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CALGARY • SEPT/OCT 2016

DOUGLAS COUPLAND’S INTERPRETATION OF

CALGARY AT

THE MARK

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publisher’s message

When I chose to cross the Atlantic to settle on the west coast of Canada in 1993, I was absolutely besotted by everything about Vancouver— the people, the sense of community, the mountains out my back window, the ocean at my doorstep. At the time, I used to comment that one of Vancouver’s most endearing qualities was that it was a village that thought it was a city. I found it charming, really. But coming from the frenetic pace and exploding populous of much larger London, and having experienced firsthand what it’s like to be squeezed, like many of the city’s urban professionals, to the more affordable outer reaches of the urban geography, I wondered how long this almost too good to be true village incarnation of Vancouver might last. Vancouver first gained the attention of the globe when it was the site of the World Expo in 1986, and then again, as it played host to the 2010 Olympic Winter Games. People around the world had their eyes opened to what those of us who live here already knew; that Vancouver was a place of striking scenic landscapes, of inclusiveness, of individual freedoms— a lifestyle community that was an incomparable place to live, work, and to raise a family. Vancouver had officially been ‘discovered’. It was inevitable, really. And the city began a paradigm shift from village to in-demand multicultural metropolis. Today, Vancouver has joined the leagues of the cosmopolitan cities of the world, alongside the likes of San Francisco, New York, London, Paris, and Hong Kong. As one would expect, the meteoric rise in rank has not come without its share of growing pains; the housing market, or more specifically the explosive increase in housing prices, without question, topping the list. That said, however, there is no way to go back in time, to reclaim the village of decades now past, or to undo Vancouver’s rise to prominence on the world stage. It’s not something that we have the power to stop, slow, or even control. In fact, if we try, it would be a disservice to us all.

Paul Mann, PUBLISHER

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EDITOR’S MESSAGE

After a somewhat nomadic upbringing — the product of a military family — I arrived in Vancouver in the late 1990s and realized that if there ever was the perfect place to drop anchor, this was it.

is no comparing to this city, its landscapes, culture and peoples. When I drove back over the Port Mann Bridge and saw the city open up before me, my heart soared — I was home. Recently some media in this city have focussed on frustrated millennials leaving the city to look for better opportunities, and of course, on the red-hot housing market debate.

Years later, as a graduate journalism student, I spent the summer in New York as an editorial intern for the Village Voice newspaper. A couple of curious editors gathered around my desk upon hearing about the new Canadian intern, from a country with a geography unfamiliar to them. They asked where I was from, and when I told them Vancouver, they looked puzzled and said they had never heard of it. I googled the cityscape for them and they were impressed with the images — the first they had ever seen. That was 2008, and now I don’t think I would run into too many newspaper editors in New York City who haven’t heard of Vancouver.

In this edition of H&L, we talk to top representatives from the real estate industry in Vancouver, and share their take on the housing growing pains this city is experiencing. This summer, a tax was imposed on foreign buyers —throwing the market into turmoil. We all watch to see how the story unfolds. Will the Provincial government live up to its reported pledge to apply tax revenues to housing affordability measures so our residents, regardless of race or class, can continue to live here? We truly hope so.

In 2011, I spent six months in Ottawa, with the intent to make it an indefinite move. When people asked where I was from and I told them Vancouver, I remember most asking rather incredulously why I had left. The answer was that I, like many young professionals in Vancouver, had felt there was a lack of opportunity here.

I believe there are growing opportunities in Vancouver, and I hope that young professionals stay, or come back if they do leave for a while. I did — and it was worth it.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

As the months rolled by, I felt a homesickness that I had never experienced before. I packed up my car and drove back to Vancouver. I took a scenic route; and while every Canadian province has a beauty all of its own, to me there

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AMANDA STUTT


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Publisher Associate Publisher & Paul Mann Director of Sales Robyn Tucker-Peck Editor-in-Chief Creative Director Amanda Stutt Christopher Gendive Copy Editor Director of Newsstand Janice Strong Sales and Marketing Craig Sweetman Contributing Writers Laura Goldstein Seema Dhawan Gail Johnson Nora O’Malley Tony Whitney Claire Newell Lucas Aykroyd Roberta Staley Barbara Balfour Janice Strong

Contributing Photographers Alex Waber Ema Peter

Marcel Lech

Account ManagerVancouver Island Laura Kalcsa Production Manager Jacqueline Allison

Marketing Assistant Letters to the Editor Natasha Suntewari H&L welcomes your comments, questions and opinions. Publication Schedule Send your letters via email H&L Vancouver to editor@hlmagazine.com. H&L Calgary H&L Vancouver Island H&L Edmonton Six times per year.

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featured contributors

Tony Whitney has covered the automobile industry for more than 25 years, handling assignments for T.V., radio, consumer magazines, auto publications and newspapers. He hosted the network T.V. show Driver’s Seat for over two decades and regularly handles Canada-wide talk shows for CBC Radio.

Seema Dhawan is a reporter and editor who loves finding destinations and personalities she can’t stop raving about. Her passion for writing and storytelling has taken her around the world, and she has written about her finds for publications that include USA TODAY, The Huffington Post and WestJet Magazine.

Laura Goldstein has written features for Globe and Mail Design, Canadian House & Home, Chatelaine, Gray Magazine and others. Laura was a performing arts publicist for 22 years. She continues to combine her love for the arts, design, retail, (eating) food, travel and the fascinating people who create it all as a never-ending source for articles.

Gail Johnson is a Vancouver-based award-winning journalist who has been writing and editing for 20 years. She has a passion for covering the lifestyle, design, health, finance and technology sectors. Gail is the food columnist for CBC Radio One Vancouver’s On the Coast program. She is also a mother and a certified group-fitness instructor.

Claire Newell is the official travel consultant for Global BC and the best-selling author of Travel Best Bets. She has written articles for Success, Professional Woman, Reader’s Digest, Today’s Parent, and is H&L Magazine’s exclusive Escapes writer. Claire is also co-host of the new travel series Operation: Vacation.

Nora O’Malley resides on the edge of Vancouver Island where she reports for the Tofino-Ucluelet Westerly News. Nora’s freelance writing has been published in: WHERE Canadian Rockies Magazine, Surfer’s Path, and Gripped The Climbing Magazine. She’s also worked as a staff copywriter for Quiksilver Australia and Mountain Equipment Co-op.

Barbara Balfour is a television host and producer, award-winning public speaker, and international print journalist. In addition to hosting a live talk show in Ottawa, she writes regularly for BBC World News, The Globe and Mail and ELLE. Barbara has published two children’s books, contributed to tourism guidebooks on Iceland and Chile, and co-edited an anthology of essays on CanadaEuropean Union relations.

Lucas Aykroyd is an award-winning Vancouver-based journalist who writes about sports for the New York Times and IIHF.com. He has covered the NHL since 1999, along with the last four Winter Olympics and 17 consecutive IIHF World Championships. In addition, his travel writing has appeared in the Washington Post, National Geographic Traveler, and The Globe and Mail.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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table of contents

FEATURES

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EDITOR’S MESSAGE AMANDA STUTT

THE EMPRESS- OLD MADE NEW AGAIN Shaking up the Grand Dame of Victoria JANICE STRONG

THE GREAT REAL ESTATE DEBATE Anatomy of Vancouver’s Heated Housing Market AMANDA STUTT

THE RUSSIAN ROCKET Catching up with retired Canucks Legend Pavel Bure LUCAS AYKROYD


table of contents

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DESIGN

DOUGLAS COUPLAND’S DESIGN BRINGS MAGIC TO THE MARK ROOTED CREATIONS: THE DUO BEHIND STUDIO NORTH

RUNWAY

COCO CHANEL: A TIMELESS VISIONARY PAUL HARDY’S KALEIDOSCOPIC ANIMALIA EXHIBIT WINTER RUNWAY INSPIRATION: WITH PRADA, CALVIN KLEIN & CHANEL

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DRIVE

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TREASURES

ROLLS-ROYCE: VISION NEXT 100 CONCEPT FAST & FABULOUS: BUYING A SUPERCAR – SPORTS OR SEDAN?

HUBLOT’S BIG BANG PIAGET’S POSSESSION COLLECTION

H&L MAGAZINE

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WEALTH

78

CULINARY

82

AVIATION

92

DESTINATIONS

98

NAUTICAL

103

TECHNOLOGY

ANATOMY OF VANCOUVER’S HEATED HOUSING MARKET

FASHIONING FINE CHOCOLATE: HOW JACQUELINE JACEK CHANNELS JOY

HONDA TAKES TO THE SKY

THE RED CITY: MOROCCO’S MARRAKESH

118 WALLY POWER YACHT

ARCABOARD: ENGINEERING THE FUTURE


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DOUGLAS COUPLAND’S DESIGNS BRING

MAGIC TO THE MARK

CALGARY’S NEWEST LUXURY BUILDING HAS ITS

EYES ON THE SKY WRITTEN BY SEEMA DHAWAN IMAGES BY ROB MOROTO


design

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One of Calgary’s newest luxury condominium buildings is letting all residents take in stellar views with their morning coffee. The MARK on 10th Avenue and 8th Street Southwest has moved the traditional resident’s lounge and taken it to the skies. Located on the 34th and 35th floors of the building, the residents lounge has a long list of attractive amenities: a glass mezzanine with

panoramic views of the Rockies and the Calgary Tower, a yoga studio, fitness centre, infrared sauna, billiards table, barbeque, wet bar, and an outdoor hot tub with a patio for sunbathing nearby. “It’s considered one of the most luxurious rooftop amenities in the city,” said Parham Mahboubi, vice-president of planning and marketing at Qualex-Landmark, the building’s developers.

The 35th floor mezzanine, only accessible by stairs inside the lounge, is the star of the show. Adorned with a desk, couches, and warm throws, the inviting space is for residents to lounge, work, or simply take in views of downtown. The mezzanine sits out like a block on top of the building and is described as an observation deck for the city.

design

The $100 million condo project is also home to the first large-scale artwork installation in Alberta by internationally acclaimed designer Douglas Coupland. Titled Interpretation of Calgary, Alberta in the 21st Century, the artwork is displayed in the lobby and features 20 coloured targets that represent flora, fauna and institutional elements of the city.

“I wanted to make this very intense colour pesto to put on the wall, so, if it’s winter out, you could change your mood,” Coupland said in a statement. “The forms become signs that will, across time, mellow and ripen within a viewer’s memory, also acting as a smart and anticipated ‘welcome home’ moment.”

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“We’re quite excited about it,” Mahboubi said about the art installation. The building is located in Calgary’s design district, making the artwork a perfect complement, he added. The grand piece makes the lobby inviting and warm, and Mahboubi describes the rooftop lounge and art installation as being two bookends. “It’s almost like two bookends to a residential condo,” he says. “Both ends are striking.” When you’re in the lobby, you’re awed, and the views from the rooftop have to be seen to be believed.


ROOTED CREATIONS THE DESIGN DUO BEHIND

STUDIO NORTH

WRITTEN BY SEEMA DHAWAN PHOTOGRAPHERS: ANDREW CHOPTIANY AND MATTHEW KENNEDY


design

When Matthew Kennedy and Mark Erickson first met as undergraduates at the University of Calgary, they learned not only that they were immediate neighbours, but also they were both headed to Halifax’s Dalhousie University to pursue Masters of Architecture degrees. In addition to hitting it off creatively, the duo now running Studio North realized they had similar business visions. On choosing the right name, Kennedy and Erickson agreed that a north arrow, used on architectural drawings for orientation, was the inspiration. The team specializes in compact living and laneway constructions that are both functional and beautiful. They’re keen on building housing in Calgary for growing families that want to live in the inner city. “The amount of space between houses in Calgary takes away from that sense of community,” says Erickson. “We just want to change that.” The duo recently finished restoring a historic home in Calgary’s Parkdale neighbourhood, and they are planning on adding a laneway component to the property.

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During their educations and travels, both Erickson and Kennedy were fascinated with small space living and how communities build around them. Kennedy researched compact living solutions in Japan, and Erickson came across them in West Africa, where a whole family would grow their space as their family grew. “Laneways provide the independence for an aging family member, as well as a connection,” says Kennedy. “It’s a detached dwelling from the main house, typically above a garage, and it backs onto a laneway.” A recent client wanted a space that would give him his privacy but also be a good fit for socializing.


“IT BRINGS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY AS DESIGNERS UP A LEVEL,

EVERY SQUARE FOOT OF SPACE COUNTS.”

Kennedy explains how they built two different living spaces, which were connected through a community area. The common area houses two fig trees, passion fruit vines, lavender, and tomatoes, and is a warm gathering space. Laneways can also provide barrier-free multigenerational housing, or they can be used for additional office space and growing families. “The scale of the laneway is something that we find really interesting,” says Kennedy. Erickson was most inspired to design laneway houses by the strong sense of community and rooted life he witnessed in West Africa. “People can live really close together and communities can be strengthened because of it,” says Erickson.

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The building process is also really important to the team at Studio North and staying involved allows them to make edits on the spot that better the design. “It brings your responsibility as designers up a level,” says Erickson. “Every square foot of space counts.” If you’re looking to renovate your space, the team recommends starting with a narrative.

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Kennedy uses the example of a client who wanted to build a play space where she could curl up with her children and read stories. The team created a reading nook in the attic with a massive circle window fitted into it. “How she imagined using that space with her family, was really inspirational for us,” he says.


FOUNDATION

CALGARY’S NEWEST HOME & DESIGN FESTIVAL

IMAGES PROVIDED BY STUDIO NORTH


Foundation celebrates home development, interior design, commercial renovation, commercial restoration and landscaping, and follows a different format by adding attractions and entertainment. Event organizers Lonnie Powell and Jordan Illingworth are entrepreneurs with backgrounds in marketing, promotions and special events. Powell plans Foundation as an annual event, and aims to take it on the road to Edmonton and Toronto after the Calgary debut.

Foundation Home & Design Festival kicks off September 10, and plans are to put a fresh twist on the traditional tradeshow model. The Foundation Festival’s vision is to showcase Calgary as a design hub of Canada, and to work with innovative companies and give them a platform to share their best work.

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“We want to take all elements of art and design and put them in one area. Furniture design, textile design, landscape, renovations, culture — we want to take every element that has beauty in it and put it together,” said Powell. We love working with young companies with vision, and we love creating.” “Calgary has so many unique companies that are doing amazing work, and the city doesn’t get the credit it deserves,” Powell added. The Foundation festival runs September 10 & 11 at Eau Claire, 200 Barclay parade SW.


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COCO CHANEL THE TIMELESS VISIONARY

FASHION CHANGES BUT STYLE ENDURES

WRITTEN BY LAURA GOLDSTEIN PHOTOS PROVIDED BY CHANEL

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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couture

Hers truly was a rags to riches story. Born in 1883 and raised in an orphanage in Saumur, France where the nuns taught her to sew, Gabrielle (Coco) Bonheur Chanel took up work with a local tailor as soon as she turned eighteen. Though fiercely independent, rebelling against the male fashion designers of the day who sought to bind women in bustiers and corsets, she was influenced by men who could help set her up in the fashion business, beginning with millenary. When the love of her life, British industrialist Edward ‘Boy’ Capel backed the opening of her boutiques in Deauville and Biarritz (he was killed in a car crash soon after) Coco Chanel persevered to open her atelier in Paris at 31 Rue Cambon, the company’s worldwide headquarters to this day. And, although World War II eventually forced her to shutter her business, she dauntlessly re-entered the fashion world in 1954 at age 71.

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A shrewd visionary with an uncanny ability to create timeless style instead of short-lived trends, Coco Chanel revolutionized fashion when she noticed that many women, still in mourning post-World War 1, dressed in black. By capitalizing on that ‘look’ but with chic styles and fabrics, she literally created “the little black dress” that is still considered a staple in many women’s closets in the 21st century. Working with perfumer Ernst Beaux, Mademoiselle created the iconic Chanel No. 5 in 1921, sonamed because it was simply the 5th scent presented to the designer and was her lucky number. It was the first perfume with an alchemy that included multiple scents. Still the number one selling perfume today, artist Andy Warhol immortalized the sleek-lined bottle in his lithographs, of which only 190 exist. Coco Chanel was a trailblazer; introducing loose jersey fabrics traditionally used for men’s underwear into her women’s collections and envisioned be-jeweled boxy fitted jackets inspired by masculine military attire. In 1924, her iconic tweed Chanel suit was born (influenced by men’s hunting and golf jackets worn in the Scottish countryside) and would become a world-wide sensation, popularized later in bouclés and silk by French film stars Brigitte Bardot and Catherine Deneuve and Hollywood actresses Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn. Today, with Karl Lagerfeld at the CHANEL helm, he continues to re-imagine that classic style.

“IN ORDER TO BE IRREPLACEABLE, ONE MUST ALWAYS BE DIFFERENT.” SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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With the re-opening of their eponymous 470–squaremetre flagship boutique in Vancouver’s Holt Renfrew this spring, the splendid CHANEL interiors evoke Mademoiselle’s historic commitment to the arts with a modern design aesthetic, while still preserving bygone elegance. Like all CHANEL boutiques across the globe, the interior was conceived by New York-based architect Peter Marino, renowned for his ability to seamlessly translate the beauty of the Luxury House into his own vision. Marino’s muse was Mademoiselle Chanel’s Parisian apartment on the rue Cambon and her townhouse on Faubourg Saint-Honoré, in Paris. Those exquisite interiors included her remarkable collection of antique folding Chinese inlaid lacquer Coromandel Screens. Echoing that theme, Marino commissioned dark lacquer screens featuring gold embossed camellias from contemporary artist Nancy Lorenz. Spectacular black filigree floor-to-ceiling accordion screens dotted with crystals by Christophe Côme are actually interlocking ‘Cs’ of the brand’s logo. Bespoke upholstered sofas riff on the classical CHANEL tweeds in the two Ready-to-Wear Salons, while a gilded Maison d’Art Goossens chandelier and vintage sunburst mirror sparkle among the shoes and handbags. Perhaps the pièce de résistance is in the jewel box of a dedicated space specifically devoted to CHANEL fine Jewellery and Watches. For the first time in Canada, the boutique showcases a dazzling array of pieces in diamonds and precious stones like the Camélia Empierré Brooch: 18-karat white gold with 12 spellbinding rare Burmese rubies surrounded by rose-cut pink, brown and brilliant diamonds. Other bijoux reflect Mademoiselle’s zeal for comets, stars, fringes, ribbons, Leo, (her zodiac sign) many stylized camellias, her favourite flower, as well as birds and butterflies. A selection of watches from the Première, J12 and Mademoiselle Privé collections, including the latest BOY.Friend watch, are also on display. The workmanship is astounding. Enamellers, engravers, carvers and stone-setters worked countless hours to perfect their exceptional designs and symmetry. Coco Chanel, the timeless visionary, re-invented the life she always wanted by staying true to herself.

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CHANEL BOUTIQUE AT HOLT RENFREW IN VANCOUVER


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“THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE. THE SECOND-BEST ARE VERY EXPENSIVE.”

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2016 IMAGES PROVIDED BY

PRADA CALVIN KLEIN CHANEL

FALL INTO WINTER


PRADA:

ARCHITECT OF HIGH FASHION


For the 2016 Fall Winter Prada show, Dutch Design studio AMO took inspiration from the traditional public stages and places of civic ceremonies. Placed around the periphery of the room, a system of balconies and tribunes defined the central space. Similar yet different, they create an imbalanced symmetry.

Similar variances can be found in the clothing. Layered textures, bold prints and metallic hues marked the runway. Wide cinched belts, flirty sailor caps, lace up boots and richly pattered tights were commanding themes. Colour schemes juxtaposed lush metallic gold against feminine florals.

Flowered, embroidered onlays, and Prada’s impeccable tailoring lend a military motif for the winter. Angular shoulders and fur puffs soften the look.


calvin klein:

A juxtaposition of

REFINED LUXURY AND UNTAMED WILD


From the night before to the morning after, the Fall 2016 Women’s Calvin Klein Collection is a sensual exploration of urban eroticism, deconstructed proportions and luxe fabrics. The interplay between his and hers dressing continues to be key, with suits comprised of precisely tailored jackets and soft, wide leg trousers.

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Light and sultry dresses are emphasized by deep v necklines. Inspired by nature inherent in both the city and the wild, the collection features an assortment of plaid and pinstriped prints as well as oversized faux fur collars. The contrast of masculine and feminine sensibilities persists with the season’s silhouettes, focusing on either ankle strap stilettos or elevated oxfords.

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FUNDAMENTAL ELEMENTS OF

CHANEL

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For the CHANEL Fall-Winter 2016/17 Ready-to-Wear Collection, Karl Lagerfeld revisits the allure and the codes of the House in a very contemporary spirit. For this collection the designer has chosen to focus on the fundamental elements of the House that have been forever synonymous with the CHANEL allure.

Embracing mid length and longer, the silhouette reasserts the emblematic codes of the House: over strict coats and men’s reefer jackets in wool, accumulations of long strings of pearls are worn like scarves. In between boaters, helmets and riding hats, hats in tweed, felt or leather are held on with a strap adorned with byzantine crosses, pearls or camellias.


The coats are extra-long or adopt XXL volumes. Others come in a pale-gold upholstery silk embroidered with chenille velvet, mini chains and gold beads. The gabardine trench coat becomes a maxi volume duster jacket. The dress coats in tweed are understated, zipped from top to bottom, or with an integrated tone-on-tone belt.

For evening, the lightest of pleats in chiffon or tulle contrast with patent leather lacing on delicate dresses. Lace and tulle frayed ruffles in shades of cream come together over tiered dresses. The little black dress is embellished with bows and flat pleats down the back.

The fuchsia washed-satin alternates with richly embroidered lamĂŠ dresses adorned with jewelled plastrons and beaded straps.

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kaleidoscopicanimalia INSIDE VISIONARY COSTUME DESIGNER

Paul Hardy’s

Glenbow Museum Exhibit WRITTEN BY BARBARA BALFOUR IMAGES BY PHIL CROZIER

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It’s been barely 15 years since Paul Hardy launched his design career, but he’s already put Calgary on the international fashion map. From costume design to interior décor, from elite personal stylist to haute couture runways, Hardy has done it all. His client list of both Hollywood heavyweights and superstars closer to home includes Goldie Hawn, Bette Midler and Alanis Morissette, among others. Known for layering different textures in unconventional ways, Hardy’s ready-to-wear collections feature items such as linen evening gowns embellished with crystals and kaleidoscope-printed silk scarves based on French taxidermy. But this Renaissance man of design is also known for juxtaposing ideas from multiple time periods and cultures in his work. Hardy lists several collaborations with cultural institutions as career

highlights, including handpicking beaded bandanas, elaborate belt buckles and iconic Western gift ideas as the curator of a retail store for the Calgary Stampede. Dressing William Shatner for his stint as a Calgary Stampede parade marshal is up there on the list – so too was designing the costumes for the Alberta Ballet’s Fumbling Towards Ecstasy, a show inspired by and set to the music of Sarah McLachlan. The most recent feather in his cap is the role of artist-in-residence at the Glenbow Museum, where his exhibit, Kaleidoscopic Animalia, was extended for public viewing until September 5. “When the museum asked me to submit a proposal, I thought of how man’s relationship with animals has influenced everything from pop culture and lifestyle to interior design, fashion, and even psychology. It’s a common thread through every culture and transcends every social hierarchy,” says Hardy. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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“Look at how much animal iconography is used in brand packaging – from cereal boxes to a beer at your local pub. I wanted to challenge people to be more aware of how this influence permeates our culture and ways of thinking at subconscious levels.” After a walk through the museum’s collection of artifacts – the largest of its kind in Western Canada – Hardy drew upon his previous experience dressing Hudson’s Bay’s Christmas displays to install the exhibit as a series of 15 store windows. The exhibit is a fitting showcase for his signature design approach, which blends industrial, modern and antique styles. It also pays tribute to his reverence for animals – Hardy visits Deyrolle, the oldest taxidermy retail shop in Paris, at least four times a year to bring back items for clients (his latest acquisition was a skeleton of a miniature horse). In one window, ‘Trapped in Tradition’, he features a map of Canada created using branded packaging with animal iconography indigenous to each of the Provinces and Territories. As a tribute to the role of the beaver and the fur trade in Canadian history, Hardy fashioned a custom corseted gown from Hudson’s Bay Company wool point blankets, and trimmed it in beaver fur repurposed from a vintage coat. Other windows reveal vignettes of fashion design in cold weather climates such as the Arctic, and a child’s toy cupboard as seen through the eyes of Little Red Riding Hood, who wears a Hardy-designed custom silk dress and matching hooded cape lined in faux wolf fur. Through his research, Hardy discovered a striking correlation between high-end fashion and utilitarian garments designed by indigenous peoples.

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“LOOK AT HOW MUCH ANIMAL ICONOGRAPHY IS USED IN BRAND PACKAGING – FROM CEREAL BOXES TO A BEER AT YOUR LOCAL PUB. I WANTED TO CHALLENGE PEOPLE TO BE MORE AWARE OF HOW THIS INFLUENCE PERMEATES OUR CULTURE AND WAYS OF THINKING AT SUBCONSCIOUS LEVELS.”

“I realized that colour, balance and proportion – things that are aesthetically pleasing to the eye ­­are innately wired into us and have a cross-cultural connection. We have an amazing black-and-white duck feather parka from the Inuit that could be part of a Chanel collection in terms of the geometry of the way the feathers are laid out. This was not necessarily a forethought in the construction of the garment, but it proves we can co-create with universal design principles.” Hardy also sees a parallel psychology when it comes to inheriting the attributes of the animals we keep around us in some form. “When primitive tribes would kill an animal and eat its heart, they believed they would inherit the attributes of that animal, such as bravery or strength,” says Hardy. “Today we see something similar through the branding of cars or sports teams, or the way a woman feels sexier when she wears leopard print shoes.” While the exhibit wraps up in September, Hardy is keeping busy with expansion plans into Europe in time for his professional 15th anniversary next year.

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drive

A NEW BEACON OF LUXURY

CO 0 10 T EX N N O I VIS

written by tony whitney images provided by rolls-royce

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T P E C


It is all too easy to think of Rolls-Royce as an automaker so steeped in its remarkable history and traditions that it doesn’t spend much time looking far into the future. That notion was utterly demolished recently when the storied British manufacturer of fine automobiles unveiled its Vision Next 100 concept to a stunned world. Modestly code named 103EX, the car is so radical, so inventive and so technically creative that not only is it a huge step for Rolls-Royce, but a shot in the arm for the entire luxury car industry. And it will surely silence forever those who thought the company had never quite emerged from the world of ash frames and handbeaten body panels.

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What Rolls-Royce is trying to achieve with this astonishing prototype is to anticipate the demands of the luxury consumer of the future. It is the result of intensive studies conducted with current buyers, which revealed a clear desire that in future decades, the marque’s plans will focus on cars which will embody key attributes that have attracted “the most discerning and powerful patrons in the world” for over a century. 54

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Rolls-Royce isn’t saying what the power unit is or will be, but points out that the big 12-cylinder engines it has used in the past are unlikely to be around when cars like this begin rolling majestically off the assembly line. It’s easy to imagine that a good-sized fuel cell would be the best answer, but the final choice remains to be seen and we can only speculate on it.

The Vision is a huge car, close to twenty feet long and over 5 feet high; and glazing, some of it hand made, completely surrounds the occupants. Access is via a sideways-opening roof panel and a rearward-opening door. The styling is completely radical and futuristic and follows no dictates from today’s luxury automobiles. The huge wheels are almost completely shrouded in superbly crafted sheet metal and up front, the iconic Rolls-Royce Pantheon radiator grille is sited as always, topped by the traditional Spirit of Ecstasy figure, so long an emblem of the famous nameplate.

Perhaps the biggest surprise is that the car is completely autonomous and all the owner has to do is to input destination data, sit back in the silken sofa (please don’t call it a car seat) and watch the lordly vehicle’s progress on a huge LED screen. Don’t even think about a steering wheel – there isn’t one. The interior is designed to evoke a feeling of privacy, warmth and ultimate relaxation, according to Rolls-Royce. These cars have always been lauded for their quietness and the Vision is sure to be the quietest Rolls ever. Rolls-Royce’s Vision Next 100 ranks among the most exciting announcements in the luxury car industry for many years, even if the arrival of such a conveyance won’t be too popular with your chauffer. Rolls-Royce describes its concept as: “A beacon of luxury that’s distinctly modern, yet glows with a timeless glamour; an individual sculpture made from one seamless surface.” Who are we to argue with that!


FAST & FABULOUS

BUYING A SUPER CAR - SPORTS OR SEDAN?

WRITTEN BY TONY WHITNEY PHOTOGRAPHER: MARCEL LECH


In the rarefied world of supercars, even the savviest buyers have tough choices to face when it comes to deciding whether to go with an exotic sports car or an ultra-luxury marque. Both types have their appeal and both offer opulence, prestige, image, performance and comfort in abundance. So what makes one prestige car buyer opt for a sportster and another for a sedan and just what is the ultimate status symbol? Every luxury car buyer has his or her own view of which set of wheels will deliver the most satisfaction, whether out on the blacktop or parked at the country club. There are practical considerations too, but most buyers shopping the supercar segment have a plethora of choices. BUGATTI VEYRON SANG NOIR


ROLLS-ROYCE WRAITH

BENTLEY CONTINENTAL GT

MAYBACH INTERIOR

Three key contenders right now in the ultra-luxury sedan sphere include superlative offerings by Rolls-Royce, Bentley and MercedesMaybach. A top Rolls-Royce costs about $418,000; a competing Bentley around $335,000 and a Mercedes Maybach carries a thriftier $235,000 sticker price. All these automakers offer limited edition special models and recently, Rolls-Royce introduced its Phantom Pinnacle Travel Edition at over $800,000.

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Owners of cars in this lofty class are usually regarded as solid and dependable with sources of wealth built on a firm foundation. To some extent, an older crowd has favoured sedans like these, but now we are seeing many more youthful people behind the wheels of marques. Today there are plenty of millenials with the means to purchase any car of their choosing. And a stolid image may be one thing but quite often, upscale sedans offer surprising performance and, well-driven, they can almost match their sports rivals.


Pure sports cars are often considered the ultimate symbol of success in life and for older buyers; they offer a fresher, more youthful image as well as undoubted prestige. Contenders in this class include Ferrari, Lamborghini, Bugatti and McLaren and all of these have, or have had, cars over $1million in their ranges, with the latest Bugatti Chiron nudging $3 million.

LAMBORGHINI AVENTADOR

Exotic sports cars are all about emotion, excitement and passionate design. A Rolls-Royce or a Bentley may not be immediately noticed as they purr by, but drive a Lamborghini Aventador or a Ferrari LaFerrari down your local shopping street and you’ll turn a lot of heads.

FERRARI 485 SPECIALE

Of course, out-and-out performance is something few people experience whatever they own, but for so many, it’s great to own a car that’s known to be capable of over 300 km/h (420 km/h in the Bugatti’s case) and will top 100 km/h in less than four seconds. As every exotic car owner knows, there is a penalty to be paid when it comes to touring. A road trip in a Lamborghini Aventador takes some very creative planning, especially for two people.

The obvious answer to the question posed is not to go for one class or the other, but to find room in the garage for an example of each. One could find great happiness in a Rolls-Royce Ghost and a McLaren 675LT, but even buying those two would involve a challenging decision-making process.

LAMBORGHINI HURACAN


BIG BANG HUBLOT’S

WRITTEN BY TONY WHITNEY IMAGES PROVIDED BY HUBLOT

HUBLOT BIG BANG CAVIAR GOLD


Hublot may not be the best known of luxury watchmakers, but sometimes, newer companies can outdo oldestablished premier brands with a combination of energy, innovation and creativity. The Swiss international watch and jewellry show Baselworld earlier this year saw the debut of a new timepiece – the Hublot Big Bang Caviar Gold with Diamonds and it typifies the Geneva company’s boldness, design savvy and horological expertise. Hublot (which is French for ‘porthole’) was founded in 1980 and initial fame was gained by the design of the first natural rubber strap in the watchmaking history. Rubber straps once characterized all Hublot watches, but in recent times, other materials like fine leathers have gained ground. The company grew rapidly when the charismatic Jean-Claude Biver took over as CEO in 2004 and it was he who piloted the Big Bang series of watches which were an instant success with their large size, exposed screws and rubber straps. The energetic Biver took Hublot to new heights and numerous awards for innovative design and the watches became very much the ones to own and show off. Today, Hublot is part of the big Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey (LVMH) group of luxury product manufacturers. Hublot is highly visible in the world of sports sponsorship and has a strong profile in Formula One auto racing, world and European soccer, skiing, athletics and NBA basketball. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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The Caviar Gold with Diamonds collection is aimed at ladies, and Caviar variants feature several case material options (including black ceramic) but the piece with an18-carat red gold case and diamonds is a newcomer. Typical Hublot features include exposed screws and the trademark rubber strap, though calf straps are optional. The bezel is set with 36 diamonds and even the screws are red gold.

The dial, with the date at the 3 o’clock position, is gold plated, as are the elegant hands with the second hand bearing the Hublot logo. The Heart of the watch is a Hublot self-winding movement of great precision and accuracy. Painstaking attention to detail is evident throughout the timepiece and even the clasp on the strap is red gold. Once the self-winding movement is charged, it has a 42-hour power reserve, impressive for a smaller watch.

While the Caviar with its opulent gold case and diamonds is an exquisite watch and costs upwards of $40,000, the timepiece by no means marks the outer limits of Hublot’s imaginative thinking. A few years ago, the company came up with its $1 million Black Caviar Big Bang with 501 baguette-cut black diamonds and beautifully sculpted 18-carat white gold case. It’s now among the classics of its time. In the years ahead, an everinnovative Hublot will surely bring even more highly desirable surprises to the rarefied world of haute horologie.


TALISMAN J E W E L S PIAGET’S NEW POSSESSION COLLECTION


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Piaget is expanding its line with the new Possession Collection. Made of pink gold and set with diamonds, the new collection is a source of inspiration for all women who follow their own rules. The Possession ring doubles up the ritual with two independent rotating bands. A project, a surprise, a moment of hesitation… the Possession ring shares everything. The Possession ring has a unique character, and echoes the expectations of today’s woman – a city girl free of all dictates, who changes from denim to cocktail wear in a blink of an eye, like Jessica Chastain, international ambassador for the Maison Piaget. With its avant-garde design, the Possession ring illustrates Piaget’s creative daring. The subtly asymmetrical effect of the double bands redefines the roundness of the ring and enhances its aesthetic power. Standing out in this new collection are two rings developed to the beat of a cosmopolitan agenda – that of a contemporary woman rushing from one board meeting and gala dinner to the next and from one end of the planet to the other. The first ring opts for a pairing of pink gold and brilliant-cut diamonds; while the more gemset second option instates a dialogue between one ring adorned with a row of diamonds and the other bearing the original central diamond.

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Old

THE EMPRESS HOTEL

MADE NEW AGAIN

SHAKING UP THE GRAND DAME OF VICTORIA’S INNER HARBOUR

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WRITTEN BY JANICE STRONG IMAGES PROVIDED BY FAIRMONT EMPRESS RENDERINGS PROVIDED BY HIRSH BEDNER ASSOCIATES SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

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The iconic Fairmont Empress Hotel has welcomed her guests with an Edwardian elegance for 108 years and over time, in a quest to keep up with the world around her, the Grand Dame of Victoria’s Inner Harbour has been renovated, refurbished, redesigned and revamped until she became more corporate than a character hotel. In July it was announced Fairmont Hotels and Resorts, along with its sister brands Raffles and Swissôtel, had been acquired by AccorHotels, one of the largest global hotels companies in the world. The purchase grows AccorHotels to more than 4,000 recognized luxury, midscale and economy hotels and resorts operating in more than 95 countries.

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The Empress is currently being restored in a $40 million, two-phase project that will modernize the property’s inner workings. The recently completed first Phase polishes up 235 guest rooms; increases the number of Fairmont Gold from 45 guestrooms to 65, expands the Gold Lounge and creates an outdoor terrace overlooking the harbour; features the opening of the Q at the Empress; and restores the Tea Lobby, now dubbed the Lobby Lounge.


FINE DINING, FINE SPACES Taking inspiration from the hotel’s historic architecture and interiors, while injecting a fresh, modern environment, Robert Puccini, founder of the Puccini Group and his design team worked with the rooms’ structural features and made careful choices on finishes and furniture to make the original architecture shine through, while updating the ambiance. In the brand new Q at the Empress Bar and Q at the Empress restaurant (Q for Queen and country) that meant working with ceiling pillars made from plaster and horsehair and painted to look like mahogany and adding silver highlights to the coffered ceiling. Leather banquettes provide seating around two bars, one made of quartzite accented with sculptural overhead lighting, and one that features satin brass detailing. A palette of jewel-tones glowing on the upholstery, along with heavy textures and prints, brings a gravitas to the space that is reminiscent of a more formal dining era. The veranda off the Q bar boasts Victoria’s best views of the Inner Harbour. “I really love the idea of bringing back the tearoom to its glory days and really using the hotel lobby,” says Puccini.

His team uncovered and refurbished carved lions head armchairs, refurbished the original tea tables and chandeliers, and, of course, brought back the palms. A central bar stocks tea and sweets during the day and morphs into a champagne bar for after dinner drinks and desserts. Restaurant Manager Doug Chant notes the menus in all four areas have gone contemporary modern classic. In the dining room, the menu focuses on local and sustainable ingredients, including herbs grown on the roof and honey produced onsite, along with seasonal offerings, which creates an ever-changing bill of fare. All of which are paired with a wine cellar that marries old world and new world vintages, with a focus on B.C. wines. Over in the Lobby Lounge, there is the legendary Afternoon Tea (scones, sandwiches, dainties and an impressive choice of teas), along with a seasonal dessert menu that includes the Empress Torte, soon to be world-famous due to the introduction of a custom chocolate in September that was developed in Paris by the hotel’s pastry chef.


WHAT’S IN A ROOM Upstairs, designers Hirsch Bedner Associates were also challenged to respect the past in their designs for the property’s more than 200 room types. Owner Nat Bosa “wanted us to bring a sophisticated modern design that was grounded in tradition with the elegant architecture and classic details that exist,” says Principal and lead designer Meghan Day.

Lacquered bookcases trimmed in bronze, a variety of seating arrangements, including private nooks uncovered during the restoration, marble tables, historic fireplaces and a communal table offer just the right combination of old-world charm and modern connectivity along with the sweeping views of the Inner Harbour.

As a result, the rooms were not changed, with original windows, mouldings and faux fireplaces restored. The bathrooms, however, all received a major upgrade including luxurious rain showers.

Gold guestrooms feature luxurious details like champagne brass accents and a palette of muted tones with pops of regal purple. Each guestroom also features a smoky Murano glass chandelier to add a touch of warmth, wing back chairs and contemporary wood tables.

Day’s team took its inspiration from the natural landscape of the city, she says, referencing Butchart Gardens, the romance of the Empress steamships and the rippling water of the Inner Harbour for its graphics and colour palette. The water is reflected in the carpet pattern of the rooms and the hallways throughout, while the romance is represented in the historic photos, posters and ephemera mounted on the hallway walls. Once past the reception desk, Fairmont Gold guests relax in the elegant lounge.

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Phase Two of the restoration will include a completely renovated reception area with floor-toceiling windows, check-in pods and a massive chandelier, along with updates to the health club, spa, public spaces, and the restoration of the remaining guestrooms. The work starts in October and is scheduled for completion in May 2017, when the “Old Lady’s” air of refined gentility and luxury will be renewed and refreshed again.


GREAT REAL ESTATE

THE

DEBATE

WRITTEN BY: AMANDA STUTT PHOTOGRAPHER: ALEX WABER IMAGES PROVIDED BY: ANGELL HASMAN & ASSOCIATES AND ROYAL LEPAGE SUSSEX

AN ANATOMY OF

VANCOUVER’S

HEATED HOUSING MARKET

LEFT TO RIGHT: MONIQUE BADUN, ERIC CHRISTIANSEN, WENDY TIAN AND MALCOLM HASMAN

H&L TALKS TO THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY’S

TOP SELLERS & KEY PLAYERS The rhetoric of real estate has prevailed in media headlines across Metro Vancouver as sales continue to skyrocket, the city demographic has become increasingly internationalized, developments are on the rise, and foreign investors are snapping up some of the best properties on the market. Many media reports are packed with hyperbole about a housing bubble, which can be defined simply as a run up in housing prices, something this city has certainly seen before.

Worries of an impending burst are palpable, and some reports have contained micro-level research that does little for the macro-level analysis. The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver’s monthly statistical reports analyze the average residential sale prices of detached homes, which by May 2016 had peaked at $1.74 million. The report stated that “Last month’s sales were 35.3 per cent above the 10-year sales average for the month and rank as the highest sales total on record for May”.

Meanwhile, also in May, Premier Christie Clark attended a trade mission in Asia to engage with foreign investors, accompanied by representatives from real estate brokerages Nu Stream Realty and Sutton West Coast Realty. In June, both Premier Clark and Mayor Gregor Robertson endorsed a proposed vacant property tax. And on July 25, the Provincial Government revealed surprise plans to tax foreign buyers 15 per cent on residential property purchases in the


Vancouver area – effective August 2 – without prior consultation with Ministers and real estate professionals. Indeed, the voices of real estate agents themselves, the lifeblood of the industry, have been missing from the dialogue, especially as reports of the practice of ‘shadow-flipping’ by some agents surfaced. For this story, H&L spoke exclusively with some of Vancouver’s top realtors, all of whom condemn shadow-flipping as an unethical practice the vast majority of agents have never participated in. They also share key insights into the intricacies of the Vancouver real estate market­­­­­­— arguably one of the hottest markets in the country. Vancouver real estate agents Malcom Hasman, Eric Christiansen, Jason Soprovich, Wendy Tian, Brock Smeaton and Monique Badun are collectively responsible for over a billion dollars in real estate sales in Vancouver.

While there was a divergence of opinion on the proposed vacant property tax, and whether the government should legislate to slow a market trend, all agree that the market is healthy, even through monthly sales and listings fluctuations in Vancouver’s many neighbourhoods. In this meeting of the minds, all the realtors we interviewed agree the most important traits a real estate agent can possess are integrity and professional expertise. They all say that their favourite parts of the job are the people they deal with and the entrepreneurial aspect. All emphasize that it is vital that a realtor be an expert on the demographics of the neighborhoods they are selling in, and that the key to success is putting in often grueling hours and being available to service their clients around the clock.


“The answer is not to tax foreign investment, not to tax vacant homes, the answer is to build more rapid transit to the outer lying areas and allow municipalities and areas of Vancouver to build more product­­, more homes,” he says. “It’s always a supply and demand issue. Politicians in British Columbia have spent a decade or more inviting the world, and foreign investors, to move to Vancouver and buy our real estate.” While these new taxes may or may not slow down sales to foreign investors, Hasman points to a Financial Post report, which stated that if real estate prices drop in Vancouver by 15 per cent, one in five people at the low end of the market who have mortgaged property in the last two years will be under water on their equity. “Is it becoming an expensive city? Yes. Is it the real estate agents’ fault? No. Real estate agents have become scapegoats,” Hasman says.

JASON SOPROVICH AND BROCK SMEATON OF ROYAL LEPAGE SUSSEX

VOICES OF THE INDUSTRY Licensed in 1984, Malcolm Hasman of Angell Hasman & Associates has orchestrated some of the biggest sales in the city. Hasman sold the Fairmont Pacific Rim Penthouse to the Dubai Royal family for $25 million in 2013, and in 2014 participated in the promotion of a private residence in Point Grey, which sold for $51.8 million. “There has been so much discussion over how expensive the Vancouver real estate market is because of the wealth of the immigration that’s come into Vancouver, but I believe that no market goes up without a consolidation or a correction along the way,” Hasman says. Despite fluctuations, Hasman believes that real estate in Vancouver will be more expensive in five years than it is today. “I’m not a believer that we are in a bubble by any means whatsoever. We are one of the most select, one of the most sought-after cities in the world to live in,” he says. To the influx of immigration, whether it is coming in from China, Europe or South America, Hasman points out that this happens to every major metropolis in the world. “I see Vancouver as continuing to grow, and the argument over house prices and the unaffordability for local residents, these are just growing pains as Vancouver becomes a bigger and bigger city,” Hasman says.

Jason Soprovich of Royal LePage Sussex started in real estate in Vancouver in 1993, and says that while the majority of real estate purchases he is seeing are for principal residences for families, there is a segment of the market that is investing on a larger scale than in previous years. “The dynamic of the market has changed to a certain degree­­— Vancouver has had a perfect storm. In this environment we have seen an influx of immigrants moving into the location and purchasing, because of low interest rates, geographical appeal and a lifestyle that affords them a safe haven,” he says. Soprovich believes the proposed vacancy tax has validity and should be hashed out, but adds, “What you don’t want to do is douse the market, and then all of a sudden you’ve lost your market.” To the Vancouver housing bubble, Soprovich says the language has been used as a dramatic headline for media purposes. “When you investigate a market as a whole — if you’re in it on a daily basis- has the frothiness subsided to a certain degree? Yes. It has slowed down — normalized,” he says. “Vancouver is always going to have a great level of people investing into it purely based on lifestyle and location.” Wendy Tian of Sutton Group West Coast, a former accountant who started in real estate in 2010, quickly rose to the top of the ranks. Tian says the majority of her clients are looking for homes for their families — for their children to go to school. On the proposed vacancy tax, she questions how the Government would be able to define a vacant house, as many foreign investors are present for portions of the year. “This policy could push them to rent out to people who really need it,” Tian says. On the Vancouver housing bubble Tian says, “I don’t think there’s much of a bubble ­­­ — with the population of Vancouver, based on statistics, we get 30,000 people each year from other countries and other Provinces.”

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Brock Smeaton of Royal LePage Sussex started in the 1980s, a time he says real estate was not a business of young people, and he notes that this trend has shifted, as the business now attracts more millennials. Despite being told he was too young and would never make it, Smeaton sold a house his first day on the job. He says he carved a marketing niche that set him apart, as he “always had more information than other realtors.” “Market knowledge is critical. I see so many transactions today, so many realtors representing people, particularly at high price ranges, who really have no solid grasp of market values, trends or market history,” Smeaton says. On the new tax, Smeaton is skeptical about Governments getting involved in any kind of industry. “Typically they always get in too late, which I think perhaps is the case now, but there has to be something to protect the local market to a certain extent,” he says. Smeaton believes international investors should contribute to the local economy, and increased taxation on foreign ownership is fair. “We’ve sold a lot of real estate in this city to a lot of people from outside, which is great, but I think at some point we are going to see the city price itself outside of affordability for local people.” On the shadow-flipping controversy, Smeaton says the practice is one that most realtors have never participated in. “Right now the industry is getting such a black smear because of a small group of people who want to do business in a way that we’ve never done in the past,” he says. On the housing bubble, Smeaton believes that in the long term, there are always going to be people who want to live and own property in Vancouver. “In the short term there has been a tremendous amount of speculation. Real estate markets don’t stay flat, they either move up or they move down. Prices have gotten pretty heated.” Smeaton believes that long-term real estate is a great investment in Vancouver, but that, “There are going to be some ups and downs along the way.” Monique Badun of Sotheby’s International Realty is a Westside specialist, licensed in 1988. Badun sees many of her clients hedging for their children, purchasing not just as an investment, but with family members in mind. On the proposed vacancy tax, Badun questions what the checks and balances will be to regulate it. “Bottom line it goes against individual rights,” she says.

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“I SEE VANCOUVER AS CONTINUING TO GROW, AND THE ARGUMENT OVER HOUSE PRICES AND THE UNAFFORDABILITY FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS, THESE ARE JUST GROWING PAINS AS VANCOUVER BECOMES A BIGGER AND BIGGER CITY,”

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Badun believes the Vancouver real estate market is in a holding pattern. She says prices have risen quickly and dramatically, but doesn’t think that means there will be a drop. “There’s too much demand,” she says. Eric Christiansen of Angell Hasman & Associates, who started in real estate in 1990, says he ‘analyzes stats like crazy’. “Capital growth has been huge,” Christiansen points out. He estimates two thirds of the sales he sees are for habitation, while some international buyers let their properties sit vacant while they wait for the value to increase before re-selling. Christiansen owns a condo, but points out that the building’s strata council doesn’t allow him to rent it out.

“I’d love it if the government came in and said I have to rent out my unit — I’d rent it in a second, but they won’t let me, [so] if they implement a tax on me when strata’s not letting me rent it — that would be unfair,” he says. Christiansen believes anyone who says definitively ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to whether Vancouver is in a housing bubble, “Is just making up an answer.” Christiansen acknowledges that the dynamics of the Vancouver market have shifted dramatically in recent years. “We’ve become a global destination,” he says. “It’s not just a local market anymore, like who’s buying and selling in Westmount, it’s who’s buying and from all over the world — I believe it’s going

to continue because now we’ve been discovered.” Over the years, and especially since the 2010 Olympics, Vancouver has transformed from a coastal city into a global gateway, attracting travellers and investors from all over the world. “It’s not just your Canadian real estate market or Vancouver real estate market anymore — it’s a global market,” Christiansen points out. Like other global cities such as San Francisco, New York or London, housing accessibility and affordability for local residents is an omnipresent issue. As Vancouver grows and evolves, foreign investors will continue to flock here, as they have been consistently courted by the Government through diplomatic engagement, and through world


events and conferences hosted by the city. The same day the Province announced the additional property transfer tax for foreign buyers, Real Estate of Board of Greater Vancouver President Dan Morrison released a statement. “Housing affordability concerns all of us who live in the region. Implementing a new real estate tax, however, with just eight days’ notice and no consultation with the professionals who serve home buyers and sellers every day needlessly injects uncertainty into the market.”

As the government continues to enact legislation in an attempt to cool down Vancouver’s heated housing market, few real estate professionals believe the new tax will stop the influx of foreign investment. Premier Clark has stated the new tax aims to prevent locals from being priced out of the Vancouver housing market. Will revenues from the new foreign buyers tax ultimately benefit the working class, and make housing in Vancouver more affordable and accessible for local residents? That remains to be seen.

“IT’S NOT JUST YOUR CANADIAN REAL ESTATE MARKET OR VANCOUVER REAL ESTATE MARKET ANYMORE- IT’S A GLOBAL MARKET”


WRITTEN BY NORA O’MALLEY PORTRAIT BY AARON PEDERDEN PRODUCT IMAGES BY CORA-LEA BLACK

FASHIONING F I N E C H O C O L AT E HOW COCOANISTA JAQUELINE JACEK CHANNELS JOY


If you could transform a thunderstorm into a box of chocolate, what would it look like? Perhaps not the easiest task for left-brainers out there, but for a creative mind like Edmontonbased chocolatier Jacqueline Jacek, the decadent shapes can be visualized without demur. “Automatically I think lightning and yellow. Yellow with a punch,” said Jacek. “We need something sharp in there too. I’m not a huge fan of doing this, but with lightning I would consider it, is doing a really sharp lemon drop of oil in there and putting really lemony pop rocks on top so when you bit into it you get the pow.” For rain she would have something soothing, melt- in-your-mouth like chamomile tea or blueberry jasmine. “When I think rain, I think what do I like to do on a rainy day? And that’s read a book and drink a cup of tea,” she said.

The gifted chocolatier founded JACEK Chocolate Couture in 2009 from her homebased studio in Sherwood Park. In 2012, she expanded to a commercial studio/boutique and in 2014 her enterprise grew to include its flagship store located in the heart of Edmonton’s downtown shopping district. “I feel like I have the best job in the world. I feel like I’m never working,” Jacek told H&L. Her handmade edible creations have since won her numerous awards, including the Don Neil Young Award for Entrepreneurship (2011), the Business of the Year Award (2014) by the Sherwood Park Chamber of Commerce, the Leaders Award by Business in Edmonton (2015), and she was recognized by Global News Edmonton as a Woman of Vision (2015).

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Last October, she partnered with Edmonton fashion designer Nicole Campre, founder of Workhall Studio to host a fashion and chocolate pairing. Models showcased garments down the runway, and after each look, guests were served one of Jacek’s new flavours. “It sold out really quickly,” Jacek said. “And I’m working on another one, but it won’t be until May 2017.” Jacek, who earned a marketing degree in New Zealand, has a knack for combining creativity with business acumen. “I had my first business when I was eleven. It was designing hats,” she recalls. Like most successful entrepreneurs, she’s quick to lend praise to the people that helped her grow her startup into a leader in the boutique chocolate industry. “Honestly, nothing that I’ve done can just be credited to me. I have an amazing team. I think one of my best qualities as a business owner is being able to find the right people to really help drive the fruition of joy.” “Our northern star is to serve joy to one million people by July 31st, 2024,” she quipped. Alongside her team, Jacek counts any purchase of a 6-piece box of chocolates or larger as one serving of joy.

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ONDA

TA K E S T O T H E

SKY

What began as a series of design sketches by the Honda Aircraft Company President & CEO Michimasa Fujino in 1997 has come to fruition 19 years later as HondaJets, Honda’s first commercial aircraft, take to international skies. Deliveries began in December 2015 at company headquarters in Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Honda Aircraft Company has been steadily ramping up production since receiving FAA type certification for the HondaJet last year. This summer, HondaJet landed at hangers in airports across Western Canada and in Toronto. Select media and prospective buyers toured the aircraft, getting a firsthand feel for the company’s foray into the world of aviation.


aviation

WRITTEN BY AMANDA STUTT IMAGES PROVIDED BY HONDAJET

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The sleek structure of the fuselage makes for better fuel efficiency, and the Over The Wing Engine Mount (OTWEM) configuration is the result of nearly 20 years of design innovation. External dimensions are 4.54 metres by 12.99 metres, with a 12.12-metre wingspan. The HondaJet reaches a maximum cruise speed of 486 miles per hour, and reaches the highest altitude (43,000 feet) in its class. The OTWEM configuration improves performance and fuel efficiency by reducing aerodynamic drag. The OTWEM design also reduces cabin sound, and allows for optimal cabin space. The senses are assuaged inside the HondaJets, as the pleasant ‘new car’ smell greets passengers, and comfortable, creamy white leather seats await. The cabin seats four, and the dimensions are 1.46 metres high and 1.52-metres wide. Multi-axis seats slide, shift and lock without track resistance, and electronically dimmable windows self tint on command. There is a private aft lavatory with a solid-surface vanity and washbasin. A total of 66 cubic feet of stowage space in the nose and aft compartments mean packing light isn’t an issue on the HondaJet.

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There are folding desks to create workspace, and more than seven feet of space from seat to seat in the club configuration. Pilots will find themselves in a proverbial ‘corner office’, with ergonomic design and state of the art situational awareness. The cockpit facilitates a single or two-pilot operation, and both crew seats have a retractable armrest. Honda HA-420 HondaJets are now available for private sale in the Canadian market.


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THE RUSSIAN ROCKET

CATCHING UP WITH RETIRED CANUCKS LEGEND

PAVEL BURE 86

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WRITTEN BY LUCAS AYKROYD IMAGES PROVIDED BY CHAMPIONAT & NHL INTERVIEW TRANSLATED BY ALEX GOVOROV WITH FILES FROM ALENA SHILOVA SPECIAL THANKS TO MAX ZEMJETIN


FEATURE

In his 1990s prime, Pavel Bure was the National Hockey League’s deadliest and most exciting goal-scorer until knee injuries ended his professional career in 2003. Bure, now 45, currently heads up the World Legends Hockey League in his native Moscow. It showcases retired NHL and international greats from Russia, Finland, the Czech Republic, Sweden, Slovakia and Germany. Russia defeated the Czechs 8-5 in the inaugural final on January 30. Bure won the playoff scoring title with six goals and an assist in three games. “Our first season was very successful,” Bure said. “It was nice to be a part of Team Russia and win the championship. Also, we got positive feedback from other teams, which is great. Lots of fans came to watch the games and there was lots of media attention. We expect this league to grow. Next year France will join us, and in two years we expect Switzerland to be the eighth team.” Adding North American teams is a work in progress for the former superstar of the Vancouver Canucks, Florida Panthers and New York Rangers. However, Bure still comes back to visit the continent where he notched 437 career goals in 702 NHL games. In September, the Russian Rocket hits Toronto, and not to check out the Hockey Hall of Fame, into which he was inducted in 2012. He’ll root for Russia at the first World Cup of Hockey in 12 years. The Russians settled for bronze while hosting the IIHF World Championship in Moscow in May, so September is a chance for national vindication.

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feature

“As a fan, I want to see the best players compete at the highest level,” said Bure, who led the 1998 Olympics with nine goals. “I enjoy watching unique people in hockey, basketball and soccer.” Bure is now married to model Alina Khasanova, and they have a three-year-old son, Pavel Jr. He lists Brazil as his most memorable recent travel destination, and it was a soccer-related trip. “We went there for the World Cup in 2014 with the owner of the Vancouver Canucks,” he said. “He invited me there. He flew from Canada and I came from Moscow. Fantastic emotions. Soccer in Brazil is just like hockey in Canada – it is a religion, so it was cool to be a part of it.” Even during his hockey days, Bure was an avid tennis player, and he’s kept it up in retirement. In December, he played in the Formula TX mixed doubles tournament in Moscow, which paired male hockey players with female tennis pros. Alongside 2004 French Open singles winner Anastasia Myskina, Bure won the final against long-time NHLer Andrei Kovalenko and three-time Grand Slam doubles champion Elena Vesnina.

“VANCOUVER IS A GREAT HOCKEY C PEOPLE ARE PASSIO above

Bure in 1994

Bure in action at the 2016 IIHF World Championships in St. Petersburg

opposite


Y CITY, AND SSIONATE ABOUT THEIR TEAM.”


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Naturally, Bure will always be best known for his dazzling exploits on the ice. To this day, he ranks fourth among modernera NHLers in goals-per-game (.623), trailing only Mike Bossy, Mario Lemieux and Alexander Ovechkin. He names former Soviet contemporaries like Igor Larionov, Alexei Kasatonov, Sergei Fedorov and Alexander Mogilny as some of his friends in the hockey world today.

“That was a great time,” Bure said. “I got a chance to play in the best league in the world – I think it always will be the best league in the world. I just had to take this chance. Vancouver is a great hockey city, and people are passionate about their team. I still stay in touch with Canucks players and managers. I try to fly to Vancouver at least once a year. It is really far from Moscow, though, so it is not easy. I had too many trips during my career.”

He and Mogilny spent three seasons together in Vancouver, where Bure made his NHL debut in 1991-92, winning the Calder Trophy as the rookie of the year. Bure’s enthusiasm is palpable when he looks back.

When he helped lead the Canucks to the 1994 Stanley Cup final, he was known for his extraordinary fitness. (A shirtless photo in the Vancouver Sun, taken during team fitness testing, became a popular collector’s item.) He doesn’t hesitate when asked to name

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his most challenging workout: “We had to run 400 metres 12 times in a row with short breaks. That was unreal. We were kind of scared of that. It was tough even for the Russian Rocket!” Today, Bure’s priority is family life. He enjoys seeing his younger brother, fellow ex-NHLer Valeri Bure, and his wife, Candace Cameron-Bure of Full House fame, along with their three kids. Valeri, 41, is now a successful California winemaker.

his role as the general manager of the Russian Olympic hockey team, which finished fourth under him in 2006. “Never say never, but at the moment I’m not considering these options,” Bure said. Ever elusive, the Russian Rocket lives life at his own pace.

In terms of Bure’s own future aspirations, he has no immediate plans to continue his family’s 19th-century luxury watchmaking business, which he briefly revived in the 90s. Nor will he reprise

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DESTINATIONS

THE RED CITY

MOROCCO’S MARRAKESH: VIBRANT

ANCIENT MYSTICAL

WRITTEN BY CLAIRE NEWELL IMAGES PROVIDED BY FOUR SEASONS HOTEL MARRAKESH & CLAIRE NEWELL

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Morocco’s Marrakesh is an imperial city full of dazzling sights, sounds and tastes both ancient and modern. Part of the allure of visiting this amazing city is that during the day you can get lost in a labyrinth of souks in the medina and in the evening you can dance in a chic, modern shishascented nightclub. Marrakesh surprised me in so many wonderful ways: the dichotomy of old world charm and modern luxury made it the perfect escape to experience history, culture, adventure, great food, nightlife, shopping and relaxation. It is now on my list as one of the top three cities I have ever visited, and I can’t wait to go back.


IF YOU ARE VISITING MARRAKESH FOR THE FIRST TIME, HERE ARE SOME MUSTSEE LANDMARKS THAT WILL GIVE YOU AN INITIAL APPRECIATION OF THE RED CITY’S RICH HISTORY AND CULTURE:

PLACE JEMAA EL’ FNA For centuries, this extraordinary square has been the heart of Marrakesh. Every night the area fills with musicians, dancers, storytellers, fortune tellers and snake charmers – each drawing a crowd of astonished onlookers. THE MEDINA SOUKS One of the world’s most famous shopping districts, the medina (the old city) and its souks provide a wide range of exotic goods, including fabric, leatherwork and jewellry. KOUTOUBIA MOSQUE The largest mosque in Marrakesh, koutoubia is famed for its magnificent minaret. Construction on the tower reportedly started in 1150. Today, it is still a functioning mosque. BAHIA PALACE A masterpiece of Moroccan architecture, this palace was built by two powerful grand viziers at the end of the 19th century, and gives a great impression of the lifestyle of Moroccan noblemen. The name means “palace of the favorite.” MAJORELLE GARDEN This world-famous gorgeous garden was created by the french painter jacques majorelle in the 1920s, and then magnificently restored by designer Yves Saint Laurent in the 1980s.

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CULINARY HIGHLIGHTS: Finding memorable places to eat is always key to me when visiting a new city, and Marrakesh didn’t disappoint. Here are a few restaurants not to be missed: DAR YACOUT A real Moroccan experience – it is set in a grand old traditional house with an enchanting setting, private lounges and an amazing panoramic view from the terrace of the medina and the koutoubia mosque. CAFÉ DE LA POSTE A french touch – for a hint of french colonial Marrakesh, this is hard to beat. From pergola to mezzanine, in a warm retro and glamorous atmosphere. PALAIS JAD MAHAL Trendy – with the feeling of an Indian palace, it is both a restaurant and a club. Moroccan and Thai cuisines top the menu, and after 11pm the restaurant becomes a lounge-bar, with a live orchestra show and belly dancers.

RETAIL HIGHLIGHTS: Marrakesh is known as one of the world’s most thrilling places to shop - from the historic souks of the medina’s to new neighbourhoods brimming with made-in-Morocco treasures, especially in the souks. Here are some of the best places for retail therapy in the Red City: SOUKS IN MEDINA You can feel the vibrant energy of Marrakesh in the souks of the Medina, featuring tailor-made caftans, lanterns, leather bags, souvenirs and more. GUELIZ In the new town of Marrakesh, Gueliz offers a dramatic contrast to the traditional Medina. A blend of old and new, the area features two small shopping centres: Carre Eden and Marrakesh Plaza. ALMAZAR MALL (ZONE DE L’AGUEDAL) The centre, the first of its kind in Morocco, is a completely covered outdoor mall which offers the widest choice of shopping in one convenient location, from the latest in international fashion to groceries.

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HAPPY TRAVELS!

KEY PROPERTIES: The choice of luxury accommodation in Marrakesh continues to grow every year. Here are a few spectacular 5-star properties I fell in love with: FOUR SEASONS RESORT MARRAKESH A modern, elegant, luxury 40-acre gated resort just four kilometres from Place Jemaa El’ Fna. LA MAMOUNIA An opulent, Moorish-inspired, classic hotel located in the heart of the city. ROYAL MONSOUR 53 lavish individual two-storey riads with courtyard patios, sitting rooms and roof terraces with plunge pools. AMANJENA Modern resort property with lavish 1 or 2 bedroom Moroccan-style villas in palm tree-shaded gardens.

DAY EXCURSIONS: Morocco has so many interesting cities and villages in very different landscapes – ranging from the Atlantic coast to the desert, mountains and valleys. Most are accessible within just a few hours, and they can provide easy day trips from Marrakesh. Here are a few worth considering: CASABLANCA This city on the northern Atlantic coast is Morocco’s main business centre and port. Visit the world’s largest mosque, colorful markets and unique art-deco districts. Located three hours from Marrakesh. AGADIR This charming resort city on Morocco’s southwest coast boasts 300 days a year of sunshine, beautiful beaches and a seaside promenade lined with cafés and restaurants that are famous for seafood. Located two hours from Marrakesh. OURIKA VALLEY Providing a quiet contrast to Marrakesh and much cooler temperatures, this valley sits at the foothills of the Atlas Mountains. The small village of Ourika has a river, cascades and numerous hiking opportunities. Located 45 minutes from Marrakesh.

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nautical

WALLYPOWER Y

A

C

H

T

It boasts an astonishing 17,000-horsepower engine, can storm over the water at 60 knots, and though it may look like a naval stealth vessel, it has all the plush attributes of a luxury cruising yacht. It’s the 118 Wallypower and it might well be the fastest and most distinctive motor yacht on the planet.

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WRITTEN BY TONY WHITNEY IMAGES BY WALLY POWER


NAUTICAL

WALLYPOWER

THE TOP DECK SEATING AREA

Monaco-based Wally Yachts is a relatively new name on the international luxury yacht scene, having been founded in 1994 by Italian industrialist Luca Bassani. Sailing yachts were the original priority, but the company has increasingly segued into high-performance motor yachts, of which the flagship is the 118 WallyPower. The list of Wally Yacht customers includes such luminaries as Gianni Agnelli and Juan Carlos 1 of Spain. The yachts are built in Italy, a country with a lengthy reputation for fine luxury vessels.

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The ultra-speedy craft was designed using the most advanced development services available, including the noted SSPA simulation tank testing facility in Gothenburg, Sweden and no less than the Ferrari wind tunnel at Maranello in Italy. The vertical bow stem was designed to pierce the waves, a much-needed attribute at the speeds this beauty is capable of. The deep V-profiled hull is glass fibre and the deck and superstructure use carbon fibre composites for light weight and great rigidity. Thanks to these hybrid


nt g at s, p n d

THE INTERIOR LOUNGE

construction techniques, the boat displaces only 95 tons, low for its size, power and level of interior luxury. Powering the US $33 million seagoing beast in the most powerful variant of the 118 WallyPower are three gas turbine engines fed by a pair of huge air vents. These big angular vents look as though they were borrowed from an F-117 stealth fighter and are probably the result of all that work in the

Ferrari wind tunnel. The vents help reduce turbulence under power and vibration levels are reported to be surprisingly low. Each engine drives a Rolls-Royce steerable water jet. With a full tank of 22,000-litres aboard, the boat has a range of 1,500 nautical miles at 9 knots, but crank it up to 60 knots and this drops to 300 nautical miles, a penalty most owners would surely be happy to accept. A variant with twin diesels is available, but this still costs US$22 million.

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The cockpit has more the aura of a luxury sailing boat than a power craft and that’s what the designers sought. The rest of the interior takes luxury yacht decor to new levels and is both tasteful and modernistic, combining roominess and practicality with an open, airy feeling. No surprise when considering that there’s a 360-degree view from the dining area. The owner’s stateroom has a skylight, king-sized bed and two en-suite bathrooms. The galley is all stainless steel

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and includes a messing area for the crew. Even when powering along in such a magnificent piece of naval architecture as the 118 WallyPower, the owner and guests will want to go ashore now and again, and when that’s called for, a tender and crane are hidden in a compartment below the deck to maintain the craft’s sleek appearance. Ranking among the world’s most desirable luxury yachts, this award-winning speedster is quite possibly the best ride you’ll ever have — unless you happen to race offshore powerboats.


TECH

ENGINEERING

THE FUTURE ARCA SPACE CORPORATION’S

ARCABOARD

BREAKS NEW GROUND

WRITTEN BY

gail johnson images provided by arca space corporation

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TECH

IT WAS A TRIP TO A RUGGED MOUNTAIN RANGE IN NEW MEXICO THAT CONVINCED DUMITRU POPESCU THAT

PEOPLE SHOULD BE ABLE TO FLOAT ACROSS LAND.

“I was together with our chief operating officer at the Organ Mountains near Las Cruces to take some photos, and his son said, ‘Dad, it would be awesome if we could have a hover board to hover over rough terrain,’” recalls the CEO of ARCA Space Corporation, a New Mexico-based company that creates the stateof-the-art, commercially available products. “I said ‘Oh yeah, we can do this. The technology is there.”

ARCA turned that boy’s dream into reality with the development of the ArcaBoard, the world’s first commercially available personal hover board. Step on top and you might feel like a superhero as you’re lifted up off the ground by 36 high-power electric-ducted fans with a rocket engine-like thrust (200 kilogram force, or 430 pounds). Hovering in a suit and tie, Popescu gave ArcaBoard’s first public presentation in Monaco in April 2016. The rectangular device, which resembles an oversize iPhone, has a built-in stabilization unit that makes it easy to manoeuver, but you can turn that system off and steer it entirely with your own body, using your weight and balance to travel above the ground, over land, water, snow or ice.

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At 272 horsepower, the ArcaBoard is more powerful than the majority of cars. Aside from the revolutionary technology required to make it possible for people to fly, designing the shape of the board proved to be a challenge in itself. It took thousands of hours of creating and testing different structures, with the team settling on a platform slightly larger than a skateboard measuring 57 inches long and 30 inches wide. At six inches thick, it provides stability and durability while safely containing the tremendous power within. “When we first started designing the shape of the ArcaBoard, we wanted to put the user first,” says ARCA Space chief operating officer Chris Lang. “We knew we wanted the board to have a friendly, familiar shape. We wanted to focus on the rider’s experience. We wanted to make sure that they didn’t have to worry about any technical details.”


The fans, controllers, batteries and proximity sensors generate a significant amount of heat, which is dissipated with a high-performance cooling system. Having so many high-power fans ensures there are enough motors to take over even in the case of multiple motor failures, to keep riders safe. The ArcaBoard comes in gold, green and blue and costs $14,900 USD. Travelling one foot above ground, it has a maximum endurance of six minutes and reaches a speed of 12.5 miles per hour. The maximum rider weight, meanwhile, is 243 pounds. The board takes six hours to recharge with the included charger, but $4,500 USD gets you a wireless docking station that charges the board in an hour. “I always wanted to create commercially available products for the masses,” Popescu says. “With the ArcaBoard, ARCA is not only able to create amazing technologies but is actually engineering the future.”

“WE KNEW WE WANTED THE BOARD TO HAVE A FRIENDLY, FAMILIAR SHAPE. WE WANTED TO FOCUS ON THE RIDER’S EXPERIENCE.”

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EYE-POPPING ACCENT PILLOWS From Robert Allen Design, the trim is the high note in this enchanting symphony of design. We love the drenched colour trim on this eyepopping fuchsia and muted grey coloured pillow palette. Available at fabricana.

Objects Desire of


THAMES PATH EARRINGS These stunning, exquisitely cut Thames Path diamond drop earrings are as mystical and unforgettable as a stroll on the Thames River. Available at De Beers.

BRINKAUS RENAISSANCE STACK Multi-coloured gemstone Renaissance rings with diamond accents set in 18kt white and yellow gold bands. New world meets old, blending the nuances of exceptional craftspeople with time honoured techniques. The culmination of each creative journey is a beautiful object of art. Available at Brinkaus.

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THE MILANO Italy and artistic mastery are synonymous. Milano is a tribute to the country that enlightened the world with the gifts of Michelangelo and Da Vinci. The ornate body of Milano is composed entirely of Italian castings. Filigree openwork gives these baroque castings a unique, lace-like quality. Available at Swarovski Lighting.

#GREEK DESIGN ARRIVES AT VERSACE HOME For Versace Home, #GREEK is used to create the utmost elegant living spaces. The new #GREEK sofa is sharp and refined, in grey cashmere, quilted with the greek key motif.

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MIND BLOWING SOUND The Beolab 90 blends world-class design and acoustics into a powerful digital loudspeaker. This intelligent loudspeaker has clarity, range and spectacular sound staging. Regardless of room placement or listening position, these speakers deliver mind-blowing sound. Available at Commerical Electronics.

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BEAUTIFUL FROM ALL ANGLES Sleek, modular design and a whole new colour concept characterize these new stereo systems. Smooth angles replace the bulky black stereos of the past. The A9 is crafted like furniture and brightens up any space. There is no need to sacrifice sound- these systems deliver the same signature ‘bang’. Available at Bang and Olufsen

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