & Grill ON THE COVER

Joyce Rodgers, Ralph Easterwood, Rita Green, Eugene Edwards COVER photo: pICTURE THIS STUDIO

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Discover why Padres Mexican Cantina & Grill is your neighborhood choice for quesadillas, enchiladas, burritos, nachos, tacos, steaks, fajitas, and more. . ........................................... 73

departments publisher’s letter..................................................7 contributors.........................................................9 letters to the editor.......................................... 10 miracle method................................................ 13 geranium festival............................................. 17 sensational seniors......................................... 21 business profile: dr. linda king..................... 31 sheriff mcbrayer............................................... 35 sacred journey................................................... 39 aging options.................................................... 41 taste of henry.................................................... 43 kebo transportation......................................... 49 invisible fence................................................... 51 coffee and a camera........................................ 53 womens health for all ages........................... 57 event: hands on henry.................................... 59 event: noah’s ark.............................................. 61 business profile: assoc. fuel systems........ 63 truffles................................................................ 67 business profile: padres cantina.................. 73 operation overseas.......................................... 78 community calendar....................................... 80 march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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publisher/ PUBLISHER/directoR editorial PUBLISHER/ EDITORIAL DIRECTOR PUBLISHER/ EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Editor EDITORIAL DIRECTOR EDITOR EDITOR EDITOR Graphic design GRAPHIC GRAPHIC DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY photography PHOTOGRAPHY

Lisa Kinchen

Lisa Kinchen lisa@hmagazine.biz Lisa Kinchen lisa@hmagazine.biz Lisa Kinchen lisa@hmagazine.biz Michael lisa@hmagazine.biz Angela K.Ratti Durden michael@hmagazine.biz Angela K. Durden adurden@hmagazine.biz Angela K. Durden adurden@hmagazine.biz www.angeladurden.com Michael Birchall adurden@hmagazine.biz www.angeladurden.com Laura Turner Jayson Earl www.angeladurden.com Laura Turner Eleste Marketing Kristina Cancelmi Laura Marketing Turner Eleste lturner@elestemarketing.com Troika Studio, Inc. Eleste Marketing lturner@elestemarketing.com troikastudio.com lturner@elestemarketing.com Darrell Emory Picture This Studio Darrell Emory Darrell Darrell Emory Emory darrellemory@bellsouth.net Picture Picture ThisStudio Studio Picture This This Studio darrellemory@bellsouth.net darrellemory@bellsouth.net darrellemory@bellsouth.net PRINTING John Hitchcock Signature Pressworks PRINTING John PRINTING John Hitchcock Hitchcock Debbie Swanson advertising/ john@signaturepressworks.com Signature Signature Pressworks Pressworks advertising EXEC debbie@hmagazine.biz john@signaturepressworks.com john@signaturepressworks.com ADVERTISING ads@hmagazine.biz P.O. Box 1390 www.hmagazine.biz McDonough, GA 30253 678.278.9022 ADVERTISING ads@hmagazine.biz ADVERTISING ads@hmagazine.biz 290 Country Club Drive www.hmagazine.biz Glo278-9022 Minerals™ makeup, Suite IS Clincical 150 and Obagi® (678) 290 Country Club Drive Drive www.hmagazine.biz 290 www.hmagazine.biz microdermabrasion products Stockbridge, provided by GA Truffles Medispa 30281 Suite 150 Suite (678) (678)278-9022 278-9022 Stockbridge, 30281 Stockbridge, 30281 We welcome your company communityGA news. Please Make-up and by Colorscience include digital at photos withMedical your press send to available Schilling Sparelease (770) and 506-9123 Make-up byproduct Colorscience Make-up Colorscience lisa@hmagazine.biz. Forwardby samples or press kits available at Schilling Medical Spa 506-9123 available at Schilling Medical Spa 506-9123 toWe the Publisher. We cannot be responsible for unsolicited welcome your company and community news.(770) Please include digital photos with your press release anddoes sendnot to lisa@hmagazine.biz. product samples. Publisher assume liability for product orand press kits to the news. Publisher. Weinclude cannot digital be Wewelcome welcome yoursamples company andcommunity community news. Please Please WeForward your company include digital products or services advertised herein. responsible foryour unsolicited product Publisher does not assume photoswith withyour pressrelease release andsamples. send toto lisa@hmagazine.biz. lisa@hmagazine.biz. and send photos press liability forproduct products or services advertised herein. Forwardproduct samples press kits toto the the Publisher. We Forward samples ororpress kits Publisher. We cannot cannot bebe unsolicited product samples. Publisher assume Hresponsible Magazine published bimonthly byPublisher H Magazine, All Hresponsible Magazineforfor isisunsolicited published bimonthly by H Magazine, Inc.does All not content are product samples. does notInc. assume liabilityforforproducts products services advertised herein. herein.whole or in part without copyrighted H Magazine and liability ororservices content are by copyrighted by advertised Hreproduction Magazineinabnd reproduction written permission is prohibited. H Magazine reservesInc. liabilitycontent in the HMagazine Magazine ispublished published bimonthly Magazine, in whole in parta without written prohibited. Hevent bimonthly byby HHpermission Magazine, Inc.is All All contentare are of anoriserror printed correction. copyrighted by HtoMagazine and reproduction in whole or in part without byreserves H Magazine and reproduction inreserves whole orerror in part Hcopyrighted magazine liability the event of anliability to a written permission is prohibited. HinMagazine in without the written H Magazine reserves liability in the event permission ofcorrection. an error tois aprohibited. printed correction. printed event of an error to a printed correction.

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publisher’s letter

Aging is not ‘lost youth’ but a new stage of opportunity and strength. – Betty Friedan pictured by Picture This Studio

W

ho among us has not received advice or guidance from an elder that we respect? We are indeed enriched to have the benefit of the wisdom and knowledge of our more “seasoned citizens” who possess an abundance of experience and a wealth of life lessons. They are a treasured resource in our community and it is only fitting that opportunities be provided for them that contribute to their quality of life as they have no doubt contributed to ours. Did you know that Henry County is home to many great centers and services to help meet the needs of seniors and their families? Henry County Senior Service Centers such as Heritage Senior Center and Hidden Valley Senior Center are just a few great examples of many that are available in our county. These centers

are multipurpose community centers for senior adults 55 and over that offer a variety of physical and social activities and classes, health and wellness instruction, educational programs and perhaps most importantly, the opportunity to socialize and fellowship with a wonderful group of people. Calendars of activities, classes and event information may be found by visiting the Henry County Board of Commissioners website at www.co.henry.ga.us/ seniorservices/SeniorCenters.shtml. Henry County is also home to a growing number of exceptional services and benefit organizations that have an ongoing need for volunteers. Meals on Wheels, for example, is a program in which nutritious meals are delivered by volunteers to senior adults, who are unable to shop and cook for themselves and are temporarily or perma-

nently homebound. This program is provided through the Henry County Council on Aging, which also sponsors the Miles for Meals Walk, an annual event that funds services and programs for senior adults in Henry County. I encourage you to take advantage of these and other opportunities to express your support, respect and compassion for our marvelous seniors. As Audrey Hepburn once said “As you grow older, you will discover that you have two hands, one for helping yourself, and the other for helping others.”

Lisa Kinchen Publisher/Editorial Director lisa@hmagazine.biz

Your feedback is extremely important to us, so, in this issue of H Magazine we are posting “Letters to the Editor”. Interested in sharing your thoughts? Please visit our updated website at www.hmagazine.biz.

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our contributors

contributors march/april 2011

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Ed Galbreath grew up in Rincon, Georgia and holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Georgia College and State University and a Master of Religious Education from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Beverly Van Gorder has lived in Henry County for 14 years. She and her husband, Jim, have five children, two of which are U.S. Marines.

Diane Ide is a long-time resident of Henry County who provides consulting, sales and marketing direction to local businesses in addition to writing winning grant applications for non-profits. She enjoys cooking, entertaining, reading,

Lisa Maye is a native of Long Island New York, the mother of four beautiful children, Rachel, Amanda, Sarah and Timothy, holds a Masters of Social Work degree from Columbia University. She is currently employed as a social work supervisor through GA DFCS.

Angel Maynard resides in Henry County and is the founder of RedPill Productions www. redpill-productions.com. She is a writer and producer whose work has been showcased at The New York Television Festival as well as California’s Indie Fest.

Jason Morrison is a 30-something dad, photographer, graphic and web designer who enjoys Mexican food and debating on the best method for surviving a zombie outbreak. In early 2009, he became 1/2 of JayMarPhotography.

Michael Ratti is the Managing Editor for H Magazine and is a Clayton State University graduate holding a bachelors degree in Liberal Studies with a minor in psychology. He is also a two-time nationally ranked professional action sports champion.

Denese Rodgers is the Director of Social Services for Connecting Henry, Inc, the local branch of the Georgia Family Connection Partnership. It serves to network social, service, faith, business, and government to improve the welfare of families and children in Henry County.

Jennifer Sconyers lives in McDonough, Georgia with her husband and two sons George and Jeremiah. Jennifer volunteers regularly at Flippen Elementary. She is a children’s author, and goes to schools and local libraries sharing her books and the love of reading!

Diane Smith a native of Ohio, has enjoyed living in Henry County for seven years. She is mother to 14-year-old Travis and wife to Pastor George Smith of Solid Rock Church of Jackson, Georgia. Diane works at Noah’s Ark in Locust Grove.

Debbie Swanson has worked in the medical field in Henry County for 22 years and is involved with many community groups. Being a true Southerner, she loves to cook for her family and friends. She also enjoys motorcycle riding with her husband and entertaining.

Sheri Willis has been a resident of Henry County for seven years. She is employed by United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta and is a member of Rotary, as well as a graduate of Leadership Henry (08). Sheri has a 14 year old son, Sterling, and they reside in Locust Grove.

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letters to the editor

H Magazine My company recently became an advertiser in your magazine. Not only have I seen the financial reward from the advertisements but I have also seen a wonderful outpouring of support from the community for my business. I am so thankful for your magazine and its dedication to the citizens of Henry County. Keep up the great work! Chef Sam Pagan MasLeon Cakes and Pastries

I wanted you to know that I appreciate the comprehensive nature of H Magazine! Because of articles written in your magazine, I have found a caring eye doctor, a compassionate dentist, and an invested physician. Thank you for highlighting the wonderful talent that we have in Henry County. Noel Pagan

Advertising in H Magazine has been one of the best decisions we’ve made as a growing business. The exposure that we’ve garnered has been phenomenal. The process was handled entirely by H staff; they took a look at our web site and designed our ad based on it. In addition to the attention that we received from the ad, Lisa personally has helped take our business to the next level by being a tireless advocate for us in the Henry County Community. Thanks, John Brown Operations Manager PROPS Design Group

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I am the miracle of ultrasound technology.

Seeing what’s happening inside a patient quickly and accurately can be the difference between life and death. That’s why we provide some of the most advanced imaging technology available. From CT scans, MRI and digital mammography, to nuclear imaging. And why, for your convenience, we offer diagnostic imaging services at our hospital and our McDonough Medical Pavilion. Because, wherever you are in Henry County, you deserve a miracle. Read patient stories at

www.henrymedical.com


Charlotte Crockett Locust Grove

I am advanced diagnostic imaging. I am Henry.


our stories

One Easy Step

to a Safer Bathroom! by debbie swanson pictures by Picture This Studio

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Local family owned and operated business offers solutions to Senior Citizens while keeping it “green”.

D

enise Martin a Georgia girl and Steve Tague a transplant from Iowa since 1985 have been business partners for 7 years. Miracle Method is the company they chose when they were “looking for something different” to start a family business. Steve personally trained his son and Denise’s nephew for 6 months to become skilled technicians. Steve and his staff attend annual training to maintain their certifications. Since 1979 Miracle Method has been using a proprietary process that restores porcelain, tile, Formica®, cultured marble and fiberglass. Home-owners save up to 75 percent over the cost of replacing worn bathtubs, sinks, countertops and tile floors. Miracle Method offers a five-year guarantee against

adhesion failure of the new finish. A refinished surface should last 15-20 years using the same care and maintenance recommended by new tub and kitchen countertop manufacturers. No room poses a greater safety threat for the elderly than the bathroom. Slip and fall accidents account for nearly 25 percent of hospital admissions for people age 65 and older. One Easy Step™ tub to shower conversion can greatly improve bathing safety. The Easy Step™ creates a 24” by 9” opening in the tub, allowing the user to step through, not over, the side of the tub. Costing a fraction of the price of a walk-in soaking tub, the Easy Step™ conversion is an affordable solution that can be installed in just one day. Removing walls, tearing out the old tub or doing

extensive plumbing modifications are completely unnecessary with Easy Step™. When installing the Easy Step™, the Miracle Method technician can also install safety grab bars, hand-held shower nozzles, curved shower rods and slip resistant tub surfaces. In today’s economy Miracle Method is the right choice to update the two most important rooms in your house the kitchen and bathroom. In most cases the total down time is only 24 hours from start to finish. Steve states that there is no need to rip out your perfectly good bathtubs, sinks and countertops that would end up in the landfill. Miracle Method is one more step in helping keep Henry County green. To see an Easy Step™ visit the Miracle Method showroom at 3409 Jodeco Rd, McDonough or visit www.miraclemethod.com. march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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feature

Lions Club Sponsors

th Annual Geranium Festival by ed galbreath

pictures by Special Photo

T

he 34th Annual Geranium Festival will be held on Saturday, May 21, 2011 in and around the McDonough Square. The festival will be held from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Exhibitors and vendors from across the Southeastern United States gather for this annual event which is sponsored by the McDonough Lions Club. The McDonough Lions Club raises money from the event that is used to help others through a variety of causes. It is expected that around 25,000 people will attend the festival. The Festival will have approximately 350 vendors, exhibitors, and community business individuals. This annual event has become a tradition for many families and continues to draw new attendees from Henry County and throughout the state of Georgia. There is something for everyone at the Geranium Festival. There is a children’s area that is very popular with younger children and their families. Live music will be available directly behind the old courthouse. Food vendors will offer a variety of delicious food options. One could enjoy fudge, funnel cakes, ice cream, peanuts, and a host of other enjoyable

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treats. Exhibitors throughout the festival display some of the best in creativity and design with clothing options, jewelry, birdhouses, candles, soaps, bags, totes, and much, much more. The festival is a place for hand crafted items and continually seeks to maintain a quality among the items presented. In addition to the food vendors and festival exhibitors, there is a Community Business Section. Many non-profit businesses, churches, and local businesses share information about their work or business. In this section, many will have give-a-way items that promote their work. These businesses and groups are not making sales, but sharing information. This is a very popular area in the Geranium Festival. The Geranium Festival has free admission and free convenient parking. Free Parking is available at Henry County High School with a free shuttle service taking those attending the festival to and from the festival area. We are excited about something new for 2011 with our parking. The new parking deck located directly behind the Judicial Center will be available for visitor parking. This new parking option will allow over 300 additional parking spaces within walking distance of the festival.

This year, we are planning to have student volunteers and others who will be able to give directions, information, and help for those attending the Geranium Festival. The Geranium Festival receives tremendous support from Henry County and cities throughout the county. The Geranium Festival is very grateful for the overwhelming support that it receives from the City of McDonough. Many hours go into the preparation of such an event and cleanup after it has finished. While the Geranium Festival is sponsored by the McDonough Lions Club, it expresses appreciation to other sponsors and groups that make this event a tremendous success. We appreciate the support of downtown merchants and restaurants in McDonough that are so helpful. For those who have never attended the Geranium Festival, this is a great year to come by and check out this unique event for the whole family. Stay in Henry County, enjoy the Geranium Festival, and see the many things Henry County has to offer. For more information about the Geranium Festival, be sure to visit the website at www.geraniumfestival.com.


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feature

Sensational

Senior

Citizens W

e have among us a rich resource that simultaneously provides nurturing, advocacy, and legacy. One might say they are a silver mine. The over-55 population in Henry County has grown steadily from just over 16% in the 90s to 17.3% for 2010. Henry County Senior Services currently has two state of the art Senior Centers that serve close to 200 clients, and a third center is scheduled to open in February. Mary Ann Hills with Henry Medical Center’s Auxiliary estimates that 95% of the Auxiliary are seniors who provide “a major contribution to HMC, not just time, but also talent and fundraising – they are the movers and the shakers.” As a demographic, seniors are more stable financially. McIntosh State Bank President, Rob Beall explains, “In my experience, most seniors in this area tend to be debt-averse, preferring not to have any debt. Even though they may not

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by denese rodgers

pictured by Picture This Studio

have or want a loan, they highly value their credit-worthiness and are very keen on having a spotless credit history. Many seniors also take the time to educate themselves on things such as rates (on both loans and deposits), fees, FDIC coverage, etc. They want to have a good rapport with their bank and banker but also want a good deal.” More and more grandparents are now pitching in to help their families through the downturn economy, and the concept of an intergenerational caregiver has taken prominence where job loss and business closings strike a community. Last, and most important – Seniors make their voices heard by exercising their right to vote. Estimating Henry’s population at 195,000 the Director of Elections & Registration, Janet Shellnut, reports that over 33,400 of Henry’s registered voters are over the age of 55. In numbers, pro-active movement, and community integration; Henry County’s Seniors are a powerful demographic.


Sensational Senior Citizens!

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feature

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Sensational Senior Citizens!

I’m Just T

hese are the self-described words of one the most good-humored persons I have had the pleasure to meet in recent years. Rita Green grew up on a farm in South Georgia and moved to the Atlanta area shortly after her graduation from High School. She then met and married her husband of 35 years, Steve. They are blessed to have an exceptionally musically talented daughter Megan, and are the proud owners of three dogs and three cats. Despite the countless times this writer attempted to gather and probe to garner the necessary information to “reflect her life story,” Rita unswervingly steered the interview towards her life and work at the “Center;” and this writer is convinced that that is exactly why Rita was chosen to be featured in this month’s edition; Rita’s selfless desire to declare someone else’s story, and in this case, the senior citizens of Henry County. So that is where we will dwell. Rita revealed that she believes she was “led down this path,” and that she has always had a “tender spot” for seniors. Rita Green is the Volunteer/ Special Events Coordinator for Henry County Senior Services located in McDonough. Within this function, Rita recruits volunteers for Heritage Senior Center, as well as for The Hidden Valley Senior Center located in Stockbridge. On a daily basis, the center delivers between 225-250

Rita

meals to the homebound seniors of Henry County, 80 % of which are delivered by the volunteers that Rita helps recruits. Most times, the volunteers are the only persons that these homebound seniors see day to day, necessitating the continuous recruitment of volunteers who play a very vital role in the provision of these services. The first Saturday in May is the annual day in which the “Miles for Meals Walk/ Fun Run” is held. This is a family, walker sponsored, walk around Heritage Park, in which part of the funding required to operate the meals-on wheels program for the homebound seniors in Henry County is generated; this is the 17th year this affair has been held, and Rita has been the chairperson over this event for over 4 years. Another integral role, in which Rita is in charge of at Henry County Senior Services, in the spring time, there are a series of breakfasts that are held for the volunteers, and a fall banquet, all in the tradition of recognizing all the center’s volunteers and expressing appreciation of their volunteerism. Each holiday season, the Henry County community “adopts” homebound seniors. This past year, despite the economic challenges that society is facing, Rita was pleased to report that over 300 seniors were helped with donations from their very own neighbors of Henry County. Rita acknowledged that she was apprehensive at first when she was initially appointed to her position at the Henry

by lisa maye pictured by Picture This Studio

County Senior Services, and she yet questioned herself as to her ultimate “effectiveness in her role.” The central “defining moment’ for Rita that dispelled these notions, was when she organized her first fall banquet for the numerous volunteers, and as she began talking with them, they shared with her how thankful they were to volunteer, and she recalled saying to herself “this is a good thing.” Rita relates that as part of the staff at Henry County Senior Service everyday presents different challenges, nonetheless, it all is exceedingly rewarding. Rita and Steve moved to McDonough in 1990. When I questioned Rita about the rare success of the longevity of her and her husband’s 35 year long matrimony, she retorted with the statement “I couldn’t imagine life without Steve; he is my best friend; he is the first face I see in the morning, and the last one I want see every night.” Steve forthrightly replied, “the man should let the woman make up all of the rules, and if he forgets what they are, to just ask her, and she will be glad to remind him!” I pleasantly smiled to myself, and thought; “now here’s a woman who is truly blessed; to have such a wise husband!” Rita Green is admired by all, enthusiastic about everything, and perpetually organized. In her husband Steve’s words, “she is always looking for a better and easier way.” What would Henry County be, without her?

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feature

We did not get paid, we had to work in exchange for receiving our education.

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Sensational Senior Citizens!

Joyce Rodgers Superlative Senior by denese rodgers

S

he started life on a tobacco farm as the youngest of six children. Joyce Ouzts was a tiny little thing, nicknamed “Toot.” Her earliest memories were of “running along behind the ice truck when he delivered ice because he would give us ice chips and let us get up in the truck.” Growing up outside of rural Cairo, Georgia Joyce remembers living between the Ochlocknee River and Big Tired Creek, “When it flooded we couldn’t even get out to the school bus – and sometimes when we could the school bus would be stuck in the mud and all us kids would have to get out and push.” She graduated from Cairo High School, which is where she found her calling to be a nurse. She recalls attending a Career Day, “I will never forget… Miss Frances Hammett, the Director of Nursing, came from the Grady Memorial School of Nursing. She had on a long-sleeved, crisp, white uniform and was so confident and professional. I decided right then that I was going in the Air Force to become a Nurse. However, my daddy said I was NOT going in the Air Force, but that he would send me to Nursing School.” She took the express bus to Atlanta to

pictured by Picture This Studio

follow her dream. “I was scared to death of that hospital, and the size of it.” It was also her first job in a way, “We did not get paid, we had to work in exchange for receiving our education.” She did love school, and formed friendships there that have lasted to this day. Joyce Ouzts (“ootz”) and her buddy, Martha Bourquine (“bo-kine”) giggled in anticipation when new instructors tried to pronounce their names for the first time. Martha Bourquine Allen, Joyce, and some dozen of their graduating class continue to hold annual reunions in celebration of their friendship. Joyce was on a prolonged assignment to the Milledgeville State Hospital when she met Elwyn Rodgers, a former Air Force staff sergeant. Their friends set them up on a blind date – that did not go well. However, Elwyn said he felt so bad about that first date that he called her back to invite her to dinner. They married in 1960, had two children, and 38 wonderful years together until Elwyn passed in 1999. Joyce’s professional life included helping to open Coweta General and South Fulton Hospital. She was with Clayton General (Southern Regional) as they opened, and was promoted to Head Nurse within her first year. Elwyn’s job in

Air Traffic Control necessitated a move for the family – to Oklahoma where they settled in the small town of Mustang. Joyce took a position in the Recovery Room at Bethany General. Shortly after moving back to Georgia in ’76, Joyce got on with the Henry County Health Department where she served for 23 years, retiring in 2000 as County Nurse Manager. During her tenure with the Health Department, she served on the Child Fatality Review Committee, Henry County Council on Child Abuse, Local Emergency Prep, the Henry Medical Center Advisory Board, Connecting Henry, Inc., Safe Kids of Georgia, the McDonough Merchants Association, and Chamber of Commerce. She was also the Nursing Advisor for “A Friend’s House,” and Hands of Hope Clinic. Joyce has been widely recognized for her contributions to Henry County since leaving the Health Department. She continues to serve in multiple capacities with her first love, Henry Medical Center, as well as Connecting Henry, Inc. and the Henry County Chamber of Commerce. She jokingly refers to herself as being “retired and on a fixed income.” We all just nod and smile and give her another hug.

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feature

by beverly van gorder pictured by Picture This Studio

years with

nce upon a time there was a little baby boy whose mother tried to give him away. After three years, she finally succeeded when her cousin eagerly adopted him, loved him and raised him as her own. Most of us would read this and express a wistful sadness that a mother could care for her own son for three years and yet continually be on a mission to separate herself from him. But this boy, born Jackie Hay on August 10, 1935 who became James Ralph Easterwood in 1938, believes this seemingly unfortunate turn of events early in his life was divinely orchestrated. “Without having been adopted by my loving parents, John and Mary Easterwood, I would have never been raised in Decatur, Georgia.” Decatur is where Glen Haven Baptist Church was founded by Pastor Randy Hardeman in 1947. And Glen Haven Baptist Church is where Ralph Easterwood gave his heart to Jesus that same year at the age of 12. It is also where he met a pretty young 11 year old girl by the name of Gwendolyn Garrison who six years later became Mrs. James Ralph Easterwood. Easterwood was a US Postal Service employee for 13 years after marrying his childhood sweetheart. During the first seven years they had five children and all the while attended Glen Haven Baptist Church. Easterwood served throughout these years as a Deacon and Sunday School Teacher. Upon sensing God’s call on his life to preach, and having been under the mentorship of Pastor Hardeman since his adolescence, Brother Ralph (as he likes to be called) was hired as Glen Haven’s Associate Pastor in 1967. He maintained this position for 16 years before becoming the Senior Pastor after Hardeman’s retirement in 1983. The church experienced phenomenal growth during the ensuing years as Brother Ralph led his congregation to be strong in outreach and mission work. Their services were televised weekly. However, the growth slowed by 2000 and then essentially stopped in 2001. Knowing how many individuals

remained without a church and without a relationship to Christ in their area and the outer lying communities, Brother Ralph and his Deacon Board began to consider a move. After much study, research and planning they made the decision to relocate Glen Haven Baptist Church to McDonough, Georgia right here in Henry County. In August of 2002, their congregation began meeting in the commons area of Union Grove High School with around 230 people. Offering a traditional style of worship, their choir led with gospel music and a mix of some contemporary songs. After two years, another 350 members had joined. The time was right to build their own home and 20 acres of land was purchased on East Lake Road just past and across from Union Grove Middle School. The doors opened in October, 2004 and new people came, worshiped and found Christ. Just six and a half years later, Glen Haven now has 1300 active members. However, Brother Ralph is quick to explain that the numbers are not important except for the evidence of what those numbers are accomplishing for the Lord in this community. Glen Haven has maintained a strong mission outreach since its relocation and Henry County has been the recipient of this church’s generosity and heart for service in countless ways. The Henry County Police and Fire Departments have benefited from fundraising by Glen Haven members for bullet proof vests and face masks. When asked what form of fundraising was used, Brother Ralph says, “I simply ask from the pulpit. I say, ‘Who will give $500, who will give $250, who will give $100, who will give any amount?’ and they raise their hands. We never write down a single name, but the money just starts coming. When I felt led to ask for help with vests for the police force, our people gave $40,000.” Brother Ralph has a strong sense of gratitude for our local law enforcement especially since becoming a chaplain for the Henry

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Purpose

Living

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County Police Department in 2005. He frequently attends Roll Call with the force in order to visit with them before their shift. He says, “Usually about fifteen officers are present and in just four hours one of those blue uniforms is a friend.” He has had the privilege of riding with 156 officers for a four hour shift over the past six years and keeps in touch with all of them annually on their birthdays. The generous giving spirit of Glen Haven and Brother Ralph has reaped God’s continued blessing time and again, but one specific instance resulted from another of their ongoing mission efforts. Two of our local elementary schools are sites for what Glen Haven calls, “Good News Club” (afternoon Bible Clubs for 2nd-5th graders) one day per week. Church members make up the all volunteer staff. One grandparent was so touched by the positive influence of this organization on his grandchild that he donated $10,000 to help fund supplies for this ministry. The examples of ministry and subsequent blessing are endless and make up the life of a man dedicated to the work of God in his community. Brother Ralph retired after 43 years of service as pastor to Glen Haven Baptist on August 22, 2010. He celebrated his retirement with that same beautiful girl he had first laid eyes on in 1947. Gwen Easterwood marked her own significant milestone by having completed 40 years of service as the church office manager. Together the Easterwoods have made a tremendous impact on the lives of many. “I believe the key to growing old better not bitter is to have purpose.” Brother Ralph says, “I always want to accomplish something each day that is worthwhile and has eternal value. I can always sleep better when I lay down knowing something significant has been done that day.” So without remorse, Brother Ralph can look to a time of being given away as a toddler and offer thanks. A divine plan surely included this life of ministry helping more than one to find his way with purpose.


Sensational Senior Citizens!

Without having been adopted by my loving parents, John and Mary Eastwood, I would have never been raised in Decatur, Georgia.

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feature

Super Senior

Eugene Edwards by angel maynard

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hat does a 1974 Chevy Nova, a 1965 Ford Falcon and a 1964 Ford Galaxie 500 all have in common? Give up? They are all cars that are owned and have been fully restored by Henry County NAACP (National Association For The Advancement Of Colored People) President, Eugene Edwards. If you have ever had the pleasure of sitting down with Mr. Edwards to talk about his passions in life, you will realize that he has three great loves and restoring cars is only one of his many interests. Eugene’s first passion in life is his wife and high school sweetheart, Annette H. Edwards, whom he calls his “All in All” which of course made this writer’s heart melt. That dedication is also extended to his children and grandchildren; Dr. Michael E. Edwards and his wife Terri and their two children Shonia and Ian Michael, who live in Singapore. Mr. Edwards daughter, a New Hope Elementary school counselor, is Monica S. Edwards. Mr. Edwards grew up in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, but has been a Georgia resident for 31 years. He and Annette raised their children in Henry County and are very proud of and involved in this community. The education, welfare and future of the county youth are very important issues for the Edwards and they let it show in their community involvement and participation. While Mr. Edwards holds the title of President of the local NAACP

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pictured by Picture This Studio

branch, Mrs. Edwards could be named the unofficial NAACP branch First Lady. She is right there by his side for guidance and support in all that he does for the local organization. Next on Mr. Edwards list of passions is of course his role in the local NAACP. He was honored with his title of President in 2008 and was just elected to lead the county branch again in 2010. I asked Mr. Edwards how and why he became involved in the organization. He recalled watching the 1977 television mini-series Roots, and remembers the stirring of emotions and discussions about race relations that ensued. He knew that he wanted to be involved and have a voice in the conversation so he sought out the local branch of the NAACP in Florida and became a member. He subscribed to the message of the NAACP then and still does to this day. The NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest civil rights organization. From the ballot box to the classroom, the thousands of dedicated workers, organizers, leaders and members who make up the NAACP continue to fight for social justice for all Americans. When Mr. Edwards took over the role of President in 2008 the branch had only a couple of events and fundraisers in the community. Under his leadership, the Henry County branch now has approximately 150 members. He has added meaningful and fun opportunities for involvement in the local community

through the NAACP. Currently they conduct an annual car show (I think we know who’s idea that was), a walk-athon, a 50’s dance, a voter registration drive and 3 community meetings a year. Their 7th Annual Freedom Fund Awards Banquet titled The Ties That Bind will be held this year on March 25, 2011, at the Merle Manders Conference Center. If you are interested in attending you can call (404) 433-3290 or email requests to naacpfreedomfund@att.net. I asked Mr. Edwards if he could give one message to the youth of this county as the NAACP President, what would that be. His response was genuine and priceless. Pull your pants up! After you do that, get a good education. What used to be a sufficient amount of education, a high school diploma, is no longer enough. You need higher education to compete in this world and provide for your family. We need good leaders in our community and we have to make sure that our future is secure in our children’s education. Great words from a great man. What is Mr. Edwards third passion in life, you ask? Why, it’s those gorgeous muscle cars he has parked in his garage of course! Each car gingerly and lovingly attended to, just like the people in the community he represents. It was an honor and a privilege to spend a morning with Eugene Edwards. Next time, I want a ride in one of those cars!


Sensational Senior Citizens!

We need good leaders in our community and we have to make sure that our future is secure in our children’s education.

march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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business profile

When a client comes to our office they can expect to feel like they are in the right place because they are treated so well and they become such a part of our family that it feels like coming home and visiting friends when they are here.

L

inda King, Doctor of Dental Surgery, Master of the Academy of General Dentistry, is known for creating natural smiles for people and helping them make healthy choices for themselves. With a focus on adult reconstruction and total health, Dr. King has been in private practice since graduating from Medical College of Virginia’s School of Dentistry in 1994 and specifically in Henry County since 1997 serving the metro Atlanta region with some patients traveling from Florida and North Georgia for treatment. From a very young age, Dr. King shared, “dentistry has been life changing for me and my family. As a teenager, I had a female dentist who detected high blood pressure in my dad which led to a change in health, for the better, for my whole family. She changed my dad’s smile from large spaces in his front teeth to beautiful white, straight teeth and a wonderful smile. She treated my TMJ problem with orthodontics, which had been misdiagnosed many times as earaches leading to many painful operations.” These experiences motivated King to become a perpetual student with a commitment to education as evidenced by not only the attainment of her dental degree but also in the achievement of the prestigious

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Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry Award in 2006, an award only 1% of practicing dentists has achieved. “When a client comes to our office they can expect to feel like they are in the right place because they are treated so well and they become such a part of our family that it feels like coming home and visiting friends when they are here” said Dr. King. “What really makes us unique is we perform a complete exam and let people know what options they have in order to get healthy. We perform screening for overall health like blood pressure, oral cancer and gum health for crosslinks to other diseases. We work with many physicians letting them know how best we can work together for things that are normally overlooked like sleep apnea, TMJ problems, lab tests, acid reflux and diabetes. The mouth is a temperature gauge which lets us know how we can help with their overall health, and healthy teeth lead to a healthy life.” In addition to general dental services, some of the many services provided at King’s office include sedation, cosmetic, and reconstructive dentistry as well as implants. They provide esthetic treatment, anti aging dentistry and spa treatments in a high touch, high technology atmosphere complete with an in house

esthetician and massage therapist so they can treat TMJ patients and complete the overall smile makeover as a treat. Dr. King and her team provide same day crowns, veneers and dentures; they also perform periodontal treatment. Dr. King added, “We listen to our clients in a manner where they feel empowered and let them take the driver’s seat with our guidance. We are large believers in education of our patients to help them make healthy decisions for themselves. Some clients who come to us have lost their confidence and self esteem through changes in their oral health. They have never been told they have a pretty smile and have avoided looking at people out of fear of being judged. We tell people this is a no judgment zone and we are just glad they are here in order to get the help they deserve.” To schedule an appointment with Dr. Linda King, located at 4146 Highway 42, Locust Grove please call 770.898.8872 and be sure to check them out on these online sources: www.lindakingdds.com www.yelp.com/biz/linda-king-ddslocust-grove www.facebook.com/lindakingdds http://twitter.com/#!/lindakingdds/ http://drlindaking.wordpress.com/


When Adam Stanfield was looking at replacing his veneers, he chose Dr. King due to her artistic ability and confidence in her procedures.

pictured Linda King, Adam Stanfield pictured by Picture This Studios

pictured top left to right Jessica Jackson, Dr. Linda King, Melinda Reeves pictured front row left to right Nikki Bradford, Maria Ray, Lyn McGonagill pictured by Picture This Studios

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feature

We are continuing this program as a way to thank seniors who helped shape Henry County and who may not be able to go get fresh fruit. We wanted to let them know they have not been forgotten during the holidays.

Seniors Not Forgotten H

-Magazine is following-up on our story about the Henry County Sheriff’s Office “Shop With A Deputy” Christmas tradition (featured in the 2010 November-December issue of H-Magazine and available on-line at http://issuu.com/hmag/docs/ novdec2010). Many of our readers asked if the Sheriff’s employees met their 2010 goal to provide Christmas for 60 children in need. In addition to that answer we will also shed more light on another Christmas tradition started by Sheriff McBrayer. As a brief recap, Sheriff’s Office employees raise money during the year to take under privileged children Christmas shopping through corporate donations and by selling fresh fruit. The more money the deputies raise, the more children will know a real Christmas.

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In 2009 Sheriff’s employees adopted 50 children after selling 7,600 pounds of fresh citrus. They knew that to raise enough money to sponsor 60 children, and meals for 20 families, they would need to sell more. With that goal in mind, they started taking fruit orders earlier in hopes of selling enough. Orders flowed in from residents of all parts of Henry County and after the count; they ordered 22,050 pounds in a mix of grapefruit, oranges and tangelos. The fruit was harvested and placed in storage sheds the day before being picked up. This was fortunate because the day after the fruit was picked a major cold snap hit that part of Florida impacting further fruit production. But the Shop With A Deputy fruit was in storage and out of the bad weather. Five off duty deputies drove four large pickup trucks pulling three trailers to the

Florida farm for the fruit on December 14th. It was brought to the Whirlpool Warehouse in McDonough where over 50 volunteers from local church groups, businesses, and high schools worked alongside 40 Sheriff’s employees. They filled over 2,000 orders of ten and 20 pound bags and made up 170 gift baskets in just over eight hours. Orders were then delivered December 15th and 16th. Through the success of the fruit sale and generous contributions from Henry County businesses Sheriff’s Office employees not only met their goal to provide Christmas for 60 children, they exceeded it! They were able to bring a very merry Christmas to 70 children and provide Christmas dinner to 27 families. Sheriff Keith McBrayer stated; “Our employees and the volunteers are amazing. In addition to all the work raising funds to pay for the Christmas gifts and meals, we


pictured top left to right Reserve Sergeant Loyd Bruce, Sheriff Keith McBrayer, Deputy Eric Wilson pictured bottom left to right Mrs. Sarah Gordon, Mrs. Florence Martin picture by Picture This Studios

needed 79 deputies to escort the children and help them with their purchases.” Sheriff McBrayer added; “Although it was nearly Christmas, we are very thankful to these volunteers and deputies who gave up time with their families and other holiday commitments to bring joy to these children.” Something new began in 2009 when a donation to buy fruit was received with the stipulation to give it to anyone of the Sheriff’s choosing. Sheriff McBrayer and

his team considered the possibilities then contacted Rita Green, Volunteer Coordinator for Senior Services who manages the delivery of Meals on Wheels for Henry County. Ms. Green provided a list of shut-ins to the Sheriff and a new tradition was born. Ms. Green commented; “We received a large number of calls afterwards wanting to know how to thank the deputies.” She added; “It wasn’t just the fresh fruit, some couldn’t believe they were remembered at Christmas.”

In 2010 money from the fruit sales allowed Sheriff’s deputies to pack and deliver “individual size” bags of fruit to 246 shut-ins. Sheriff McBrayer explained; “We are continuing this program as a way to thank seniors who helped shape Henry County and who may not be able to go get fresh fruit. We wanted to let them know they have not been forgotten during the holidays”. This is just another way to show that Henry County appreciates their senior citizens. march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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our stories

by diane ide

Seniors Serving and Being Served

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ith an average patient age of 77, Sacred Journey Hospice most often serves seniors. Like similar hospice facilities, Sacred Journey provides in-unit comfort and support to terminally ill patients and their families. They offer specialized care that promotes the highest quality of life by ensuring comfort and dignity for the patient, while concurrently ministering to the patient’s family members. Hospice care neither prolongs life nor hastens death. It is a combined community of specially-trained professionals, volunteers and family members focused on quality of care for patients and loved ones. Sacred Journey is also reliant on seniors who serve. Much of its volunteer support comes from retirees and seniors who make

time to sit with, feed, or do other services for patients. Some seniors participate via church ministries. The ladies of Henry Baptist Church provide beautiful fleece blankets, the Busy Bee Quilters of Lord of Life Lutheran Church provide lap quilts and Hampton United Methodist Church women dedicate and provide prayer shawls, Weekly volunteers come in to distribute Comfort Cookies and an item made so lovingly by these “angels.” Still others bring in pet-therapy dogs, some fill the facility’s bird feeders. “There’s no age limit to who can help in helping those in need here” says Director Annette Rogers. Sometimes the person who gives their time to provide a much-needed respite for a continual caregiver gets just as much benefit from their service as the family member being relieved. While not everyone is comfortable offering to volunteer in a hospice, those who do so find it very rewarding. Pat Windham, who herself suffers from multiple sclerosis, has been volunteering weekly services for three years to provide hand and foot massages for the patients she fondly refers to as “guests” in an effort to give them a special “spa-like” experience. ince she uses a walker, she is sometimes mistaken as a patient rather than a worker. But says Pat “when I’m at Sacred Journey I get so much joy in the company and comfort that I give to others that I forget that I even have an ailment myself. There have been so many blessings for me such as the time I got goose bumps hearing a WWII vet sing Ave Maria in perfect Italian.” Pat especially enjoys spending time

picture by Picture This Studios

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and attention on patients who don’t have family and in letting them know that they’re not alone. She credits local businesses such as Eagles Landing Pharmacy, Holiday Nails and Moye’s Pharmacy for generously supplying her with quality lotions to use on the patients. “There’s just a feeling of love that you get when you walk in the door” says Pat, “and that love, warmth and comfort for the patient is what it’s all about.” Sacred Journey’s participation doesn’t end when a patient passes away. They assess and monitor the family throughout the grieving process. They hold memorial services in spring and fall to commemorate loved ones who’ve passed. These services include lighting a candle in their memory and at the end releasing a butterfly in their name to signify the continual cycle of life. Sacred Journey Hospice works with the Veterans Administration and is implementing a Vet-to-Vet program, recruiting veterans to volunteer and to participate in ceremonial pinning services for veteran patients. “We feel that it’s important to our patient to make a special effort to ensure he/she knows how much their service to our country means,” says Ms. Rogers Sacred Journey Hospice provides a vital service to seniors -- those being served; as well as those who serve.

www.sacredjourneyhospice.com


january/february 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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feature

While Aging May Not Be An Option . . .

by diane ide

pictured by Picture This Studio

There Are Options For The Aging

L

aurie Hamilton, RN, BSN, coowner of Aging Options since 2009, exudes passion for her work -- which is to be an advocate for seniors and their family members who want the best possible care for them. Laurie’s roots go deep in Henry County. Her family moved here in the 1930s and both sets of grandparents and her own parents, Jerry and Faye Harvey, are life-long Henry County residents. Her Grandfather Copeland owned a dairy farm off Flat Rock Road and her Grandmother Copeland was the first female insurance agent for Georgia Farm Bureau. Laurie’s parents continue to live on part of the family’s dairy farm today. Laurie and husband Chris are raising their three sons as fourth-generation Henry County residents. Laurie recalls childhood visits to her grandfather in the hospital and caring for her grandmother, which ignited her passion for improving the quality of care for seniors. Then she encountered Janet Dawkins, who founded Aging Options in 2004. Janet had a background in social work and a real passion for helping senior citizens, often going the extra mile after hours to take them to the farmer’s market to be sure they had food. Together Laurie and Janet, who continues to do consulting with Aging Options, combine forces advocating for their clients and mapping needs with capabilities that family members are often ill-equipped to handle. Her desire is that we make a plan right now, while we are healthy and strong, for the time when we may no longer be able to make

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the best decisions for ourselves. Says Laurie, “we plan for what we want to happen in the event of our death; but not for our eventual care.” Rather, clients tend to seek her services once a family is already in crisis -- after the hip is broken or after Alzheimer’s has claimed their loved one -- which also means that decisions regarding their continued care tend to need immediate focus. At those times Laurie and Diana Cowan, independent consultant in the South Atlanta region, go into high gear. Even given short timeframes, they insist on getting sufficient information to prepare them to offer the best solutions for the senior in need. They meet with the senior and/or family member and do an assessment of the individual situation, enabling them to best match the physical, emotional, financial and social needs of the senior. Says Laurie “it’s traumatic enough to move a senior from their home once, so the assessment is valuable in helping prevent the need to move them a second time.” Then they propose a continual plan of care that offers options that best meet the needs of the senior, and that also give family members hope that a solution exists. Solutions may include outside placement, providing resources and education on Medicare/Medicaid, financial planning, recommending appropriate support group resources for a family member, or finding local respite care that allows a caregiver some much-needed time away. They also specialize in assisting with veterans benefits. Aging Options seeks ways to keep married couples together, whenever safety and care

permit. They also seek to keep seniors near their homeplace where friends and family can visit and where they have memories. But paramount is the need to get them the best care possible for the needs that they have. Says Diana, “if this was my own Mama, this is what I’d do. And knowing that someone is happy where they are -- that’s what makes my job worthwhile!” The services of Aging Options are free to clients. “There are a number of calls we take and people we help for which we never receive a penny, and that’s okay” says Laurie. “We are blessed in so many ways for the help we provide” she says. Our revenue comes from commissions paid to us by communities for our referrals. And we only make a referral when we feel the environment, the social aspect and the finances are right for our client. This isn’t just a job to us; it’s a ministry.” Aging Options personnel often continue to visit clients after placement and maintain contact with family members. It’s that personal touch that keeps them busy and that promotes future business through word-of-mouth. The recent 2010 Census results reflect that 7.5% of Henry County’s population were 65 and older as of 2009. Add to that the alarming rate of baby-boomers who are only just beginning to reach that status and it’s easy to see that the services of Aging Options will be in high demand in the years to come. To learn more about Aging Options, visit www.agingoptionsga.com or call 678.300.7058 or email laurie@agingoptionsga.com.


our stories

by angel maynard

Y

ou want to go out for dinner but you don’t want to head to Atlanta and fight the traffic and the crowds. You have a couple of restaurants you frequent quite often in Henry County, but you are in the mood for something different tonight. Where do you go? You get on Facebook and ask your friends. They unfortunately have no new ideas because they frequent the same restaurants you do. Does this scenario sound familiar to you? Let me introduce you to the man with a plan! “As Henry County has grown, so has the incredible variety of restaurants. Thankfully, diners no longer need to leave the county limits to explore one of life’s great pleasures. Taste of Henry provides an avenue for these local restaurants, chefs,

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and culinary entrepreneurs to showcase their talents in a way that is fun for the whole family. We all seem to frequent the same restaurants all the time, so why not use this opportunity to try a new restaurant - or 20 new restaurants! The choice is yours, and there is something for everyone at Taste of Henry.” – Beau Kelley, Chairman Taste of Henry Taste of Henry will celebrate its 10th year anniversary on May 13, 2011, at the Jason T. Harper Event Center at Heritage Park. They are moving the event up a week this year to accommodate for the Easter holiday. Lets explore what Taste Of Henry is and how you can attend. After that we will examine why you will not only be satisfied by your experience, but proud of yourself for supporting what is

behind this grand event. Taste Of Henry is a gathering of over 20 local restaurants, diners, sweets, delis and various cuisines, all in one place for you to sample. From sweet to sour and from salty to savory, Taste Of Henry has something for every palate. Some of last year’s participants were: Southern Poundcakes, The Seasons Bistro, Jail House Brewing Company, Wise Guys Wings and Starbucks Coffee. I suggest you stop by Starbucks Coffee first for a Venti to keep your energy high for this night! Each presenter offers sample size portions for you to taste. The sizes are just enough for you to enjoy, but not too big that you fill up too quickly. This is a feeding frenzy you want to last. I suggest elastic waistband pants for the evening.


The cost of admission is extremely low considering the amount of food and fun you will have at this event. Adults: $20.00 Children under 5 years old: $5.00 Seniors 60 and over: $15.00 Now that you know what this event is, where you need to go and how much it cost to attend, let’s talk about why you will be proud of yourself for going. One hundred percent of the proceeds from Taste Of Henry go toward the maintenance, operation and sustainability of A Friend’s House, a Henry County home for children in crisis. A Friend’s House opened its doors to children in need in 1998 with the hard work and determination

of a few very dedicated Henry County residents. Forty six percent of their yearly budget comes from fundraisers like Taste of Henry, as well as grants and other donations from residents and local businesses. I was able to sit down and speak with three of these people for this interview: Jill Holder, Executive Director; Nan Jenkins, Director of Development; Jeff Wilder, Chairman of the Board. They told me that since 1998 A Friend’s House has grown from a grassroots campaign of selling hand painted coffee cups to raise money for children in need, to a 501c(3) nonprofit organization with a beautiful facility which houses 24 beds for infants and children up to 18 years of age. They provide clothing, medical and dental exams, mental health services, education and activities

for the children. This facility truly cares for and loves each child that enters. They would like to express, in this article, how extremely grateful they are for all the generosity they receive from the residents of Henry County. So, now you know the what, when, where and why about Taste Of Henry. This event is a “must do” on your calendar for May 13, 2011. Now, lets eat y’all! If you would like to be a participant, sponsor or an attendee at Taste Of Henry, you can find more information at their website: www.tasteofhenry.org If you would like more information about different ways you can help A Friend’s House through donations and volunteering you can go to their website: www.afriendshouse.org march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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our stories

Take care of the customers. Take care of the employees. Take care of the equipment. Be debt free. pictured left to right Ryan Michael Roark , Robert Roark Jr , Robert Roark Sr pictured by Picture This Studios

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by jennifer sconyers

Roark Roots

Run Deep In Trucking

& warehouse industry

R

yan and Rob Roark, of Kebo Transportation Services, Inc. are brothers and have been raised in and around the trucking and warehouse business by their father Robert (Bob) Roark who started the company in 1986. Over the course of the last 20 years, Kebo has flourished into a major Southeastern competitor servicing over 12 states and delivering truckload freight for several major corporations as well as brokering freight throughout the country. Kebo is a family owned and operated company with humble beginnings dating back to the late 1960’s when the senior Roark received a call from a friend asking him to bring his truck to Atlanta to help move some furniture. He was paid $50, a lot of money in those days, and the rest, as they say is history. When I asked Ryan Roark how their business was going he stated “Doing real well! One thing we have going for us is; Dad has always preached ‘Take care of the customers. Take care of the employees. Take care of the equipment. Be debt free.’ We have been growing and expanding because of our family upbringing. We have about 40 to 50 employees and most of our drivers have been here for 4 to 6 years! They have found a home here,

we tend to keep them.” I commented that this is quite an impressive employee retention rate in the trucking industry as typically most companies have a high turnover rate. Ryan agreed and went on to tell us “They run regional so they are home in the evenings with their families. We also have GPS tracking on all our trucks so if they break down on the road we can send whatever help they need right where they are. Or, if a customer wants to know where the shipment is we can tell them the exact location. The employees and customers are not just a number here; they are each a person and should be treated well.” Rob Roark joined us then and overhearing what Ryan was saying added “One of the men working in the warehouse has been here for 10 years at least and he has brought both of his sons to work here too. My son Austin works here every summer. Ryan’s wife has also been working her for the past 10 years.” Thinking of my own sons, I asked “How is your safety record here?” Ryan smiled “Great.” He said simply, “We have a satisfactory rating; drivers go through all their inspections and the meetings. Kebo’s number one focus is safety and quality.” They went on to explain how combining trucking and warehousing provide

“JIT” (Just In Time) delivery for their customers, “We have drivers ready to go when a call comes in and the customer needs fright moved right away.” I can definitely see how Kebo Transportation being paired with All South Warehouses makes them one of the best Distribution / Logistics companies in the Southeast! “Our customers also like that we are EPA Smart Way Partners. Because some of our freight is dry goods we are inspected by the FDA and AIB, American Institution of Baking, and our rating is Superior!” That is huge! A Superior rating is not easily had! Their website sums it up nicely, “Each customer large or small always receives our utmost attention to detail and outstanding customer service. Our goal has never been to be the cheapest carrier, but to be the best carrier and build long lasting relationships with our customers and provide them with the best on time delivery possible in the industry.” Clearly they have found a niche in the trucking and warehouse business and they do it well! To reach them for your business trucking or warehouse needs call 404.244.9374 or check them out online www.kebotrans.com or www.allsouthwarehouse.com. march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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our stories

Invisible Fence

Keeps Pets Safe & Happy, Pet Owners Too! by lisa kinchen

S

ome people said Sadie was a bad dog. OK, I admit it I said Sadie was a bad dog. A beautiful collie lab beagle mix, Sadie a young, energetic “rescue dog” that adopted our family a few months ago, was not too fond of a leash and had no concept of boundaries. While she didn’t bark too much, or make too many messes in the house, or shred the furniture, although her fur tends to cling to couches like a fine blanket, Sadie was a roamer which may be natural for her breed. However, when given an open back yard, little training, and an uninformed first time dog owner, Sadie did not know the limitations of her own home. Her behavior resembled that of a young child in perpetual “play mode” at the park just outside of a parent’s audible reach, as she would roam about the back yard, front yard, side yard, neighbors’ yards, and finally the Post Office. Yes, one day, Sadie found her way across several busy streets and ended up half a mile from home. Fearing for her safety and in desperate need for behavioral reform, I contacted Jerry Parker, Regional Manager with Peachtree South Invisible Fence for the solution. I soon learned that indeed Sadie was not a bad dog at all. Established in 1999, and with a customer base of over 2,000 Invisible Fencing by Peachtree South is an authorized, full service Invisible Fence dealership serving the Atlanta Metro area (South of I-20).

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Parker, who also supervises their office on the north side of Atlanta with a customer base of over 10,000 has 12 years of experience with the Invisible Fence Brand and is well versed in the training of pets and animal behavior, explained that “dogs don’t have problems as much as people have problems with what dogs do.” Jerry and the staff of Invisible Fencing by Peachtree South focus on the entire solution of the customer’s unique problems and challenges of pet ownership. All of the staff receives not only certified training for outdoor containment but for indoor solutions too, as well as animal behavior in general. From installing the system, to training pets with their exclusive Safe Dog® and Perfect Start® training to making sure you get the customer support when you need it, Invisible Fence by Peachtree South is there to help. Whatever the breed, size or temperament of the pet, they can help protect him from danger while being free to play. With over 12,000 satisfied local customers as well as support from neighborhood veterinarians, Jerry and his team will work hard so you can rest easy knowing your pet is safe at home. With a lifetime warranty and a guarantee that it will work on any animal, it is a win win situation for the customer. Jerry cautioned against the use of baby gates to contain a pet or keep them from certain areas of the house as stepping over a baby gate is not a safe thing to do. Invisible Fence by Peachtree South also helps people with indoor solutions like

keeping the pet out of certain rooms or off furniture. Jerry explained that most indoor problems can be solved by their Indoor PetFree™ Solutions. Their product works as well with cats as it does with dogs, and people can use the Pet Free products to keep cats off the countertop and the dinner table. The company strives to help the community in not only containing pets but keeping them safe in other situations. For example, they are participating in Project Breathe™ whereby they provide by donation each area fire department with a set of pet oxygen masks. Every year, due to house fires, hundred of animals die that could have been revived with the proper equipment. Jerry shared, “We try to show the same respect for the pets as we do for our customers…because they are a family member.” Indeed life is much easier, happier and safer these days for Sadie and our whole family since working with Jerry and the folks at Invisible Fence. Sadie adjusted very quickly to the invisible fence and her behavior improved significantly within minutes of training. Sadie continues to be a loving, energetic, inquisitive pet but now she is noticeably happier and has the freedom to explore her environment safely. For further information or to schedule a free consultation with an Invisible Fence Pet Safety Expert, please call 770.460.8693 or visit them online at www.peachtreesouth.invisiblefence.com.


coffee and a camera

coffee and a camera H Magazine is proud to share with you these stunning images of Henry County that were captured by the lens of Dr. Fallas of Fallas Family Vision.

H

ey Morrison, there is a great place to take some pictures that I pass every day. Let’s go Sunday morning.” And with that simple statement, Peto Fallas gave life to Coffee and a Camera. The premise is simple and only two real requirements exist to participate. The first is the love of photography and the second is the willingness to meet at 6:00am on a Sunday morning. Many of the photographers lead busy lives nearly consumed by their full time jobs, children, and other family needs. Slowing down is rarely an option. Despite the unusually early hour that the group meets, everyone is cheerful and enjoys the break from the rapid pace of regular day life. Comradery, jokes, knowledge, fashion and laughter are all shared during the shoots. To

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inspire and be inspired. It is all there. Most importantly, there are the photos. There is a freedom for photographers with Coffee and a Camera. They are allowed to wander the countryside and cityscapes, left to their own devices and creativity to capture the world around them. After an early start on Sunday mornings, when the Coffee and a Camera crew typically operates, the world seems to spin a little slower and almost pause for the camera. It is therapeutic to work at a different pace and take time to appreciate the amazing scenes nature has provided. Small shacks become the subject of attention. Open fields, streams, and bridges that are normally only passed during a busy commute, are now viewed with an artistic and patient eye. The group has even ventured to places outside Henry County, places

like Milledgeville, and Augusta, GA. When Peto first ventured out on a Sunday morning with friends, he had no idea that in a few short weeks there would be standing room only in a Starbucks at 6:30 in the morning. He merely wanted to enjoy photography and share that with others. His driving and contagious passion is the primary reason for the group’s success and also the reason it will continue to strive and reach into new boundaries. Future plans include a web page where local photographers can exhibit their work and sell it. “I just want to have people share something positive, that makes their week start out the right way”. Fallas said. For more information on Coffee and a Camera please visit the groups website at www.coffeeandacamera.com.


by jason morrison

picture by Jason Morrison

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Energy Efficient New Homes

efficient

comfortable

quality

Georgiapower.com/builder 55

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56


our stories

Women’s

Health for All Ages

W

hen Katie Pittman (88) drives by one of the “Girl Docs” billboards in Henry County, she can say “That’s where I go for women’s health.” So can her daughter, Sandra Sweat (69) … and her granddaughter, Louann Horton (48). Oh – and let’s not forget her great-granddaughter, Jacqui Horton, who is twenty years old. It seems it’s a “family thing!” Why do four generations of women from one family go to Women’s Health Specialists in Stockbridge? It started fifteen years ago when Katie Pittman began to see Dr. Sheryl Simpson-Jones for her women’s health check ups. When her granddaughter, Louann, moved into Henry County and began to look for medical care, Katie told her, “Have I got a doctor for you!” “When I walked in and met Dr. Simpson-Jones, the first thing I noticed was her eyes,” reflected Louann. “I thought ‘she has beautiful eyes,” and I could see the warmth and caring there.” Louann’s experience has spanned from the older location of Women’s Health Specialists in the “tower” at Henry Medi-

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cal Center to its current address at 115 Eagle Spring Drive in Stockbridge. It wasn’t long before she was recommending Dr. Simpson-Jones to her mother, Sandra, and then to her daughter, Jacqui. What will a new customer experience upon arrival? The first thing that catches the eye is the graceful swan that adorns the sign and tops the doorway of the building. The logo continues on the inside, where patients are soothed by an inside waterfall in the waiting area. Examination rooms are all decorated differently, with soundproofing between rooms to ensure patient privacy. Schedulers work at keeping patient waits as short as possible. According to Louann, the staff is very friendly, professional and quick to put fears at ease. “I took my daughter, Jacqui, for her first visit,” she recounted. “She was nervous – after all, no woman really likes these appointments! But she came out smiling, at ease.” Louann also took her niece, Kalyn, (whose father is serving in the armed forces in Afghanistan) to see Dr. Simpson-Jones. Kalyn’s reaction? “I’m glad that’s over…but I’m glad it was her!” One of the most appealing things to

by diane smith

the women of this family is the true feeling of warmth and caring they receive at Women’s Health Specialists. “There have been times,” shared Louann, “When I had something going on in my life and Dr. Simpson-Jones looked at me and simply said ‘Let’s talk,’ and she listened.” Does she feel that women are comfortable with this practice because it is staffed by all women doctors? “Absolutely – not only do they understand women’s bodies, but they also get the emotions we deal with because it’s the same ones they deal with!” Women’s Health Specialists is a fullservice OB/GYN office, offering general gynecology services, pregnancy services, patient education, and even a body wellness and weight management program. In addition to Dr. Sheryl Simpson-Jones, the practice is staffed by Dr. Kimberly McIntosh and Dr. Temitope Olubuyide. Office hours are 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday. For more information, call 770-474-0064 or visit the website at www.womenshealthspecialistsonline.com. Women’s Health Specialists of Eagles Landing – serving all generations of women’s health needs.


our stories

Roark Roots

Run Deep In Trucking Hands on Henry pictured by Picture This Studios

The 13th Annual Hands on Henry is April 16th, 2011. Hands On Henrys is a community day of service that is organized by the Chambers’ Leadership Henry Class.

O

n this day, various community volunteers gather to complete projects submitted by local community businesses, non-profits organizations, civic groups, schools and faith based organizations that would not otherwise be completed. Volunteers include individuals, families, co-workers, clubs and church groups. The projects range from painting and cleaning to landscaping and building repair. In the past such organizations as Noah’s Ark, A Friends House, Haven House, local Schools and Parks and Rec have had a huge benefit in this awesome community initiative. Last years’ Hands On Henry brought out 2000+ volunteers. We anticipate this year it will grow at least 25-30 % (500-600) more volunteers. The 2011

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Class has taken the vision and initiative a step further and added a second location for pre-registered volunteers and walk-in volunteers to sign-in and participate. The two locations will be Henry County High School and Henry Medical Center. The Class of 2011 hopes the convenience of the HMC registration site will encouraged increased participation in the event. Also new for 2011 is the “MicroSponsorship” program. Individuals who wish to help the goal of improving the community we live, work and play in can do so by becoming a Micro-Sponsor. Sponsorship levels start at only $50! For further information on volunteering or becoming a sponsor please go to www.handsonhenry.org, email: volunteers@leadershiphenry.com or sponsors@leadershiphenry.com or contact the chamber at 770.957.5786.


january/february march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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our stories

Rock,

Roll Reminisce

It’s time to Rock and Roll!

Well, it will be on May14 ... by diane smith

D

o you remember listening to the radio in the 60s and 70s – often on the sly from parents who did NOT approve of the “new sound”? If you are a little younger, you may have heard remakes of the oldies – or enjoyed listening to some retro tunes… like Devil with a Blue Dress On, Good Golly Miss Molly, or I Just Want to Celebrate. Speer Entertainment is getting ready to help Henry County citizens to Rock, Roll and Reminisce with an oldies concert at the Jason T. Harper Event Center at Heritage Park in McDonough, Georgia. The concert will feature Mitch Ryder and Barry McGuire; as well as Pete Rivera, formerly of Rare Earth; Dennis Tufano, original lead singer of the Buck-

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inghams; and Sonny Geraci of Climax and The Outsiders. Ricky Nelson’s twin sons, Gunnar and Matthew, will perform “Ricky Nelson Remembered,” a loving tribute to their dad, America’s first teen idol. A local favorite, The Rockerz, will also get Henry County up and dancing. In addition to providing a good time & good food (thanks to OBs Barbeque), the concert will benefit a Henry County non-profit. According to Speer Entertainment founder Linda Walker, “Proceeds from Rock, Roll and Reminisce will benefit Noah’s Ark in Locust Grove. A portion of the ticket sales and the proceeds from the silent auction will go to assist this wonderful organization.” Noah’s Ark provides a permanent home to more than 1,000 rescue animals and also has capac-

ity to serve up to 24 children in need of assistance. Speer explained, “While Noah’s Ark animal habitats are open to the public, they charge no admission fee. So donations and fundraisers are vital to continuing their mission.” Mark your calendars, get out your dancin’ shoes – and be ready to Rock, Roll and Reminisce on Saturday, May 14 at 5:00 p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to speerentertainment.com or call Noah’s Ark at 770.957.0888. As you leave the Jason T. Harper Center (with tired feet and ears ringing from that last wonderful guitar riff), you’ll leave with some good memories – and the satisfaction of knowing you’ve made one of Henry County’s non-profits a little stronger.


ENGINE MACHINE SHOP DIESEL SPECIALISTS

ENGINE MACHINE SHOP DIESEL SPECIALISTS march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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business profile

Team Patterson takes

AFS Diesel to

New Heights

B

ehind the engaging smile, firm but friendly handshake and charming yet direct demeanor is a man with great ambition for the future and great respect for the past. Meet Doug Patterson, one third of the family team that is Associated Fuel Systems, Inc., soon to be known as AFS Diesel, same solid company doing business for the past 30 years, but with new branding and new marketing. H magazine recently caught up with a very busy Patterson during some precious little downtime where he agreed, while multitasking, to share some thoughts about family, the company, and the future. Doug Patterson the family man is undoubtedly a dedicated father to daughters Kendall, age 8 and Braelin, age 5 both actively involved in cheerleading. He’s husband of 10 years to their mother Mandy and together they are expecting daughter number three in July and Doug couldn’t be happier. Patterson literally beams when he talks about his family

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and it is clear they are priority one; when he’s not at AFS, he spends as much time as possible with them cherishing every moment. Rounding out the family there’s also some 4 legged members that require his attention too—kitty Jinx and two beautiful English bulldogs, Norman and Zoey. Keeping up with a growing family and a growing business motivates Doug to work out at the gym at least three times a week, a fitness habit he developed many years ago conducive to his active and demanding lifestyle. And, as time permits he rides his Harley and participates in a number of motorcycle charity events in and around Georgia. In the way of history, Doug shared he has always worked for the company that his dad Pat Patterson started back in 1981 but he is quick to add that he started as a janitor in the business where more seasoned employees sometimes playfully teased him by moving the trash around just out of his reach. Over the years, he’s done a little bit of everything from

working in the shop to working on trucks and everything in between. He took some time to attend college and hone his marketing skills but it has always been what he describes as his “real world experience” that makes him and his family business leaders in the industry. Doug, who has a deep respect for the history of the company, now serves as Chief Operating Officer while brother Dean Patterson is Chief Executive Officer and dad Pat, although technically retired, still manages to put in a full 3 to 4 days a week. Both brothers credit the work ethic and values instilled by their dad for the success of the company noting they are debt free which is certainly admirable especially during these troubling economic times. “Early on, the company started out as a fuel systems and turbo charger specialty shop. Now we are known for building engines, every aspect of diesel engines, and shipping all over North and South America. We remanufacture and rebuild diesel engines, all makes and models” Doug explained. Even so, they


pictured Dean and Doug Patterson pictured by Picture This Studio

are eager to branch out and grow the business even more which is why they are in the midst of re-engineering their business model including new branding which is one of the driving forces behind the name change to AFS Diesel. “Our name is deceiving,” Doug said, “when you hear it you think fuel and air—we want people to hear that we do every aspect of the diesel engine.” They even added a company “mascot” which will serve as their logo. The mascot, now dubbed “Cam Diesel” resembles a diesel engine with large tattooed muscles, reflective of their strength and strong reputation in the industry. When asked how it is that AFS has not only survived but thrived for over three decades, Doug replied, “The market has changed and we have changed with the market. We are in the forefront of changing with EPA and “green” standards. So many of our competitors are no longer in business because they did not change with the times. Just like the I Pads of today are faster than the laptops of three years ago, technologically engines are

more advanced than ever and each one has a computer. By adapting and updating our equipment we have kept pace with the times and the needs of the industry.” Some of the machine shop services AFS offers its customers include complete engine block machining, cylinder head rebuilding, complete engine component rebuilding such as water pumps, oil pumps, air compressors, remanufacturing of rods, and crankshaft grinding. AFS prides themselves on being a clean and drug free facility that is DOT certified with 43 trained employees all having an average of 15 years with the company. “We have great employees—they are the backbone of the business, not me and my brother” Doug was quick to add. They are also proud that they have been able to get through these tough times without layoffs and without cutting employee pay. Instead of cutting salaries, they reinvested back into the company personally. Over 75% of AFS’ employees live in Henry County. This fact coupled with the economic

presence of their company translates into a significant contribution to the local economy. Doug is committed to providing the best in this industry but if you have questions don’t send him an e mail! Although he is a techno gadget aficionado, he is not a big fan of e mail preferring instead the human touch of an actual conversation. He even admitted to us that they only recently began using voicemail at work. Patterson summed it up this way, “We are the best at what we do. We do not take short cuts—everything is first class.” When challenged on how he could make such a bold statement, Patterson replied with his characteristic confidence, “Our reputation speaks for itself. Our customers are always satisfied.” Team Patterson invites you to please visit their web site www.associatedfuelsystems.com or call them at 404.361.1361 or come by the facility at 3939 Moreland Ave., Conley with all your truck engine and component needs.

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You put a fortune into your house. What if it could return the favor?

Upgrade your energy efficiency for an immediate return of $ 525! Georgia Power is rewarding energy efficient customers with a handsome rebate. Replace your gas water heater with a Marathon® and get a $525 rebate! Marathon’s design makes it one of the most energy-efficient water heaters on the market. And, Marathon’s inner tank will never rust, corrode, or leak. They guarantee it. For additional savings, convert your gas furnace to an ENERGY STAR® qualified heat pump. ENERGY STAR heat pumps use substantially less energy than standard models and can save you up to $300 a year. Call 1-800-524-2421, ext. 550 for rebate details and installer recommendations. And prepare for a sweet payback. Certain restrictions may apply. Must be a Georgia Power customer to qualify for rebate. Actual energy savings may vary based on individual equipment and usage. All equipment subject to manufacturers’ warranties. 2010 Marathon rebate is available from January 1 through December 31, 2010. ENERGY STAR heat pump rebates and tax incentives may be available – call for details. Rebates are subject to limitations and subject to change without notice.


feature

F

truffles medispa

A

C

I

A

L

S

of Skin Care BY LISA KINCHEN & DR. PAUL FELDMAN, M.D.,F.A.C.S.,F.I.C.S. (Note: This is the second in a six part series.)

A

facial is often considered to be a self-indulgent and pampering treat. I learned however, that facials, while certainly luxurious and soothing, serve as an important component of skin care. As Stephanie Basile, esthetician with Truffles Medispa, explained, “I try very hard to maintain the pampering aspect for each of my clients by providing a calming and relaxing environment, while at the same time, addressing the skin care needs and concerns for each client. During the facial process, the overall health of the skin is assessed, and minor skin problems can be addressed, such as dryness, oiliness, and minor acne breakouts”. My esthetician at Truffles Medispa shared that a facial is a very important tool in analyzing a clients skin care needs as it allows them to see and feel the skin during the procedure, allowing them to intimately analyze the client’s skin condition, in this case, mine. My facial treatment was then customized based on this analysis which revealed I had some problem areas known as sunspots. The facial coupled with an at home skin care plan has once again yielded fantastic corrective results. In early December, I was recommended to start on the Obagi Nu-Derm®

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System, which is the #1 prescriptionstrength, physician dispensed skin care system available. The Obagi Nu-Derm® System is only one of many skin care systems offered by Obagi® Medical Products. Besides the Nu-Derm® system, which is their most corrective, anti-aging system; they have systems that specifically address acne, rosacea, and a Vitamin C based system for younger, less damaged skin, as a first step in anti-aging and correction. I chose the Obagi Nu-Derm® System as a corrective, anti-aging measure, as a recommendation by Truffles Medispa, to address my skin care concerns. The entire line works synergistically to promote a total skin transformation. The Obagi Nu-Derm® System, which was first created in 1988, uses prescription strength active ingredients to help increase cell turnover, resulting in younger looking and acting skin, as well as elimination of freckles and sun spots. The active ingredients also promote collagen synthesis which helps to reduce fine lines and wrinkles and improve the skin’s firmness. This is a corrective skin care program that I am using at home which can be combined with all procedures performed at Truffles Medispa for enhanced results. My esthetician, Stephanie, took great care to educate and guide me on

the proper use of the Obagi® system for my at home regimen. I have found this feedback to be quite valuable especially in light of the product’s potency. In fact, I check in with her regularly so that she may monitor my progress between visits to Truffles. I strongly encourage anyone who utilizes an at home system to be sure to partner with a licensed esthetician to ensure optimum results. It has been several weeks since I started the system, and having a facial was a great opportunity for my skin to be reassessed and see how my skin transformations were coming along. I am certainly pleased with the results I see! When I first consulted with Stephanie, my skin was very dull and sallow, with visible areas of sun spots and the beginning signs of aging. After my microdermabrasion treatment in November, and diligent compliance with my Obagi® home skin care regimen, my skin is brighter and clearer, and has a healthy glow to it that was not there a couple of months ago. I’m excited about the improvements I am already seeing and feeling as a result of the Truffles Medispa treatments, and I look forward to continuing with the awesome skin care plan developed especially for me! For more information please visit www.trufflesmedispa.com.


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our stories

Nancy Hanks featured in

Downtown

Hampton Mural

K

athy Williford has always loved to draw and paint. With a degree in Art Education from the University of South Florida, she taught art in high school in Florida for eight years and then entered the corporate world, holding jobs, unfortunately, that were not related to art. She continued however to dabble in art as a hobby. About ten years ago when living in Knoxville, she was asked to paint a mural in a hair salon. This was her first mural and she painted it nights and weekends while working her full-time job. “That made me realize it was time to take some risks and see if I could support myself doing what I love” Williford explained. “Painting murals made sense to me from a business standpoint because it gave me a buyer for my work before I actually painted it. Within a short time I quit my real job and started my own business painting murals” she added. The City of Hampton’s quaint downtown area proudly displays one of Williford’s gorgeous murals, a train many will remember, the Nancy Hanks. Williford explained that an important part of Hampton’s history revolves around the train running trough town and

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their historic 100 year-old Train Depot so it was fitting to have the Nancy Hanks featured in their first mural. Inside the frame is a depiction of the original Nancy Hanks passenger train that ran between Savannah and Atlanta in the 1890’s. She was named after a racehorse that won a derby race during that time. The children standing in the foreground outside of the frame represent the 1950’s era which is when the Nancy Hanks II was in operation. While working on the mural, Williford enjoyed chatting with many of the townspeople and visitors stopping by, many of whom shared their fond memories of riding on the Nancy Hanks II. She said. “Painting outdoors created a lot of interest and I think having the mural has added to our community pride and has given our downtown another wonderful point of interest.” A short drive to Hampton is well worth the trip where the historic Train Depot is open daily to welcome visitors. Several excellent restaurants, shops, spas, a museum, historic buildings and homes as well as many fun-filled festivals and events may be found in this charming town. Hampton is growing up, growing better, and with thoughtful planning, maintaining that small-town charm making it a wonderful place to live and visit.


pictured Kathy Williford picture by Picture This Studio

march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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business profile

pictures by Picture This Studios

Your Neighborhood Choice!

S

ince opening their doors in October of 2009, Padres Mexican Cantina & Grill has been keeping customers of all ages happy and coming back for the scrumptious food, casual friendly atmosphere and top notch service. Co-Owners Lisa Durham and Todd Fallaw, both locals, have over 24 years of restaurant business experience between them and it shows in this large, well appointed establishment where diners are not only

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treated to excellent food and beverages but are entertained with music, 12 big screen TVs positioned throughout the cantina and a full service bar where you can experience their signature “Margarona” concoction. Durham and Fallaw recognized a need for this type of restaurant in a fast growing area and set out to provide a high quality eating experience that offers fast and friendly service, an extensive array of traditional Mexican dishes, soups

and salads, daily specials, and creative new offerings such as their smothered shrimp and salmon filet. There’s definitely something for everyone on their menu with everything from appetizers, to quesadillas, enchiladas, burritos, nachos, tacos, steaks, fajitas, vegetarian fare and seafood to a tempting assortment of desserts---everyone leaves happy, satisfied and fulfilled. Padres, with a spacious 180 person capacity, easily accommodates both small and large groups with


the ability to comfortably host parties, showers, reunions and sports teams and gatherings of any size. An added plus, with 15 employees, Padres is definitely a boost to the local economy. Quality ingredients and superior customer service are trademarks at Padres making the lunch and dining experience memorable for customers 7 days a week. When asked what he likes most about being in the restaurant business, Fallaw replied “I enjoy meeting new people and

feeding happy customers.” Clearly Fallaw and Durham know what it takes to make the customer happy since business, including repeat business, is great and customer feedback is consistently positive. Recently, while buying paint at a local store, Durham overheard some people talking about the great food at Padres, “that really made me feel proud knowing our hard work and commitment to quality is paying off and that folks are enjoying our food” she remarked.

It is easy to see how locally owned and operated Padres Mexican Cantina & Grill is truly your neighborhood choice. To experience Padres, check them out any day of the week. They are open from 11:00am to 10:00pm Monday through Friday, 11:00am to 11:00pm on Saturdays and from noon til 10:00pm on Sundays. Padres is conveniently located in the Publix Shopping Center at 2875 Hampton-Locust Grove Road in Locust Grove.

march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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student spotlight

josh

reim by sheri willis

pictured Kathy Williford picture by Picture This Studio

Josh Reim attributes his success to God and his parents. Josh is a senior at Community Christian School and was chosen as the winner of the Wendy’s Heisman Award for school year 2010-2011. Eligibility for application is limited to men and women entering their senior year of high school; have at least a “B” average, participate in athletics and are leaders to their underclassmen. Josh’s passion is soccer and he has played the sport since he was a young boy however, recently he began playing football, basketball, and running track. He excels in athletics and says “I am using my God given talents to worship and give glory to God.” Josh is also very involved with the school and his church, Community Bible. He is Vice President of the Student Government, a member of the schools’ Food Network, participates in the WAVE program; which is choreographed sign language to music, and is also involved with the church’s children’s ministry. Last year Josh went on a mission trip to Nicaragua; he assists the youth group by doing yard work, washing windows or whatever the needs may be for those who donate money to the youth group for their mission trips. Josh’s giving spirit and commitment to service has been a constant help at home and at school. His willingness to volunteer as a leader is an example to his peers. When Josh’s parents Rick and Patti talk about their son, you can see the sparkle of pride in their eyes. Josh wants to major in Sports Science or Athletic Training when he attends college; he is hoping for an athletic scholarship however, he has already been accepted by two schools on an academic scholarship. The future is looking bright for Josh Reim as well it should for such a well rounded young leader in Henry County. march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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operationoverseas

A Life Prayed Home By: Beverly Van Gorder

I

n 1967, as a 19 year old young man, Thomas J. Davis did not have any military aspirations. But the draft quickly placed his focus on service to his country with the US Army when he was called up that year. On June 2, 1967 he found himself in Fort Jackson, SC undergoing Basic Training. And by October 19, 1967 all familiar was left behind as he arrived in Vietnam to help fight a war. He was a Private (PVT) with the 196th Light Infantry Brigade, which meant he would see combat up close and personal. Five months later in March, 1968 he experienced just how personal it would be. His unit moved into Que Son Valley one evening, set up camp and prepared for the day ahead. In the morning, the first platoon went out and made contact with the enemy. Later a second platoon went out to help the first. Davis and two buddies, Isaiah McMillan and Porter Earl Calloway were left to secure the hill upon which they were camped. “I was the youngest in age and time in country among the three of us,” Davis remembers. “Calloway was a ‘short-timer’ meaning he had less than 30 days before heading home and McMillan was the only one with a wife and son.” Because the soldiers who had gone out from the hill were outnumbered and the hill itself offered no real protection, it was not long before they were ambushed.

“McMillan and I were crawling our way out and Calloway was behind us. He got up at one point in the line of fire taking a hit to one of his thighs. McMillan told me to go get him. He laid down fire as I crawled back for Calloway. I crawled out a second time with a six foot 190 pound soldier on my back and as I tried to get up my ankle snapped, but I never even felt the pain,” Davis recalls. “We hid out and made every attempt to defend ourselves, but the ammo eventually ran out and we were captured. For two days we were moved, often drug, through rice paddies even as friendly artillery fire (USA) came in on top of us. At one point, unable to walk, Calloway and I were thrown into a hole. We told McMillan to try to get away, but he refused to leave us. Calloway needed medical care, but was not given any treatment and as a result died within a short time. Ten days later, McMillan and I arrived at our first of many POW camps.” Davis says their main focus was on escaping, but the entire camp was surrounded by punja sticks. These were placed in the ground at 40 degree angles with sharp tips left exposed and covered with feces so as to create infection in anyone who might attempt to cross and get caught on them. This left them with little hope of escape. The days and weeks turned into months and then years as they were held in South Vietnam until 1971. At that point they were

forced to relocate to North Vietnam. It was a grueling hike as they walked every night for three months before reaching their destination. Two more years would pass before freedom came with war’s end in 1973. When asked if he has any resentment over having had to serve without getting to choose, Davis earnestly states, “This country is worth the sacrifice; it is worth defending. I have lived in a lot of places around the world and we definitely live in the greatest country on Earth.” Five years in captivity. Five years without family or friends. How did Davis survive? He explains, “Some people may say they do not believe in God, but there are no atheists in a foxhole especially when the bombs are coming. You ultimately realize there is a higher power. I did not have a personal relationship with Jesus when I was in Vietnam, but my mother loved Jesus with all her heart. My mother kept me hanging on; I knew she was praying. She was a great mother, my hero really. I did give my heart to the Lord in 1983. I know my mother also prayed for that, but as for getting out of Vietnam alive---my momma prayed me home.” Author’s note: Thomas J. Davis retired as a Sgt. Maj. after 30 years with the US Army. He received many medals during that time, including the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star, and the Combat Infantry Badge. He and his wife of 37 years, Barbara, have been residents of Henry County since 1999. march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Pictured top left to right Mable Lloyd, Lonnie Lloyd, Paul Hotten, Dora Hart bottom left to right Galen Ahrens, Bobby Stephens, Mae Stephens, and Lavern Hooten

P.O. Box 1390 McDonough, GA 30253 or visit www.hmagazine.biz

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march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz


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Denim & Dimanonds Auction Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough

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Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough

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Daylight Saving Time Begins at 2am

Locust Grove Mardi Growl Dog Parade 11:00am 770.692.2323

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day

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Strong Rock Patriot Review Talent Show

Henry County Kiwanis Arts & Talent Showcase 7:00pm Henry County Performing Arts Center

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Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough

Mat & Sands Track Clinic Strong Rock Christian School

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Sacred Journey Hospice Volunteer Training 5:30pm - 9:00pm

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Sacred Journey Hospice Volunteer Training 9:00am - 12:30pm ELCA Online Academy Open House 3:00pm & 6:00pm To reserve a space call 77.957.2927

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ELCA Open House 9:00am To reserve a space call 77.957.2927

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St. James Job Networking Group 7:00pm - 9:00pm St. James Catholic Church McDonough Meetings and workshops are Free and open to all!

Southern Crescent Habitat for Humanity Henry Build Benefit Concert by Spivey Hall Children’s Choir 7:00pm Hosted at McDonough Presbyter ian. Tickets on sale at habitat partner churches. Tickets: $15 per person ofr $50 for 4 www.schabitat.org

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Crossroads Career Network 7:00pm Stockbrdige First United Methodist Church, 4863 North Henry Blvd. Provides network events with professional speakers and a 6-step workshop series to assist career explorers in reaching their goals. Childcare provided. 770.474.4111 www.crossroadscareer. org/stockbridgefumc

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St. James Job Networkig Group 7:00pm - 9:00pm St. James Catholic Church McDonough

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Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough County-wide Track Meet at Strong Rock Christian School

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Henry Players presents The Producers 7:30pm Henry County Performing Arts

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April Fool’s Day Henry Players presents The Producers 7:30pm Henry County Performing Arts

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Sacred Journey Hospice Volunteer Training 530pm - 9:00pm

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Sacred Journey Hospice Volunteer Training 9:00am - 12:30pm Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough St. James Job Networking Group 7:00pm - 9:00pm St. James Catholic Church McDonough Meetings and workshops are Free and open to all!

march/april 2011 • www.hmagazine.biz

Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough Arti Gras 12:00pm - 5:00pm New Orleans Style Artist Market and Festival

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Crossroads Career Network 7:00pm Stockbrdige First United Methodist Church, 4863 North Henry Blvd. Provides network events with professional speakers and a 6-step workshop series to assist career explorers in reaching their goals. Childcare provided. 770.474.4111 www.crossroadscareer. org/stockbridgefumc Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough Locust Grove Easter Egg Hunt 10:00am City Hal lComplex

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Strong Rock Christian School Open House 2:00pm

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Henry County Schools Spring Break Begins

Pinwheels for Prevention Child Abuse Prevention Program 11:00am on the square in McDonough

Administrative Professionals Day Blood Drive at Strong Rock Christian School

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St. James Job Networking Group 7:00pm - 9:00pm ELCA Fine Arts presents “Sound of Music” 7:00pm

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Arbor Day ELCA Fine Arts presents “Sound of Music” 7:00pm

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Pet Adoption Saturdays 11:00am - 3:00pm Henry County Humane Society 46 Work Camp Road McDonough Locust Grove Day 10:00am 770.692.2323 ELCA Fine Arts presents “Sound of Music” 1:00pm College Softball Tournament at Strong Rock Christian School



H Magazine - March/April 2011