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H U N T S V I LLE / L A K E

O F

B A Y S / A L G O N Q U I N

PA R K

Welcome to one of Ontario’s most beloved four-season destinations – the Town of Huntsville, the Township of Lake of Bays, and Algonquin Provincial Park — a vast and wondrous playground that attracts tourists from every corner of the world. A place where people take life just a little bit easier, and maybe enjoy it just a bit differently than their big city cousins.

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COVER PHOTO • Kelly Holinshead

ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Dreams Becoming Reality Marketing • 705-789-7135 PRINTING Aben Graphics Ltd. • 705-789-4404

PRODUCED BY Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce ERRORS & OMISSIONS

For a complete list of supportive Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce members, visit www.huntsvillelakeofbays.on.ca. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information contained in this guide. If you have any questions, comments or would like to advertise in future publications, please contact the Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce.

Huntsville: A Leader in Sustainability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Happy Trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Festivals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Nuit Blanche North . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Park to Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Beaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Doors Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Wolves & Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Winter Fun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Attractions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Arrowhead Provincial Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 En Plein Air Downtown Art Auction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Flavour Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Savour Muskoka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Muskoka is Triathlon Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Where to Stay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Celebrating Tom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Lake of Bays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Adventures in Shopping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Algonquin Provincial Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 COMMUNITY PARTNERS

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FOR TOURISM INQUIRIES OR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

HUNTSVILLE/LAKE OF BAYS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ~ OPEN ALL-YEAR

8 West Street North, Huntsville, ON P1H 2B6 T: 705-789-4771 • F: 705-789-6191 • chamber@huntsvillelakeofbays.on.ca www.huntsvillelakeofbays.on.ca • www.huntsvilleadventures.com

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Huntsville: A Leader in Sustainability

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By Rebecca Francis - Town of Huntsville What is sustainability? Sustainability for Huntsville is about balancing the three P’s: People, Planet, and Profit. This triple bottom line approach captures the essence of sustainability by measuring the impact of the organization's activities on the world, including its profitability and its social, human and environmental capital.

people and operations. We are constantly evolving to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the way we do business. After all, as a municipality, we are well-positioned to inspire our staff, individual residents, community organizations, and businesses to implement actions towards sustainability.

Why is it important? Sustainability is important for Huntsville because it is required in order to be a resilient, vibrant, and healthy community. Sustainability is imperative if Huntsville as a corporation and as a community is to prosper in profits, people, and the planet. What is Huntsville doing? Sustainability in Huntsville happens in two main ways: corporately as the Town and community-wide. In both these cases, the Unity Plan is the framework through which Huntsville works towards a sustainable future.The Unity Plan provides a community-based vision of sustainability. Corporate Sustainability For Huntsville, being a leader in sustainability starts with our own 4

Culture of Sustainability Sustainability is everyone’s job! We take a team approach to solving problems and coming up with sustainable solutions. From the management of the vehicle fleet to a new procurement policy, we take a holistic approach to come to the solutions that set our

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municipality apart from others and provide the best possible solutions for citizens and visitors to our wonderful community. Partnerships We can’t do it alone, so we collaborate with others in our community who are leaders in sustainability. One of our newest partnerships is with the Waterloo Summit Centre for the Environment (WSCE).The WSCE is working to provide a technical vision for developing sustainable innovative economic development, advanced professional development training, as well as infusing creativity through student-community partnerships. The WSCE currently provides an exceptional teaching laboratory for environmental professional development courses, and spawning community environmental group collaborations. University of Waterloo students partaking in field courses at the WSCE have helped to undertake projects as diverse as greenhouse gas inventories, lake water quality monitoring for lake associations to bioengineering.The WSCE is just getting started and will become an even bigger part of sustainability.


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Sustainability Exchange: Dialogue with other municipalities In late 2012, Huntsville showcased our leadership in sustainability by hosting other municipalities for the Sustainability Exchange. Our friends and colleagues at other Ontario municipalities, institutions and their partners showcased their successes and challenges when it comes to implementing sustainability. We shared solutions that embrace innovation and allow us to shift our sustainability plans and strategies into action. Parking Meters to Bike Locking Devices You no longer have to pay to park in downtown Huntsville a fantastic economic sustainability decision for our main street shops. As a pilot project, we turned some of those parking meter posts into bike locking devices.There are five along the main street; can you spot them? Community Sustainability A huge part of how Huntsville implements sustainability is through our community projects. Residents in Huntsville are passionate about sustainability and take the lead on some important projects. Active Transportation Strategy Fall of 2012 saw another great partnership for Huntsville. A group of planning students from Ryerson University developed an Active Transportation Strategy for the Town of Huntsville.Three main themes emerged in the strategy and form the basis for their recommendations: connectivity, accessibility, and education. Now that we have this strategy we are mobilizing to implement some of their suggestions, both through policies and on the streets and sidewalks of Huntsville. Green Team for Youth This group is for youth and families to learn about sustainability in a hands-on, fun-filled way! The Green Team is environmental education inspiring youth towards sustainability and awareness of their carbon footprint, while making a positive impact on the planet they will inherit.The group meets monthly and has started to take the lead on waste disposal at local events like the Santa Claus Parade, the Terry Fox Run, and our Earth Day celebrations.These young people are truly models for sustainable behaviours in our community. Here in Huntsville we are committed to sustainability. Corporately through the culture in our workplace to the way we do business, and the partnerships we cultivate with others leaders. Our community is also passionate about sustainability through the projects they initiate and the example they set. Here in Huntsville we’re constantly defining what sustainability means to us and working to balance the three P’s: our people, planet and profit.

Welcome to the Town of Huntsville!

Huntsville hosts numerous year-round festivals and world class events in our state of the art facilities.

Huntsville has hosted events including the 2010 G8 Summit, 55+ Senior Games, Olympic Torch Relay Celebration, OFSAA Nordic Ski Championships, Ontario Paralympic Winter Championships and Ironman 70.3. Enjoy the natural landscape and beauty that surrounds Huntsville with the towering white pines, granite rocks and pristine lakes. Muskoka Heritage Place is a historical highlight. Experience a steam train ride, two museums and pioneer village.

Enjoy year-round live entertainment on stage at the Algonquin Theatre in the heart of downtown.

Experience and enjoy Huntsville!

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Kelly Holinshead

HappyTrails

Take a deep breath – stop and listen for the wild sounds amongst the trees, look out over a forest canopy or learn an interesting fact about ecology. You are on one of the many trails in Algonquin Provincial Park and whether you are out for a short day-hike, an overnight backpacking trip, on your bike or with cross-country skis, these are among the best ways to experience Algonquin!

Algonquin has three impressive networks of backpacking trails, with loops that range from 6 km to 88 km in length. Overnight or multiple night backpacking trips will give a new appreciation for getting ‘into the bush.’ As your trip ends, you will emerge at the trailhead feeling the satisfaction of finishing your trek and relishing the memories of wilderness that you encountered on the trail.

Interpretive Trails Perhaps the most popular and accessible of trails in Algonquin would be the interpretive trails scattered along Highway 60. Each one focuses on a unique aspect of Algonquin’s natural or cultural history. There is a trail to suit every interest and fitness level, from an easy 1.5 km boardwalk trail that introduces the visitor to spruce bogs and wildlife typical of the north (Spruce Bog Boardwalk), to a demanding 10 km hike up a high ridge that affords an excellent view over some of Algonquin’s lakes and forests (Centennial Ridges). Other interpretive trails vary in length and include Whiskey Rapids (2.1 km), Hardwood Lookout (1.0 km), Mizzy Lake (10.8 km), Peck Lake (2.3 km),Track and Tower (7.5 km),Hemlock

Bicycle Trails When you come to Algonquin, don’t forget your bike! Whether you are looking for a technical challenge on your mountain bike, or prefer to stick to more leisurely trails with the family, Algonquin has a bike trail for you. The Minnesing Mountain Bike Trail has four challenging loops (4.7 – 23.4 km in length) that will take 1-3 hours to ride, and will bring you through hardwood forests and beside lakes in the Park’s largest wilderness zone. If you are with your family, or just prefer a more relaxing ride, then be sure to visit the Old Railway Bike Trail, accessible from Mew Lake Campground, Pog Lake Campground and Rock Lake Campground. Stretching for 10 km (one-way) along the bed of the old

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Allison O’Mara

On the trail in Algonquin Park

Bluff (3.5 km), Bat Lake (5.8 km), Two Rivers (2.3 km), Lookout (2.1 km), Big Pines (2.9 km) and Booth’s Rock (5.1 km). All of these trails are scenic 30-70 minute drive from Huntsville. For those wishing to explore the Park further, there are also interpretive trails on the North and East sides of Algonquin Park: Barron Canyon (1.5 km), Berm Lake (4.5 km) and Brent Crater (2 km).

Backpacking Trails For more adventurous

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hikers,


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Background Image - Holly Nunn

Ottawa-Arnprior-Parry Sound rail line, this trail gives the rider a chance to explore, through wayside exhibits, the history of the rail line and a different era in Algonquin. Remember to ride safely, be mindful of others on the trail and enjoy the scenery!

Ski Trails Possibly one of the most beautiful and rewarding times of the year to visit the Park would be after a fresh snowfall, with blue skies and the crisp winter air against your face. Algonquin’s three excellent cross-country ski trail networks allow you to experience just this. The winter also has to be one of the better times of the year to see wildlife, or at least the tracks that they have left behind. The Fen Lake Ski Trail – a groomed trail network that explores old hardwood forests typical of the west side of Algonquin – is located just inside the Park at the West Gate (about 30 minutes from Huntsville) and has loops that range from easy to more difficult (1.1 –

12.9 km). In the winter, the Minnesing Bicycle Trail becomes a Wilderness Ski Trail (ungroomed), offering the skier a chance to explore this wonderland. The Leaf Lake Ski Trail offers a wide range of options and its Pinetree Loop ranks highly amongst the premiere ski trails in southern Ontario for the experienced skier. On a clear day, the lookouts on this loop provide a view of more than 15 km.

Allison O’Mara

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Attractions A visit to Algonquin – whether to get ready for a hike or to relax after finishing one of our trails – is not complete without seeing the Algonquin Visitor Centre, the Algonquin Logging Museum or the Algonquin Art Gallery. Inside the Visitor Centre are world-

class exhibits on the natural and cultural history of the park, a bookstore and gift shop, and an observation deck that has a tremendous view of a wild Algonquin landscape. The Algonquin Art Gallery is open seasonally, from June to October, and displays an Algonquin-inspired selection of works in the three wings of its gallery, as well as an outdoor gallery and a boutique. The Algonquin Logging Museum is a definite stop for anyone interested in the history of logging and displays a recreated camboose camp and an old steam-powered machine called an “alligator” along an easy 1.3 km trail. As you finish hiking, skiing or biking a trail in Algonquin Park, you will be reminded of what makes this landscape special. It could have been the sunrise over a misty lake, a glimpse of moose through the trees, the chorus of bird songs, or just the sense of accomplishment that you feel as you reach the end of a trail. Come and discover your favourite Algonquin trail!

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Festivals

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DLL Management

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ENTERING OUR THIRD DECADE

By Rob Saunders Huntsville Festival of The Arts

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Festival performer, the TASBB combines youthful enthusiasm with a high level of musical ability to recreate all your favourite big band sounds. Celebrated vibraphone master Peter Appleyard will return to the Festival along with his ‘Sophisticated Ladies’ show. Local restaurants are encouraged to get in on the action with jazz music through the day and evening around the community.

Huntsville Festival of the Arts

With the twentieth

anniversary season properly celebrated in 2012, the Huntsville Festival is looking forward to the 2013 season with great anticipation. The area’s premier multi-genre arts festival has made a name far beyond its borders for its artistic offerings in the fields of jazz, pop, choral, Celtic, country, orchestral and classical music, as well as theatre, written word, poetry and the visual arts. Again this year a star studded lineup is planned, including blues legends the Downchild Blues Band, Festival favourite Natalie MacMaster joined by her husband Donnell Leahy, folk icon Bruce Cockburn, rising folk rock duo Whitehorse and country star Deric Ruttan among others. Offers have been made to have Jesse Cook open the Festival with a double show but this was not confirmed at press time. The Huntsville Jazz Festival will return again in 2013, running from August 1 to August 3. Headlining will be The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, an institution in the deep south and purveyors of that classic New Orleans Dixieland sound. Big Band music will return with the performance of the Toronto All Star Big Band. A regular

In addition to this special day of festivities the fringe aspect of the Festival continues to grow with a series of free events. Nuit Blanche North returns on Saturday July 13 for its third year. In 2012 over 5,000 local residents and visitors of all ages crowded the Main Street and Town Dock to enjoy an eclectic mix of interactive art installations. Running from 8pm until the wee hours of the morning this year’s event promises to have a number of surprises that can be enjoyed by the

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whole family. Entertaining buskers will be returning and the very popular evening fire show is sure to thrill visitors once again. The always popular En Plein Air, a daylong outdoor visual arts fundraising event, will return on July 25 and the popular Arts Splash children’s art and activity day will be held on July 6, starting at noon. Families can also enjoy the children’s series, at the Legion, co-presented with the Huntsville Public Library, as well as the return of our Cushion Concerts in River Mill Park. Look for our ‘Play Me’ piano in the theatre courtyard and tickle the ivories in this unique open air setting. Also returning weekdays in July, patrons can relax and enjoy Music at Noon. This half-hour lunchtime concert series, offered free at Trinity United Church, will be presented over fifteen weekdays from July 8 to July 26. Each year new activities are added to enhance the appeal of the Festival. If you plan to be in the area over July and August, visit our website for a current list of events! For tickets and information, contact the Box Office at 705-789-4975 or by email at info@huntsvillefestival.on.ca or visit www.huntsvillefestival.on.ca.


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Scott Turnbull

Events IN HUNTSVILLE & LAKE OF BAYS

Kelly Holinshead

Downtown Huntsville BIA

For every season and reason, there’s a festival or special event going on somewhere in Huntsville, Lake of Bays or Algonquin Provincial Park. From loppets, winter carnivals, maple syrup festivals, to fishing derbies to fabulous fall fairs and studio tours, there is always something to delight, excite and ignite the imagination of every member of your family!

Downtown Huntsville Canada Day — July Rotary DockFest Bathtub Derby & Parade — July Group of Seven Mural Festival – July Tom Thomson 100th Anniversary Midnight Madness – July Summer Sidewalk Adventure – August Antique, Classic & Custom Car Show – September Scarecrow Festiva – October Tiny Tots Halloween Parade — October Black Frid “eh” – November Huntsville Santa Claus Parade – November

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Arts & Culture

National Aboriginal Day – June Doors Open – June Art Splash – July Huntsville Festival of the Arts Season – July Huntsville Jazz Festival – July/August Edge of the Woods Outdoor Theatre Festival – July Nuit Blanche North – July Baysville Walkabout Festival – July en Plein Air Painting and Auction – July Baysville Boat Show – August Artists of the Limberlost Open Studio Tour Weekend – August Muskoka Autumn Studio Tour – September/October Huntsville Fall Fair – September Culture Days – September North Words Muskoka Literary Festival – September Film North – September Muskoka Heritage Place Great Pumpkin Trail – October

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Huntsville Girls Hockey Association Hockey Tournament – January 2013 Ontario 55+ Winter Games – February Spin the Lakes Bike Tour – May Band on the Run: 2013 Half Marathon – June Muskoka 51.50 Triathlon – June Muskoka’s Fastest Kid – June The Limberlost Challenge – July Port Sydney Muskoka Kids Triathlon – July The Muskoka Grind off Road Triathlon Duathalon Trail Run – August Huntsville Muskoka Otters Junior A Season Opener – September Muskoka Ironman 70.3 – September Running Scared – Huntsville’s 5km Zombie Run – October

Winter Fun

Winter Carnivals & Parades

Muskoka Loppet, Arrowhead Park – January Algonquin Outfitters Winter Family Fun Day, Oxtongue Lake – February Kearney Dog Sled Races – February Comics on the Rocks - February

Muskoka Tourism

Farmers Markets

Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend November 7-10, 2013

This is a only a selection of events in our area. Please visit www.huntsvilleadventures.com for a complete list of community events with details.

Wilf McQuinn

Open Spring until Fall Huntsville – Thursdays Baysville – Fridays Dwight – Tuesdays

Wilf McQuinn

Background Image - Jack Stewart

Don McCormick

Trish Kruusmagi

Huntsville Santa Claus Parade – November Baysville Santa Claus Parade – December Port Sydney Winter Carnival – January Dwight Winter Carnival – February Dorset Snowball Winter Carnival – February

Ontario Parks

Don McCormick

Don McCormick

Don McCormick

Athletic & Sporting

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Nuit Blanche North events

Scott Turnbull

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The bold interactive multi-arts street festival returns for its third year!

JULY 13, 2013 • 8PM-2AM

Katherine Fleitas

visitors who will flood the streets of downtown Huntsville for a free fun filled evening of interactive art, and performances in unconventional places. From visual art, to buskers, to music, and fun exhibits, this magical event has something for all ages.

A joint presentation of the Huntsville Festival of the Arts and the Edge of the Woods Theatre Company, this year’s event features original creations by over 60 artists inspired by the theme of “land.” The evening kicks off with a presentation of Music for Wilderness Lake by Governor General Award winning composer R. Murray Schafer. Mr. Schafer will be on hand while this chamber music piece is played at dusk by twelve trombonists 12

positioned around the shores of the Muskoka River and cued by a conductor from a raft floating on the water. Accompanying the music will be a choreographed parade of dancers, giant puppets and statues in canoes and other watercrafts. Following this, Main Street will be closed to traffic while visitors explore a

Scott Turnbull

Join over 5,000

number of different artistic projects and events. These include giant inflatable mosquitos, yarn bombs, interactive performances, hands on activities, and a line-up of world class buskers. These activities will all lead towards an epic fire show on the Town Docks including juggling,hula hoops and acrobatics. Last year’s event was described as “creative, unusual, inspiring and innovative” by Huntsville Mayor Claude Doughty who went on to say

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“Nuit Blanche North is an essential part of making our community one of the most innovative, vibrant and creative places in the Province.” While the initial intent of a Nuit Blanche is late night creativity, Nuit Blanche North has extended its offerings to make sure the whole family can be involved. Local artist

Carolyn Wagland effused “my kids haven’t stopped talking about Nuit Blanche North. I feel truly blessed that we have something like it in our community.” Increasingly the business community is joining in to offer a wide range of food and refreshment options throughout the evening. For a complete list of the evening events and how to get involved visit www.nuitblanchenorth.com or contact 705-571-4334.


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Spectacular ways to putt away the day...

Holly Nunn

Trish Kruusmagi

Golf With its many must play courses, a great game of golf is always in the bag in Huntsville or Lake of Bays. Lush Muskoka landscape, fresh north air and well-maintained grounds, are sure to make for a unique golfing experience every time. Whether you’re a novice or seasoned golf enthusiast, we’re sure to have a suitable course to challenge your level of proficiency and skill. Huntsville and Lake of Bays are home to a half-dozen prime golfing stops at all price points; more

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landmark courses are just a short drive away. Depending on your schedule and budget, plan a major day or an entire golf getaway around historic Bigwin Island (a Doug Carrick design where the arrival is a key part of the experience and you will get those amazing vistas of surrounding Lake of Bays), the Mark O’Meara course at Grandview Golf Club (with a fantastic forest layout and conditioning that’s second to none) and Deerhurst Highlands (the Tom McBroom

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masterpiece that started it all, putting modern Muskoka golf on the map). Back toward and in Huntsville, those with limited time or tighter budgets, or anyone else for that matter, shouldn’t miss these hidden gems: North Granite Ridge (a bargain, conveniently located mid-way between Huntsville and Bracebridge), Huntsville Downs (an insider’s favourite since 1925), Deerhurst Lakeside (test every club in your bag) and Diamond in the Ruff (a true 9-hole jewel).


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Bigwin Island Golf Club

great places to golf

BIGWIN ISLAND GOLF CLUB 1137 Old Hwy. 117, Baysville 1-800-840-4036 • 705-635-2582 www.bigwinisland.com

DEERHURST HIGHLANDS & DEERHURST LAKESIDE 1235 Deerhurst Dr., Huntsville 1-800-461-4393 • 705-789-6411 www.deerhurstresort.com

DIAMOND ‘IN THE RUFF’ GOLF CLUB 1137 Old Parry Sound Rd., Raymond 705-385-2222 www.diamondintheruff.ca

GRANDVIEW GOLF CLUB: MARK O’MEARA COURSE & GRANDVIEW INN COURSE 939 Hwy. 60, Huntsville 1-877-472-6388 • 705-789-4417 www.grandview.clublink.ca

HUNTSVILLE DOWNS GOLF 182 Golf Course Rd., Huntsville 705-789-1000 www.golfhuntsvilledowns.ca

NORTH GRANITE RIDGE GOLF COURSE 476 South Mary Lake Rd., Port Sydney 705-385-0808 1-866-385-0808 www.northgraniteridge.com huntsvilleadventures.com • 2013/14 VISITORS GUIDE

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The Park-To-Park Trail

Park to Park

is a regional trail association maintaining an east-west link through the Muskoka and Parry Sound Districts and Haliburton County. Connecting Killbear Provincial Park to Algonquin Provincial Park, this 230 kilometre length of trail is a destination for all trail enthusiasts. Park-To-Park maintains a four season multi-use trail system that will link seven of the province's premiere provincial parks, as well as area attractions, services, amenities and other trail networks such as the Trans Canada Trail.This provides a seamless trail system encompassing community trails, snowmobile routes, historic colonization and logging roads, former rail beds, new links and some secondary roads. The Park-To-Park Trail route traverses a region rich in natural and cultural heritage. Highlights include visible evidence of the logging and railway history of the area. Early settlement villages and colonization roads are features common along the trail. Physically, the trail passes numerous lakes, rivers and streams, as well as extensive areas of forest, field and wetland habitat. A celebrated feature of the Park-To-Park Trail is the Precambrian geology of the Canadian Shield. The trail cuts laterally across the southern extent of the Shield exposing the glacially scarred granite bedrock. Trail uses may include the following activities, but not on all sections of the trail. Visit www.parktoparktrail.com to find out what uses are allowed on certain sections.

• Hiking/Walking • Cycling • Cross-Country Skiing • Snowmobiling • Horseback Riding • Dog Sledding

Kelly Holinshead

Peter Searle - Office/Operations Manager

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Park-To-Park Trail Association 70 Church Street, Parry Sound, ON, Canada P2A 1Y9 Web: www.parktoparktrail.com Phone: 705-746-7663 x26 Mobile: 705-774-0024 • Fax: 705-746-7829

Background Image - Holly Nunn

• ATVs/Trail Bikes


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what to do

Parks &

Beaches ...make a splash!

Huntsville, Lake of Bays and

settle in for some serious relaxation. Pack a picnic, bring the water toys, load up the family and head out for an enjoyable day at one of our many public beaches. There are a variety of locations to launch your kayak, canoe, or boat for a fun-filled day on the water. Huntsville has four lakes which connect via the

Muskoka River, where you can swim, paddle and explore over 70 kilometres of scenery unique to this area. Lake of Bays is the largest lake in north Muskoka and is known around the world for its spectacular beauty. So go ahead and make a splash Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Algonquin Park – it’s good for the soul!

Terri Tebby

Town of Huntsville

Algonquin Park have a wonderful selection of public beaches.The water is clear, clean and perfect for cooling off on a sizzling summer day. The long stretches of sandy beaches are ideal for strolling, throwing a frisbee or soaking up the sunshine. Bring a lawn chair, umbrella and a good book and

Town of Huntsville

Camp Tawingo

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ALGONQUIN PROVINCIAL PARK

BAYSVILLE DAM

45 km East of Huntsville 705-633-5572 • www.algonquinpark.on.ca

Just off Hwy. 117 in Baysville, picnic area

BRUNEL LOCKS PARK Muskoka Rd. 3 N., Huntsville • 705-789-5105

On the Muskoka River 3 km south of Huntsville on Brunel Rd., picnic area

AVERY BEACH

CAMP KITCHEN

Hunters Bay off Main St. W., Huntsville sandy beach and covered picnic area

Camp Kitchen Rd., Huntsville Swimming and picnic area

ARROWHEAD PROVINCIAL PARK

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Johanne Stewart

Trish Kruusmagi

Fairy Bay Guest House

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DORSET FIRE TOWER PARK

OXTONGUE RAPIDS PARK

Just off Hwy. 35 in Dorset, family picnic area

Just off Hwy. 60 east of Dwight, public picnic area

DWIGHT BEACH Lake of Bays on Dwight Beach Rd., excellent beach with picnic area

PORT SYDNEY BEACH Mary Lake on Muskoka Rd. 10 in Port Sydney, sandy beach area

DYER MEMORIAL NATURE RESERVE 11 km northeast of Huntsville on Williamsport Rd., off Muskoka Rd. 3, overlooks Big East River, public picnic area

RAGGED FALLS Hwy. 60 in the Oxtongue Lake area just before Algonquin Park, trails, public picnic area, dock, washrooms

CANADA SUMMIT CENTRE On Park Dr., just off Brunel Rd., Huntsville, indoor swimming pool • 705-789-6421

RIVER MILL PARK Downtown Huntsville on the Muskoka River, children’s playground and picnic area

HUTCHESON BEACH Lake Vernon off Muskoka Rd. 2 in Huntsville, beach, swings, washrooms and picnic area

TOWN DOCK PARK

LION’S LOOKOUT

RIVERFRONT, CENTENNIAL & GRIST MILL PARKS

On Forbes Hill Drive, just off Brunel Rd., by The Canada Summit Centre, breathtaking panoramic view of Fairy Lake, Muskoka River and Downtown Huntsville, public picnic area

Downtown Huntsville on the Muskoka River

Just off Hwy. 117 in Baysville, public picnic area

TALLY-HO BEACH Peninsula Lake off Hwy. 60 in Hillside

NORWAY POINT PARK

Kelly Holinshead

Just off Old Hwy. 117 east of Baysville, swimming and picnic area

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Wolves & Coyotes

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In the Huntsville & Lake of Bays Area By Jan McDonnell - Muskoka Conservancy

the spring and summer, I have been awakened by the sound of yipping and howling, a sound that is both evocative of a wild place as it is a bit off-putting and scary. Is it coyotes or wolves that I am hearing? Wolves and coyotes are members of the Canid family of animals, the same family that includes dogs. There are three main wild Canids in Ontario – the grey wolf of northern Ontario, the smaller eastern wolf of Algonquin Park and the eastern coyote which is common throughout central and southern Ontario. More than two hundred years ago, European settlement across southern and central Ontario changed the landscape as forests were cleared for agriculture and development. These habitat changes, as well as wolf persecution which eliminated wolves from much of the region, allowed coyotes to expand their range and provided opportunities for coyotes to breed with the remaining wolves. These broad habitat changes occurred in Muskoka as well, so today, coyotes are much more commonly seen. Coyotes prefer to inhabit open areas comprised of woodlots interspersed with farmland and other openings. This is where they can find their preferred food, which includes small mammals, hares and rabbits and sometimes deer when the snow gets deep enough to restrict deer mobility. Coyotes are extremely adaptable and they do extremely well in urban areas. Coyotes are not generally found in Algonquin Park because it is heavily forested and also because Algonquin wolves do not take kindly to interlopers in their territories. Adult female coyotes weigh 13 to 16 kg (28 to 35 lbs.) and males between 16 and 18 kg (35 to 40 lbs.).

Randy French

I don’t know about you, but on occasion in

The eastern wolves found in Algonquin Provincial Park are quite distinct from the very large grey wolf of northern Canada. Adult female eastern wolves weigh about 25 kg (55 lbs.) and adult males about 30 kg (66 lbs.). Eastern wolves are year round residents of the Park, but they do roam far and wide to find food. They feed on three main prey items: deer, moose and beavers. In the winter, wolves may venture out of the park into winter deer yards to hunt and feed on deer. Wolves may be present in the Lake of Bays area where there are many pockets of wintering deer especially to the north and the east of the lake. They are more likely to be seen in this area in the winter than in the summer. Given all this, and supposing you have seen an animal which looks like a coyote or wolf, how do you tell the difference? Well the answer is that it is hard to say because it could be either one or a hybrid of both. Research has shown that breeding eastern wolves are less common outside of Algonquin provincial park and that the farther from the park you go, the less likely that eastern wolves are found and that coyotes and hybrids are more common. DNA analysis might be the only way to say for sure. Muskoka Conservancy is a non-profit charitable organization dedicated to preservation of Muskoka natural & built heritage.Visit www.muskokaheritage.org. huntsvilleadventures.com • 2013/14 VISITORS GUIDE

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Winter Fun Lake of Bays is the place to be.This area has abundant winter activities suitable for all ages and abilities and many of your favourite summer activities have winter counterparts to get you outside year round. Like to hike? Many of our beloved trails are open in the winter for crosscountry skiing or snowshoeing. Snowshoes offer the ability to traverse slopes or areas of deep snow that may not be accessible on skis. New, lightweight models are user-friendly for

Ontario Parks

If mountain biking is more your thing, a snow bike, sometimes called a fat bike, has extra-wide tires that can take you places your mountain bike can’t go. Some bike trails are accessible year-round or look for snowshoe trails with hard-packed snow ideal for winter biking (but be sure to check that bikes are welcome first). In winter, the many lakes and rivers in Huntsville/Lake of Bays offer a new perspective on the landscape and a

both kids and adults and make snowshoeing as easy as putting one foot in front of the other. Whether on snowshoes or skis, there’s nothing quite like breaking a trail through fresh snow and feeling as though you’re headed somewhere that no human has ever been. Lack of foliage in the winter makes it easier to spot wildlife. Look for moose, deer, smaller mammals like red fox and pine martens, and winter-hardy birds like great gray owls, spruce grouse 22

new platform for activities. Walking or skiing along the shoreline can reveal surprising views. Skating rinks or paths can be quickly cleared with just a shovel for a game of shinny or a leisurely skate. Ice fishing is an easily-accessible family activity for anglers and many summer species can also be caught in the winter. Frozen waterfalls and ice-covered cliffs become a new challenge for climbers who don’t mind sub-zero temperatures. There are, of course, activities that

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are unique to the winter months as well. Four-legged friends can join in the winter fun with skijoring, a Norwegianinspired sport where a dog pulls a cross-country skier using harnesses and a rope. If you want to sit back, enjoy the scenery and let someone else do the work, outfitters who offer dog sledding or horse-drawn sleigh rides may be more your speed. To feel the exhilarating rush of wind on your cheeks, local ski hills offer familyfriendly slopes for snowboarding and skiing or just grab a sled, find a hill and

Holly Nunn

If you love winter, Huntsville/ or gray jays.

Kelly Holinshead

Kelly Holinshead

By Dawn Huddlestone - Algonquin Outfitters

let gravity do its thing. No matter how you choose to enjoy winter, remember to pause and listen to the muted sound of the snow-covered landscape. Marvel at the dormant trees that will soon be vibrant with life. Breathe deep and relax. A winter getaway in Huntsville/Lake of Bays can be invigorating or relaxing, action packed or laid back. With a myriad of activities to experience, the choice is yours.


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Jack Stewart

Muskoka by Snowmobile

A 1,600 kilometre network of trails

in Muskoka covers some of Ontario’s most scenic landscape, and are maintained by committed local clubs. Muskoka’s trail network provides snowmobilers with a spectacular view of frozen lakes surrounded by snow-clad hills, valleys and thick forests.Whether your preference is short loops or multiple day journeys, this large trail network will provide you with unlimited touring opportunities. With your choice of accommodation along the way you and your friends will be able to rack up some serious miles! Visit Hill & Gully Snowmobile Club at www.hgrsnowmobileclub.ca or Du Ya Wanna Trail Riders at www.dywsc.com to purchase trail permits and get up to date trail conditions.

Chill out with memorable winter fun & warm up with hysterical comedy!

Bill Smith

www.huntsvilleadventures.com

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Attractions

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ALGONQUIN THEATRE 1-888-696-4255 • 705-789-4975 www.algonquintheatre.ca

DEERHURST MUSICAL STAGE SHOW 1-800-461-4393 • 705-789-6411 www.thedecadesshow.com

DORSET LOOKOUT TOWER 705-766-1032

DORSET HERITAGE MUSEUM 705-766-2814 www.dorsetheritagemuseum.ca

DYER MEMORIAL NATURE RESERVE Williamsport Road, Huntsville Decades - Deerhurst Resort

GROUP OF SEVEN OUTDOOR GALLERY WALKING TOUR 705-789-1400 www.groupofsevenoutdoorgallery.com

HIDDEN VALLEY HIGHLANDS SKI AREA 1-800-398-9555 • 705-789-1773 www.skihiddenvalley.on.ca

1-800-663-2787 • 705-788-2787 www.huntsvillefestival.on.ca

HUNTSVILLE OTTERS JUNIOR A HOCKEY Town of Huntsville

Hidden Valley Highlands

Huntsville Festival of the Arts

HUNTSVILLE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS

WITH SO MANY THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN OUR AREA... THE BIGGEST DECISION IS WHERE TO START!

www.huntsvillehockey.ca

LADY MUSKOKA BOAT TOURS 1-800-263-5239 • 705-646-2628 www.ladymuskoka.com

MUSKOKA HERITAGE PLACE MUSEUM, VILLAGE, TRAIN 1-888-696-4255 • 705-789-7576 www.muskokaheritageplace.org

MUSKOKA STEAMSHIPS 1-866-408-4795 • 705-687-6667 www.realmuskoka.com/steamship.php Huntsville Festival of the Arts

RIVER MILL PARK AND PLAYGROUND Downtown Huntsville

ROTARY YOUTH PARK Skateboarding Park located in Huntsville at McCulley – Robertson Complex www.rotaryyouthpark.com

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Arrowhead Provincial Park At this year-round park in the heart of

Education Park staff offer guided hikes and children's programs twice a week.Amphitheatre programs two or three nights a week explain the park's natural and cultural history. In winter, Arrowhead Nordic ski Club offer cross country ski instruction to kids and adults of all abilities. Fishing Mayflower Lake is stocked with brook trout. Arrowhead Lake is good for small mouth bass. Boating Motorized boats (including electric motors) are prohibited on Arrowhead and Mayflower lakes. Canoes are ideal for exploring the shorelines and viewing the wildlife of these lakes. Swimming Three short, quiet sandy beaches with change facilities back into birch groves. Beaches are shallow and great for kids. Cycling Arrowhead has two moderately challenging mountain bike trails — the five km Arrowhead Lake Trail and the three km Lookout Trail. Helmets are recommended.

Ontario Parks

Muskoka, hike or bicycle on trails that wander through maple forests and past waterfalls, beaver ponds and homesteaders' farms. Quiet Arrowhead and Mayflower Lakes, and the meandering Little and Big East Rivers, are ideal for paddling, fishing and swimming. Return in winter to ski on groomed trails, tube down a hill, snowshoe, or skate on an ice skating trail over one kilometre long!

Skating Go for a skate through the forest on the new 1.1 km skating trail loop.Arrowhead now offers skates to rent for the whole family! Afterwards, unwind at one of our two heated warmup shelters or gather around the open fire at the tubing hill.

Cross-Country Skiing The park grooms 28 km of track-set, cross-country ski trails and 11 km of skate skiing trails. Each trail is rated for difficulty and ranges from beginner to expert.You can rent both classic and skate skis at the fully stocked Park Pro Shop and buy other amenities such as waxes, gloves, clothing and hot chocolate too. If you want to challenge yourself, come out for the Muskoka Loppet. The event is hosted every January by the Arrowhead Nordic Ski Club. More information can be found at www.arrowheadnordic.ca. Getting Here 7 kilometres north of Huntsville off Hwy 11. Exit 226, turn right to Arrowhead Park Road. Please note all vehicles entering the park must obtain and display a valid park permit. For more information contact: 451 Arrowhead Park Road, Huntsville, Ontario P1H 2J4. Tel: 705-789-5105 or www.ontarioparks.com.

Sandra Macdonald

Wildlife Viewing The park is home to a wide variety of wildlife typical of the Canadian shield. Deer, moose, fox, racoon, skunk, chipmunks, beaver, lots of birds and even a wandering bear. Snowshoeing There are over 6km of marked snowshoe trails.Travel along Mayflower Lake or stomp your way to Stubb's Falls. Snowshoe rentals are available at the Park Pro Shop. huntsvilleadventures.com • 2013/14 VISITORS GUIDE 25


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Downtown Art & Auction 5 T H A N N U A L E N P LE I N A I R

By Kelly Holinshead - The Shutterbug Gallery

opportunity to witness the creation of a painting that you could then hang in your own home! On July 25th, 2013 starting at 9:00 a.m. The Shutterbug Gallery and Huntsville Festival of the Arts are hosting their 5th annual fringe event of the festival that will ultimately benefit students who are pursuing a fine art education. The annual event raises funds for bursaries for students pursuing a fine art education, and to date nearly $10,000 in bursaries have been awarded to students throughout Muskoka.

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Kelly Holinshead

Don’t miss this extraordinary

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Renowned local artists such as Wendy Moses, Col Mitchell, Lynda Lynn and Gerry Lantaigne, as well as area dignitaries, create their masterpieces right in the public eye, utilizing various locations along Main Street and in the parks of beautiful downtown Huntsville. If you’ve ever wanted an opportunity to critique an elected official, this could be your chance! The artists are given a canvas, 16” x 20” in size, as well as primary paint colours; they are requested to bring their favourite brushes, additional paint or medium and all their imagination.


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Kelly Holinshead

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Kelly Holinshead

They only have four short hours to complete their work, so they need lots of encouragement from on-lookers. Artists are also provided with a poster that will help patrons of the arts to identify the event, the artist and their work for the upcoming auction. Once the artists are finished, the original works are put up for display on the Town Hall steps. Music plays as passers-by check out the masterpieces that will be auctioned off, choosing the ones they will bid on.

At approximately 3:00 p.m., a very lively and entertaining art auction is conducted by local auctioneer Gord Mitchell, offering the public at large a chance to bid, with the proceeds benefiting more fine art bursaries for our youth. This is a wonderful opportunity to watch the creation of a masterpiece, own that original painting and to support emerging young artists. For more information, contact Kelly Holinshead at The Shutterbug Gallery, 170 Breisacher Rd., Huntsville, ON P1H 2N5. Phone: 705-788-7392 or email thebug@vianet.ca.

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dine

On The Docks Pub

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Flavour Adventures

Tempt your taste buds here in

Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Algonquin Park! There is a wide variety of culinary experiences to choose from in our area. From chocolate treats, to coffee shops, cafés, pubs overlooking the water and fine dining. Roadside cafés, markets and pubs to savour sophisticated fare, you will find

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homegrown, local flavour for every taste bud in our communities. Wine and dine on the water’s edge, in magnificent resorts and inns or in bustling street side restaurants and patios where there is plenty to see and savour. With over 50 dining establishments in Huntsville, Lake of Bays and

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Algonquin Provincial Park to choose from – you are certain to find a culinary delight to fit your budget and curiosity. Traveling with the kids? Little ones will delight in our pizzerias, breakfast diners or ice cream parlours. The last one usually does the trick after a long car trip!


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RESTAURANT & CATERING

Creative catering for people with taste! Join us at the restaurant, or we will come to you! 3 Guys And A Stove provides catering for weddings, corporate groups, events and holiday parties. Whether it is an intimate gathering on the dock, or an elaborate affair in a rustic old barn - let us help you plan your next event because our goal is...

tasting life to the fullest!

8 Weekend Breakfast Marché

All Day Menu

Lunch & Dinner Features

143 Highway #60 East, Huntsville • 705.789.1815 • info@3guysandastove.com

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Savour Muskoka dine 8

FIELD TO FORK EVENT • SUNDAY, AUGUST 11

Savour Muskoka

Muskoka’s acclaimed annual culinary event, Field to Fork, celebrated at the peak of the summer season is being held in 2013 on Sunday, August 11th. This is an unforgettable and delicious event experience with Muskoka and Parry Sound’s top chefs highlighting their regions highest quality locally produced foods and drinks. Fantastic local entertainment will provide the soundtrack for an afternoon of fun and indulgence with your family and friends. Hosted on a local area working farm, this culinary celebration is an opportunity to engage in our rich food system and talk with the chefs who turn it into art. You will taste the local craft beers and spirits, meet the brewers and winemakers, play in the fields and enjoy the farm life! SAVOUR Muskoka is a grassroots collection of local farmers, chefs, brewers, retailers, Culinary artisans, accommodation providers and food-engaged community members who work together to cultivate the appreciation and development of Muskoka’s local food and drink

production. In addition to SAVOUR Muskoka’s well-attended Culinary Events like summertime’s Field to Fork and the winter/spring Maple Syrup celebration, Tap the Sap, SAVOUR creates delicious, educational year-round Culinary Trail tour packages and Farm and Culinary workshops led by Muskoka’s most celebrated chefs and farmer producers who are the top in their field. The Edible Schoolyard, which enlivens schools with Edible

Food Gardens and teaches kids how to grow, cook and steward their own food, is one of several initiatives which is supported by proceeds from events like Field to Fork. SAVOUR is helping create a strong local food system that ends up serving us all. Promoting the local way of eating and drinking helps our local economy grow, creates jobs and a skilled workforce and makes the freshest, tastiest, healthiest and most sustainably-produced foods accessible to more and more people every day! Whenever you eat out, look for the SAVOUR Muskoka member logo. Ask which local farms/producers are responsible for growing the food you eat! Continued support of these restaurants in turn supports the farmers. We all thank you! Field to Fork tickets on sale in May 2013! For more information a visit www.savourmuskoka.com. Connect on Twitter @SAVOURMuskoka and on facebook. Call 705-646-7118 or email info@savourmuskoka.com.

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Muskoka is

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Triathlon Country By Don McCormick and Rich Trenholm

Photos by Don McCormick

Visitors to Muskoka, anytime between May to September, might round a corner in their car to see hundreds of cyclists streaming towards them, hunched over their handlebars peddling as hard as they can. Or, they might be held up briefly at an intersection while a large group of runners cross over in front of them. They could be enjoying a picnic in a local park and look out to see hundreds of swimmers racing down the river towards them. Who are these people and what are they doing? That is when people realize that they are visiting one of the premier endurance sport destinations in Canada. During weekends in the spring through to the fall, there are numerous running, cycling, triathlon, and duathlon races being held in Huntsville and Lake of Bays,and it is highly likely that you will experience one of the above scenarios. And, if you are traveling in the area midweek you will almost surely see individual or small groups of cyclists or runners out training on the roadways and on the trails. With a natural playground for endurance sport training, and having a complement of over ten different endurance races in Huntsville and Lake of Bays, the area can reasonably lay claim to being the premier location for

endurance sport in Canada, if not the world. It has hosted national and world championships, World Cup events and is one of the few places in the world that hosts two IRONMAN branded events. Few, if any, other areas in the world can make a similar claim.Why is the area so popular for hosting endurance sports, such as triathlons?

Part of the reason is the physical geography. Muskoka has hundreds of lakes and rivers with clean, warm water for the swimming leg of the triathlon. Being cottage country there are hundreds of miles of cottage roads that are treelined and have relatively little automobile traffic on them - ideal for bike training and racing. And since Muskoka sits on top of the Canadian Shield these roads twist and turn, rise and fall creating a roller coaster-like bike course that is very challenging, interesting and sometimes downright thrilling. These same hills make for

challenging run courses. A Muskoka triathlon endows major bragging rights on a triathlete who completes the course.A Muskoka race T-shirt is worn with pride. Craig Alexander of Australia, the World IRONMAN and 70.3 Champion says, “This course [the Huntsville course] should be the World Championship course.” This same physical geography – the lakes and rivers, the forests, the granite outcroppings, the hills and valleys – combine to produce a very beautiful physical environment that can take some of the sting out of the grueling physical effort required to do a triathlon. "The natural beauty offers a wonderful distraction from my screaming muscles," says Chris King from Buffalo, NY. Huntsville and Lake of Bays has been hosting triathlons since 1989. The residents and the Town Council are very supportive of the events and the volunteers who help run the races have earned a very well-deserved reputation among the athletes as being among the best anywhere. Why not plan your visit to Huntsville and Lake of Bays to experience one of these events? Careful though - you might just be tempted to return as a competitor! www.trimuskoka.com.

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Terri Rilling

If you are planning a trip

THE AREA OF HUNTSVILLE, LAKE OF BAYS & ALGONQUIN PARK IS DOTTED WITH A VARIETY OF ACCOMMODATIONS

to Huntsville, Lake of Bays or Algonquin Park, be it for a vacation, a business trip or just to appease your adventurelust, there are a few key points to consider when deciding where to stay. Here are a few ideas to help: First, you must know the purpose of your trip.You may say it is something as general as a vacation or a business trip, but it is good to be more specific with what you want. You may be traveling on business, but you may also want to relax or explore the wonderful area of Huntsville, Lake of Bays and Algonquin Park. You may want a vacation, but do you want to try something adventurous or do you just want to relax at a spa? Deciding on these things will help you plan where to stay, and possibly save you time and money since you can choose the right accommodation that can cater to all

your needs. Draw up a budget table with possible projections on how much you would want to spend on your accommodations.Think of the services you want to enjoy while away and account for extra transportation costs if necessary. The area of Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Algonquin Park is dotted with a variety of accommodations, from family-operated lodges and resorts, cozy bed and breakfast homes, cottage rentals, and full amenity hotels and resorts. Outdoor enthusiasts relish the natural beauty of the many area campgrounds as they drift off to sleep under a blanket of stars. Contact the Huntsville/Lake of Bays Chamber of Commerce or visit our website www. huntsvilleadventures.com for a full list of accommodations in North Muskoka.

Background Image - Arowhon Pines

Killarney Lodge

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feature 8

Celebrating Tom Photos from the permanent collection of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery, Owen Sound, ON

By Gerry Lantaigne

This year marks the celebration of Tom Thomson’s life as an artist. It was in 1913 that Tom Thomson decided to dedicate his life to being an artist full time. He decided to undertake this life changing move after the exciting sale of his painting called Northern Lake. It was shown at the 41st Annual Exhibition of The Ontario Society of Artists earlier that spring, and purchased by the Ontario Government. It sold for $250.00 which was quite a lot by today’s standards (but nothing compared to its value today). This led Tom to ask for a leave of absence from his job to go on a sketching trip up north for the summer. He tried his hand at being a fire ranger in the Timmins area, but this left him with little time for his art. In mid-summer we find him back at Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park, doing what he likes best: taking long canoe trips and

sketching his way through the wilderness. Tom stayed in the Park painting at various sites and locations through November. He passed through

Huntsville on his return trip. Perhaps to visit with his friend Dr. McRuer, or more likely, to see the Trainor family, and in particular their daughter Winnifred. The family cottaged on Canoe Lake and lived at 11 Centre St. in Huntsville, the home of our mural of Thomsons’ painting The Canoe. Upon returning to Toronto he was introduced to the artist A.Y. Jackson, at a friend’s studio. This meeting with Jackson would create a lasting friendship, and have a powerful effect on Thomson’s development as an artist. Soon they were to work in the same studio space, where A.Y. Jackson shared his experience in art and art movements. This would prompt Tom to create and explore different techniques and ideas; innovations that were soon to change the landscape of Canada’s art culture, and its tolerance and acceptance of modern art.

From 2012-2017, we invite you to join Huntsville’s celebration of the 100 year anniversary of Tom Thomson’s life in our area. Throughout this celebration, different organizations from throughout the community will be hosting events, workshops, and exhibits. For further information and updates please visit www.huntsvilleadventures.com and look for the following Tom Thomson seal.

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Lake of Bays B A Y S V I LLE • D O R S E T • D W I G H T

Enjoy a scenic loop drive

with plenty of great experiences and attractions around Lake of Bays. If you like to browse, these 3 hamlets have fantastic shopping in unique settings – great for a day trip – enjoy lunch or libations along the way!

Background Image - Jack Stewart

Baysville

The community of Baysville is a small village on Lake of Bays surrounding the inlet to the famous Muskoka River. The village welcomes tourists year-round and provides a number of quaint shops and services of interest. The area hosts many cottages owned by celebrities who are often seen around the village and has a history of entertaining the rich and famous. The world famous Bigwin Inn has been completely refurbished. Back in the day, it hosted famous entertainers such as Louis Armstrong and Count Basie, and catered to the Gatsby-era of Hollywood stars and celebrities. Bigwin now has one of the country’s greatest golf courses with vistas on Lake of Bays that will not soon be forgotten. Baysville is now also home to a number of mural recreations from the Group of Seven Outdoor Gallery which can be spotted around the village and near the new Lake of Bays Brewing Company. Many travelers have passed through this historic charmer throughout the decades and have never forgotten the warm village atmosphere and hospitality of its locals. For more information about Baysville visit: www.baysvilleontario.com.

Dorset

Welcome to Dorset – A Community with a View. Dorset straddles the District of Muskoka and the County of Haliburton. Its landscape has inspired generations of writers, painters and dreamers with its

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natural beauty, massive forests, pristine lakes, nightly displays of Northern Lights and the call of the loons – all this, just two hours north of Toronto. The downtown section spans ‘the Narrows’ between Big and Little Trading Bays. Located at Highway 35 and the end of Muskoka Road 117, it is an easy and scenic drive from the Greater Toronto area and Algonquin Provincial Park is only a further thirty minutes drive northeast. Dorset is home to the world-famous Dorset Lookout Tower and the widely known Robinson’s General Store. The historic single lane humped-back bridge spans the channel between Big and Little Trading Bays and also boasts the village’s only traffic lights. In 2010, the Bigwin Steamship was re-launched on her 100th Anniversary. Many years and much hard work were needed to rebuild this beautiful lake steamer, which departs from the town docks in Dorset. The Dorset Heritage Museum is a must-see for all visitors wanting to learn more about Dorset’s ever-changing history. Pick up a free Heritage Walking Tour booklet for a lovely stroll visiting various sites throughout this charming community. The vast areas surrounding Dorset are dotted with dozens of smaller, pristine lakes. Lush mixed forests and spectacular rock out-croppings complete the breathtaking scenery. We invite you to experience it for yourself! For more information about Dorset visit: www.dorsetcanada.com.

Dwight

Welcome to Dwight! On the shores of Lake of Bays in Ontario, Dwight is in an excellent location for travelers looking to head out on the water and try their hand at

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some fishing. Visitors to this hamlet can enjoy their summer getaway by taking to the lake for some swimming or boating from the glorious Dwight Public Beach, which features picnic tables, swimming areas and a public boat launch ramp. It is within walking distance from the quaint and eclectic shops offering Muskoka treats from ice cream, fudge and maple syrup, to complete cottage furnishings. Here travelers will also find Ragged Falls, a sharp and dramatic drop of the Oxtongue River, accessible by car with parking available and marked hiking areas to explore.The Oxtongue River Park offers a wonderful walk along the rapids with picnic sites and breathtaking views. Snowmobiling, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are popular winter pastimes. Visitors here will not find it difficult to find a place to stay and with so much wonderful nature-viewing in the area, they won’t be at a loss for things to do and new places to discover. Lots of unique cottage resorts and lodges offer accommodations for all tastes and pocketbooks. Nearby, take a detour on Limberlost Road and enjoy an unforgettable artistic experience with The Artists of the Limberlost Open Studio Weekend/Tour, an annual tradition taking place each August. For more information about Dwight visit: www.discoverdwight.com. Here’s a tour that you can take over and over and discover something new each time. Public libraries in each village have free high speed for public use if you want to share your memories right away… and feel free to share your experiences and pictures with us – we would love to hear your feedback! Enjoy your ride…


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Wilf McQuinn

Adventures in

Shopping

Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Algonquin Park offers a shopping experience you’ll not soon forget. Arrive downtown Huntsville by boat at the Town Docks or come by car and park at one of our many designated downtown free parking spots. Take a stroll down our tree-lined streets to find over 120 unique boutiques, shops and services. Huntsville is home to the only indoor mall in Muskoka, and features over 20 shops & services. Huntsville’s Commerce Park located at Centre St. and Hwy. 60 is home to a variety of businesses and grocers. You might be surprised… and may even find yourself splurging on a unique gift! If it’s delicious food you crave, Huntsville, Lake of Bays & Algonquin Park have an incredible array of restaurants, pubs and cafés sure to have a delectable treat or two just waiting to tickle your tummy. Downtown merchants host a number of not-to-be missed shopping events all year-round. Visit DowntownHuntsvilleAdventures.com and mark your calendars. Be sure to enjoy the colourful and eye-catching murals in our year-round Group of Seven Outdoor Gallery. Tom Thomson's images of the north have

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always been deeply representative of Algonquin Park and the Huntsville area. In celebration of the Group of Seven and Thomson's contribution to our heritage, some of the best-loved paintings of the Group of Seven have

been replicated by mural artists and framed by our Downtown shops and services. Come enjoy the over 30 beautiful murals sprinkled throughout Downtown and surrounding area. Watch, interact with the artists, and experience art in the making as seven Canadian artists gather for ten days to create seven murals during our Annual Group of Seven Mural Festival in July. Plus, you can help paint too with our Annual ‘Add Your Brush Stroke’ Community Mural. Visit www.groupofsevenoutdoorgallery.ca

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for more details. Plan a leisurely drive to Baysville, and tour the local brewery and browse the quaint businesses located in the area. Travel further to Dorset and experience the gorgeous views from Dorset Lookout Tower of Lake of Bays, be sure to visit Robinson’s General Store – voted Canada’s Best Country Store. Dwight features lovely cafés, a world class canoe builder and cottage and home décor to keep your cottage dreams alive. Visit one of our many area outfitters and let them help plan your next adventure in our beautiful area! Ladies — get your mother, aunts, daughters and girlfriends together for the annual Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend in Downtown Huntsville on November 7 to 10, 2013. For one weekend a year, Huntsville pulls out all the stops for you – special adventures in shopping and discounts, pampering, live entertainment and culinary delights await all girlfriends in Huntsville! For a complete directory of our chamber members please visit the website at www.huntsvilleadventures.ca.


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Plan Your Adventure in Delightful Shops & Services • Cafés and Haute Cuisine Group of Seven Outdoor Gallery • Downtown Waterfront

Canada Day - July 1st Nuit Blanche North - July 13th Midnight Madness - July 19th Summer Side Walk Sale - August 17th Classic Custom Car Show - September 14th Tiny Tots Halloween Parade - October 31st Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend - November 7-10th Black Frid ‘eh’ - November 29th Santa Claus Parade - November 29th Here you and your family will do, taste and try things you’ve never done before. And it all starts downtown. . .

We look forward to greeting you!

DowntownHuntsvilleAdventures.ca

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NOVEMBER 7-10, 2013 What woman wouldn’t want to spend a weekend with the girls – relaxing at the spa, indulging in some retail therapy, enjoying delectable food, and having a bunch of laughs? Well mark your calendars and get your gal pals ready for the annual Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend, taking place November 7-10, 2013! This annual event, now in its seventh year, continues to get bigger and better! Featuring fashion shows, beauty seminars, and highlighted by such artists as Amanda Marshall, Jann

Arden, Chantal Kreviazuk and Kathleen Edwards, the weekend continues to offer additional events and activities each year. Planning is well underway for 2013 and local accommodators will be offering fantastic packages for ladies traveling from out-of-town – be sure to check www.huntsvilleadventures.com for all the exciting details as they happen! Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend is the perfect opportunity for women to relax and reconnect with old friends. Share a glass of wine and

reminisce about the past. Spend the day exploring the downtown shops and all the amazing & unique items each has to offer. A chance to rejuvenate the mind, body and soul with good food, great friends and unforgettable entertainment! So ladies, ditch the husband and kids for a few days and start planning your getaway to Huntsville and Lake of Bays – you deserve a few days of pampering and Girlfriends’ Getaway Weekend is just what the doctor ordered!

Photos by Wilf McQuinn

CONCERTS • FASHION • SPAS • DINING • SHOPPING

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Algonquin Provincial Park

Kelly Holinshead

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registered charity made up of members, donors, staff and volunteers who are passionate about enhancing the appreciation of Algonquin Park through the delivery of educational programs, activities and events. This dedicated group of individuals has been enhancing the experience of Park visitors to this magical place for 30 years (1983-2013). Their passion has supported numerous projects over the years, like generating millions of dollars in gifts for Algonquin Park; year-round front-line staffing of the Algonquin Visitor Centre and Algonquin Logging Museum; hosting the only official Algonquin Park website featuring timely and detailed Park related information; and much, much more… If you would like to share your passion for Algonquin Park by donating, volunteering or becoming a member, please visit

The Friends of Algonquin Park is a non-profit

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www.algonquinpark.on.ca or call us at 613-637-2828. It is through the support of people like you that we are able to continue providing quality educational experiences in and about Algonquin Park. These include such events as Loggers Day which will take place on Saturday, July 27, 2013. Join us for a highly entertaining and educational day when the Algonquin Logging Museum comes to life with demonstrations around the Logging Museum trail. The musical group The Wakami Wailers, are scheduled to return to Algonquin Park for an appearance at Loggers Day on July 27, 2013 and an open air concert on July 28, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. The award winning Ontario-based group will get your toes tapping through a fun-filled evening of entertaining stories and songs from their popular releases – The Last of the White Pine Loggers, Waltz with the Woods, and River through the Pines. Meet the Researcher Day will be held on Thursday, August 1, 2013. Come and get an inside look at some of the topics and results of current research being conducted here and meet some of the people doing the work. Charity barbeque proceeds will support research in Algonquin Park. Activities such as the Experience Algonquin Workshop series are another way to experience the best of what Algonquin has to offer! For these workshops, expert instructors are brought in from communities around Algonquin Park to share their passion and expertise on a variety of recreational and natural history topics. As a participant, you will work closely with instructors in a small group setting, taking home new skills and knowledge, as well as field guides and tools needed to pursue your interest further. Programs such as the Group Education Program offers school, youth, and adult groups a wide variety of educational programs that allow visitors to discover Algonquin Park’s amazing natural and cultural history. All programs are delivered by highly qualified Park Naturalists. To learn more about these events, or for a complete listing of all the exciting activities and programs The Friends of Algonquin Park have to offer, visit our website at www.algonquinpark.on.ca. Visit us on … twitter = @AlgonquinPark facebook = The Friends of Algonquin Park YouTube channel = FOAPAlgonquinPark …and share your passion for Algonquin Park.

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Lawren Harr Mural Art Snow II 1915is’ is t: G e rr Trinity U y nited Ch Lantaigne 2006 33 Main urch (side wall) St. E.

Tom Thomson’s Autumn Foliage 1916 Mural Artist:Tim Webb 2007 Algonquin Outfitters - 86 Main St. E.

ichael’s Franklin Carm 1929 ke La or irr M Lantaigne 2005 Mural Artist: Gerry(side wall) se ca ok The Bo 93 Main St. E.

Tom Tho White Birch mson’s Mural Artist: Jo Grove 1916 Algonquin Th hn Hood 2007 eatre (rea 37 Main St. E. r wall)

Where else can you explore Tom Thomson and the Group of Seven replications under square miles of open skies? ONLY IN DOWNTOWN HUNTSVILLE AND SURROUNDING AREA!

TheGroupofSevenOutdoorGallery.com The Group of Seven Outdoor Gallery, originally founded by Gerry Lantaigne, is a project of the Downtown Huntsville Business Improvement Area (BIA). Contact the BIA for more information at 8 West St. N., Unit 4, Huntsville, ON P1H 2B6 705-789-1400, huntsvillebia@bellnet.ca.

Tom Thomson’s1915 ober Algonquin Oct Lazos 2007 m illia :W tist Ar Mural (rear wall) Algonquin Theatre E. 37 Main St.

A.Y. Jackso Night Pine Isl n’s Mural Artist: Janine and 1924 White (Marson) 2007 Hutcheson, Reynold s & Caswell (rear wall) - 27 Ma in St. E.

Tom Thomson’s Northern River 1915 Mural Artist: Gerry Lantaigne 2006 Flotron’s Tweed & Hickory (rear wall) 18 Main St. E. son’s Tom Thome 1916 in P ck The Ja e 1999 erry Lantaign Mural Artist: G(side) - 4 Brunel Rd. Miss Lester’s

Tom T Autumn’s G homson’s Mural Artists: Gearland 1915-1916 with over 1,300 rry Lantaigne, along Huntsville residen ts and visito Reflections of Mrs 2010 uskoka (side) 49 Main St. E.


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2013 Visitor's Guide