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MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

EQUINES IN THERAPY & LEARNING PROGRAMS

Information on all four levels included.


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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

EiT/L Level 1 The EiT/L level 1 training includes fundamental information that can be applied to every model and method where equines are taking part in therapy and learning programs. This workshop is a theoretical and practical 4-day training that presents an alternative approach to understanding equine-assisted therapies and activities through science and research. It is based on the most recent research pertaining horse-human interaction, equine cognition, equine welfare and several other fields that contributes to explain the dynamics between horses and humans, as well as knowledge about equines, equine welfare, and wellbeing, with focus on EiT/L programs. The days consist of a mix of theoretical seminars and discussions and practical exercises with horses and humans. The practical exercises will include how to enhance observational skills and how to link what is seen with what is known, how to stay aware of personal filters/lenses, and how to use and formulate observations into equine-centered questions directed towards the client(s). In addition to providing options for honing observational skills, behavioral training also creates new skills that improve safety and welfare for the horse and allow space for the horse to freely express him/herself in way that can promote growth for the horse. The training is adapted to the participants’ level of knowledge. Some topics may be limited depending on the participants prior experience or knowledge while other topics may be covered more in depth. A dialogue will be initiated with each interested participant to establish expectations on the training as well as specific knowledge needs. There will also be a list of suggested readings sent to participants prior to arrival. The format encourages open discourse to help participants apply the concepts to their own programs and provide examples of how these principles can be applied to every program. This is not a model or stepby-step process, rather it is a way to integrate science and research into existing models or upon which to develop new approaches to equine-assisted therapy and learning programs. The purpose is to introduce application of science in all EiT/L programs and to clarify uncertainties and misunderstandings in equine-human interactions and in the field of EiT/L programs.

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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

The training covers the fundamentals of: • Equine evolution – domestication, co-existence with humans. Wild/feral vs domesticated equines • Equine biology - what do we need to know? • How the equine’s previous and current life affects how he can contribute to EiT/L programs • Ethics • Equine cognitive abilities • General conceptions and preconceived notions about equines. • Equines and humans’ common mammalian background. The importance of species-specific knowledge. • How a common ground between horses and humans is created. • The mirror neuron theory and why we don’t know if it explains what goes on between horses and humans. • How horses learn and how training affects your horse. • Horse behavior and ”misbehavior” (stereotypical behavior, ”bad” habits, aggression, etc). • How does an equine know what to do in EiT/L programs? • Equine stress – eustress and burnout. • Negative equine welfare. • Positive equine welfare – growth for equines. • Anthropomorphism – the bad and the good version. • Essentials about comparative psychology to know how horses and humans differ and affect each other. • The horse as a subject, why objectification and instrumentalization don’t belong in EiT/L programs. • Intersubjectivity theory – addressing the two attachment systems at play between horse and human. The horse as a transitional object. • The horse as a helper in grounding, staying in the here and now while working on therapeutic issues. The horse as a safe companion. • How to enhance your observational skills and how to use them in EiT/L programs to formulate questions to the client, and to look out for the equine’s welfare. • Safety issues – what is safety in EiT/L programs? How to assess situations. • The EP’s role before, during and after sessions. • The EP support to the equine. How to remain a safe person for the equine. • Awareness of yourself and what you bring to a session. • Teamwork and respect. How you work within your scope of practice. • Activities. How to choose them. Props, space, and environment. • Working with different populations – who affect your work and how you prepare. • Why you as an EP need to work with a licensed mental health professional IF you are offering any kind of psychological treatment. • How and when mounted work can be used, and what kind of mounted work. • Your responsibilities as an EP – towards the horse, the client and the therapist. • How to prepare for sessions. How to prepare yourself and how to take care of yourself after sessions. • How you, on your own, can further develop your observational skills and use your own senses and awareness as tools.

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

EiT/L Level 2 Level 2 of EiT/L dives deeper into the mental/cognitive capacities of equines (foremost horses), the equine’s perceptions and into the neurobiology of the equine central nervous system. This level also draw parallels between neurobiology and physiology and what we know about equine behaviors, in domestic horses and in wild/feral horses. To broaden the understanding of horses this level also explores how equines communicate (intentionally and unintentionally) and how this carries over into relationships with each other as well as with humans. Level 2 also integrates comparative psychology and physiology in order to explore where animals are similar, as being mammalian species, but also where they differ. Level 2 contains the above theory, but also continues to emphasize your observational skills related to equine behavior and communication (both intraspecies and interspecies). As a result, this level involves practical work with horses and facility resources, observing and interacting with equines, and creating practice sessions. The days are designed to connect what was learned and discussed in the classroom with what is applied in practical work. Practical work builds on what was learned in Level 1 and develops even greater observational skills and involves more structured/semi-structured horse-human interactions so that participants view multiple interactions of each dyad and practice recording observations. Participants practice looking for patterns for two reasons;

1. Relaying observations back to the treatment team to assist in reaching the proposed goals for the client.

2. Looking at the horse behavior with a critical eye towards perspective and welfare.

The interaction and language that develops is a key factor in determining the effectiveness of the treatment and if it is in line with the goals. Knowing equine behavior and equine-human interactions is a critical component of looking at the interaction and knowing if it fits with therapeutic goals. Topics covered include: • Overlaps and differences in human and horse ethology and how it applies to different EiT/L programs and models and practices/activities – specifically addressing the environment at the venue where the training is taking place and the effects of different facilities on horses and horse-human interactions. • EiT/L approaches to incorporating behavioral and emotional regulation (grounding/mindfulness). • Incorporating nature and the importance of nature/outdoors. Compare with indoor venues. Discuss options for working with horses and catering to the venue.

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

• Emphasize the importance of knowing each horse individually. Each horse and human create a unique dyad and therefore a unique language that develops between them. The overlap in ethology and practical approach to using comparative physiology and comparative psychology to assist in the therapeutic process. • Different aspects of movement, in horses, between horses and between humans and horses: • Emotions as active regulators in behavior, movement, and intention and mediators in social interactions. • The role of emotions for both horse and human in the context of EiT/L based on client goals. • Comparative Physiology as it applies to the Central Nervous Systems (CNS) with regards to stress and hormonal regulators • Communication and Relationships • Physiology, neurobiology and session structure – Introduction to how to structure an EiT/L session so it aligns with equine and human ethology, promoting welfare for both horse and human, and aligning activities with outcomes that promote welfare for all. (In-depth flow charts are developed in Level 3.)

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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


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MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

EiT/L Level 3 In Equines in Therapy & Learning Programs Level 3 we focus on practicing and applying the theories and knowledge learned in Level 1 and Level 2. We explore and focus on core concepts in mindfulness, experiential learning, and the practical aspects of structuring, planning, executing and evaluating sessions, as well as on the teamwork and the different team members responsibilities. We also go through other frameworks and resources that needs to be in place, including the importance to know about state or/and regional regulations, as well as establishing team ethics and other aspects of “behind session work�. This means Level 3 has fewer theoretical lectures compared to the first two levels and focuses more on practical approaches of designing and practicing sessions based on learned theory. Participants will combine the knowledge from Levels 1 and 2, in addition to gained experiences, to develop sessions that have therapeutic value to clients while still considering equine welfare and utilizing all aspects of knowledge related to equine-human interactions. Participants are encouraged to explore different approaches to sessions based on available resources such as horses, facilities, partners, and nature in order to create sessions that are targeted to the needs of the client(s). We will explore how each facility can create a variety of opportunities to incorporate nature, movement, mindfulness, self-exploration, social atmospheres, and rhythm in conjunction with the individual horses to create different therapeutic (or supporting, educational or personal growth) experiences for clients. Part of the training will involve the development of flowcharts (decision trees) and explain the decision-making process to developing and structuring tailored EAP/L sessions that cater to the client and horse(s) using ethology, behavior, cognition, neurobiology, physiology, movement, psychology, and the theoretical concepts of the previous levels. The flow charts presented are generic and are meant as a foundation that practitioners can change based on the needs and backgrounds of clients and horses (and facility environments that are available). Participants will work together (we encourage teams to take the training together), to practice developing sessions using the horses at the host venue and explore alternative options within the environment. Participants will also be asked to develop sessions based on their own venue(s) and horses and discuss these with the group to explore additional alternatives. This last exercise will involve a single hypothetical client with goals and potential diagnosis/problems. It is meant to show that, even if the same client were to show up at each venue, the process may differ greatly based on available horses, facility, and environment even with the same theoretical foundations.

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

Mindfulness in theory and practice: • Self-awareness for team members and team awareness • Environmental Awareness • Role of nature • Role of movement and rhythm • Practical use of mindfulness in any session • Mindfulness as a focus of therapeutic experiences vs learning experiences • Trauma-informed/sensitive mindfulness vs trauma-focused mindfulness • Mindfulness in phase 1 work in trauma work (stabilization, grounding, and preparing) • Facilitating self-awareness in clients • Research in mindfulness in EAAT/L and other programs Experiential learning in theory and practice: • Definition and use of experiential learning in education, therapy, coaching and supportive work • Experiential learning in EiT/L levels • How to utilize this concept with ourselves • How this applies to clients • How this applies to horses, equine psychology, equine welfare, and the equine-human experience Learning to structure sessions: • Develop full sessions from start to finish • Different uses and options for structuring things – practice using the theory and concepts as tools and apply them to different circumstances (using creativity and imagination in addition to ethograms and other behavioral notification systems) • Example Flowchart/Decision tree • Practice in groups • Develop different options for sessions in groups through discussions Teamwork: • How do train and grow your team • Who does what in your team (including the horses?) • Who is responsible for what? • Theory around teamwork Practical approaches – general and individualized: • Ethics • Rules and regulations • Record keeping and documentation • Possible research protocols

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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

EiT/L Level 4 Train the trainer. Or main mission with all our training is to get existing and emerging research out to providers to implement and use. By offering a Train the Trainer module, we invite everyone who has taken our first 3 EiT/L levels to join us in this effort. The skills and knowledge needed to educate is fundamentally different from those needed to facilitate. Levels 1,2, &3 help prepare facilitators. Level 4 is designed to take those who understand the theory and facilitation and guide them on the skills needed to educate others in this field. The Equines in Therapy and Learning Programs, Level 4 training focuses on how practicing professionals can develop educational experiences for others that are based on the science and research they have learned through the trainings with Mimer Centre. This course involves an overview of materials, how to create and develop teaching materials that cater to a target audience, how to develop materials that remain within the professional scope of practice, how to ensure a focus on equine and human welfare, and how to reach different audiences. The EiT/L Level 4 training also discusses the responsibilities that are expected if the participants chose to work or train under the Mimer Centre name and the types of support that are available if they chose to do so. EiT/L Level 4 topics: • Responsibilities associated with working under the Mimer title • Keep in scope of practice when teaching others – this is different for different people • Make sure to train and teach about horses as well as practice • How to find and build networks for support online and locally. • How to find and build networks for clients online and locally. • Focus on welfare for both horse and people • How to implement experiential learning as a trainer vs as a facilitator • How to structure and turn informative material, facts and practices into education • Defining the role as an educator/trainer • Defining teamwork in education/training • Maintaining physical and emotional safety in training • How to increase curiosity and the growth potential in your participants/ trainees • Ethics in education, especially pertaining to education with live animals • How to understand and work with cultural and professional differences • The role of mentorship, supervision and peer support • How to teach about all aspects impacting outcome in experiential learning in EIT/L programs (nature, outdoors, environment, the team approach, movement, animals etc) • Keeping the team updated on emerging and relevant research, developing knowledge, and improving best practices. • Continuing education for the educational/training team, including education in self-awareness practices, team care, and team development • Maintaining and growing sustainability as a business

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

LESSON PLANS LEVEL 1/page 16 - 21 LEVEL 2/page 24 - 29 LEVEL 3/page 32 - 37 LEVEL 4/page 40 - 43

MiMer Centre MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

LEVEL 1

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Lesson Plan - Level 1

Day 1 – Overview: introduction to the work and the building blocks of it 8.30-9.30 Registration. Introduction of MiMer, the field of equine assisted therapy and learning, the trainers, the participants, and the training and learning agenda. An overview of the education (all 4 levels). Structure, practicalities, and logistics, focusing in on level 1. 9.30-10.30 Background and orientation: Introducing the work and MiMer’s role in the field. What is Equine Assisted Therapy and Learning? What does the work look like? Why do we work in teams? Who are the team members in an EiT/L team? How do you define the roles in the team? What role does the horse play? How important is equine welfare? For the horse? For the therapy and learning? What is experiential learning? What is neutral language? What role does natural environments and other factors around equine assisted therapy and learning play? Why do MiMer’s educations focus in on equine welfare? Horse-human interaction? Science and Research? Stress and trauma? Teamwork? Being module independent? Introducing the first observation session, focusing in on – what is behavior? What do I see when I look at horses? How do I talk about what I see? 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practice session: Practicing equine observation 1. The observer and the observed, the reasons for working with observations, and using horse behavior to facilitate human growth. Observing to maintain equine welfare. How to practice observations. 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Science and research, best practice: What is Cognitive Science and Psychology? Cognition vs Psychological experiences. How do you study this? Human filters/lenses – anthropomorphism – the good and the bad version, vs anthropocentrism vs anthropodenial. Your own filters. The role of equines in therapy vs other animals. Why do we choose to work with horses in therapy? The science perspective and theoretical lenses vs the best practice perspective. Stress and Trauma: Why is knowledge about and understanding of stress and its meaning and impact on living beings important? Why is being trauma informed/sensitive important in all work with living beings?

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


Lesson Plan - Level 1 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

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Theory: Equine evolution and coexistence with humans: • Equine evolution, domestication and genetics, coexistence with humans, wild/feral versus domesticated equines, different kind of equines • Equines’ digestive system (hind gut fermenter), nutrition, pasture management, • The body of the horse, development, and growth – why movement is important • The horse’s circadian rhythm – seasonal, daily, comparing different horse keeping systems to how wild horses live. • The equine brain and neural network • Similarities and species-specific differences between equines and humans. 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections: Discuss the observation exercise and the theoretical input from day 1. How do we study equine behavior? What is a behavior? How do you understand behavior? What did we see? What did we look for? And what is the difference between what we see and what we look for? Common myths about horse behavior. Pitfalls to look out for when you transition between equestrian knowledge and knowledge about equines. What do we know, and what have we been taught – and what does research/science say? What do I need to know about horses as a professional in the field of equine assisted therapy and learning? What is experiential learning? Day 2 – Equines, equine welfare and wellbeing, introduction to stress and trauma 8.30-10.30 Theory: Equine social cognition. Understanding the importance of the equine’s social life: • Band/group life – differences between living in the wild and in captivity • Space – for the band as for the individual • Movement (for food, shelter, water) • “Handling”/responding/reacting to “predators” (differences between wild/feral horses and domestic horses). What predation in general means to horses. • Play • Social learning • Female/male differences • Goal – enhancing group cohesion and collaboration • The horse as a flight/fight animal? • Social dynamics vs hierarchies • Group Cohesion vs leadership (stallions, leader mares?) • The dominance-submissiveness paradigm.


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Lesson Plan - Level 1

Introducing the second observation session, focusing in on – how do I organize/structure what I see? Observing for 2 reasons, with equine welfare in mind and with the use of observations to formulate client questions. Working with ethograms. 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practice session: Practicing equine observation 2. How to systematize your observations. How to use an ethogram (studying equine behavior). Looking for and choosing what behavior in the equines to use in a session. How to present your observations to the client(s) and how to ask open-ended and neutral questions. What “activities” to choose and what possible props to use. Which connections do we do between what we learned in/from research and what we see? Did you see signs of stress? How have your perceptions and understanding changed since the observations you did in day 1? 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Theory: Trauma. Basic understanding of what stress and trauma is and how they relate to each other. What does it mean to be trauma informed/sensitive? Vs being trauma focused. Trauma in humans. Working with trauma in humans. What is secondary trauma? The prevalence of trauma. The window of Tolerance. Traumatic stress, PTS(D), C-PTS(D), dissociation. Equine Assisted Trauma Therapy (EATT). 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-16.00 Theory: Trauma, continuing. 16.00-17.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections: on the observation exercise. How are the horses’ behaviors (or non-behaviors) contributing to the sessions? What is it the horse contributes with? What is the difference between a session with horse-human interaction and only human-human interaction? What is the role of the Equine Professional in a session? Why does an equine need an Equine Professional present, with sufficient knowledge of equine behavior and equine needs? Equine stress behaviors? How do you become and remain a safe person for the equine? Why is an EP, with specific equine knowledge, needed in EAP/EATT? Day 3 – Equine cognition and trans-species psychology 8.30-10.30 Theory: Equine cognition (continued) how does a horse use his mental faculties? When he interacts with other horses? His environment? Human beings? In a therapeutic setting?

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


Lesson Plan - Level 1 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

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Equine cognitive abilities: Equine senses and perception (including proprioception, neuroception etc). What differs and what is similar to human senses and perception? To other animals as e.g. dogs. What mental faculties does a horse have? How do they differ from ours? How are they similar? – Assumptions/myths in equitation, cultural differences, traditions and habits, and what the research tells us. • Perception • Attention • Memory • Thinking/reasoning • Emotion • Learning • Communication/Language. How do horses communicate? What do they understand/make of human communication – verbal – non-verbal? Introducing the third observation session, focusing in on – horse-human interaction. Defined roles in the teamwork. What does the EP do and look for? What does the therapist do and look for? 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practice session: Practicing equine-human interaction observations 1. We take turns and practice observing each other interact with the horses. What is interaction? What do we look for? Safety issues? When and how to interrupt an interaction. What kind of information do we get by observing equine-human interaction? About the equine? The human? Their shared experiences? Comparing our subjective perspective with observed behaviors. How do we keep our feedback respectful to the horse? To the client? How do we as much as possible keep our own interpretations of what we see out of the therapeutic/learning situation? Why do we do that? 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Theory: Horse-human interaction, horse-human communication. Building relationships. What is connection? • Gaze following/joint attention • Equine communication • Understanding intention • Decision making • Equine learning and learning theory • Creating contact – a common ground for interaction (imitation/mirroring, the chameleon effect etc) and what this means for therapeutic interactions. • Agency – the horse as a subject. To keep away from instrumentalization and objectification. • Interaction with humans • The mirror-neuron theory, other theories on cognition that plays a role in understanding interaction between other beings.


Lesson Plan - Level 1

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MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

15.00 - 15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections: on the observation exercise. What did you notice in the equine-human interaction? Further discussions on the role of the equine(s), the Equine Professional(s), the therapist(s) and the client(s) in an EAP/EATT session. How to prepare for sessions and how to follow-up. How you on your own can practice and develop your observational skills further, as well as your skills to stay neutral in your language and ask open-ended questions. Day 4 Putting it together: Equine-human interaction, the role of the equine, equine welfare, teamwork, defining roles in the teamwork 8.30-10.30 Theory: The equine’s role in EAP/EATT/EAL and in different existing models and in different ways of working. Introducing Intersubjectivity Theory. A theoretical outline of what goes on between equine and client. Discussing: • Rhythm, rhythmicality • Attachment for safety, attachment for companionship • The shared space between the client and the equine • Bridging between the client and the therapist – the equine and/or the EP as a transitional object. • Grounding • The equine as a safe companion • Touch/oxytocin • Bridging out into “the world” Introducing the fourth observation session, focusing in on – horse-human interaction in EAP/EATT/EAL. Working with props. Looking at roles (again). Looking at the dual task for the EP to monitor equine welfare and support the therapist/teacher/coach etc with equine observations. 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practice session: Practicing equine-human observations 2 and what to look out for, pay attention to, when working with different kinds of clients. Letting the equine assist with the above discussed areas, how to support the equine in this work. 12-30-13.30 Lunch


Lesson Plan - Level 1 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

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13.30-14.00 Theory: Equine Welfare – practical aspects, how to “mange” stress in horses • Housing • Space • Feed • Pastures/pasture time • Hoof care, dental care, vaccinations and medications, de-worming • Veterinary interventions, interventions by other equine professionals • Stereotypies • Equine stress-eustress. How the work we are doing in EAP/EATT/EAL can help create engaging environments that help both horse and human have eustress, and how you can create it outside sessions. 14.00-15.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections: What is connection? How do we make the horse feel secure/safe in this work? How do the horse and the client affect each other? Can a horse become overwhelmed? Dissociated? Put in fight, flight or please/fawn mode? How do we make sure this work does not become too much for the equine? What is equine “self-care”? Pros and cons of mounted work. Discussions on the research done and clinical experiences about equines working with clients diagnosed with PTSD, CPTSD, dissociative disorders, developmental trauma and other trauma-related “disorders”. What is negative and positive equine welfare? What role do these areas/points play in developing/maintaining equine welfare? How do they apply to EAP/EATT/EAL? Why is important for an EP to know about equine stress and possible equine trauma? How can we move from equine welfare to equine wellbeing in equine assisted therapies 15.00-16.00 Coffee/Tea with wrapping up and final discussion and questions. Presenting the content of level 2, which is focusing of some of the more important current theories on stress and trauma and how they can help you when you dive into understanding more of the interaction between horses and humans, in therapeutic and learning environments. Group feedback to the trainers and evaluation of the training. © The lesson plan for the EiT – Equines in Therapy and Learning progams, level 1, is copyright protected. All rights belong to Katarina Felicia Lundgren and Emily Kieson, at MiMer Centre, Sweden, 2019-2020


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Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

LESSON PLANS LEVEL 1/page 16 - 21 LEVEL 2/page 24 - 29 LEVEL 3/page 32 - 37 LEVEL 4/page 40 - 43

MiMer Centre

MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy & Learning programs

LEVEL 2

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Lesson Plan - Level 2

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MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Equines in Therapy, Level 2 – Lesson Plan Day 1 - Movement 8.30-9.30 Introduction (everyone) and training agenda, presenting what will be talked about and practiced, practicalities. Overview of Level 1, fundamentals and what was learned. Short discussion on what people have learned or experienced since Level 1 9.30-10.30 Movement ● ● ● ● ● ●

What is movement? & Motor learning Biomechanical model vs. Nervous system approach Somatosensory system: proprioception & interoception Modern perspectives on movement Vestibular System Pain

10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practicing equine observation 1. Observing a single horse – movement, behaviors, choices, etc. What do you observe in the horse’s movement? Where is the horse in relation to other horses? Where is the horse in relation to outdoor spaces and nature? How does the horse move and in what direction? 12.30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections on the observation exercise. What is the difference between observing horses and observing a single horse? What do we need to know to create a clearer picture of what we’re observing? What questions can we ask to give clarity to our observations? 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 2 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

15.30-17.00 Different lenses of movement & communication, Movement in practice ● ● ● ●

Embodiment Attunement and Kinesthetic Empathy Synchrony and Shared Coordination Intercorpreality Movement in EAP – Role of rhythm, unmounted and mounted work

Discussion Points What is the role of movement in EAT/L? What kind of movement opportunities or options do we offer horses? How does that impact their movement abilities and expression? How can concepts from modern movement science be applied to horses? What are the common “myths” about pain? How can awareness of pain help us in understanding pain in horses? Day 2 – Communication and Relationships 8.30-10.30 Equine Individuality and Relationships. How do we recognize when the horse is expressing something of his/her own versus what s/he is picking up from the client or facilitator? How do we recognize what each person is bringing into the space and how this is influencing the horse? How do we better understanding relationships and how they can manifest (and be used) in the EAP environment? Equine affiliative behaviors ● How horses initiate bonding/attachment ● Touch and the role in equine-equine relationships and equine-human relationships ● Role of arousal and eustress ● Maintaining relationships ● The role of rhythmicality and sound in bonding/relating ● Movement and attention to behavior in conspecifics ● Social learning and connection with bonding/attachment ● Movement and application to relationships ● Intergenerational transfer of meaning in a culture to determine the importance of ● different knowledge and skills (lenses) 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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Lesson Plan - Level 2

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MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

11.00-12.30 Practicing equine observation 2. Observing the single horse and his/her affiliative behaviors with other horses and/or humans. Always looking for both affiliative and agnostic behaviors so noticing both – subtle and obvious affiliative behaviors (ALL motion) 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections on the observation exercise. What is observed? Where does this fit into the behavioral patterns of horses? Where does this fit into the behavioral patterns of this individual horse? What is observed in the interaction that is important when discussing relationships and social bonding? 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Communication and Relationships ● ● ● ●

Attachment Bonding within and between species Horse-horse and horse-human interactions in sessions Language and terminology

Discussion – In what ways can movement be incorporated into EAP sessions at different facilities? What do the facilitators need to understand of the horse and client before consciously incorporating movement into sessions. Day 3 - Emotions 8.30-10.30 Emotions and Intersubjectivity – Horse-Human interactions Emotions defined – basic and non-basic ● Emotions and cognition ● Function of emotion relating to self ● Intersubjective regulation of movement ● Neurobiology of emotions ● Social system ●

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 2 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practicing equine-human interaction observations 1. What are we observing when we’re watching for movement in both horse and human? What types of movements occur in both species separately? Together? What types of behaviors are the focus? What are we looking for? 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections on the observation exercise. 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Emotions and Theoretical Approaches Polyvagal Theory ● Mirror Neuron Theory ● Amygdala Neuron Theory ● Panskepp ● 13.30-17.00 Group discussions and sharing with reflections on the observation exercise. What did you notice in the equine-human interaction? Further discussions on the role of the equine(s), the Equine Professional(s), the therapist(s) and the client(s) in an EAP/EATT session. How to prepare for sessions and how the knowledge learned can be utilized to help with sessions or help plan sessions. How does this apply to each facility?

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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Day 4 8.30-10.30 Physiology, Neurobiology and Structure of Sessions Neurobiology and physiology of arousal and application in interspecies relationships ● and EAP Neurobiology of movement with relation to dopamine, cortisol, endogenous opioids, ● and relation to anxiety and depression Comparative physiology of horses and humans and health repercussions ● Effects of short and long term stress on neurons and stress response ● Noticing pain and discomfort – movement and muscles ● Causes of pain and discomfort (emotional, physical, and anticipatory) and the ● manifestations Differentiating between behaviors indicating eustress and distress ● 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Practicing equine-human observations 2. Noticing behaviors and variations. What behaviors are a result of the individual? What might be a result of today/this week/this month? What might be some indicators of pain or discomfort (psychological or physical)? What stress behaviors were seen? How can they be interpreted through an understanding of motivation and stress? Have participant structure a basic session – using and applying the knowledge learned to create a session – understanding the use of the facility spaces, horses, welfare, etc. – emphasizing the importance of flexibility How to apply all the knowledge into observations and thereby use everything you see whatever shows up. (other animals, people, weather, plants, etc) 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Compassion Fatigue Compassion Fatigue in facilitators and in horses ● Recognizing the behavioral patterns of individual horses and what each person or ● horse brings into the session

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 2 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Group discussions and sharing with reflections on the observation exercise. What is connection? How do we make the horse feel secure/safe in this work? How can we help structure sessions given our facilities, equines, and incorporating space and client? How can we improve our understanding of the horse? What is equine “self-care”? 15.00-16.00 Coffee/Tea and discussions on the pros and cons of structured activities, mounted, unmounted, and at-liberty. Discussions on the role of these principles in working with different clients and therapists. How to begin using these tools to help the therapist work towards goals. © The lesson plan for the EiT – Equines in Therapy, level 2, is copyright protected. All rights belong to Katarina Felicia Lundgren and Emily Kieson, at MiMer Centre, Sweden, 2019

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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LESSON PLANS LEVEL 1/page 16 - 21 LEVEL 2/page 24 - 29 LEVEL 3/page 32 - 37 LEVEL 4/page 40 - 43

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Equines in Therapy, Level 3 – Lesson Plan Day 1 8.30-9.30 Introduction (everyone) and training agenda, presenting what will be talked about and practiced, practicalities. 9.30-10.30 Overview of Level 1 and Level 2 and what was learned. Overview of fundamentals. Short discussion on what people have learned or experienced since Levels 1 and 2 and how they have implemented material into practices. • Participants are asked to write down challenges and/or solutions they have encountered since the last trainings. These will be used in discussions throughout the workshop. 10.30-11.15 Coffee/Tea break 11.00-12.30 Mindfulness • Self-awareness • Environmental Awareness • Role of nature • Role of movement and rhythm • Practical use of mindfulness in any session • Mindfulness as a focus of therapeutic experiences vs learning experiences • Trauma-informed/sensitive mindfulness vs trauma-focused mindfulness • Mindfulness in phase 1 work win trauma work (stabilization, grounding, and preparing) • Facilitating self-awareness in clients • Research in mindfulness in equine-assisted therapies and programs 12-30-13.30 Lunch

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 3 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

13.30-15.00 Group work – Evaluating Resources – Particpants will move out to the horses and assess the horses and facility based on the knowledge they have learned in Levels 1 & 2 and list resources and approaches to structuring sessions. What is available? What is known about the horses? What resources are available that includes both horse interaction and non-horse interaction (nature, paths, etc)? How can mindfulness be used both as a prelude to sessions or as a stand-alone session given this atmosphere? 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Groups and Planning Sessions Participants are asked to go over resources and discuss preliminary options for sessions based on their own professional focuses. Time is allotted for sharing and giving feedback to each group. Day 2 8.30-9.00 Check-In What was learned from the experience yesterday and any thoughts. 9.00 – 10.00 Creating Sessions • Example flowchart/decision tree • Allowing for flexibility for facilities and for structure • Concepts of existing models and how they are broken down into elements – using those concepts to structure sessions and activities using the tools (learned form levels 1 and 2), available horses (knowing individual horses and welfare), and existing facility resources. • Developing sessions for different clients (individual, group, disorders, trauma, etc) • Finding creative approaches in addition to available resources and skills (e.g. ethograms and other behavioral notification systems) • Developing sessions for different purposes (mindfulness, self-exploration, structured therapy, etc) 10.00-10.30 Coffee/Tea break

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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10.30-11.45 Teamwork • • • • •

Theory supporting teamwork versus individual work Defining team members Training and growing a team (individually and as a partnership) Defining roles and responsibilities Defining and understanding the role of the horse

11.45-12.30 Creating sessions in groups – Participants break into groups and develop a flowchart/decision tree based on the existing facility and then design a session based around an imaginary client. 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Practice Session – Participants work in teams to practice sessions with the horses, the facility, and imaginary client. 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Discussion in small groups – What worked? What didn’t work? What could be done differently? What would be different if it were a different client? How would this be different at the participants’ facilities? Groups will show how learned theory and elements were practically applied.

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 3 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Day 3 8.30-9.00 Check-in and thoughts from yesterday 9.00-10.30 Session Development • How to think about all of the theories, elements, and welfare while designing a session • Looking at different options for sessions based on variations in applied knowledge of theories • Creative approaches to planning using existing theories, skills, and resources • Discuss different types of therapeutic goals, the facility, and how to incorporate learned theories and elements into sessions 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break and transition out to the horses 11.00-12.30 Developing Sessions – Breaking down elements and designing three different sessions as a group: Session topics will be based around the professional goals of the participants and can be based on mindfulness, clients with trauma, group clients, therapeutic interventions, etc. 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Groups take the same session as yesterday and try different approaches based on new perspectives or concentrations (also designed around the specific professions of the participants) 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Group discussions about what happened. Groups give feedback to one another about how each applied learned elements and incorporated theories, welfare, and knowledge of horse-human interactions. Groups discuss alternative options for sessions and ways that would change if the sessions were done at their own facilities (or familiar facilities).

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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Day 4 8.30-9.00 Check-in and thoughts 9.00-10.30 Practical Approaches (General and Individual) • • • •

Ethics (general and legal) Rules and regulations Record keeping and documentation Research protocols (for future research collaborations), Institutional Review Boards (IRB) and Clinical Trials.

Networking and Marketing (HorseHub) • Discussion of local resources • Discussing individual professions and local resources for professions • Options for finding help and assistance • Educational options and career development 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break 11.00-12.30 Session Development – Participants create new sessions based on their own interests/focuses/professions and develop flowcharts based on their own (or known) facilities and horses. Participants create a new session based on an imaginary client assigned by the trainers (and based on the professional focuses of the individuals). 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Practice Sessions – Participants facilitate the sessions they created, noting the differences between how this would play out at their own facility versus the host facility. 15.00-16.00 Coffee/Tea and discussions on how the sessions went and how the participants feel moving forward. Evaluation and feedback for the trainers as well © The lesson plan for the EiT – Equines in Therapy, level 3, is copyright protected. All rights belong to Katarina Felicia Lundgren and Emily Kieson, at MiMer Centre, Sweden, 2020 MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


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LESSON PLANS LEVEL 1/page 16 - 21 LEVEL 2/page 24 - 29 LEVEL 3/page 32 - 37 LEVEL 4/page 40 - 43

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Lesson Plan - Level 4

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Equines in Therapy, Level 4 – Lesson Plan Day 1 – Review and Future Goals 8.30-9.30 Introduction (everyone) and training agenda, presenting what will be talked about and practiced, practicalities. 9.30-10.30 Overview of Level 1, 2, & 3 and what was learned. Overview of fundamentals. Short discussion on what people have learned or experienced since the previous levels and how they have implemented material into practices. 10.30-11.15 Coffee/Tea break 11.00-12.30 Goals Participants are asked to list their goals for practice and as trainers and specify their scope of practice (what credentials or certifications do they have to facilitate trainings in equineassisted activities and/or equine welfare). Participants are asked to share these in small groups and clarify their goals and practices. 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Evaluating Resources and Facilities – Participants will move out to the horses and assess the horses and facility based on what is available as a training facility. What is needed? What is available? What do we need to know about the horses at the facility? What types of classroom accommodations do we need? What types of horse facilities do we need? 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Groups and Planning Sessions Participants are asked to go over resources and discuss how these resources may or may not fit with their intended goals as practitioners and/or trainers. How can we create trainings at facilities that are not ideal?

MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 4 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Day 2 8.30-9.00 Check-In What was learned from the experience yesterday and any thoughts. 9.00 – 10.30 Scope of Practice and Goals • Identifying scope of practice • Clarifying professional goals as practitioners and trainers • Recognizing limits • Fostering partnerships to expand training/professional opportunities • Recognizing options and opportunities at each facility • Importance of equines and equine welfare 10.30-11.45 Coffee/Tea break 11.45-12.30 Developing Trainings • Preparation – What is needed online, in person, at facilities and how far in advance • Mental preparation – practice and finding partners, self-awareness • Defining the education team and teamwork • Physical preparation – technology of facility, physical items to bring, what does the facility have? – Using every resource that is offered (nature, movement, etc) • Equine welfare and recognizing the individuality and agency of horses as part of the practice and an important topic to teach in trainings. • Ethics in education as it applies to both participants and horses 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Practice Planning – Participants use their list from yesterday combined with their professional focus and identify what could work for them at the facility and what they would need to adjust in order to create a training. 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Discussion – Small groups and then as a bigger group. What is the goal/focus of the MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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training? How does the facility meet those goals with regards to resources? How can you adjust to make it work? Day 3 8.30-9.00 Check-in and thoughts from yesterday 9.00-10.30 Training Development • How to plan out topics • Breaking down topics • Experiential Learning – what this means in facilitation vs education • Working with cultural and professional differences • Breaking down days into sections with breaks and variety of environments – How to increase curiosity and growth potential in participants • Encouraging discourse • Tailoring trainings to audience 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break 11.00-12.30 Developing Trainings – Participants work in small groups. Participants look at their goals, scope of practice and facility, and begin plotting out a training schedule based on a oneday or two-day schedule (or longer). 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Groups take their ideas and identify how it would play out at the facility. Participants are encouraged to try out teaching each other using a part of the facility. 15.00-15.30 Coffee/Tea break 15.30-17.00 Group discussions about what happened. Groups give feedback to one another about how each applied learned elements and incorporated professional knowledge and knowledge about the horse. MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org


Lesson Plan - Level 4 MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Day 4 8.30-9.00 Check-in and thoughts 9.00-10.30 Networking and Marketing (HorseHub) • Networking online and locally for support • Networking online and locally for clients/participants - advertising • Finding markets and identifying needs – developing new material for new markets • The role of mentorship, supervision, and peer support • Keeping updated on current research and industry information • Continuing education as a constant practice for the team • Sustainability as a business practice • Working independently or with Mimer Centre – what it means to work under a company or organization 10.30-11.00 Coffee/Tea break 11.00-12.30 Training Development – Participants work in groups to create a short lecture/presentation/demonstration that aligns with their goals and scope of practice. They can utilize resources at the facility and are encouraged to incorporate the horses into their presentation/demonstration and identify equine welfare aspects of both their demonstration and as part of their training module. 12-30-13.30 Lunch 13.30-15.00 Practice Trainings – Each group gives their presentation to the group. 15.00-16.00 Coffee/Tea, discussions, and feedback for each group. Questions and discussions about how to move forward and ongoing support for those who work with HorseHub or Mimer Centre. Evaluation and feedback for the trainers as well © The lesson plan for the EiT – Equines in Therapy, level 4, is copyright protected. All rights belong to Katarina Felicia Lundgren and Emily Kieson, at MiMer Centre, Sweden, 2020 MiMer • Hällestad 311 • 247 95 Torna Hällestad +46 768 95 98 68 • info@mimercentre.org • www.mimercentre.org

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WHAT IS HORSEHUB? HorseHub is an EU financed project being developed in the region of Lundaland, in Skåne, Sweden. The name of the EU project is Sustainable Growth for Horse Businesses (Hållbar Växtkraft Häst). The project owner is Kävlinge kommun. The purpose and the goal of the project is to create an infrastructure to help horse businesses thrive, containing networks, trainings, workshops, mentorhood, internship systems, knowledge spreading, etc. in all areas that will support a sustainable growth in the horse business sector. If you live or have your horse business within the Lundaland region, it is free of charge to be a member of HorseHub of and take part in our projects. Your contribution is your knowledge time, energy and will to grow and will to help others grow. The HorseHub project is also open for participants outside of Lundaland (and Sweden), but then there will be a small membership fee. Since HorseHub is founded on the principles of a give & gain network – it is a bidirectional project. It means we, all members are equal, and we give and gain by taking part. It is by no means a passive membership, for anyone. A secondary goal is to establish HorseHub as a sustainable business so it can continue to help horse businesses grow far and long beyond the EU-funded project has finished. Sustainability is one of our key concepts and we integrate into our work by adhering to UN:s 17 global developmental goals that are to be reached by 2030.

Our services include, but are not limited to: · · · · · · ·

Setting up, inviting and facilitating Network meetings Offering workshops around your identity as a horse business entrepreneur & owner/co-worker. Analyzing & mapping your horse business, and suggesting potential areas for development and growth Offering educations in horse business management, personal & business development trainings (en hancing leadership skills), marketing (with a focus on social media) Offering educations in new business areas related to human physical and mental health, social work, human development & learning, tourism, culture (art, crafts & history) Offering educations about horses – new knowledge, research and how to put that into practice, to main tain and grow equine welfare Offering educations & workshops on ethics, visions & missions – where you as a horse business entre preneur are positing yourself in regard to the rest of society. What is your contribution to sustainability? In all of this – we put you – your business – and the HORSE in the center. We invite you to Harness and Own your Resources – to reach a Stable Economy.

HorseHub is a EU-funded project in collaboration with Kävlinge kommun, Leader Lundaland & Jordbruksverket. Join our network and find out what we can do for you so you can do more for yourself and your business! Martin Hansson & Katarina Lundgren Project Leaders in HorseHub www.facebook.com/HorseHubInternationalBusinessNetwork


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EDUCATORS

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Emily Kieson

PhD, MS, PgDip, ESMHL, (Oklahoma, USA) Emily has a PhD in Comparative Psychology from Oklahoma State University, a MS in Psychology from Oklahoma State University, Post Graduate Diploma in Equine Science from the University of Edinburgh, and a B.S. in Ecology and Evolution from Rutgers University. She currently teaches psychology at Post University and Unity College and also teaches animal behavior at Unity College. Her passion is researching equine behavioral psychology in the context of the horse-human dyad with specific application to equine assisted therapies. Emily has spent almost 20 years as a multi-disciplinary trainer and instructor in both Texas and Oklahoma and became interested in equine-assisted activities and therapies about ten years ago. She has been trained in Equine-Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA), Natural Lifemanship, Psychodynamic Equine-Assisted Trauma Therapy (PEATT), Special People United to Ride (SPUR), and the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) in which she is certified as an Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning. It was during these trainings that she discovered the lack of research in horse-human interactions and became interested (honestly, obsessed) with developing the science in this field. Specifically, Emily is interested in understanding how horses interact with humans in ways that mimic social bonding to help develop better models of equine-assisted psychotherapy that use equine interactions to parallel interpersonal relationships. She also has ambitions of using this to help individuals create better relationships with their horses at home and create more centralized educational resources for horse owners and equine practitioners. Emily is a therapeutic riding instructor at a PATH facility in Stillwater and collaborates with various equine therapy facilities in Oklahoma for both research and therapy for all sectors of society. She also serves on the Equine Welfare Committee at PATH to develop better recommendations for equine education and welfare within the PATH community. Emily serves as Research Director at MiMer Centre and heads the research department alongside Francesca Gatti. Emily also serves as secretary on the Board at MiMer and is our contact person and program director in US (together with Kate Causbie). Together with Katarina Lundgren, she is also responsible for creating and developing our educational material. You can find Emily at emily@mimercentre.org


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Katarina Lundgren

MA student, BA, BA, EP, TSM Instructor (Sweden) Katarina is currently working on her Masters in Cognitive Science at Lund University and has a BA in Language and Literature as well as a BA in The History of Ideas and Science and Philosophy. She has also a 1-year education from SLU in Entrepreneurship in the Countryside/Animal Science. She has extensive training in the eagala model and has also a certification from Learning Animals as an equine-human interaction facilitator, and various other trainings, but she is a strong advocate for science based and model independent trainings. Her main passions are horses and humans – and communication and interaction – in all kinds of combinations, as well as trauma informed/sensitive and trauma focused care and understand. Her main passions are horses and humans – and communication and interaction – in all kinds of combinations, as well as trauma informed/sensitive and trauma focused care and understanding. In the horse world, she has managed a livery yard, riding school and educational center. She has for many years worked with helping people grow and develop with the help of horses and nature and educated about equine welfare. She is currently involved in establishing equine assisted psychotherapy/traumatherapy, other equine assisted interventions/activities and nature-based interventions/activities in Sweden. She travels internationally and gives trainings, workshops, seminars and writes about equine-human interaction, equine welfare, equine behavior, equine ethics and equines in therapy and learning programs. Katarina has a past in the business world as a marketing coordinator, information and communication specialist, educator, project leader and writer. Besides running MiMer (with its research fund, MiMer Trust), she is also Project Leader and Developer at HorseHub, an EU funded network initiative that helps horse businesses grow and develop. As a growth facilitator, trainer, trauma sensitive mindfulness (TSM) instructor and strong advocate for collaborations and teamwork, she always focuses on maintaining awareness of differing perceptions, biases and the importance of perspective-taking. It is in dialogue and through collaborations we grow, not through competing with each other. “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” (African proverb)

MiMer Centre

Katarina is the Chair of Boards in MiMer and the Director of MiMer Centre. She is heading the development of the organization and functions as a support person to all the other members, at the board and in MiMer’s extended network. Together with Emily Kieson, she is responsible for all the educational content as well for creating and developing it. You can find Katarina at katarina@mimercentre.org


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Sonja Lairila

BA, Yoga/Mindfulness/Movement Instructor (Finland, Germany) Sonja is an equine ethics and -relationship consultant & yoga instructor. She has a BA in Nature and Communication from University College Northern Denmark. Sonja has 20 years of experience in different disciplines with horses. Her passion to truly understand equines was evoked by working with many traumatized horses over the years. By being close to horses that had suffered lead her to study equines, and equine-human interaction intensively from different perspectives.

understand, both ourselves, and our equine partners better.

Besides horses, Sonja is a Dynamic Mindfulness yoga instructor, and her passion for movement and mindfulness reaches over to the equine world as well. She is curious about mindful movement experiences, and how that connects to the relationships/interactions with horses. She believes in the power of just being and observing in order to

Sonja’s interdisciplinary approach aims to bring a wider understanding and better welfare to the world of equines. Her aim is to help people improve their relationships with their equine partners through mutual understanding and to improve the general welfare and wellbeing of equines (and humans) by education. Sonja is a board member in MiMer. She is responsible for our information and communication (with a special focus on our website and blog) together with Kate Causbie and Katarina Lundgren. Sonja is also our overall European contact person and program director, together with Katarina Lundgren. You can find Sonja at sonja@mimercentre.org


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Eleanor Petitt Licensed Psychologist (Sweden)

Eleanor is a psychology and trauma consultant for MiMer. She is a licensed psychologist, has her own company and at present works within the health care system in the Swedish county of SkĂĽne. Eleanor grew up in the countryside and has always had a close bond to nature and an active connection to animals. Some of her core interests include treatment and research in the fields of exhaustion syndrome, psychological trauma and nature based and animal assisted psychological treatment and rehabilitation. Eleanor received her psychology degree from the University of LinkĂśping, where she was also trained in psychodynamic and cognitive psychotherapy. Since then Eleanor has had further training in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Eye Movement and Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR) and Nature Assisted Interventions (NAI). Eleanor also has work experience and training in a number of special areas: these include psychological trauma, nature based and animal assisted rehabilitation for people with exhaustion syndrome, chronic (long term) pain, and acquired brain injury. Eleanor has considerable experience with both individual and group treatment, lecturing, planning and holding workshops, and developing treatment programs. She is passionate about spreading knowledge and lessening stigma. You can find Eleanor at petittpsykologi@gmail.com

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MISSION/ABOUT

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MiMer

Equine - Human Education and Research Center

– is an international non-profit organization dedicated to research and education in all fields of equine-human interaction. We believe that information and knowledge is the key to improving welfare for both horses and humans in all areas of life where horses and humans interact. Through our own scientific studies in equine behavior and horse-human interactions and by utilizing existing research in all fields of equitation, animal behavior, neurobiology, cognitive science, psychology, ethology, and animal-human interactions, we create experiential educations, (trainings, workshops, seminars etc.) and educational materials for individuals interested in horses, horse behavior, horse-human interactions, and equine assisted activities, therapies, and learning. We hold high standards for the material we generate and rely exclusively on existing and emerging research in combination with proven and established best practice in this field. Our goal is to help people understand the fundamentals of horses, humans, and horse-human interactions in order to apply this knowledge in their fields and improve outcomes through proper application of these scientific principles. We do not teach a “method” and instead create materials for our audiences that allow them to incorporate and apply this knowledge into their existing or future practice. Our educational opportunities guide participants through the science and practices, create dynamic discussions, and allow for creative approaches for applying this knowledge to each individual’s unique goals, and thereby help them build sustainable businesses or organizations working in all diverse areas of equine assisted interventions and activities. The validity and importance of our material is recognized by a growing number of credentialing associations including the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl. - https://www. pathintl.org) and the Washington Mental Health Counselors Association (WMHCA) through which participants can receive continuing education credits for taking MiMer courses. We are seeking further accreditation and validation and are currently going through several such processes, since it is very important to us to offer high quality content to all our participants, in all our educational services. Each of us on the MiMer team has extensive international experiences with horses and their welfare, ranging from trainers and instructors to facilitators in equine assisted coaching and learning, therapeutic riding, and equine professionals in mental health. Our team includes instructors in trauma sensitive mindfulness and yoga (with and without horses), managers and educators in equine welfare, as well as horse experts in horse management and handling in a variety of settings and combinations. We are also trained and have extensive experience working with nature-based interventions. We have a number of researchers on staff who continue to collect data on all kinds of horses and horse-human interactions and we have collaborative networks with research centers, universities, national parks, and working rescue and equine-assisted therapy centers around the world.


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Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Relevant Papers

Stauch, K., Somers, A., Song, Y., Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (2019). Why Asia Needs Comparative Psychology: Applications in Canine-Human and Equine-Human Intearctions. Asian Journal of Interdisciplinary Research. Vol 2, no.4 pp 51-68. https://doi. org/10.34256/ajir1946 Kieson, E. (2018). The Importance of Comparative Psychology in Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies. International Journal of Comparative Psychology. Vol. 31. Kieson, E., & Abramson, C. I (2017). Horse and Human Communication: A Review of History and Future Prospects. In: O.V. Kascheev, I.V. Antonenko, & I.N. Karitsky (eds.) Psychology in Modern World: Collection of Articles of International Scientific-Practical Conference. Moscow, Kosygin Russian State University (Technology. Design. Art), (pp. 357-359). Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (2016) Equines as Tools vs Partners: A Critical Look at the Uses and Beliefs Surrounding Horses in Equine Therapies and Argument for Mechanical Horses. Journal of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry. Vol. 15, p. 94-95. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2016.08.067 Abramson, C. I., Kieson, E. (2016) Conditioning Methods for Animals in Agriculture: A Review. Ciencia Animal Brasileira, vol. 17, no.3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1089-6891v17i341981 Kieson, E., & Abramson, C. I. (2015) Exploring the relationship between animal behavior and consumer products: developing critical awareness through classroom and home-based experimentation. Comprehensive Psychology, 4, 23.

Relevant Book Chapters

Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (2019) The Importance of Time, Proximity, and Patience: Preliminary Results of a Pasture Interaction Study and Implications in EAP. In I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2019: 3rd International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Minds-n-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 4). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer. Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (2018) Horses are Not People: Research, Parallels, and Problems using Equines as Relationship Models in EAP. In I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2018: 2nd International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Mindsn-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 3). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer. Lundgren. K. (expected publication 2021), Applying Theoretical Frameworks and Organizational Structures to Help Develop the Animal Assisted Therapy Field, in L. Kogan and P. Erdman (Eds.) Career Paths in Human-Animal Interaction for Social and Behavioral Scientists, Routledge Lundgren, K. (2018). Freedom From... and Freedom To... Equine Welfare and the role of the Equine Professional in Equine Assisted Interventions, in I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse of Course 2018, Compendium 3, A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2018: 2nd International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Minds-n-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 3). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer. Lundgren, K. (2019). What science says about equine-human interaction in equine assisted therapy - An outline to a theoretical framework, in K. Sudekum Trotter and J. Baggerly (Eds.) Equine-Assisted Mental Health Interventions Harnessing Solutions to Common Problems, Routledge Lundgren, K. (2017). The Horse as a Biological Being – Ecology and Evolutionary Adaptations, in I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse of Course 2017, Compendium 1, A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2017: 1st International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Minds-n-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 1). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer. Lundgren, K. (2017). Equine Cognition and Equine-Human Interactions – Expanding Our Knowledge on Equines to Improve Equine Assisted Therapies and Equine Welfare and Wellbeing, in I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse of Course 2017, Compendium 1, A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2017: 1st International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Minds-n-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 1). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer. Lundgren, K. (2017). Sharing Minds – Equine-Human Intersubjectivity in Equine Assisted Psychotherapy – An Outline to a Theoretical Framework, in I. Parent (Ed.) A Horse is a Horse of Course 2017, Compendium 1, A Horse is a Horse, of Course 2017: 1st International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness (Minds-n-Motion Symposium Compendium Book 1). Torna Hallestad, Sweden: MiMer.

Presentations at Conferences

Speaking: Kieson, E. (June 2020) Using Knowledge in Horse and Human Affiliative Ethology to Improve Horse-Human Relationships: Analysis of Affiliative Behaviors in over 600 Horses and Overlaps with Human Social Bonding Behaviors. Accepted for oral presentation at the 3rd Annual Equine Cultures in Transition Conference, Swedish Agricultural University (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden. (conference canceled) Kieson, E., Rudd, C. (May 2020) Equine Communication: Emerging Research, Common Misconceptions, and Understanding Behavioral Indicators of Welfare. Accepted for oral presentation at the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) Virtual Conference. Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I (May 2020) Emerging Research in Domestic Equine Social Behavior, Equine-Human Interactions, and

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Implications for Horse-Human Bonding. Accepted for oral presentation at the 3rd International Equine Welfare and Wellbeing Conference through Proyecto Caballo, Barcelona, Spain. Kieson, E., Lundgren, K. (August 2019) Animal-Assisted Interventions: Competencies and Ethics – Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Trauma. Oral presentation at the Collaborative Symposium at the 2019 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Chicago, IL. Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (April 2019) The Importance of Time, Proximity, and Patience: Preliminary Results of a Pasture Interaction Study and Applications to Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy. Oral presentation at the 3rd International Symposium for Equine Welfare and Wellness, Scranton, PA. Kieson, E., Abramson, C. (November 2018) Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP): Uses and Applications. Oral presentation at the Oklahoma Psychological Association Annual Conference, Tulsa, OK. Kieson, E., Abramson, C. (August, 2018) Horses Aren’t People: Research, Parallels, and Problems using Equines as Relationships Models in EAP. Oral presentation at the 2nd Annual International Symposium on Equine Welfare and Wellness, Torna Hallestad, Sweden Kieson, E., Felix, C., Webb, S., Abramson, C. (August, 2018) Horses Prefer Food over Human Contact for Task Reward and Notes on Pasture Retrieval Behavior. Oral presentation at the 55th Annual Conference of the Animal Behavior Society, Milwaukee, WI. Kieson, E., Felix, C., Webb, S., Abramson, C. (August, 2018) Horses Prefer Food over Contact for Task Reward and Considerations for Horse-Human Bonding. Accepted for Oral Presentation at PATH International Regional Conference, El Reno, OK Kieson, E., Felix, C., Webb, S., Abramson, C. (July, 2018). Horses prefer food over human contact for task reward: Considerations for human-horse bonding. Oral presentation at the 27th Annual Conference of the International Society for Anthrozoology, Sydney, Australia. Kieson, E., Felix, C., Webb, S., Abramson, C. (June, 2018). Horses Prefer Food over Human Contact for Task Reward and Considerations for Human-Horse Bonding. Oral presentation at the 16th International Congress of Equine Facilitated Programmes, Dublin, Ireland. Kieson, E., Kirkland, B. (2018, March) Equine Behavior. Horse Owners’ Workshop, Oklahoma State University. Kieson, E. (2017, August) The Horses’ Perspective: Understanding how we communicate with horses and interpreting their behavior. PATH Region 8 Conference, Ward, AR. Lundgren, K. (2020, June) Rhythms of Relating – A Common Window of Rhythm for Horses and Humans? Accepted for oral presentation at the 3rd Annual Equine Cultures in Transition Conference, Swedish Agricultural University (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden. (conference postponed until 2021) Lundgren. K. (2020, May) Using Cognitive Science as a lens and Intersubjectivity Theory as a theoretical framework to understand equine-human interaction and co-existence. Accepted for oral presentation at the 3rd International Equine Welfare and Wellbeing Conference through Proyecto Caballo, Barcelona, Spain. Lundgren, K. (2019, December) Sharing Minds in Motion – Equine-Human Interaction in Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP). Invited Speaker at the “From Theory to Practice in Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy” seminar day at the Cavaliero Stables in collaboration with IAAAP – The Israeli Association of Animal-Assisted Psychotherapy, Kfar Bnei Zion, Israel. Lundgren, K. (2018, August) Freedom From... and Freedom To... Equine Welfare and the role of the Equine Professional in Equine Assisted Interventions. Oral presentation at the 2nd Annual International Symposium on Equine Welfare and Wellness, Torna Hallestad, Sweden (as well as being co-organizer and host). Lundgren, K. (2018, June) Sharing Minds. Equine-Human Intersubjectivity in Equine Assisted Psychotherapy. Oral presentation at the 16th International Congress of Equine Facilitated Programmes, Dublin, Ireland. Lundgren, K. (2017, August) Equine Welfare and Wellbeing in Equine Assisted Therapies. Oral Presentation at the 2nd Animal Welfare Science Symposium at Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Stockholm. Lundgren, K., Tarka, M. (2017, July) The Horse as a Biological Being – Ecology and Evolutionary Adaptations. Oral presentation at the 1st Annual International Symposium on Equine Welfare and Wellness, Wartenberg-Rohrbach, Germany (as well as being co-organizer). Lundgren, K. (2017, July) Equine Cognition and Equine-Human Interactions – Expanding Our Knowledge on Equines to Improve Equine Assisted Therapies and Equine Welfare and Wellbeing. Oral presentation at the 1st Annual International Symposium on Equine Welfare and Wellness, Wartenberg-Rohrbach, Germany. Lundgren, K. (2017, July) Sharing Minds – Equine-Human Intersubjectivity in Equine Assisted Psychotherapy – An Outline to a Theoretical Framework. Oral presentation at the 1st Annual International Symposium on Equine Welfare and Wellness, Wartenberg-Rohrbach, Germany. Lundgren. K. (2016, October) How we as facilitators see, treat and keep our horse(s). A key factor in the outcome of EAP/L sessions. Or how we never can take ourselves and our knowledge, ideas and views out of the equation. Accepted oral presentation at the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association Annual Conference, Werkendam, The Netherlands.


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Equine-Human Education and Research Centre

Lundgren, K. (2015, January) Meeting Individuals from different Cultures – Animals in Human Therapy. Accepted oral presentation at the 3rd Minding Animals Conference, New Delhi, India. Lundgren, K. (2014, November) The Subjectivity of the Horse – Why it is necessary for us to consider it. Accepted Oral presentation at the 2nd Nordic Research Seminar on Equine Assisted Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden. Lundgren, K. (2014, March) Minds in Motion Education & Research Centre. Oral presentation at the seminar series “The Animal Turn” at the Pufendorf Institute at Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Posters

Kieson, E., Lundgren, K. (August 2020) The Role of Touch, Proximity, and Affiliative Behaviors on Horse-Human Interactions. Accepted for presentation at the 2020 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC. Kieson, E., Lundgren, K. (August 2020) The Implications of Touch on Equine Welfare in Equine-Human Interactions and Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies. Accepted for presentation at the 2020 American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington DC. Kieson E. Johnson, A., Abramson, C.I. (June 2020) Proximity and Time as Shared Bonding Strategies for Horses and Humans: A Mixed-Methods Study on Interspecies Social Bonding. Accepted for presentation at the 2020 conference of the Society for Qualitative Research in Psychology (SQIP), Lesley University, Cambridge, MA. (conference canceled) Kieson E., Lundgren, K., Abramson C. I. (November 2019) Incorporating Equine Ethology and Behavioral Psychology into EAP. Accepted for presentation at the International Conference for the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship, Denver, CO. Kieson, E., Lundgren, K., Abramson, C. I.. (August 2019) Preliminary Findings of Observations of Affiliative and Stress Behaviors in Large Horse Herds with Variations in Resources. 15th Annual Conference for the International Society for Equitation Science, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

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Kieson, E., Markland, S., Dykes, H., Abramson, C. (May, 2019) Proximity and Time are Essential for Horse-Human Bonding: Preliminary Results from a Study on Horse-Human Interactions. 31th Annual Conference for the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, Boston, MA. Kieson, E., Markland, S., Dykes, H., Abramson, C. (April, 2019) Proximity and Time are Essential for Horse-Human Bonding: Preliminary Results from a Study on Horse-Human Interactions. Annual Conference for Oklahoma Psychological Society, Edmond, OK. Kieson, E., Stauch, K., Abramson, C.I. (September, 2018) Animal-Human Interactions Online Course: A Collaborative Online Approach to Teaching Students and Professionals. Annual Conference for Oklahoma Network for Teaching of Psychology, Ada, OK Kieson, E., Felix, C., Webb, S., Abramson, C.I. (September, 2018) Horses Prefer Food over Human Contact for Task Reward: Considerations for Horse-Human Bonding. Poster accepted for presentation at the 14th Annual Conference for the International Society for Equitation Science, Rome, Italy. Kieson, E., Abramson, C. (July, 2018). Equine-human interactions in therapy: A lack of research in horse-human bonding. Poster presentation at the 27th Annual Conference of the International Society for Anthrozoology, Sydney, Australia. Kieson, E., Webb, S., Abramson, C.I. (2018, April) No Difference in Pasture Retrieval Behavior between Horses Retrieved for Lunging versus Grooming: Preliminary Findings. Poster presented at the 36th annual Oklahoma Psychological Society Spring Research Conference, Edmond, Oklahoma. Kieson, E., Abramson, C.I. (2016, June) Equines as Tools vs Partners: A Critical Look at the Uses and Beliefs Surrounding Horses in Equine Therapies and Argument for Mechanical Horses. Poster presented at the 12th Annual Conference for the International Society for Equitation Science, Saumur, France.


MiMer Centre

Equine-Human Education and Research Centre


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