Page 1

TEXAS A&M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & KINESIOLOGY

FALL 2012


Howdy! The name of our department magazine is particularly appropriate this year as we have literally been on the move! Over the last few months, most of our Health Education, Kinesiology, and Sports Management faculty, staff, and graduate assistants as well as non-physiology labs, centers, and institutes have moved to the third floor of the Blocker Building. First aid, athletic training, exercise physiology, and biomechanics teaching labs as well as research labs for five exercise physiology faculty members have been moved to the second floor of Heldenfels Hall. We have also renovated about 6,000 sq. ft. in the Research Park adjacent to the Exercise & Sport Nutrition Lab to house Dr. Nicolaas Deutz, Dr. Mariëlle Engelen, and their research group who have come from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences to Texas A&M University to establish a Center for Translational Research in Aging and Longevity. Finally, construction is underway on our 115,000 sq. ft. Physical Education Activity Program (PEAP) building that will be built across the street from Reed Arena, on the corner of John Kimbrough Blvd and Penberthy Blvd. Construction is scheduled to be completed at the end of July 2013, and we plan to move our PEAP faculty from the G. Rollie White Coliseum to their new building in time for the fall 2013 semester. In addition to this exciting news, we had a record breaking year in terms of teaching, research, and service last year. Our faculty taught 1,600 classes to over 2,500 undergraduate and graduate majors and minors and 25,000 non-majors. This ranks us in the top three at the university in terms of the number of students taught and credit hours generated. Our students continually rate our courses very high on student teaching evaluations (i.e., 4.7±0.2 on a 5.0 scale), and employers view our graduates as highly trained and very well prepared. Our faculty and students were also heavily involved in department, college, university, community, and professional service. A number of our faculty members held leadership positions in their professional organizations, and several of our students and faculty members received awards for their teaching, research, and/or service. Thus, in a time when some may question the productivity of university professors, our department is a shining example of how faculty members and their students can make an impact through high quality teaching, scholarship, and professional engagement. As you can see, HLKN is certainly on the move and making an impact through teaching, research, and service! I hope you enjoy reading about some of the programs, activities, faculty, and students that make our department one of the best in the nation. We appreciate your support as we work to transform lives through the practice and study of physical activity, health, and sport. Gig ‘em, Richard B. Kreider, Ph.D., FACSM, FISSN Professor & Head

On The Cover: An artist’s rendering of the Department’s new Physical Education Activity Program building. The new building is scheduled to be ready for students by Fall 2013.


TEXAS A&M DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & KINESIOLOGY

FALL 2012

Contents Bright Days Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Location changes highlight a higher profile for HLKN on campus

9

Welcome! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Anthony Boucher & Kelly Wilson join HLKN faculty

Making History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Record-breaking year for HLKN

Aging Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Deutz hired to develop the Center on Translation Research on Aging & Longevity

10

Spring Lecture Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2012 Spring Lecture Series & Special Events

More Than Just Left Turns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Research helps NASCAR pit crews take more checkered flags

Helping First Responders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 FITLIFE program provides heart health awareness to local firefighters

13

Students As Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 HLKN majors get the chance to take over kinesiology class

Ready, Set, Crawl! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Creating an infant-friendly home that fuels baby’s development

Q&A: Ledric Sherman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Double duty as a health graduate student and an instructor in the Physical Education

16

Activity Program

Sanchez Falls for Skydiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 When not in the lab, Ph.D. student Brittany Sanchez competes as a skydiver

Giving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 How you can give back to the CEHD and HLKN

Congratulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 2011-2012 Teaching and research award winners

18

Current External Funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22


Bright Days Ahead Location changes highlight a higher profile for HLKN on campus The words “on the move” do not just describe the magazine you are currently reading; they also describe the direction of the Department of Health & Kinesiology. Many changes are in progress that will benefit students, faculty and staff for years to come. Here’s a highlight of what will be happening in the near future. Future Physical Education Activity Program building

Since 1980, the department has called the Tom and Joan Read Building home. Built during the final expansion of the east side stands of Kyle Field, Read has been home to the bulk of physical education classes for the university, as well as offices for faculty, advising and business staff. Faculty and staff said goodbye to the Read Building at the beginning of this summer. This is when most of Health & Kinesiology moved to the John R. Blocker Building, on Ireland Street near University Drive. The Department of Health & Kinesiology is on the third floor, formerly housed by agricultural economics. Virtually all health education, kinesiology and sport management faculty, along with all essential parts of the department, are housed in Blocker.

The new aging center will be located in Research Park

While virtually all offices are gone from the Read Building, it will serve the department for another year. Read will still be used by the Physical Education Activity Program (PEAP). Faculty offices for PEAP also remain in place at G. Rollie White Coliseum. However, a new era for physical activity will begin with the construction of a new physical education building. The new as yet to be named building will be constructed near the corner of Penberthy Road and John Kimbrough Boulevard. The PEAP building will have enough court space for 12 badminton courts, six volleyball courts, or four basketball courts, three weight rooms, and four special use rooms. Other features include rooms for fencing, gymnastics, self-defense, dance, yoga, Pilates, and boot camp activities. There will also be an outdoor boot camp area. Offices for faculty and graduate students in PEAP will also reside in the new building. The 115,000 square foot facility is scheduled for completion by July 2013.

Meeting and special use rooms for students are there as well. For the first time since the early days of the department, the bulk of people will be housed in one location. Wet lab and testing areas currently in the Read Building moved to Heldenfels Hall. Other lab areas in different locations, such as Bone Biology Laboratory, Muscle Biology Laboratory and the Exercise and Sport Nutrition Laboratory, will remain in their current locations.

Wet lab and testing areas are in Heldenfels Hall

2

A new aging center, headed by Dr. Nicolaas Deutz, is located next to the Exercise and Sport Nutrition Lab in Research Park on west campus.

Faculty and all essential parts of the department are housed in the John R. Blocker building


Welcome! Anthony Boucher & Kelly Wilson join HLKN faculty The Department of Health & Kinesiology at Texas A&M is pleased to announce the addition of Anthony Boucher, Ph.D., MPT, ATC, LAT to the department as an assistant professor. Boucher will work in the Graduate Athletic Training Program in the department. He most recently served as the director of the same program at Baylor University. “Dr. Boucher’s background as a clinician as well as his teaching, research and mentoring experience will allow him to make a significant contribution to the new MSAT program,” said program director Lori Greenwood. “Dr. Boucher’s research interests in the use of musculoskeletal ultrasound, blood flow Doppler, and EMG triggered electrical stimulation will contribute to athletic training student education and promote collaboration with other HLKN faculty.”

The department would also like to welcome Dr. Kelly Wilson as a tenure-track Associate Professor of Health Education. Dr. Wilson was a graduate of our Health Education Ph.D. program in 2004 and has been a professor at Texas State University since then. Dr. Wilson’s research interests include child and adolescent health status and behaviors; minority health issues and health disparities; teen pregnancy prevention; and, pregnant and parenting adolescents. Dr. Wilson has published 11 papers in peer-reviewed journals (with nine others in review), two books, and three book chapters; has been a PI, Co-PI, or Co-I on projects totaling more than $1.2 million in funding; and, has made over 70 presentations at professional conferences. Dr. Wilson has taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate health education courses, mentored a number of graduate students, and has held committee and/or leadership positions in the American School Health Association, National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Eta Sigma Gamma, the American Association, Texas Health Association, and TAHPERD.

3


Making History Record-breaking year for HLKN Last year was one for the record books. HLKN faculty members, staff members and students increased work in several areas on the way to making the department not only one of the largest health and kinesiology programs in the country, but also one of the best.

HLKN faculty members were cited 1,335 times last year, which was a 14% increase from 2010. College of Education & Human Development tracked grants, and grants managed outside of HLKN in which our faculty served as PI’s or Co-PI’s, totaled $3.08 million. Compared to 2008, this represents a 70% increase in annual external funding. Instructional and clinical faculty members received $404,000 in external support, gifts or grants last year. HLKN faculty submitted a record 60 grants and served as PI’s or Co-PI’s on 47 grants.

Tenured/tenure track faculty (TTF) had 115 total publications with 100 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. This represented an average of 4.1 publications per TTF with a research assignment, a record number of total and peer-reviewed publications in HLKN. Previous records were 101 total publications (2001) and 84 peer-reviewed publications (2002). Instructional and clinical faculty members reported publishing an additional seven national articles, three book chapters and 46 regional publications/performances. The average impact factor (IF) of articles published in journals reporting an IF last year was 2.57 (range 0.238 to 7.581), which is about the 75th percentile of science journals. Faculty reported that 61% of articles published last year were in moderate to high impact level journals in their respective fields, and many of these publications included students as author or coauthors.

4

HLKN faculty presented 221 national or international presentations, 134 regional or state presentations and 115 teaching presentations, averaging 5.3 presentations per faculty member. A large number of these presentations included students as authors or coauthors. These accomplishments are the result of every student, staff member and faculty member in the department working together to produce high quality work.


Aging Research Deutz hired to develop the Center on Translational Research in Aging and Longevity A new era in research focusing on how we age is coming to Texas A&M. Dr. Nicolaas Deutz, MD, Ph.D. and his research team have come to Texas A&M University and developed the Center for Translational Researcb in Aging and Longevity. Dr. Deutz started in April and has over 20 years experience in clinical nutrition and metabolism research in both humans and animals. According to SciVerse Scopus, the database containing abstracts and citations for scholarly journal articles, he has published 257 articles in journals with an average impact factor in the 90th percentile of all science journals. Dr. Deutz also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Nutrition, Clinical Nutrition Supplements, and e-SPEN, the European e-Journal of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. He and his research group are currently funded by the National Institutes for Health, Arkansas Center for Clinical and Translational Research, and American Institute for Cancer Research. He is planning on transferring six to eight current grants and up to five pending grants. The new center is housed next to the Exercise & Sport Nutrition Laboratory (ESNL) in Research Park where they will develop a translational biomedical research facility to accommodate basic and applied clinical research.

Dr. Deutz has been appointed as Full Professor in the Department of Health & Kinesiology and recommended for appointment as the Ponder Endowed Chair in Health & Kinesiology. Additionally, College of Education & Human Development dean Douglas Palmer and Health & Kinesiology department head Richard Kreider will be supporting an application for Deutz to be named a distinguished professor.

Dr. Deutz’s research team includes:

Dr. Deutz and his research team were hired to develop an aging research center.

• Mariëlle P.K.J. Engelen, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, Department of Geriatrics, College of Medicine, UAMS) • John J. Thaden, Ph.D. (Lab Head and Analytical Chemist) • Gabriella Ten Have, Ph.D. (Lab Manager and Head of Animal Research) • Nancy Thaden (Journal Managing Editor and Development)

This includes offices, a conference room, mass spectroscopy and molecular analytical chemistry facilities, examination and procedure rooms, and an expanded BSL2 lab capable of housing several beds for overnight studies. Dr. Deutz’s group will share human testing and training facilities with the ESNL.

5


Spring Lecture Series 2012 Spring Lecture Series & Special Events In the Department of Health & Kinesiology, we want to introduce our students to the top experts, theories and research from across the nation. Last spring, we had several lecture series and special events that impacted our students tremendously.

Huffines Discussion

The 2012 Huffines Discussion guest speakers.

It is too easy for scientists to revert to ‘sciencespeak’ when interacting with the public. Thus, we have developed a series of public talks on the educated-lay level that is highlighted by an event we call the Huffines Discussion. We intentionally recruit speakers who are passionate about their area and are on the cutting edge. In addition, we try to present a diversity of speakers to represent a widerange of thought and viewpoints. Last spring we had 660 attendees with an additional 150 attendees at three video-linked University sites (Virginia Tech, Univ. of Kentucky, and Univ. of New England). • • • • • • • •

Dr. Wendy Kohrt, University of Colorado Denver Dr. Jacques Dallair, Performance Prime Dr. Stella Volpe, Drexel University Dr. Michael Davis, Oklahoma State University Dr. Dennis Bramble, University of Utah David Epstein, Sports Illustrated Dr. Noah Dean, Casedhole Solutions Michael Hodges, Texas A&M University Former Linebacker

The Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity in Sport Conference Dr. George Cunningham with guest speaker, Dr. Pat Griffin. (right)

6

The Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Sport Conference was held April 6, 2012. The conference featured a who’s who of speakers, including leading LGBT advocates and researchers. The purpose of the conference was to bring people together to discuss issues surrounding lesbian, gay,

bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues in sport, and by bringing together activists, administrators, and researchers, we were able to gain a broad understanding of the issues at hand. Response to the conference was overwhelming, as we had standing room only. Most of the attendees were students, and they were able to learn more about the struggles, successes, and triumphs of LGBT persons in sport, as well as strategies to make sport more inclusive. Another outcome of the conference is a book, “Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Sport”, which will be published by the Center for Sport Management Research and Education and made freely available to the public. • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Dr. Eric Anderson - University of Winchester Dr. Erin Buizuvis - Western New England University Helen Carroll - National Center for Lesbian Rights Mary Ann Covey - Texas A&M Student Counseling Services Dr. Janet Fink - University of Connecticut Dr. Pat Griffin - GLSEN Sports Project Dr. Vikki Krane - Bowling Green State University Karen Morrison - NCAA Dr. Camille O’Bryant - California Polytechnic University - San Luis Obispo Dr. Sue Rankin - Penn State University Dr. Ellen Staurowsky - Drexel University Dan Woog - Staples High School Cyd Ziegler - Outsports.com


We want to introduce our students to top experts, theories and research from across the nation. 2012 Distinguished Lecture Series The theme of the 2012 Distinguished Lecture Series was Youth Sport and Health. Lectures focused on how to promote health and wellbeing in children, adolescents, and college students through physical activity, sport, and healthy behaviors. Promoting physical education, health education, and how sport affects health, disease, and academic performance was also explored. • • • • • • •

Exercise is Medicine! - James D. Fluckey, Ph.D. Comprehensive School-Based Physical Education & Health Education Programs - Eloise Elliott, Ph.D. How Exercise Regulates Our Emotions and Optimizes Our Cognitive Capacity John Ratey, Ph.D. Relationship of Physical Activity to Academic Achievement - Steven Kelder, Ph.D. Impact of Athletics on Student Health and Well Being - Mark Cousins Ph.D. Promoting Community-Based Physical Activity - Panel Discussion moderated by Gregg Bennett, Ph.D. Influence of Educationally Relevant Health Disparities on Academic Achievement of Urban Minority Youth Charles E. Basch, Ph.D.

Bowen Loftin, Tommy Bain (Cotton Bowl Classic), Grant Teaff (Executive Director, AFCA) and was moderated by John Rhadigan (Fox Sports Southwest). Fundraising, football operations, and understanding the position of Athletics Director have been past topics.

The 2012 College Sport Symposium guest speakers with HLKN faculty. (left)

Trott Lecture Series With a generous gift from Cheryl and John E. Trott Jr., the Division of Sport Management has been able to bring some of the top names in the sport industry to campus. The series allows top practitioners the opportunity to share their experiences with students, faculty, staff, and the Sport Management program at Texas A&M. This year’s guest speaker was Tom Farrey, ESPN Commentator and author of “Game On: The All-American Race to Make Champions of Our Children”.

2012 College Sport Symposium The College Sport Symposium and Lecture Series occur every spring and can take six to seven months to plan. The goal is to attract the best and the brightest talent in intercollegiate athletics and invite them to Texas A&M University to share their knowledge. The event allows our graduate and undergraduate students to come face to face with the industry’s finest. Last spring, the event attracted over 330 students, faculty, and other guests from the community to learn the intricacies of conference realignment. It featured Mike Slive (SEC Commissioner), President R.

Tom Farrey, ESPN Commentator. (left)

7


Join the more than one-half million former students that are the Aggie Network! Why not enjoy the quality education that comes with being enrolled at Texas A&M, with the convenience of an online, flexible community? Join the College of Education & Human Development online community and see for yourself. Programs Offered:

8

Master’s • Bilingual Education • Curriculum & Instruction • Health Education • Human Resource Development • Public School Administration • Special Education • Sport Management

Certification/Training • Accelerate Online Secondary Certification • Bilingual Certification Prep Course • ESL Certification Prep Course • BTLPT-Spanish Exam Prep Course • BTLPT-Spanish Writing Prep Course • Training & Development Program • Virtual Instructor Program

Doctorate • Curriculum & Instruction

Learn more: education.tamu.edu


More Than Just Left Turns Research helps NASCAR pit crews take more checkerboard flags David Ferguson never knew that his love of racing would be tied to his career in exercise science. But now, the Ph.D. student is involved with the testing of NASCAR pit crews to improve the speed and health of the group. “I am a fan and a professional in the field,” David said. “It’s the ultimate feeling of doing what you love and it’s not work at all.” In looking for a program that would suit his interests, David found Dr. Tim Lightfoot, the current director of the Huffines Institute. The key for David and the Huffines Institute is letting crews know that being healthy and safe can better their performance. Work originated with Ganassi Racing (now Earnhardt Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates) in 2007. It was the first time NASCAR gave permission for an outside group to come to the track and measure physiology during a race. David credits that opportunity with having the right people in the right place at the right time. “NASCAR had not done it before and they haven’t done it since,” David said. Testing involved pill-like devices that the crews swallowed. The pills kept track of body temperature and recorded how the crew members dealt with physical demands of the race.

2011 Sprint Cup Championship. It also gave David a chance to celebrate with the crew. “I said ‘if you guys win a race in Texas, I get to go to victory lane’,” David recalled. “They won. It was a madhouse and a thrill to be there.” After the success with Stewart-Haas, more racing groups came to Ferguson and the Huffines Institute. “The best part is that the science that we defined has paid off,” David said. “The question we get now is, ‘What did you do with Stewart-Haas?’” The research gathered may be helpful in refining training in major sports such as football, and non-traditional sports, including mixed martial arts. Testing can also have realworld applications, showing how training and exercise can relate to overall health.

Ph.D. student David Ferguson during a break in testing at a NASCAR event.

For David, he credits having the best resources and people in the nation at Texas A&M for making this type of research possible. And it doesn’t hurt that that he gets to enjoy his work so much. “Working with NASCAR has been a true thrill,” David said. “Doing a study while cars are going 200 miles per hour was one of the best and out of control experiences of my life.”

The study found that simple procedures, such as adjusting training schedules, cut down on time in pit row. In a sport where hundredths of a second can mean the difference between winning and losing, this type of research is important. Work continued with Stewart-Haas Racing. Trust is a big issue since this type of testing was out-of-the-box thinking. The StewartHaas team trusted David and his team, started winning more races and eventually won the

9


Helping First Responders FITLIFE program provides heart health awareness to local firefighters

10


Through the FITLIFE Program at Texas A&M University, students monitor the cardiovascular health of local community members. Firefighting is a job that requires extreme bouts of physical activity, often under severe conditions. It’s no surprise that the cardiovascular system of a firefighter is pushed to the limit when fighting a blaze. In fact, studies reveal that more than 50% of on-duty deaths are attributed to heart disease, making it the leading cause of death among firefighters. Through the FITLIFE program at Texas A&M University, researchers are currently monitoring the cardiovascular health of more than 200 local firefighters from both Bryan and College Station Fire Departments.

feedback for major risk factors, as well as lifestyle

modification

recommendations.

“We are happy to say that serious health issues were identified in several of our firefighters as a result of these efforts,” said College Station Fire Chief R.B. Alley. “These firefighters were able to contact their personal physicians and receive life saving treatment, which allowed them to remain active on the job.” The program also gives undergraduates in the applied exercise physiology major

The goal of the program is to identify firefighters who are at an increased risk for developing heart disease, ultimately preventing heart-related fatalities in the field.

a chance to apply what they have learned

The program offers an annual cardiovascular health profile, which includes an assessment of several risk factors for heart disease including blood pressure, cholesterol levels, body composition analysis, as well as muscle strength and endurance tests.

skills to work in a hands-on environment,

“The very nature of firefighting as a profession is one of lengthy periods of sedentary activity separated by intense periods of very strenuous physical activity,” said Dr. Steve Martin, clinical assistant professor of exercise physiology and FITLIFE program coordinator. “Our goal is to determine how fit firefighters are for duty, how at-risk they are for developing heart disease and how their susceptibility changes over time.” By identifying those at risk for heart disease, the researchers hope to prevent the occurrence of cardiovascular events among firefighters. Each participant is provided with a report summarizing the results that includes

in the classroom, in a real-world setting. “Our students get the chance to put their providing them with invaluable experience for their future careers,” said Martin. In light of American Heart month, held in February, Martin encourages the public to take a moment to think about their heart health. “Taking an active role in your health and wellness is crucial,” said Martin. “American Heart month is a great time to reflect on your current diet and exercise routines and make conscious changes to become heart healthy.” FITLIFE

is

a

university-based

exercise

and physical fitness program directed by the Applied Exercise Science Laboratory at

Texas

A&M.

The

program

offers

cardiovascular testing and a variety of lowcost exercise classes to the local community.

11


Students As Teachers HLKN majors get the chance to take over kinesiology class

Alyssa Locklear consults with student leaders before their class lesson.

There is an old saying that “to teach is to learn twice.” This is true for some health and kinesiology majors preparing to help others.

what students have done in the past because I want to see what they come up with on their own.”

The students, currently preparing to be coaches, physical therapists, and occupational therapists, are getting a chance to teach other students while playing the role of populations needing help with exercise and fitness.

Groups rotate weekly with everyone in class getting a chance to prepare a lesson plan and teach. They are evaluated on their lesson the day their group teaches.

Instructor Alyssa Locklear designed this class as a component to a current writing-intensive kinesiology course. The idea of students being teachers came from talking with those in real world physical education settings. “I looked at all of the different career paths my students were embarking on to design a course to work best for them and their research,” Locklear said. Each week during the semester, different students lead the class by teaching various exercises for different real world settings. Students will break into groups of four to five, usually based on their individual career paths. As part of lesson plan proposals submitted to Locklear, students have to teach exercise routines to specific groups. The classes are geared to help five populations: stressed out office employees, balance-impaired older adults, pregnant women, active college students, and elementary school children.

Students in the “copy room” show how lifting stacks of paper can be a quick way to relieve stress in the workplace.

They design a 40-50 minute workout routine, from warm-up to cool down. The only requirement is that aerobic walking must be included into the routine. Everything else is left open to students. “I’m always so proud of their creativity,” Locklear said. “I never give them examples of

12

“This whole class is focused on not just you as a college student, but you as a professional in your field,” Locklear said. “That’s what they write about in their proposal and puts them in the world of physical education.” The majority of the students in class have a positive reaction to this teaching style. It is useful for the future coaches and therapists who may eventually work with people of different ages and backgrounds. “They have to teach their peers usually, but this way, they have to think about every piece of this workout based on the group they are in,” Locklear said. While the class is somewhat more difficult than a normal class, students appreciate how realistic the class is, which helps them prepare for their future careers. And it’s a fun change of pace. One week they could be playing the role of a 60-year-old; another week they are elementary kids. Locklear said she was very impressed with last spring’s group of students and is excited to see the next groups’ ideas.


Ready, Set, Crawl! Creating an infant-friendly home that fuels baby’s development It’s a common practice for new parents to question whether or not their infant is developing on target with other children. To eliminate envy on the playground among parents, researchers from Texas A&M University created an easy-to-use assessment tool for parents to determine if their home is equipped for a positive learning environment. Carl Gabbard, director of the Motor Development Lab, selected graduate students and a team of researchers from Methodist University of Piracicaba (UNIMEP) in Brazil, and developed the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development – Infant Scale (AHEMD-IS), to assess the quality and quantity of motor development affordances, or opportunities, available in the home during early childhood. “The first several years of life are a time of immense growth and learning and, for obvious reasons, the home is the primary agent for this development in the early years,” said Gabbard. “Although we know the home environment contributes to infant motor development, little research exists examining this relationship.” Parents and clinical personnel can use the instrument to assess and prescribe ways to improve the home environment, creating an optimal setting for motor development. Another common use is as a tool for early intervention in homes that may have children at risk for developmental delays. With the AHEMD-IS, parents or caregivers answer various questions about infant and family characteristics, as well as those pertaining to availability of physical space

inside and outside the home, daily activities, parental stimulation, play materials, and toys. Questions are presented in a userfriendly manner with pictorial examples. “For young children, the world can be compared to a playground, where each toy and piece of equipment affords a new motor action,” said Gabbard. “Infants experience learning and growth through affordances in their everyday activities and environments by playing with toys, crawling around furniture in the home, and interacting with nurturing adults and other children. The AHEMD-IS helps parents determine whether or not these crucial affordances are available in the home.” The instrument has been used by Gabbard and his team in more than 500 homes in the United States, Portugal and Brazil. Findings support the idea that the number and variety of affordances in the home can affect motor development. Infants whose homes had higher AHEMD scores displayed significantly better future motor scores. Research is also currently examining the association between home scores and cognitive ability as the child enters school, notes Gabbard.

Carl Gabbard, selected graduate students and a team of researchers developed a scale to determine if infants are getting the best learning environment possible in their homes.

“We anticipate that this project will make a significant contribution toward understanding the potential of the home environment in optimizing motor development of the child - a factor that has come to be recognized as critical to overall infant and child mental health,” said Gabbard.

13


Dr. PJ Miller was the recipient of the TAHPERD Honor Award in January!

There was a great showing of students and community members at the 2nd Annual Huffines Discussion.

Dr. Gregg Bennett (right) and the Center for Sport Management Research & Education hosted the 9th Annual Sport Marketing Association Conference in Houston.

814


Under the leadership of Dr. Lori Greenwood, the Graduate Athletic Training Program is up and running!

Welcome Dr. Nicolaas Deutz and his team to Texas A&M. Dr. Deutz will be heading the new aging research center on campus.

Melinda Grant and Frank Thomas stand in front of the boxes of “Aggies Commit� shirts given to students upon completion of PEAP courses.

15


Q&A: Ledric Sherman Double duty as a health graduate student and instructor in the Physical Education Activity Program

16


“We in the health field have the capability of helping to refine and improve so many lives in our society.” Where you are originally from? Houston.

surrounding community. To be considered among these individuals meant a great deal to me.

How did you choose Health & Kinesiology at Texas A&M? I started What else do you do in the here in our department Fall 2004 as a full- department? I am an Instructional time instructor in the Physical Education Activity Program (PEAP). While in my first few years of teaching, I had contemplated continuing my education in our department and applying to the doctoral program. I made the decision to begin the program Fall 2009.

Assistant Professor in PEAP. I have been in this position for seven years now, and I have enjoyed working with the students that I have come in contact with during my time here. I am also thankful to work alongside some of the most motivated, diverse and dedicated group of individuals, those being my fellow PEAP colleagues!

What kind of research are you currently involved in? I’m currently What do you wish to do after working on my dissertation, which is an you leave Texas A&M? As of now, exploratory research study investigating the experiences of diabetes self-care management among African-American men living with Type 2 diabetes.

Why do you view this type of research as important? For me the

research is important because the purpose is to give more insight and shed light on behaviors and lifestyles that have not been addressed in underrepresented populations in the health education literature. So in essence, the research is searching to know the “how” instead of the “why” in regards to behaviors and lifestyle practices.

What do you consider your proudest moment at A&M? My proudest moment was when I received the Emil Mamaliga Outstanding Teacher Award. I was really surprised and honored to earn the award. The faculty that had won this award, prior to and after me receiving it, have worked really hard in our department and for this university by serving our students and the

my first choice is to be in a postdoctoral appointment to further deepen my research expertise in my area of interest as well as acquiring advanced scholarly training. After completing this appointment, I will then focus on obtaining a tenure-track position at a research institution, where I would like to continue my research, teaching, community outreach and service.

What would you say to students who are going into the health field? This is a period when you require

a great deal of self-discipline as well as self-control. I would advise students to continue to stay focused on their academic responsibilities as well as constantly remind themselves why they are aspiring to become a professional within the realm of Health Education and Promotion.

17


Sanchez Falls For Skydiving When not in the lab, Ph.D. student Brittany Sanchez competes as a skydiver

18


Brittany Sanchez will admit she was hesitant when she received a skydiving jump as a birthday present from her father. However, it only took one jump for her to change her mind. “It was his idea, and I was a little hesitant,” Brittany said. “But as soon as I hit the ground, the first thing I asked was when can I go again.” The exercise physiology Ph.D. student from Houston continued to make jumps and is now part of the team that won a gold medal at the 2011 U.S. Parachute Association National Skydiving Championships in Arizona. “The draw originally was just the pure thrill,” Brittany said. “Now I’m more intrigued in the different disciplines it has to offer.” The best teams from around the country come to the event, which is considered the “Super Bowl of skydiving”. Brittany’s team won gold in eight-way formation skydiving, one of the most difficult disciplines. The team jumps from the aircraft more than two miles above ground. The objective is to complete as many different formations, or points, in free-fall within 45 seconds. Brittany’s role is the camera flyer. She films the formations and makes sure that the judges can see everything to be scored. The job comes with a great amount of responsibility. If judges are unable to see a maneuver because it is not caught on video, the team may receive point deductions.

“If the judges can’t see a point, it’s on me. No pressure,” she joked. Teams perform ten jumps to get a final score. On the last jump, Brittany’s team was leading and had a solid final jump. So solid a jump, that they were confident they would be taking home gold. “We knew we won when we landed,” Brittany said. “In fact, one of my teammates, as I’m filming after the skydive, does a backflip. We knew it right then!” When she’s not jumping, Brittany can be found working in the Exercise & Sport Nutrition Lab (ESNL). Eventually she would like to do either full-time research with an institution or a faculty research position. The learning experience at Texas A&M has fulfilled my expectations and then some,” Brittany said. “The faculty has been an absolute joy to work with.” Even with team training, working in the ESNL and working as a math lab coordinator in the Student Learning Center, Brittany finds a way to make approximately 600 jumps a year. How does she do it all?

Brittany Sanchez is the camera flyer for her skydiving team, responsible for taping all formations for the judges.

“I’ve heard of this phenomenon called sleep,” Brittany laughs. “Fortunately, since most of our training is done on the weekends, I get to devote my time during the week to my studies.”

19


Giving Back Endowment and gift options for HLKN The Texas A&M Department of Health & Kinesiology is dedicated to providing the highest quality of education for its students. Crucial to this quality educational experience is outstanding faculty, state of the art equipment and facilities, and scholarships for students who cannot afford tuition. Lecture series and symposiums, which bring in top industry leaders to share their knowledge with our students, are also vital to our learning culture. This quality of education is made possible with the help and generosity of some very special people. One example of that generosity is Cheryl and John Trott ‘66. They established the Trott Excellence Fund for Sport Management. The fund supports the Trott Lecture Series, which gives experts in the field of sport management the opportunity to come to campus and share their experiences with students, faculty and staff. The fund provides upgrades for facilities at the Sport Management Career Center and supports access to job placement websites for current students to network with former students.

Giving Options Endowed Scholarship Program For some students, a scholarship may determine whether or not they can achieve their dream of earning a college degree. Help our future health, kinesiology and sport management leaders who are in need of scholarships today. The impact of your generosity will be felt for generations to come. • Permanent endowments can be established for $25,000 or more • Scholarships may be established in your name, the name of a loved one, or someone you wish to honor

20

• Payment may be made in one or multiple payments over a five-year period • Gifts to establish scholarships are eligible for corporate matching gift programs • Scholarships are awarded to highly motivated students within the Department of Health & Kinesiology Faculty Fellowship Program You can create a gift to inspire faculty research and teaching through a faculty fellowship. As a department, we are committed to providing resources and recognition to well deserving professors who are preparing our students for important careers in health, kinesiology and sport management. • Permanent endowed gift of $100,000. A permanent endowment can be established over a period of up to five years. You have an option to give an additional $5,000 each year to allow for the fellowship to be awarded during the year preceding full funding of the endowment. • Non-endowed gift of $15,000 funding three $5,000 annual awards For information on how to give to the College of Education & Human Development or the Department of Health & Kinesiology please contact: Steve Blomstedt Sr. Director of Development College of Education & Development 802 Harrington Tower 4222 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-4222 979.847.8655 s-blomstedt@tamu.edu

Human


Congratulations 2011-2012 Teaching and Research Award Winners Service Pins

Other Awards & Recognitions

Dr. John Lawler – 20 years Ms. Jana Crouse – 25 years

Armstrong Graduate Student Scholar Award E. Nicole Melton

Faculty Promotions

Emil Mamaliga Teaching Award Gretchen Tyson

Dr. E. Lisako McKyer Associate Professor with Tenure Dr. John Singer Associate Professor with Tenure Dr. Shane Hudson Clinical Associate Professor Gayden Darnell Instructional Associate Professor Alyssa Locklear Instructional Associate Professor Ledric Sherman Instructional Associate Professor Teresa Wenzel Instructional Associate Professor Outstanding Graduate Student Anthony Roselli Physical Education Activity Program David Ferguson Kinesiology Brittany Rosen Health Education E. Nicole Melton Sport Management

Presidential Professor Excellence Award Dr. Pat Goodson

for

Teaching

Robert B. Armstrong Scholar Award Dr. Charlie Shea Janene Kissinger Staff of the Year Award Marybeth Henthorne

Dr. Susan Ward was awarded the Teacher of the Year for Health Education and Advisor Appreciation Award.

Emma Gibbons Legacy Award Dr. Leonard D. Ponder Visionary Leadership Award Thomas A. and Joan Read Advisor Appreciation Award Dr. Susan Ward Excellent Service Award Read & G. Rollie White Custodial Staff

Teacher of the Year Dr. Susan Ward Health Education Dr. Steve Martin Kinesiology Dr. Paul Batista Sport Management

Dr. Pat Goodson is the first CEHD professor to be named a Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence at TAMU. (left)

21


Current External Funding BLOOMFIELD, SUSAN (Professor) PI, Maintaining Musculoskeletal Health in the Lunar Environment 2008-06-01 - 2012-05-31 $1,370,018 NSBRI Baylor College of Medicine

FLUCKEY, JAMES (Associate Professor) Co-I, Maintaining Musculoskeletal Health in the Lunar Environment 2008-06-01 - 2012-05-31 $1,370,018 NSBRI Baylor College of Medicine

BLOOMFIELD, SUSAN (Professor) Co-PI, Contributors to Long-Term Recovery of Bone Strength following Exposure to Microgravity - NRA/Research and Technology Development to Support Crew Health and Performance in Space Exploration Missions 2008-06-01 - 2012-05-19 $447,888 NASA-Johnson Space Center

GOODSON, PATRICIA (Professor) Co-PI, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Cancer Genomes Education and Training for Texas Health Educators 2010-08-01 - 2012-07-31 $300,000 Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT)

BLOOMFIELD, SUSAN (Professor) PI, Team Leader - Musculoskeletal Alterations Team 2008-05-01 - 2012-04-30 $163,333 NSBRI Baylor College of Medicine CHEN, LEI-SHIH (Asst. Professor) PI, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Cancer Genomes Education and Training for Texas Health Educators 2010-08-01 - 2012-07-31 $300,000 Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) CHEN, LEI-SHIH (Asst. Professor) PI, Knowledge, Attittudes, and Intentions regarding Advanced Reproductive Genetic Testing among Parents of Children with Disabiliiteis in Taiwan 2011-10-01 - 2012-09-30 $30,000 Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation CROUSE, STEPHEN (Professor) PI, Hydroworx Combined with Resistance Training 2010-02-01 - 2012-08-31 $25,000 Hydroworx, Inc. CROUSE, STEPHEN (Professor) PI, City of Bryan Fire Department Cardiovascular Health Profile for Firefighters 2011-01-01 - 2012-12-31 $80,000 Bryan Fire Department

14 22

GUIDRY, JEFFREY (Associate Professor) Co-PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $220,921 DHHS-PHS-NIH KREIDER, RICHARD (Professor and Department Head) PI, The Curves Women’s Health and Fitness Initiative 2008-08-15 - 2013-08-31 $2,058,903 Curves, International KREIDER, RICHARD (Professor and Department Head) PI, Effects of Russian TARRAGON extract Supplementation Prior to Creative Supplementation on Whole Body Creatine Retention: A Proof of Concept Study 2010-12-01 - 2012-12-31 $20,145 Phytolab GMBH & Co. KREIDER, RICHARD (Professor and Department Head) PI, Simplified Human Clinical Trials Beneficial Effects of Bossa Nova Original Beverage in Cardiovascular Disease 2010-10-01 - 2012-12-31 $44,499 TAMU Agrilife LEE, TEAK (Graduate Assistant Research) Co-PI, Dietary Cholesterol & Resistance Training as Countermeasures 2011-07-01 - 2012-06-30 $5,000 American College of Sports Medicine


MARTIN, STEVE (Clinical Asst. Professor) Co-PI, City of Bryan Fire Department Cardiovascular Health Profile for Firefighters 2011-01-01 - 2012-12-31 $80,000 Bryan Fire Department MASSETT, MICHAEL (Asst. Professor) PI, Genetic Basis for Exercise Training Responses 2008-04-01 - 2012-03-31 $1,792,370 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCKYER, E. LISAKO (Asst. Professor & Director) Co-PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $1,079,048 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCKYER, E. LISAKO (Asst. Professor & Director) Co-PI, Statewide Evaluation of Childhood Obesity Prevention Policies in Texas: Texas Safe Routes to School and Increased Healthy Food Access for WIC Clients 2008-07-15 - 2013-07-17 $490,708 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation MCKYER, E. LISAKO (Asst. Professor & Director) PI, Building Capacity in Rural and Underserved Communities: Center for Community Health Development 2009-09-30 - 2014-09-29 $39,629 DHHS-PHS-CDC

Administrative Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-31 $339,919 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $46,940 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $373,432 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $47,864 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research Administrative Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-31 $170,947 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $284,427 DHHS-PHS-NIH

MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $46,042 DHHS-PHS-NIH

MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $47,864 DHHS-PHS-NIH

MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $219,620 DHHS-PHS-NIH

MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research Administrative Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-31 $331,698 DHHS-PHS-NIH

MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research -

23


Current External Funding MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Training Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-08-31 $32,211 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $201,569 DHHS-PHS-NIH MCLEROY, KENNETH (Adjunct Professor) PI, Building Capacity in Rural and Underserved Communities: Center for Community Health Development 2009-09-30 - 2014-09-29 $39,629 DHHS-PHS-CDC MISRA, RANJITA (Professor) Co-I, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research - Project 3 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-21 $1,079,048 DHHS-PHS-NIH MUENZENBERGER, AMBER (Director of Health Informatics) Co-I, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Cancer Genomes Education and Training for Texas Health Educators 2010-08-01 - 2012-07-31 $300,000 Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) RIECHMAN, STEVEN (Assoc. Professor) PI, The Effects of Caffeine on Muscle Protein Synthesis Post Resistance Exercise 2011-06-01 - 2012-05-31 $9,384 National Strength and Conditioning Assoc RIECHMAN, STEVEN (Assoc. Professor) PI, Dietary Cholesterol & Resistance Training as Countermeasures 2011-07-01 - 2012-06-30 $5,000 American College of Sports Medicine SHAW-RIDLEY, MARY (Assoc. Professor) Other, The Program for Rural and Minority Health Disparities Research -

24

Administrative Core 2007-09-30 - 2012-05-31 $842,564 DHHS-PHS-NIH SHAW-RIDLEY, MARY (Assoc. Professor) PI, More Than a Picnic: It’s a Family Affair for Lifestyle Change 2011-03-01 - 2013-02-28 $576,677 Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) WOODMAN, CHRISTOPHER (Assoc. Professor) PI, Vascular Biology and Aging: Modulation of Endothelial Phenotype by Pressure and Shear Stress 2010-07-01 - 2012-06-30 $140,000 American Heart - South Central Current external funding for the Department of Health & Kinesiology at Texas A&M University is over $2 million.


We’re Always On The Move. Stay connected with friends: facebook.com/HLKNAggies

Join our college family: facebook.com/TAMU.Education

Want to be the first to know what we’re doing? http://bit.ly/hlkn_news Want an opportunity to visit Aggieland? http://bit.ly/hlkn_events Follow us! @hlkn_tamu

25


Texas A&M University 4243 TAMU College Station, TX 77843-4243 hlknweb.tamu.edu

On The Move - Fall 2012  

Texas A&M University's Department of Health and Kinesiology is proud to present their publication, On The Move, highlighting the people and...