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CONTENTS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................. ...............................................................................

FEATURE PLAY BALL

14

RAVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40-46 SEX ON THE BEACH

40

SOUND HEALING

42

BUBBLED SIP

44

POE-BOKEN

46

HERITAGE

24

hLIFE

FACES

48

ARTIST FEATURE .. 58

WE’RE ALL FROM SOMEWHERE

............................

ST. ANN’S ITALIAN FESTIVAL

34

EUGENE FLINN

ROB VENTURA

EVENT PIX .......... 52-55

hNOW ................... 60-62

WHERE IT’S AT (BIGGIES)

52

SPELL IT OUT

60

FRESH AIR (TILTED KILT)

54

GLORY NIGHTS

62

OUT OF DODGE ..... 56

CONNECT WITH US. WE’RE ALWAYS HAPPY TO HEAR FROM YOU.

URBAN OASIS

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............................................................................................................................................................

HOBOKENED Hello Hoboken! Before I introduce myself, I would like to sincerely thank Diana Schwaeble for her amazing work with hMAG. I have been graced with the opportunity to work with the hMAG team for over a year and I am beyond thrilled to work even more closely with them as Editor. My relationship with Hoboken has blossomed over the years. It all started about 15 years ago when my father, Art Tate, became Postmaster of this magical place. He would bring my family to the St. Ann’s Festival, incredible restaurants like Amanda’s, and Rotary meetings. I remember volunteering for Geri Fallo and performing at the Try Transit Festival. I remember singing our National Anthem and meeting Nancy Sinatra at the dedication of the Frank Sinatra Station Hoboken Post Office in 2003 and for the induction of the Frank Sinatra stamp in 2007. My brother Michael, who lives in town, stood up for Hoboken when his college professor insisted that the first baseball game was played in Cooperstown. We all know better than that! Yep, I’d say Hoboken became a part of our family. In 2008, I joined the Hoboken Rotary Club and met a lot of wonderful people in town. I volunteered, founded the Annual Hoboken Rotary Spelling Bee, and produced Charles Mee’s ‘Fire Island’ at the Monroe Arts Center to raise money for the Hoboken Homeless Shelter. During that time, I definitely slurped down many bubble teas to happily stay on task. Now that I have a bookkeeping

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business here as well as a band, The Jersey Follettes, I feel a part of Hoboken. When Elizabeth Barry asked to interview me for Hoboken Women to Watch and to sing at TEDxHobokenWomen, that sealed the deal. I’m Hobokened for sure. Hoboken Rotary was where I met Joe Mindak. If there was any way to help, he was there. hMAG sounded like an incredible idea and once it hit the pavement, I remember thinking how beautiful it was. Now, when I read the magazine, I’m proud to be part of something with such a dedication to positivity. With a focus on all of the happy things that make up the place that we live, work, and play, I hope to continue my exploration of Hoboken with you all, discovering together. Let me know what’s going on and introduce yourself at our awesome monthly hMIXERS! All the best, Noelle Tate - Editor & the whole hMAG team

FROM OUR READERS “I’ve been hip to hMAG for about a year. I carry it with me in my tote...The articles are high quality and so is the mag .” -Nancy

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CONTRIBUTORS & CREDITS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............................................................................................................................................................. OTHER CONTRIBUTORS RANDI ROBERTS writer JESSICA FIGLAR writer

ROBERT WAGNER photographer SHERRY RUCZYNSKI photographer

DIANA SCHWAELBLE writer

THETA PAVIS

ALAN SKONTRA

Writer thetapavis@gmail.com

Writer alanskontra@hotmail.com

Theta is a Jersey City-based writer and editor. A poet and avid traveler, she has worked at a variety of newspapers, magazines and websites. Theta currently serves as the Media Adviser to students at New Jersey City University, where she also teaches writing. When she’s not working she enjoys listening to her 8 year old talk about Minecraft.

Alan was born in New Jersey but moved to Virginia in the third grade. He lived in Virginia for more than 20 years, and the whole time he was thinking he had to get back to New Jersey. He now lives in Hoboken and has published the book “The Legendary Locals of Hoboken.”

WIL HINDS photographer

MELISSA ABERNATHY writer

CEZARE RAMONE photographer

hMAG/HOBOKEN PUBLICATIONS 80 River Street, Penthouse Nor th, Hoboken, NJ 07030 201.916.3448/201.410.8282 • info@hmag.com • www.hmag.com

hMAG JOE MINDAK publisher/co-founder

KEVIN CALE CCO/co-founder

SANG LEE (1966-2010), art director BRITTNEY HANLON art director

EDITORIAL NOELLE TATE editor, noelle@hmag.com

ADVERTISING ELIZABETH BARRY business development, elizabeth@hmag.com

CREATIVE TISHA CREATIVE, LLC Tisha Creative, LLC, 201.410.8282,

MELISSA COLANGELO

KARL HAMMERLE

Writer mcolangelo641@gmail.com

Photographer karlhammerle@gmail.com

Melissa is a 22-year-old recent Quinnipiac University grad, returning to her hometown of Hoboken. She is extremely passionate about music, media and blogging, which is often what you will find her doing. She is also the creator of the music blog CarpetJuice.Tumblr.com

Karl Hammerle is a professional actor with a knack for photography. He specializes in photographing live music, theater, pets, and has done photo shoots for The Jersey Follettes. You may have seen Karl behind the bar at Coopers Union over the past year.

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info@tishacreative.com, www.tishacreative.com

COVER INFO ROBERT WAGNER photographer, creative direction KEVIN CALE cover design

B UDDY MATTHEWS talent

HOBOKEN, NJ location

hMAG is published six times a year by Hoboken Publications, LLC. ©2009-2013 Hoboken Publications, LLC. Reproduction in whole or in par t without written permission is strictly prohibited. hMAG cannot be held responsible for unsolicited material.

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FEATURE 14

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FEATURE

PLAY BALL

SPORTS IN THE MILE SQUARE STORY BY ALAN SKONTRA SPREAD PHOTO BY ROBERT WAGNER OTHER PHOTOS COURTESY OF ZOG, ABL, AND NBA PHOTOS/BROOKLYN NETS

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FEATURE 16

Many people - even far away from Hoboken - know about the city’s role as a founding birthplace of baseball. However, sports in Hoboken didn’t stop with the paving of the Elysian Fields in the late 19th century. Today’s Hobokenites are playing in professional leagues, taking the competition to other cities, and making the Mile Square a hub of athletic activity. The Player In the National Basketball ‘Association,’ there are 30 teams with 15 players per team, meaning there are only 450 jobs available in the world’s most competitive basketball league. Given that these days some 20% of the league is foreign born, it’s all the more a wonder that a kid from Hoboken – point guard Tyshawn Taylor – earned his way into the prestigious NBA. Taylor, who stands 6’3, has a high-rising story. He spent much of his childhood living in Hoboken’s public housing projects. Though money was tight, so was his community. “Growing up there, it was a small place, but it was family and community oriented,” he said. “That’s really what I remember most.” He learned the game on the city’s courts, and later he played high school ball at St. Anthony in Jersey City under national Hall of Fame coach Bob Hurley. During Taylor’s senior year in 2008, the team went 32-0 and won the USA Today’s ranking as the top team in the nation. Taylor then played at the University of Kansas, which almost won the 2012 national championship game. He also traveled to New

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Zealand and helped Team USA win the 2009 FIBA World Championship for players under 19.

“Buddy” Matthews can still remember box scores from decades ago.

In 2012, he was one of 60 players drafted into the NBA. The Portland Trailblazers selected him with the 41st pick as part of a deal that sent Taylor to the Brooklyn Nets, with whom Taylor played during the 2012-13 and 2013-14 seasons.

For example, Matthews remembers beating Hudson County powerhouse Memorial High of West New York for the first time in decades during the 1989 season. The previous year, Memorial had shelled Hoboken 18-6, and at the end of the game the Memorial fans mocked Hoboken’s red-haired pitcher by singing the Howdy Doody theme song.

Taylor said he had to learn a lot more about playing in the NBA than just passing and shooting. “Everybody knows how good the players are, but there’s also the business aspect,” he said. “The season is from October to June, and you’re on the road the whole time. You miss holidays. It’s hard on your body and your personal life.” Taylor is trying to stick in the NBA. In January of 2014, the Nets traded him and cash to the New Orleans Pelicans, who immediately released Taylor to reopen a roster spot. Taylor finished the season playing with the Maine Red Claws of the NBA’s developmental league, and he will look to join an NBA team before the 2014-15 season. Regardless of his future, Taylor made it into the NBA, the very top of his profession. “You have to work hard, whatever your craft is,” he said. “You have to be willing to sacrifice, to give up a lot to get where you want to be. Confidence goes way beyond, too.” The Coach Baseball is big on counting stats, so maybe that’s why longtime Hoboken High baseball coach Charles

Hoboken had a team full of freshmen and sophomores during that season, and the following year Matthews reminded his older and improving players of that humiliation before the rematch with Memorial. “We were coming along, having a good year, and we just knew we were good,” he said. “We went up there, and I told the kids, when we beat them, we’re going sing that song. We beat them 10-2.” Matthews coached Hoboken High’s baseball team from 1986 to 2011, during which he led the team to eight county championships, five state sectional championships, and four appearances in the overall state title game. Matthews star ted coaching as a child at the Hoboken YMCA, thanks to his mentor, Mike Granelli. “He had me begin coaching when I turned 12, coaching younger kids seven or eight years old,” Matthews said. “Basically I’ve been coaching ever since. Even when I was

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Matthews played baseball for Hoboken High until he graduated in 1972. He then played for St. Peter’s College in Jersey City, and after earning his degree, he became a teacher.

FEATURE

out playing with my friends, I was the one setting everything up.”

17

He had been looking to coach, and when the job for Hoboken High’s boys’ basketball team became open in 1986, Matthews applied. But he really wanted to coach baseball, too. “I said I’ll coach basketball if you let me coach baseball,” Matthews said. Since he retired as a teacher in 2011, Matthews also had to stop coaching at the school. Looking back, he still remembers many of his best former players. There was Danny Ortiz, who helped Hoboken win two county championships by giving up only one hit in two title games. Ace pitcher Eduardo Gomez set the school

“Almost impor tant as the game is the post-game of heading down to your local watering hole and having a beer or two,”

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FEATURE 18

association called Hockey Nor th America. “We strikeout record in 1994 by sitting down 141 batters. Matthews later groomed Kenny Roder, a 2012 graduate who struck out 172 batters that year and pitched a perfect game. Like a big league team relying on its farm system, Matthews kept nurturing good baseball players. “I was always worried after good players graduated, but the talent kept arriving,” he said. Matthews said the relationships he had with his players were the most rewarding part of his coaching career. “It’s not the pros, but it’s more enjoyable,” he said about coaching high school players. “You’re coaching and developing and molding young men. Sports kept a lot of our kids interested in school, it helped them graduate, and seeing them come back and be successful in their fields has been rewarding.” The Team Siblings Roger and Erika Muller have ties to Hoboken going back 100 years, when their grandfather started

“We were the first team from New Jersey ever to win the national championship,”

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the Muller Insurance business that still operates on Ninth and Washington Streets. Their ties to hockey go back almost 25 years, when after attending several New Jersey Devils games, the Mullers decided to start their own team. “We got kind of bored sitting there watching the Devils play,” Roger Muller said. “We said, ‘boy, it’d be fun to play’.” However, Muller didn’t know how to ice skate. “A lot of people go to hockey games, and they wish they could play,” he said. “We didn’t know how to do anything.” So Muller star ted taking classes from an

figured out what we needed to buy, and then the next class was about how to put it on,” he said. “By the sixth or seventh session we started having scrimmages. I remember saying to my mother, ‘I’m getting better, I only fell down 20 times during the game’.” Muller joined a travel team called the New Jersey Rebels that unfor tunately won only one game in two seasons. He then decided to form his own team, the Hoboken Rockets, and find good players. “I made sure I made friends with A-level players,” Muller said. “We star ted doing really well after that.”

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FEATURE 19

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FEATURE 20

By 1993 the team had won a tournament in Washington DC, and in 2001 it won the National Hockey Nor th America Tournament in Toronto. “We were the first team from New Jersey ever to win the national championship,” Muller said. “I’m proud of that one.” The Rockets now exist as an organization with three teams: one for beginners, one for older players, and one for players in their prime. They play locally at the Icehouse in Hackensack. Muller said the games are competitive though not as physically violent as in the professional NHL. The Mullers’ business sponsors the group, and Roger serves as the general manager. He still plays, as does Erika, who went from having only childhood figure skating experience to eventually trying out for the USA Olympic women’s hockey team. Over the years the Rockets have featured many Hobokenites, including fire captain Jimmy Nardello and chiropractor Michael Kelly of the Spine & Spor ts Health Center on Eighth Street. Muller said he still enjoys playing hockey 25 years after first learning. He’s a better skater too. “I’ve learned how to be in the right place,” he said. “As soon as I stop scoring I’m going to retire.” The Leagues Hobokenites who are too old for high school, can’t skate, or don’t got game for the NBA can still enjoy playing spor ts by joining one of the two regional and national recreational leagues that have franchises in

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the city: ZOG and ABL. Together they have enrolled thousands of Hobokenites in fun and competitive leagues for softball, flag football, kickball and many other spor ts played at Kennedy and Mama Johnson Fields and other venues in the city.

during a ZOG game. “I can’t even tell you how many marriages I’ve seen come out of ZOG,” Corbin said. “I know people who met playing in Hoboken, and now they’re pushing strollers together.” ••

Chris Corbin, the general manager of ZOG’s Hoboken leagues, said that while many local players are former athletes, others join just for fun. “We have the ex-athlete that loves competition, and then we have the social athlete looking for an excuse to go out on a Tuesday night and play kickball,” he said.

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“People play for lots of reasons,” Jason Ross, the Hoboken ABL commissioner said. “They play for that sense of camaraderie, hanging out with friends and catching up on life, reliving glory days, meeting new people, having fun, staying fit and more.” Besides promoting spor ts, both leagues feed into two staples of modern Hoboken life: bars and families. After games, players usually gather for happy hour to rehash big plays or simply catch their breath. “Almost impor tant as the game is the post-game of heading down to your local watering hole and having a beer or two,” Ross said.

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“We have the ex-athlete that loves competition, and then we have the social athlete looking for an excuse to go out on a Tuesday night and play kickball,”

Whether on the field or in the bar later, many league players have also found love. Ross met his fiancé during an ABL game, and Corbin also met his wife

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The Favorite Place to Visit For Hoboken's Finest Artists, Musicians and Chefs

329 Washington Street • Hoboken, NJ (201) 656-9698

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HERITAGE 24

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HERITAGE

PORT OF ENTRY to a continent STORY BY MELISSA ABERNATHY PHOTOS COURTESY OF HOBOKEN HISTORICAL MUSEUM COLLECTIONS, COLLECTION OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS & HARVARD UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

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HERITAGE

Today, Hoboken’s piers host concerts, Movies Under the Stars, soccer games and sightseers. A century ago, hordes of people also crowded Hoboken’s piers, but for a different reason: these piers were the “port of entry to a continent.”

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That phrase, taken from a History of Hudson County published in 1924 by Daniel Van Winkle, describes Hoboken’s role in the Por t of New York-New Jersey during the peak period of U.S. immigration, 1892 – 1924, when some 20 million people immigrated to the United States. More than half, 12 million, passed through the Por t of New York and Ellis Island, and a good many came through Hoboken, with some settling here and putting down roots. Hoboken was a predominantly German and Irish community in the 1890 census. The immigrants that passed through Ellis Island between 1892-1924 reshaped Hoboken’s demographics, and fueled the city’s economy as well. In 1890, 40 percent of Hoboken’s 43,648 residents were foreign-born and the majority of the city’s native-born residents had parents born in Germany or Ireland. Only 790 Italian immigrants lived in Hoboken in 1890.

Photo Credit: Bob Foster

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Just two decades later, in 1910, Germans and GermanAmericans continued to dominate Hoboken, but for the first time, the city had more Italian and ItalianAmerican residents than Irish and Irish-Americans. Hoboken also had a growing number of residents born in Russia, Austria, and Norway.

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HERITAGE

The role that Hoboken’s piers played in U.S. immigration history is detailed in the new exhibit, “Hoboken, Ellis Island, and the Immigrant Experience, 1892-1924,” on view August 3 – December 23 at the Hoboken Historical Museum, 1301 Hudson Street. Guest curator Dr. Christina Ziegler-McPherson, an immigration historian who lives in Hoboken, collaborated with museum director Bob Foster and their collections manager to bring to life the experiences of immigrants who passed through Ellis Island and Hoboken. They used images, ar tifacts, and oral histories from the peak years of U.S. immigration.

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Why Hoboken? Location, location, location. Hoboken’s piers were the U.S. por t for four of Europe’s major passenger shipping lines: HamburgAmerica Packet Company, Nor th German Lloyd Steamship Company, Scandinavian-American Line, and Holland America Line, while others, Cunard, White Star, and more, docked on the Manhattan side of the Hudson River. T he Immigr ation Ac t of 1891 es t ablished feder al contr ol over immigr ation for the f ir s t time . Im migr ant s wer e to be scr eened for physical and ment al disabili ties , cr iminal and immor al backgrounds, and extreme pover ty at 24 points of entry. Even though ‘unacceptable’ individuals were sent back to their port of origin at the shipping companies’ expense, the transatlantic passenger ship lines eagerly responded to a surge in demand with larger, faster ships.

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HERITAGE 28

Suddenly, Ellis Island, a former munitions depot, became the country’s most heavily used immigration station. Immigration to the U.S. spiked, and shifted from Nor thern and Western Europe to Eastern and Southern Europe. For the first time, the primary countries of origin were Austria-Hungary (including southern Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and nor thern Romania), Italy, and Russia (including eastern Poland, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, the Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, and Georgia), supplanting Germany, Ireland, and Great Britain. The Immigrant Experience Immigrants’ experiences’ varied greatly by their por t of origin. Germany passed laws requiring the passenger shipping lines to manage control stations at its borders with Russia and Austria, where would-be immigrants were screened for disease, disability, and pover ty, and disinfected of lice before entering. Soon, Germany also required steamship companies to house immigrants at their por ts of embarkation, to keep travelers quarantined from the general population. These facilities could house 4,000 people at one time, and had dormitories, kosher kitchens, hospitals, bathhouses, and churches and synagogues. In Genoa and Naples, however, conditions were rougher. In Genoa, immigrants would camp out by the docks or sleep on the street, while in Naples, immigrants crowded into overpriced boarding houses. In Naples, immigrants were examined by U.S. Marine-Hospital Service doctors and then again by the

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ship’s doctor at the gangway to prevent substitutions for healthy persons by diseased ones. Other European shipping companies also built screening facilities at their main por ts to prevent having to transpor t rejected immigrants back from America. This corporate medical inspection was effective: for every one person denied entry at Ellis Island, the steamship companies themselves denied passage to five would-be immigrants. Class Divides on Board Once on board, each passenger class had its own deck and separate eating and sleeping facilities. First-class cabin passengers had sumptuously appointed cabins with private bathrooms, and they dined in elegant dining rooms set with the finest china and silver, waited on by staff and fed by gourmet chefs. Second-class passengers enjoyed private cabins, but shared toilets with other passengers on their deck. For cabin passengers, transatlantic travel was like staying in a luxury hotel. For steerage passengers, the only benefits of the boom in ocean travel were that it was fast and relatively cheap. They shared large rooms that could hold up to 300 people, sleeping in bunk beds 6 feet long by 2 feet wide, stacked two or three levels high with 2 ½ feet between them. They were often segregated by sex and marital status. Toilet and bathing facilities were also communal in steerage. Steerage passengers were fed cafeteria-style in large dining halls, and were often expected to wash and reuse their utensils and dishes for each meal.

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After being cleared by federal customs and state and federal health officials to dock, the ship would sail into its ber th at the piers in either Manhattan or Hoboken. Cabin passengers would disembark and were free to catch trains to the interior or ferries to Manhattan.

HERITAGE

On arrival in New York Harbor, the class system continued. Every morning at 5:30 a.m., doctors from the U.S. Marine-Hospital Service would sail out to boats that arrived the night before in the harbor to interview first and second-class cabin passengers in their cabins.

29

Steerage passengers remained on board until they were ferried to Ellis Island, where they again underwent another health examination. Then, Bureau of Immigration officials interviewed each individual, asking twenty-nine questions and comparing the answers to the ones recorded on the ship’s manifest at boarding. The goal was to prevent the entry of “undesirables”, including polygamists, anarchists, the physically and mentally disabled, pauper, those liable to be a public charge, prostitutes and others convicted of “crimes of moral turpitude,” and persons with a “loathsome or contagious disease.” If there were no health or other problems, the immigrant was formally admitted to the U.S. and allowed to collect his or her luggage and take the ferry either back to Hoboken or to New York City. Immigrants who were flagged for health or other reasons were detained on site to be interviewed more extensively. About 2 percent of immigrants were excluded, mostly for health reasons.

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HERITAGE 30

Immigration Equals Jobs The surge in immigration created a huge regional economic boom. About 4,600 Hoboken residents, or 15 percent of the city’s working population, held jobs directly and indirectly tied to immigration and shipping: merchant seamen, longshoremen, luggage por ter, teamsters, cab drivers, hotel guides or “runners”, hotel owner, saloon keepers, steamship ticket agents, and more. In 2006, the Museum interviewed Paul Samperi, whose father Joseph was a one-time “hotel runner,” for the oral history chapbook series, “Vanishing Hoboken.” Samperi explained: “Now what does a runner do? He goes down to the steamship lines, and he mentions to the people coming in who he is and what hotel he represents, and ‘Would they like to stay at the hotel?’ Most of them would stay a day or two at the hotel, then they would get tickets on railroads going out west. … So he would go to the German lines, the Holland line, and he would tell them, ‘I’m from so-and-so hotel…We’d like to have you. We’ll take care of all your needs. If you’d like us to get you tickets, to anywhere in the United States, we’ll be glad to take care of you.” (excerpt from A Nice Tavern, Remembering the Continental Hotel and the Union Club, Recollections of Paul Samperi, Hoboken Historical Museum, 2008.) The entire oral history series, over 25 separate chapbooks, is archived in downloadable PDF form on the website, www.hobokenmuseum.org, and many are available for $3 in the Museum gift shop.

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War and Immigration Backlash Doom Ellis Island Immigration plummeted after World War I began in late July 1914. That year, more than 1.2 million immigrants entered the U.S.; in 1916 only 298,826 people immigrated, the lowest number since the 1898 recession.

one of the oldest buildings on the waterfront, 1301 Hudson Street. Admission is just $2. ••

After the war, the U.S. passed the 1921 Quota Act, limiting the number of entries to 350,000 per year, with quotas of 3 percent of each nationality living in the U.S. in 1910. Canada and Mexico were exempt from the quotas. In 1921, the U.S. admitted 805,228 people; in 1922, only 309,556 people were admitted. In 1924, an even fur ther restrictive Immigration Act was passed, lowering the quota levels to 150,000 entries per year, based on groups that had been living in the U.S. in 1890. Germans, Irish, English, and other Nor thern Europeans received the vast majority of quota allotments, while Italians and people from the former Russian, Austro-Hungarian, and Ottoman empires, were greatly restricted. The 1924 law also initiated the entry-visa system by State Depar tment consulates in immigrants’ home countries, eliminating the need for screening at Ellis Island. After 1924, the only people detained at Ellis Island were those who had problems with their paperwork, and war refugees. Learn more about U.S. immigration and Hoboken’s vital role during its peak period by visiting the Hoboken Historical Museum, open 6 days a week in

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hLIFE 34

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HLIFE

St. Ann’s Italian FestivaL A Magical Tradition for All to Share STORY BY NOELLE TATE PHOTOS COURTESY OF VITO ZARRILLO AND ST. ANN’S CHURCH

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The Ultimate Reunion This July 23rd-27th, an extraordinary tradition will continue, reuniting the community to keep the faith alive in the streets of Hoboken. This will be the 104th Annual St. Ann’s Italian Festival hosted by St. Ann’s Church. Many could not imagine Hoboken without this yearly gem—without the feast and the music and the unimaginably delicious zeppole, of course. However, what’s special about this festival runs much deeper than entertainment and food—those extras are just the icing on this beautiful time for the church. The joyful festivities stem from a prayerful nine day novena for St. Ann, the mother of the Blessed Virgin Mary and grandmother of Jesus, and rejoins those who have been part of this celebration over the years. Father Remo DiSalvatore, the current pastor at St. Ann’s, is in awe at how this tradition has been handed down through generations for over 100 years. “I think Hoboken is such a wonderful place to be right now— a mix of the old and the new—and St. Ann’s Festival offers the opportunity for the blending of these groups. I think it actually helps Hoboken. Everybody’s part of it and everybody’s welcome,” he says. “The parish family, neighborhood people, and the element of faith have made this possible.” Fairly new to Hoboken, Father Remo’s personality and practices fit perfectly with the community and intention of the feast. Marie Stinson, married by Father Remo and long time member of St. Ann’s Guild, describes him as “a person that you should feel very proud to

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represent your church. He gives a lot of legitimacy to the religious community. He’s old school, downto-earth, and believes in respecting the Church and traditions. We’re lucky to have him.” Vito Zarrillo, member of the Holy Name Society, explained that the feast is planned by parishioners of the church, particularly of the Holy Name Society and St. Ann’s Guild. According to Vito, “It’s fantastic. When people say ‘Hoboken,’ the St. Ann’s Italian Festival is inevitably something that people know us for. It’s a great way for people to get together even if you don’t see each other throughout the year. It’s one of those moments—multi-generational—that happens every year.” The Holy Name Society at St. Ann’s is run by the men of the parish and is devoted to advocating greater reverence to the Holy Name of Jesus. Similarly, St. Ann’s Guild is an organization of women who lead the Church’s fundraising efforts, and promote devotion to St. Ann. Leading the festival are chairpersons Marie Totaro and Mario Ferrara. Marie has been a chairperson for 25 years and Mario began working alongside her in 2001. When one festival comes to a close, they begin planning the next one, and so on. It is their largest fundraiser with proceeds funding outreach programs and the upkeep of the church. Built in 1925, the structure is currently being restored—a preservation campaign for the landmark has begun.

The Novena & Flower Presentations Novena comes from the latin word for ‘nine’. A novena comprises nine days of intense prayer, as did the apostles and the Blessed Virgin Mary upon the ascension of Jesus until the coming of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. This particular novena honors St. Ann, patroness of unmarried women, childless couples, mothers, pregnancy, housewives, women in labor, grandmothers, and cabinet makers. It all begins with an emotional first night. The Holy Name Society carries a 600 pound statue of St. Ann down the aisle to the altar where she remains throughout the novena, all while singing the Italian hymn Dell’Aurora Tu Sorgi Piu Bella, meaning ‘you rise more beautiful than the dawn’. Each night following, there is a 7 o’clock mass with a beautiful flower presentation and a special prayer for novena. Parishioners believe this a profoundly powerful time for prayer. St. Ann is adorned with a new stole of pink roses every evening. Each stole is donated by one of the faithful with a specific intention—perhaps in prayer or remembrance of a loved one—and they may take them home thereafter. On the last day, a stole of white roses is bestowed by St. Ann’s Guild in memory of their members passed. Donated flowers also grace the church alters and walls. Stop in to see them all, admire the multitude of lit candles, and offer a prayer. Jewels of Intention Over the years, women struggling to conceive or be wed would offer jewelry to St. Ann believing their prayers would be answered. Gold earrings, rings, and

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charms are pinned to a powder blue satin cloak draped over the statue of St. Ann the night before the feast day. Guild members are honored with this special task of dressing the saint. Marie Totaro recalls a miraculous story about a female photographer taking photos at the feast about 20 years ago. This particular woman was of Jewish faith and confided in Marie that she wanted to conceive but was not able. Marie said to her, “I’ll give you a piece of St. Ann’s old cloak. Pray to her, and you will become pregnant.” Marie did not want to discard the older cape, so she cut it into pieces to give away for these purposes. The photographer gratefully took the cloth and prayed and soon after did become pregnant. She named her daughter Ann in honor of the saint. “There have been many who have seen the miracle of St. Ann,” says Marie, “She has helped so many women.” St. Ann’s Day The novena culminates with St. Ann’s Feast Day where the word ‘feast’ refers to an annual religious celebration on a day dedicated to St. Ann herself. A solemn mass begins in the moring at 9am and is offered by the Archbishop. You must be very early to the mass to attend as it is always packed with members and even those who used to live in Hoboken years ago still returning just for this mass. If you attend, you will see the St. Ann’s Guild members dressed all in white to match the stole around St. Ann. After mass has ended, the famous 5 hour procession starts and members of the guild carry the saint out into the streets followed

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by parishioners and Holy Name Society members. Women of the guild who are older and unable to support the weight of the statue are still able to take part in processing with St. Ann now that the 600 pound statue is on a cart and pushed with poles down the street. Years ago, women with prayers for pregnancy carried the statue barefoot on the hot cobblestones as a sacrifice to the saint. During this celebration of faith, people in the streets will offer money to members of the church as a donation or reach out to touch St. Ann. Hours later, as the statue returns to the church, the band outside plays, “When The Saints Go Marching In,” welcoming her back. A small ceremony is performed and everyone empties into the street to enjoy the last night of the festival together.

Street festivities There are so many things to do at the festival, from its center at 7th & Jefferson expanding to Madison and Grand. A lively beer garden in the parking lot boasts music and a specialty drink of red wine and peaches. Lou Tiscornia and his wife Linda run this awesome spot for those of age. There are food vendors including delicious sausage and peppers by Tony, a member of the Holy Name Society. Crafters line the streets along with carnival games for the kids. Last year, the notorious 50/50 raffle, run by Louise Chardos, produced a prize of over $17,000. Musicians fill the streets with song from the large stage outside of the church. This year’s headliners include The Nerds, Dave Arellano, and as

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Save the best for last - Zeppole Oh, yes, you know the zeppole at the St. Ann’s Italian Festival, and if you don’t, you should run there this year. Run. And then wait on the long line surrounding the booth. It’s worth it. This renowned zeppole booth is run by current president of the St. Ann’s Guild, Margaret Milizzo and in the past by Madeline Saulino. The guild members work the booth during the festival and make all of the zeppole. The recipe is a secret, but I did find out the secret ingredients: love and devotion. I assure you: in that heat, with women all the way up to their 80s slaving over stainless steel vats of dough, love and devotion are certainly a big part of the zeppole. Love and devotion are a part of the whole festival. Hope to see you there!

hLIFE

always, a Sinatra tribute. In the past, performers such as Connie Francis, Chuck Mangione, Pat Cooper, Judice LaRosa, The Belmonts, The Duprees, and The Drifters have played at the festival.

39

Afterthought The magic of the feast has already begun. A few years ago, a photo of a headlining musician was to appear on the cover of the Reporter. Somehow, when the paper came out, there was a huge photo of St. Ann printed instead. No one knew how it got there, but Marie Totaro was certain—St. Ann is the main event and she tends to like the publicity! And how remarkable—this hMAG is to published for July 17th, which happens to be the first night of the novena for St. Ann. ••

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RAVES 40

Sex on the Beach Roll RAVE BY RANDI E. ROBERTS PHOTOS BY SHERRY RUCZYNSKI

Robongi’s special roll, Sex on the Beach, is summer in a roll with vivid textures and refreshing flavors that tickle the tongue. Sweet crab and creamy avocado soothe the heat of spicy tuna, but the crunch of tempura shrimp keeps the roll alive. Each bite is as delicious and surprising as the first, recalling beach air and a rivaling freshness. •• Robongi, 520 Washington St.

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RAVES 42

Sound Healing RAVE BY MELISSA COLANGELO PHOTOS BY ROBERT WAGNER & RAFI CORDOVA

From sound healing to rehabilitation, Roger Ansanelli does it all. Ansanelli’s sound healing sessions include meditations accompanied by various instruments such as a singing bowl, which result in higher vibrations in your body. The outcome of this type of healing is a grounded, relaxed state. Swing by Mondays for $11 at 1 Newark Street, 3rd Floor to participate in a rare and magically calming experience. •• 1 Newark Street, 3rd Floor

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RAVES 44

Bubbled Sip RAVE BY RANDI E. ROBERTS PHOTOS BY SHERRY RUCZYNSKI

Long hot summer days call for refreshing cool sips, bursting with flavor and a boost of energy, like the Malaysian milk coffee or tea with bubbles from Satay. As a perfect warm weather treat, it is smooth and decadent but also uniquely invigorating. The sweetness of the strong coffee and luscious cream is studded with chewy dark tapioca balls orbs, adding intrigue to the satisfaction. •• Satay, 99 Washington St.

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RAVES 46

Poe-Boken RAVE BY JESSICA FIGLAR PHOTOS BY KARL HAMMERLE

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FACES 48

EUGENE FLINN

STORY BY DIANA SCHWAEBLE PHOTOS BY WIL HINDS then we had the superstorm Sandy. It took us until April to find a contractor. DS: When did you become interested in history? EF: I was a history major in college. My grandmother used to cane chairs and she was a lover of antiques. I guess I got that preservation gene from her. But Hoboken lends itself to that. You walk down Main Street and if you didn’t see the traffic lights it could be the 1930s. There is something so unique about Hoboken. You had this incredible industrial city with a huge waterfront and they built all these homes. They were smart enough to say, if you want to build you have to build with masonry that keeps with the character of the town.

Hoboken has plenty of well-known locals, but none perhaps as widely recognized as Eugene Flinn. He is easy to spot, wearing his signature look, a shir t and bow tie, hurrying to one of his restaurants on Washington Street. He is the face of Café Elysian, Amanda’s and the recently renovated Schnackenberg’s. While some restaurateurs make a point to remember a customer’s favorite dish, Eugene goes a step beyond and remembers a customer’s family story. Recently, he took some time out of his schedule to dish about Hoboken, history, and his busy schedule.

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DS: How did you get involved in Schnackenberg’s? EF: For years, I would come here and talk to Mark and his mom. As a restaurateur, I always saw vitality in having a place like this in existence. And I said, what can I do to help you? Mark said, ‘Why don’t you take over the business and I’ll stay and do the chocolates?’ So he does the chocolates for us and we do everything else.

DS: What would you like to see more of in Hoboken? EF: People eating grilled cheese sandwiches at 7! An appreciation of things past so we can carry that on to the next generation. I think we have an incredible community. When we had the superstorm, we had people helping people for weeks. It makes you proud to be a part of that community. We have three restaurants in this town. It’s very important to me to have the community feel like they are weaved into the fabric of the town. DS: Is there a vibe that you strive for with all your places? EF: It’s probably the hardest thing to do – to anticipate people’s needs. That is what we strive for in all our businesses.

DS: What is it like running three businesses? EF: It’s hard. It’s a little like ping pong. I love it though. I’m living my DS: How long have you had this place? wildest dream. It’s not easy all the time, but if it was easy everyone EF: We opened in December 2013, but we actually took it over would do it. •• in September 2012. We were ready to start work in October, but

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EVENT PIX 52

hMIXER MAY 22, 2014 PLACE: Biggies PHOTOGRAPHER: Cezare Ramone MUSIC: Michael Deej BENEFICIARY: Hoboken Catholic Academy RAFFLE PRIZES: GoRow, Biggie’s, and Midtown Authentic Gift Cer tificates QUOTE OF THE NIGHT: “The hMIXERS are awesome - a lot of fun and it’s great to see everybody in town. Biggie’s is fun too - I’ve been going to their original location since I was a kid.” - Phil

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EVENT PIX 55

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EVENT PIX 54

hMIXER JUN 19, 2014 PLACE: Tilted Kilt PHOTOGRAPHER: Cezare Ramone MUSIC: Adam Levine BENEFICIARY: Wallace School RAFFLE PRIZES: Kodak Jewelers & Tilted Kilt Gift Cards, Jack Daniels QUOTE OF THE NIGHT: “We’ve been reading the magazine and we like it a lot - it’s a good way to learn about Hoboken - the ar t, nightlife, museums, and the Heritage ar ticle is our favorite. We love the mixer too, it’s our first and a great way to meet people and hang out!” - Nancy & Jay (first hMIXER!)

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EVENT PIX 57

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OUT OF DODGE

56

URBAN OASIS STORY BY THETA PAVIS PHOTOS COURTESY OF KINGSPA FITNESS

I’d heard locals mention a Korean spa existed in Palisades Park, but nothing could have prepared me for KingSPA Fitness. It’s a massive, immaculate palace of relaxation. To enter the women’s spa section (there is also a men’s spa) you strip down completely, then pass into a huge room with showers and plunge pools ranging from hot to ice cold. There’s also a steam room and tables where staff will give you a vigorous body scrub and/or wet massage. You’ll see plenty of Korean women squatting at the small shower units (they also have stand up showers) thoroughly soaping and shampooing themselves; the only time I have ever seen something like this before was in Japan. It costs $45 to get in (although you can often find coupons) and that admission price lets you stay all day (or night; it’s open 24-hours a day, seven days a week). Massages, etc., cost extra. If the idea of being stark naked isn’t your thing – that’s OK.

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When you first enter and pay at the reception desk, someone will show you around and hand you a cotton T-shir t and shor ts (pink for women; white for men) to wear in the unisex areas of the spa, which include numerous lounges, a Korean restaurant, and a mind-boggling array of different hot saunas. You can get a foot massage or chair massage at the hands of some of the best masseuses ever. There are areas filled with giant recliners on which to relax, watch TV or nap. Free Wi-Fi is available along with computers, and throughout you will see people playing chess or the strategy game Go. There is also a beauty salon and other treatments available, The highlight of KingSPA is the numerous saunas, each with different proper ties. They have wonderful signs outside of each one explaining the benefits; the Yellow Mud room, for example, is supposed to be an antioxidant that prevents aging. No matter what’s bothering you, however, when you leave you’ll feel totally restored and relaxed. ••

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ARTISTS 58

MUSICIAN

ROB VENTURA STORY BY MELISSA COLANGELO PHOTOS COURTESY OF ROB VENTURA

Artist Rob Ventura, new to the Hoboken art scene, wasn’t always a visual artist. In fact, Ventura didn’t start painting until he was an undergrad at Boston College. His interest in the fine arts stemmed from researching artists like Kavinsky who “shared the truth about painting a composition in a musical sense.” His interest in music turned into more of an interest in art, and so he began to pursue this passion. As a person of the 21st century, Ventura has a love for technology, which he fuses together with traditional art to create unique, abstract pieces. Ventura begins his art process by making an image on Illustrator, projecting it on canvas and lastly, hand painting the image. The outcome is a modern, vibrant, crisp piece. Visit www.robventura.com and make sure to check out Ventura’s artwork at the Proto Gallery show opening July 27th at 66 Willow Ave. ••

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hNOW 60

SPELL IT OUT

STORY BY NOELLE TATE PHOTOS BY SHERRY RUCZYNSKI

The Annual Hoboken Rotary Sponsored Spelling Bee took place in Hoboken each year. It takes a lot of hard work to be asked to the traveling dictionary to their classroom. Ariel Prevor from HoLa this past April at Hoboken Catholic Academy. This event gath- Spelling Bee; some schools even have their own bees to select placed first, with Hoboken Catholic Academy students Nanki ers the best 4th grade spellers together for a friendly and exciting the top 3 for the competition. Participating schools include: HoLa, Nagpaul and Emily Cao taking 2nd and 3rd, and Lucas Hjetberg competition! Founded in 2009 by yours truly, the Spelling Bee was

Wallace, All Saints, TG Connors, Stevens Cooperative, Mustard Seed, from HoLa winning 4th place. Congratulations to the winners

born to encourage literacy and enhance the Rotary dictionary

Hoboken Catholic, and Calabro. The top four spellers are awarded gift and all participants! ••

donation program that provides dictionaries to all 3rd graders certificates to Barnes & Noble, and 1st place also takes an antique

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hNOW 62

GLORY NIGHTS INTRO BY NOELLE TATE PHOTOS BY ROBERT WAGNER

A night to remember took place on May 19th for the senior citizens of Hoboken. Division Head of Hoboken Senior Services, Tom Foley, along with Michelle Flett, brought back the Senior Prom after Hoboken Catholic Academy and Principal Matthew McGrath happily agreed to host this event. Many sponsors in town such as Lucy Melendez, Anthony Romano, Eugene Flinn, Ed Madigan, Cosmo Sancilo, Joe Mindak, and more contributed to assure that everyone who attended got the full experience. Empire Realty provided a flower corsage to each senior as they entered the prom. The Hoboken Elks Club graciously donated the food, Frank Raia donated dessert, and the children of the Hoboken Catholic Academy’s Youth Ministry Program served as waiters and waitresses for the evening. 30s, 40s, and 50s music filled the room and everyone had a blast! For future events check out the senior citizen center at 124 Grand Street. ••

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