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HITO MAGAZINE / ISSUE 6 / APRIL 2012


SHARE YOUR STORIES ARE YOU PART OF THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY IN NEW ZEALAND? We’re looking for some bright beauty stars to speak to about their successes. The passing of the new constitution means that the beauty industry is now officially part of HITO. We are excited about hearing and sharing stories in the HITO FORMA Magazine. If you know of someone who is a high achiever or excelling in their industry training, don’t hesitate to let us know. The beauty industry is a varied and exciting area to work and train. There are sure to be many success stories out there which could inspire and inform, and we would love to share them. Please contact Kelly Henderson with any information or suggestions. E: Kelly.h@hito.org.nz | P: (04) 499-1180.

HITO NATIONAL OFFICE PO Box 11 764, Wellington 6142 Phone (04) 499 1180 Fax (04) 499 3950

NORTHERN Phone (09) 579 4844 Fax (09) 579 4845 Mobile (027) 470 0169

AUCKLAND Phone (09) 579 4844 Fax (09) 579 4845 Mobile (027) 443 2401

MIDLAND Phone (09) 579 4844 Fax (09) 579 4845 Mobile (027) 480 6550

MID-CENTRAL Phone (04) 499 5150 Fax (04) 499 5152 Mobile (027) 470 0170

CENTRAL Phone (04) 499 5150 Fax (04) 499 5152 Mobile (027) 445 5758

NORTHERN SOUTH Phone (03) 338 5376 Fax (03) 338 4376 Mobile (027) 483 2405

CONTENTS COVER STORY

SOUTHERN SOUTH Phone (03) 338 5376 Fax (03) 338 4376 Mobile (027) 470 0171

QBYE COMPETITION WINNERS

50 YEARS IN HAIRDRESSING

LIFELONG LEARNING IN NEW PLYMOUTH

Dianne Ladopoulos

Jenny Roberts

Lyndsay Loveridge

A Term That Can Strike Fear

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LITERACY SUPPORT

KIERAN JAMES

LEVI WILSON

LAURA SIMPSON

To Learn Without Literacy Or Numeracy Gaps

An Industry Where He Could Make A Difference

On Loving Hairdressing

BARBERING IS ADDICTIVE

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What is Fashion?

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COMPLEX SETTING

By Rebecca Bruce

Features In A New WorldSkills Video

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what is FASHION?

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f you are a hairdressing apprentice, 2757 is a number you will know well.

what is

2757

ALL ABOUT?

This number stands for the final assessment every apprentice sits before becoming a qualified stylist. The assessment tests the skills and knowledge of a apprentice and sees them put into action.

Before getting to the finals, you will have completed a total of 41 Unit Standards. The challenge with 2757 is being able to absorb all of this knowledge and skill into the final assessment. In other words, being able to show off how much you have learned!

to do fashion work and show integrated skills in a “commercially acceptable time”. The three elements are: • Directional Fashion Perm • Multi-shade Colouring • Complex Long Hair The word “fashion” is often talked about in 2757. What is meant by fashion in the assessment is something that can be difficult to understand. The Guidelines booklet for this assessment defines fashion as “non-basic hairdressing, which could include competition type styling.” At HITO, we hope to make the fashion part of your final assessment clearer and easier to understand. Read on to find out more.

This final hairdressing assessment has three parts. In each element, you’re asked

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 3


what is FASHION?

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isplaying a fashion look is an opportunity for you as a stylist to showcase your hairdressing ability beyond a basic level. It is also a chance to show the assessor you can integrate the skills learned throughout your apprenticeship to create something on trend. To get the best end result in your assessment, you need to put in the hours of preparation and practice. Talented stylist, salon owner and trainer Lyndsay Loveridge has helped many apprentices prepare for their final assessment. Lyndsay’s salon HQ Hair by Design in New Plymouth was named HITO Training Salon of the Year 2011. Lyndsay has had well over 125 apprentices come through the salon and qualify successfully. When it comes to fashion in 2757, Lyndsay knows it can be a hard concept to get your head around. “Comprehension of fashion is so varied… often there is a gap between what we think of fashion in the industry and the trainees understanding,” she explains. Lyndsay says it is important for trainers to realise that even after an apprentice has finished their unit standards, there is still more to learn.

“We are all on a lifelong journey of education and training,” she says, “from me, the leader, to the newbie in the salon.” “At HQ we recognise the need for further training and education for 2757.” Finding out what exactly is ‘current’ and ‘fashionable’ at the time of your final assessment can be the challenge. Lyndsay recommends each stylist keeping their own ‘style file’. In the file a stylist can keep a collection of images of current hairstyles and source how to do them. A style file can feature a page per style, cut or colour, with the end result being a practical guide to the looks the stylist can do. A file such as this can easily be put into a client’s hand to show them fresh, new hairstyles.

SO WHERE DO YOU GET THESE IMAGES? AND HOW DO YOU KNOW THEY ARE IN FASHION?

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PREPARING FOR THE FASHION ELEMENT OF YOUR FINAL ASSESSMENT Lyndsay recommends spending time doing lots of online research. “We live in the age of the internet which is a marvellous educational tool,” she says. “To see what’s in fashion I’ll often go online and Google search ‘hot hairstyles’, or search for images of music and movie stars and how they’re wearing their hair.” In the salon, Lyndsay encourages her stylists to be ahead of the client. If you as a stylist are keeping up with the current styles celebrities are wearing, for example, you can be ready for any requests. When someone comes in and asks for a style like Rihanna’s, you will know exactly what they mean and have some pictures on hand already. Lyndsay has several fashion websites she frequents for inspiration. Style.com, the Hairdressers Journal Interactive (www.hji.co.uk) and Behindthechair.com are a few she recommends. “But I’ll go through every online hair magazine I can find,” she adds. These websites provide ample fashion images and show you what is new and fresh in the hairdressing industry. Another practical idea is to search the internet for well-known hairdressers and have a look at what work they are currently doing. Ask around at your salon if anyone has a favourite hairstylist they look up to or a fashion website or magazine they can recommend. Lyndsay would even suggest visiting websites for companies that produce technical products used in salons. The product images are often accompanied with beautiful fashion images to inspire you. You can even go on from this by checking the name of the hairstylist who worked on these images and doing an internet search on them to find more of their work. Before you know it, you will have pages and pages of fashion images to inspire you, giving you a grasp on what looks are current and on trend.

You can use these images to create a mood board, style file or look book that can be a guide for your assessment. Always remember it is a great tool for your client too. “Thinking you can do something because you have the picture is often not reality,” Lyndsay adds. “Practise makes perfect - it takes the guess work out of what you do and is less stressful to boot! Remember you want your work to be fun!” LYNDSAY LOVERIDGE


what is FASHION?

The Successful Stylist Checklist Be proud to be a hairdresser and always strive to be the very best you can be! Team work is everything! Help and be helped – give and you will get! Remember you are a hairdresser 24/7. Even when off duty, people notice who you are? ’C onversation’, lift your game – be interested and interesting! Learning is life long -it keeps you current and thirsty for more! Talk your talk and walk your talk! ’C onsultation’ Never under-estimate the power of making some-one look and feel great!

Remember it is not about you – it is all about your client! Never ever let a dissatisfied client leave your chair. Get it right before they do! The only thing to bring to work is a good mood- leave your bad mood outside the door! Lip service is not the mark of a professional, ‘be focused!’ Gossip is a no, no! P lay it safe with your talk! Don’t be late, honour each client’s appointment time! ’Be in the moment’ and do what needs to be done – not just what you want to do! Do it every time because that is your job. It is a win – win for both you and your client!

LYNDSAY AND HER TEAM ACCEPTING THE HITO TRAINING SALON OF THE YEAR AWARD 2011

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what is FASHION?

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mily Frew from Biba salon in Auckland found practical preparation to be vital in the lead up to her final assessment.

EMILY FREW

Emily, who was named HITO Apprentice of the Year in 2010, sat her final assessment in December the same year. As part of her planning for this assessment, Emily created a “look book” detailing the fashion looks she intended to achieve in her finals. “I had a page for my colour, a page for my perm and my hair up,” she explains. “On each one I had pictures I’d found and diagrams I’d drawn showing the look I was going to do and how I was going to achieve it.” For anyone preparing for their final assessment, Emily would recommend making a similar “look book” or mood board to bring all your ideas together. “This keeps you, your model and assessor on the same page,” she explains. Emily made sure she had a firm grasp on what was fashionable at the time of her assessment. That way she was able to choose fashion looks that were current and on trend. She did this by keeping an eye on what clients in her salon were asking for. She also studied what looks Senior Stylists were doing. This is a fantastic way to pick up on current trends. Take note of what looks are frequently asked for in the salon as these an excellent indicator of what is currently fashionable. If, on the other hand, there are looks that were being asked for regularly but you notice a drop in their popularity, this is a sign of something going out of fashion. Emily also researched fashion editorials and runway shows, taking these global trends and interpreting them into a more commercial, wearable form. “Runway or editorial looks I commercialised by just bringing the style down a notch, naturalising it so that clients are more comfortable to wear it at everyday functions, but still feel edgy and fashion forward,” she explains. If you take a look at a few different runway shows from the current season, you may notice the popularity of a certain hair colour or style. This indicates that this colour or style is in fashion at the moment, so it may be something

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APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 2010 EMILY FREW’S TIPS FOR PASSING 2757 you want to incorporate into your assessment. As fashion is highly seasonal, make sure you look at the current season and not something from two years ago by accident. An easy way to find images from recent runway shows is to page through new fashion magazines or use Google to search for images. Be specific in your internet search - writing ‘Stolen Girlfriends Club, Autumn/Winter 2012’ into a search engine will bring up accurate, current results. Typing in “fashion shows” will bring much more mixed results. In terms of magazines, Emily recommends Tribute online magazine, Grazia, Fashion Quarterly, Harper’s Bazzar, and Australian Vogue. Each of these magazines features stunning fashion editorials which will inspire you and give you a clear idea of what styles are currently fashionable. After you’ve researched your looks and decided what you want to achieve in your assessment, Emily advises to practice, practice, practice! “For my finals I practiced on my friends and mannequins. I used my workmate as my hair up model so whenever we had any down time at the salon I would practice on her,” she says. “I practiced for at least a few hours a week uninterrupted, along with as this down time at work, and working on clients as my experience kept growing.”

Emily had help from her employer and another senior stylist at work in the lead up to her assessment. She also went to a perm workshop taken by Anne Miller. This workshop covered the expectations of the perm in unit 2757. Workshops such as this are particularly helpful, she says. For her models, Emily used a workmate, a friend and a friend’s friend. She recommends using family and friends if they are willing, or asking them to ask their friends. If you’re having trouble in your model search, social media can be a convenient medium to use. You can use your Facebook account to advertise what you’re looking for to your friends. If you are doing this, Emily advises putting together an online look book of the looks you want to do on your models. This could inspire someone to have a change. Another piece of advice from Emily is to do a mock assessment before the day. “As much as you practice the different components separately, it’s valuable to have another set of models to do similar work to what you plan to do for your assessment,” she says. “Once you’ve done that, you’ll be a million times more confident you can do it.” Emily has shared her top tips for passing 2757. Take a look for some helpful insight from someone who has been there.


what is FASHION?

Emily’s Top Tips

F I N A L S 2 7 5 7

Find the perfect hair types for your looks. Inspiration and imagination. Never give up. Ask anything (questions/doubts? C lear it all up before the day). LO T S and lots of practice. Strong communication and understanding between the assessor and yourself of your looks and the final outcome. 2 sessions (morning and afternoon). 7 aspects to the day (colour, cut, blow-dry, perm, cut, set and hair up). 5 good sleeps leading up to the day. 7 deep breaths before you start!

EXERTS FROM EMILY’S LOOK BOOKS

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“ I THINK QBYE IS THE BEST THING THAT HAS HAPPENED FOR MY CAREER.”

DIANNE LADOPOULOS

QBYE COMPETITION WINNERS

At first Rebecca thought that a “piece of paper” wouldn’t make much of a difference to her career. But when she opened her own salon four years ago, she soon realised that in order to bring on any apprentices she would need to become qualified. Rebecca went ahead with her QbyE and really enjoyed the experience. “There have always been hairdressing qualifications, but it’s great to see barbers being recognised at the same level,” says Rebecca. She is an advocate for the barbering industry and says barbering qualifications give apprentices something to work towards.

IF YOU’VE BEEN IN THE HAIRDRESSING OR BARBERING INDUSTRY FOR OVER EIGHT YEARS HAIRDRESSING BUT ARE UNQUALIFIED, THEN QUALIFICATION BY EXPERIENCE (QBYE) IS FOR YOU.

“It’s nice having someone assess you as well. Even when you’ve been in the industry so long, it’s good to know you’re still doing everything right.”

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Since finishing, Rebecca has had two apprentices complete their apprenticeship in her salon and has worked with our team at HITO on some NZQA barbering standards.

t’s a way to have your skills recognised towards gaining a National Qualification. For hairdresser Dianne Ladopoulos and barber Rebecca Bruce completing their QbyE has paid off in more ways than one. From August to November last year HITO offered a special QbyE promotion. Not only was there a discount on the course fee but, if the QbyE was completed within three months of signing up, the stylist went into the draw to win an iPhone. Two brand new iPhones were available, one for a hairdresser and one for a barber. Many completed their QbyE within the timeframe but only two could win. In the end Dianne Ladopoulos and Rebecca Bruce earned themselves not only a National Certificate but a new iPhone as well. Hairdresser Dianne Ladopoulos completed her QbyE after 16 years in the industry. Inspired by her aunt, Dianne wanted to be a hairdresser from the age of five. But after finishing school she was not confident in finding an apprenticeship because of a hearing disability. “I thought this would be a huge disadvantage,” she explains.

Later in 1996 Dianne’s boyfriend (now her husband) encouraged her to go after her dreams. She applied at Schnips Phd in

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Pakuranga and it was all go. Dianne worked at this salon for 12 years. However due to having her first child towards the end of her training, she didn’t end up completing her final exam. Being unqualified was something Dianne felt was hanging over her head, but she thought the process would be hard and expensive. However with the support of HITO and her trainer Vicki Bradley at Soma Day Spa and Salon in Howick she completed her final exam. “Being able to say I’m qualified has given me the confidence I‘d always known it would,” says Dianne. Since finishing her QbyE she has taken a job as Senior Stylist at the Marina Salon in Half Moon Bay.

“I’d definitely recommend QbyE,” Rebecca says. “It has been a fantastic experience.” If you’re interested in gaining a QbyE, or just want more information, please visit our website www.hito.org.nz or give Kelly Slater a call at our National HITO Office on (04) 499 1180. The QbyE process has no time frame but our enthusiastic team are here to help you complete your certificate as quickly as possible.

She would recommend QbyE without hesitation. “I think QbyE is the best thing that has happened for my career,” she smiles. “Thank you HITO for the opportunity to finish what I started.” Rebecca Bruce from Dads & Lads in New Plymouth also completed her QbyE after barbering for 15 years. Originally from the UK, when she began working there was no barbering qualification available.

DIANNE’S WELL DESERVED iPHONE


MARK YOUR CALENDAR

THE INDUSTRY AWARDS ARE BACK! THE 2012 HITO INDUSTRY AWARDS ARE SET TO BE AN EXCITING NIGHT YOU WON’T WANT TO MISS. TAKING PLACE AT THE WELLINGTON TOWN HALL ON NOVEMBER 11TH, THE INDUSTRY AWARDS ARE A CHANCE TO HONOUR RISING STARS IN HAIRDRESSING & CELEBRATE THE SUCCESSES OF THE PAST YEAR. THIS YEAR’S THEME IS ART DECO.

TICKETS $145

APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR

TRAINING SALON OF THE YEAR

One of New Zealand’s most prestigious hairdressing awards, Apprentice of the Year goes to someone who truly stands out as an up and coming star in the industry.

This is awarded to a salon with exceptional training characteristics and a commitment to excellence in training and professional development.

TRAINER OF THE YEAR

HAIRDRESSING TUTOR OF THE YEAR

The Trainer of the Year Award recognises the exceptional industry knowledge, training characteristics and personal achievements of trainers. This is a new award which started last year.

This award goes to a tutor with an exceptional commitment to motivating and inspiring learners.

JASMINE MCBETH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP This award goes to an apprentice whose commitment and passion stands out and has allowed them to be the best and achieve their goals. The winner receives a $3,000 training and development scholarship and a pair of specially fitted scissors from KJ Scissors worth $1000. Applications for these prestigious awards will be available shortly so keep an eye out, and tickets will be on sale soon.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 9


JENNY ROBERTS 50 years in Hairdressing THIS MONTH JENNY ROBERTS OF NEW PLYMOUTH IS CELEBRATING 50 YEARS IN THE HAIRDRESSING INDUSTRY AND HAS “LOVED EVERY MINUTE OF IT”.

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“DO WHAT YOU LOVE, LOVE WHAT YOU DO.”

1961

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rom a young age Jenny had her heart set on becoming a hairdresser. Then based in the UK, it was in 1962 on her 15th birthday that Jenny and her Mother negotiated a salon job for her. The salon owner, who Jenny remembers as ‘Mr Antony’, agreed to train her after some persuading on her Mother’s behalf. The deal was that Jenny would work for free but he would give her industry training, something she says probably wouldn’t be allowed to happen these days. What may seem like an unbelievable break was just what Jenny needed and she thrived in the salon environment. During this time, she attended some advanced cutting schools where she had her first encounter with Tony and Guy. After two years, Jenny’s family moved back to their native Blenheim, New Zealand. Jenny put herself out there once again, using her generous nature and her experience from the UK to get a job at another salon. From Blenheim, Jenny moved on to New Plymouth and worked as a hairdresser there. Next it was Pukekohe where she started her first salon; later she opened another in Hamilton. Finally in 1982 Jenny opened The Beauty Box back in New Plymouth where she’s still based today. It was in New Plymouth that Jenny had her first introduction to a formal organisation – the Taranaki Hairdressers Association, which she is still a member of. Jenny has seen an increase in the prevalence of formal associations like this and HITO, a change which has made things much easier. Over the years, Jenny has also noticed a positive change in formal training and attitudes towards training. Throughout Jenny’s early career, she got by on her recognised prior learning’ as there

were no qualifications available. It was only five years ago that she sat her final exams and got a National Qualification. When Jenny started in hairdressing trainees were told “what to do, but not why to do it” she explains. “You just did what you had been shown.”

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She believes the qualifications and training available now are “incredibly helpful”. “They show stylists where they are at, what limitations they have and why things are done the way they are.” One thing Jenny firmly believes is that all stylists need plenty of time on the floor before qualifying, even after completing classroom training. “Nothing can replace that over and over again practicality that you only get from practice on the floor,” she explains.

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Jenny has had several apprentices train under her over the years and believes wholeheartedly in attending classes to improve your skills. “One of my bosses sent me to a cutting class as a reward, and I realised this was the best way to reward apprentices under me – with more training,” Jenny says. “I’ve also had L’Oreal salons since day one, and their courses taught me a huge amount.” Looking back over the last 50 years, Jenny remembers her favourite time being the late 1960s and the 1970s. Every weekend women would come into the salon to get long hair ups for parties and balls, something she found “so exciting”.

1991

Jenny has worked every year since the age of 15, yet she is still passionate about what she does. “It’s not hard when you love something. Do what you love, love what you do.” TODAY

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BETHANY TAKING A CLIENT THROUGH HER CONSULTATION.

LIFELONG LEARNING AND MOTIVATION IN NEW PLYMOUTH LYNDSAY LOVERIDGE, OWNER AND TRAINER AT HQ HAIR BY DESIGN, IS PASSIONATE ABOUT HELPING YOUNG STYLISTS SUCCEED IN THE HAIRDRESSING INDUSTRY.

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amed HITO Training Salon of the Year 2011, HQ has seen well over 125 hairdressing apprentices complete their training and qualify. Lyndsay has been in the industry since the late 1960s and has a wealth of knowledge and experience to offer. She believes that making mistakes is part of the journey, but the key is to use these as steps to success. Not that she thinks she has ‘made it.’ Lyndsay believes we are all on a lifelong journey of education and training – “from me, the leader, to the newbie in the salon,” she explains. Located in New Plymouth, HQ Hair by Design moved to the city’s main street six years ago after 18 years in Centre City shopping centre.

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HQ takes education and training seriously, and the results are unmistakable. “It’s very evident that all past and present staff of the salon have been trained at such a level that they are a cut above other stylists in the region,” says Jeremy Scarle, HQ Senior Stylist.

“ YOU CAN CREATE PARTNERSHIPS WITH CLIENTS THAT LAST FOR A LONG TIME.”

With a desire to produce skilled, versatile hairdressers in mind, HQ has developed an innovative in-salon training programme. The HQ programme is aligned with and designed to compliment and support the three years of Off Job Training apprentices complete.

Lyndsay thinks it’s important to teach hairdressers to be proud of who they are and the work they do.

Each trainee is taught a variety of skills in the programme, not just hairdressing. Life skills and presentation skills are on the agenda

“Hairdressing is one of very few occupations where you get to spend large blocks of time with people one on one,” she explains.

and apprentices are required to give presentations each year of their training.


“You can create partnerships with clients that last for a long time.” When new employees come into the salon they are first treated to a service as a client. This allows them to experience what great customer service feels like and see what will be expected of them in the future. Another part of the HQ in-house training programme is a mentor system. All apprentices are mentored by a buddy from the team, someone who has “been there and done that.” They care, create rapport, listen to the apprentice’s on-going needs and give them advice, support and deadlines to work within. “There are so many playful personality types in the industry,” Lyndsay says, “they need the deadlines and support to keep them motivated.” As an employer or trainer, the most important thing you can do, in Lyndsay’s opinion, is lead by example, or “walk the talk.” As they say, people will follow not just what you say but what you do. Preparation and planning is another important part of training. This means not just making plans having the willingness to tailor your plans to suit the needs of the salon and the individual. “Sometimes it takes going outside the box,” Lyndsay explains. “This is a world of change, and we need to meet the needs of change. If you keep doing the same old, you keep getting the same old.” It is important to remember, however, that as the employer you can’t be all things for all people. Lyndsay recommends finding the best person in your team, or even if necessary, looking outside your team to fill that training need. “If you end up spreading yourself thin over too many areas, you can’t give your best to any of them,” she says. Lyndsay is passionate about education and advises young apprentices to look at the bigger picture, not just here and now. “Getting your qualification is your passport for life,” she says. For trainers and employers, Lyndsay says it’s important to remember young apprentices like to be challenged and trusted with more responsibilities.

“ SOMETIMES IT TAKES GOING OUTSIDE THE BOX... THIS IS A WORLD OF CHANGE, AND WE NEED TO MEET THE NEEDS OF CHANGE. IF YOU KEEP DOING THE SAME OLD, YOU KEEP GETTING THE SAME OLD.” “Training shouldn’t end once a stylist passes their final assessment, to do so can mean that the stylist becomes restless and perhaps ready to move on. After becoming qualified young people want to take the next step, to train others, to pass their knowledge forward…they want more to do, then they feel more fulfilled within their job.” Lyndsay’s passion for what she does is something that keeps her motivated to do the best job possible. “Stay in the game as long as you’re passionate,” she recommends, “and you’re delivering each and every time you pick up those scissors.”

“TRAINING SHOULDN’T END ONCE A STYLIST PASSES THEIR FINAL ASSESSMENT, TO DO SO CAN MEAN THAT THE STYLIST BECOMES RESTLESS AND PERHAPS READY TO MOVE ON.” FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 13


COMPLEX SETTING HITO TUTOR OF THE YEAR 2011, CLAIRE ALLEN, WRITES HER FIRST ARTICLE FOR FORMA.

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omplex setting is a term that can strike fear into even the most experienced trainers. To be honest, before I began teaching I would not have been able to explain what constitutes a complex set aside from the fact that it sounded difficult. Complex setting is made up of three essential parts in order to meet the assessment requirements:

• Moulding or placement – which creates a flat or hollow area in the design • The use of a minimum of 5 rollers with 2 different placement types (e.g. on base, off base, ½ off base, over directed, under directed or indentation) • The use of a minimum of 5 pincurls with 2 different placement types (e.g. long stem, short stem, no stem, stand up and barrel) One of the key issues I come across as a tutor and from an assessing point of view is that trainees struggle to see the difference between an elementary set and a complex set. A question I challenge them with in their first lesson is “Do you think that models hair would sit like that naturally?” If the answer is yes, then it is not a complex set. Complex setting requires you to take the hair out of the way it falls naturally and manipulate it into a shape. With this in mind, model choice is a huge factor when preparing for your complex setting assessment. You only have 1 hour and 10 minutes from the time you apply your styling product to completion of your dressing out, and this is including the application of any finishing product. So you don’t want to choose a model with hair down to her waist. Similarly, you also don’t want a model that has super thick or highly damaged hair, both can take ages to dry and this can affect your ability to stay with the assessment time frames. Damaged hair also tends to have poor elasticity, which can result in limp or little wave/curl or movement if the correct roller size is not used. Now that I have probably put you off complex setting for life, I would like to talk about the benefits of being able to

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complex set confidently. Looking at current fashion trends, there has been an obvious movement towards big hair with curl and volume. After a long period ironing our hair to death, setting is back. I have been involved in a number of weddings recently and I have seen a resurgence of big, glamorous, romantic hair. This is often created, with a modern twist, through setting. Look at any number of well know celebrities and fashion magazines and they will all show that complex setting is a fantastic and fun skill to have. So don’t be fearful when delivery of complex setting comes up in your training timetable. It is a fun, challenging, and creative skill to develop and you will find it useful in your hairdressing career. Claire Allen HITO Tutor of the Year 2011 CLAIRE ALLEN


LITERACY SUPPORT HITO IS PASSIONATE ABOUT EVERY APPRENTICE HAVING THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN WITHOUT LITERACY OR NUMERACY GAPS STANDING IN THE WAY.

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s an organisation, we are also committed to improving literacy levels in the hairdressing industry as a whole. Developing literacy skills within the industry will help salons develop their customer base and adapt to future needs. Natasha Spencer from The Right Cut in Palmerston North knows the value of pursuing literacy training first hand. At school Natasha always had trouble with literacy, but she was too embarrassed to seek help. After leaving school and coming into the hairdressing industry a an apprentice, Natasha began to find her off job training and study difficult.

write them down for me. Now I’m doing everything by myself,” Natasha says.

Both Natasha’s employer and her Sales and Liaison Manager Fiona noticed she was struggling, and they did some study with her. From that, they recommended she attend adult literacy classes.

She is noticing a substantial change in everything, from spelling to the way she speaks, and her workmates are noticing too.

“I realised how frustrating this had become,” Natasha says, “and I was happy to do something about it.”

“Problems with literacy are nothing to be ashamed of. The best thing you can do is get some advice and training. It makes such a vast difference,” Natasha says.

Natasha followed through with some adult literacy education for her first year as an apprentice and she started doing well. In her second year, she began to find training and work quite hard and ending up stopping her literacy education. Eventually, Natasha managed to get back on track. Now in her 3rd year of her apprenticeship she’s spending this year finishing off her literacy training and doing well. It may be hard sometimes, and you may make mistakes, Natasha would “100% recommend” pursuing literacy training. She is now starting to see how much benefit her training has had on her career. “I’ve started to realise how much it has helped. I used to have to tell my tutor the answers for assessments, and she would

To get a copy, or just find out more information, talk to your Sales and Liaison Manager.

HITO’s commitment to up-skill people in the hairdressing industry means that all Modern Apprentices have a literacy assessment when they sign up. This makes sure the tutor, employer and apprentice are all on the same page. It’s a chance to evaluate any gaps and make sure the apprentice can get all the training needed. To create even more emphasis on literacy and numeracy this year, we have also launched an exciting new computer based learning tool for salon employers and trainers. Called “Aquarius”, this tool has exercises and real-life suggestions to help salon owners, managers and trainers help support apprentices Aquarius covers a wide range of topics from reception and retail skills to making a superb first impression, telling the time, spelling client’s names and giving and following instructions.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 15


TRAINING MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE

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n 1 April 2012, the government will increase the minimum training wage for employees aged 16 or above from $10.40 to $10.80 per hour.

For further information, please refer to www.ers.govt.nz/pay/minimum.html

This applies to apprentices in a HITO training agreement over 16 years old.

If you are under 15 year old, there are places where you can’t work.

The minimum wage for those not in a training agreement also rise to $13.50.

Additional Information Regarding Minimum Wage There is no set rate for employees under 16 years old. The rates are gross before tax. Holiday pay must be paid in addition to the minimum wage. There are serious ramifications for breaches of Minimum Wage requirements (and holiday pay) and Labour Inspectors (Labour Department) have the power to issue demand notices if: • An employee complains and the Inspector believes the employee has not received wages or holiday pay; • Where the employer has been given a 7 day notice to comment on the complaint and the Inspector is satisfied the employee is entitled to the wages or holiday pay. Labour Inspectors can enter the employer’s premises under the provisions of the Act, interview people and require copies of wages, time and holiday records. Employers who fail to comply with any ‘requirements’ of Inspectors face penalties under the Act.

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Youth Age Restrictions on Dangerous Work

These restrictions also apply to people under 15 visiting the workplace. They don’t apply to any areas if the employee works at all times in an office in that area, or in any part of that area used only for selling goods or services. They don’t apply to visitors who are under direct adult supervision, on a guided tour or who are in areas accessible to the public. No-one under 15 can work if: • Goods are being prepared or made for sale: • Any construction work is being done: • The work involves machinery. This includes using or cleaning any machine, powered tool or appliance: • Any other work is being done in that area that is likely to harm them: • This doesn’t apply if at all times they work in the office or in any area used only to sell goods or services. No-one under 15 can: • Drive or ride on a tractor, implement, mobile plant or other vehicles. • Operate machinery. • Lift heavy loads or perform any other work that is likely to injure their health. No-one under 16 can work after 10pm or before 6am.


NEW HITO CONSTITUTION UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTED

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onday 19 March 2012 was a historic day for HITO and for the industries that HITO supports for qualification development. It was the day that changed the HITO constitution and officially sanctioned the HITO coverage of the Beauty industry. After years of working towards this goal, this was an exciting step for HITO and a step that moved the organisation forward substantially in its rules, coverage and future proofing. HITO Board Chair Allison Murray thanked all existing HITO members and the constitutional working group at the HITO AGM. A lot of preparation, hard work and listening were put into the extensive consultation process over recent months. The new constitution will come into effect, once registered, in early April. “Thank you for your vote of confidence,” she said as the constitution was unanimously adopted. Salon owner Cathryne Baarspul of Napier said that the passing of the new constitution has opened doors for the industry. “This is our chance to grow as an industry. I’ve been in hairdressing for years but it’s still so exciting to see us growing and going forward in a new direction.” The new constitution means there will be some substantial changes to the way membership is structured and the way the Board is organised and appointed. However, HITO’s day to day operation will continue as normal. The Board elected at this year’s AGM, remains the same but has now become the transitional Board under the new constitution. It will continue to lead HITO for the next six months, until a Special General Meeting scheduled for Monday 15 October when a new Board will be voted on by the new membership. Only those who are members as of Monday 15 October will be entitled to speak. And, if full members, vote at the special general meeting.

MEMBERSHIP One of the next steps is for new membership forms to be developed over the coming months. We will send these out to invite all of those working in the barbering, beauty and hairdressing industries to join. Members can be in one of two categories: • Full membership (employers) and; • Associate members (associations, corporates, training providers, individuals, employers, employees and students). All employers and trainees with an existing training agreement will be sent a variation form allowing them to join as a member. Other employers and industry people will be sent full membership packs. The transitional board will also appoint the inaugural Board Appointments Panel. Once this panel is appointed they will be calling for nominations to the new Board, either for elected or appointed positions. Once again, HITO would like thank everyone who has been involved in the entire process. There have been dozens involved since it started including every member of the Regional Hairdressing Associations who spent the time and energy reading and understanding the constitution. The association presidents and secretaries arranged meeting and discussions. We are and will continue to be proud of our close association with all of the hair industry. We are also excited about building on our relationships with barbering and beauty.

The future is bright. Please contact Sharon van Gulik on 021 663 597 with any questions about the next steps in this process.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 17


KIERAN JAMES


“SCISSORS ARE A HAIRDRESSER’S MOST IMPORTANT TOOL... IF YOU SERVICE THEM PROPERLY, THEY WILL LAST YOU A LONG, LONG TIME.”

KIERAN JAMES TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO ENGINEER KIERAN JANES STUMBLED ACROSS AN INDUSTRY WHERE HE FELT HE COULD MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

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ver since he has been on a mission to manufacture quality, hand crafted, professional hairdressing scissors.

“I’ve watched a lot of hairdressers over the years, and could see that the design of the scissors on the market was fundamentally flawed. My design lowers a hairdressers arm by 45 degrees, and this takes the pain away from the hairdressers neck and shoulders,” says Kieran.

stainless steel then welded onto the blade piece which is made from high carbon stainless steel. After shaping they are then taken through a series of very complicated steps to harden them to the exact hardness for hair scissors. Each pair of KJ Scissors cost $1000 and while Kieran admits this puts some hairdressers off at first, it doesn’t take long for them to realise that they are an investment worth making.

“Ask a hairdressers partner how they are when they get home and if the answer is ‘grumpy and tired’ then they probably need to invest in a pair of my ergonomic scissors. Within days of using them their Repetitive Stress Injury pain disappears. It’s incredibly rewarding seeing hairdressers who for years have been struggling on a diet of panadol and anti-inflammatories to rediscover their passion for hairdressing,” says Kieran.

“Scissors are a hairdresser’s most important tool and when you think about how many cuts they do in a year, $1000 is nothing. If you service them properly, they will last you a long, long time,” says Kieran.

Kieran’s scissor design is patented, with each pair taking about one month to manufacture from start to finish. Using machinery that he has invented himself, Kieran can produce 20-40 pairs a month. Each pair is individually tailored to the finger length of the hairdresser, and can be made for either left or right-handers.

One of Kieran’s biggest pet hates is the lack of quality scissor sharpening services available in New Zealand. Kieran is a Worldrecognised expert at scissor sharpening, and can sharpen and return scissors by courier in around 3 working days.

Each blade is made up of two pieces; the handles are cast from hypo-allergenic

KJ Scissors offer a money back guarantee if you’re not satisfied, and it is proof of the quality of Kieran’s scissors that no pair has ever been returned.

“There are a lot of cowboys out there saying they can sharpen scissors but in reality they’re destroying them,” says Kieran.

Kieran believes that the industry needs to endorse scissor sharpeners who meet a certain standards. He says that a competition that would allow sharpeners to prove their skills would be a useful first step. KJ Scissors are a sponsor of the Jasmine McBeth Memorial Scholarship, providing a free custom made pair of scissors to the winner. Kieran says he was prompted to sponsor the Scholarship after meeting Jasmine. “I was at a low point with my business and meeting her in New Plymouth was a real motivation. It was a privilege for me to be able to give her a pair of custom made scissors. The letters and feedback I have received from the Jasmine McBeth Scholarship winners continue to inspire me and keep me motivated,” says Kieran. One of Kieran’s future goals is to design and develop a cheaper, entry level, pair of scissors suitable for people entering the industry, or for use by senior stylists as a second pair – something he sees as essential for any professional hairdresser. For more information on KJ Scissors go to www.kjscissors.co.nz or phone 07 863 4899

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 19


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FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 21


Shape future hairdressing skills and professionalism

HITO MENTORS

WANTED

Are you are interested in supporting apprentices and industry training? HITO is looking for skilled, professional and inspiring mentors. You will be running and delivering skill and fashion based training sessions, writing articles on industry related trends and bringing your topics to life. If you have qualified as a hairdresser for 2 years or more, have worked continuously as a stylist, excel in and are passionate about training? We want you to apply for these 12 month fixed term positions in: Northland Auckland Bay Of Plenty/Poverty Bay Waikato Taranaki/Wanganui Hawkes Bay Manawatu Wellington Nelson Marlborough Canterbury/ South Canterbury/Westland Otago/ Southland

In return you will receive a fee for your service, professional development and be provided with the opportunity to take part in an advanced qualification. To register your interest, email your CV and a letter explaining why HITO needs you. You should include proof of your professional development over the last 2 years. You may include any supporting evidence. Email Renee Heatherwick at: renee@hito.org.nz


Sign on a new year 1 or 2 hairdressing apprentice between April and September and receive a 60-90 minute inspirational, power-packed phone consultation with Malcolm from Shock Consulting.

“It will revolutionise the way you think about your business!” In the session, you will brainstorm: • Where you seriously want to be. • What your main issues are right now. • Ideas on how to overcome them. • Why all successful salon owners employ apprentices. • How apprentices increase your revenue.

“You will hang up feeling excited and energized about your business again”

Malcolm’s passion is people; his enthusiasm is business, and his mission is to help salon owners in achieving the dream they had when they first began. Malcolm can help you live out your dream through empowering you to create a business that can run on autopilot. Then you can do the things you want to do - not just what you have to do. Malcolm brings over 25 years of Salon Industry experience to your door to help you succeed.


LEVI WILSON

LEVI JUST LOVES HAIRDRESSING LEVI WILSON DIDN’T HAVE TO LOOK FAR TO FIND HIS PASSION. DESPITE REPEATEDLY TELLING HIMSELF THAT HE WOULD NOT FOLLOW IN HIS PARENT’S FOOTSTEPS AND BECOME A HAIRDRESSER, THE 3RD YEAR APPRENTICE IS NOW CONVINCED THAT HAIRDRESSING IS THE CAREER FOR HIM.

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evi’s parents, Debbie and Tony Wilson, own Raven Hair Cutters in Auckland. Having grown up around hairdressing Levi never thought he would become a hairdresser himself, but he hasn’t looked back. “I just love it - every aspect of it. It’s fast paced, you’re making people feel beautiful, and you never have a sad client,” says Levi. “It’s been great learning off my parents - they encouraged me to get cutting on the floor really early on. Being dropped in the deep end it was sink or swim stuff and a lot of hard work, but it was worth it”, says Levi. Levi’s obvious talent has caught the eye of key people in the industry, including 2011 New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year Sara Allsop, who Levi has work for at the last two New Zealand Fashion Weeks. Sara has asked Levi to form a show for Next Generation at Hair X in Auckland

“ I WANT TO BE THE BEST, BUT I KNOW IT’S A STEEP HILL TO CLIMB AND THERE’S HEAPS MORE I HAVE TO LEARN.” (3-4 June). This will involve Levi and his co-worker Bridgette Craig working together to develop fashion forward looks for eight different models. Levi will also be working For Sara at the opening show of the Australian Hair Expo (9-11 June). Levi’s strength lies in his cutting, and he sees himself specialising in this in

the future. Session styling is another aspect of the industry that really excites and motivates him. “I love session styling because it’s so quick. You get a look, and you work hard out to perfect it,” says Levi. Levi says his main goal in hairdressing is to make his clients look and feel as beautiful and as stylish as he can. “I want to be the best, but I know it’s a steep hill to climb and there’s heaps more I have to learn. Once he finishes his National Certificate in Hairdressing Levi is interested in expanding his experience and knowledge by working in London for a few years, before returning to the family business.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 25


WHERE HAVE ALL THE SENIOR STYLISTS GONE? A WEEK WOULDN’T GO BY WHERE HITO DOESN’T HEAR THAT SALONS ARE LOOKING FOR SENIORS.

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t is not uncommon to hear “I only want to employ senior stylists, or....” Whilst hairdressing is not officially recognised by the Government as a sector suffering from a skill shortage in New Zealand it is, however, commonly felt amongst industry itself that there is a shortage of qualified seniors.

One of the key factors for this that needs to be acknowledged is that if the industry doesn’t train then this will be an ongoing issue. Employers express frustration about losing their seniors to Australia, or in more recent times we are seeing those seniors choose a change of career path. There will always be a portion of hairstylists who will train, get qualified and live and breathe the industry for many years to come, but there is a growing number who will have more than one career path in their working lifetime. Some of the younger stylists are choosing to pursue other career opportunities outside of hairdressing, and this is indicative of the current employment world we live in. What we need to focus on is that they are taking with them some fantastic non-hairdressing transferable skills that you, as employers, have contributed to – customer services, business skills etc. So how do we shift our mindset to recognise that this is the way of the world now and what can we do to ensure how seniors stay in the industry. No matter what strategies you implement as an employer if a senior stylist wants to explore other career paths, wish them well and focus on the value that they have brought to your clients, and your business. There are those that will stay in the industry but will explore other employment opportunities in other salons. Some of the key reasons this happens is when a stylist is:

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• Not feeling valued • Not achieving a good work/life/balance • Financial recognition, i.e. Pay rate/bonus schemes not meeting expectations of stylist • Returning from maternity leave and require more flexibility with hours of work • Nowhere for them to ‘grow’ in their current environment, i.e. Training role, salon management opportunities. Succession planning is vital for a good business operator. Who are you bringing through in your business and developing to continue to meet the demands of the clients? Who are you grooming to maybe one day take over your business? Why build up successful salon to then have no-one to take it over in the years to come. As an industry we have a responsibility to keep training or our shortage of qualified senior stylists is only going to get worse. We need to invest in the future of the industry, and if we do not keep ‘growing our own’ then we seriously have to question ourselves, and remind ourselves about who it was that once gave you an opportunity – an opportunity to follow your passion and that helped you to become the senior stylist, and successful business owner, you are today.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT! Fiona Nelson - HITO Sales & Liaison Manager


BARBERING… IT’S SO ADDICTIVE! I STILL REMEMBER IT LIKE IT WAS YESTERDAY – MY FIRST DAY AS AN APPRENTICE AT ‘CAMERON’S BARBERS.’ the way my apprentices have grown and developed over the years, displaying this same passion. Barbering truly is the best industry in the world. I know I may appear biased, but if you’re looking at entering the field, I promise you, you will not be disappointed. Name any other job where you get to work alongside talented people in an explosive, memorising atmosphere?

REBECCA RECEIVING AN AWARD FROM THE CEO OF POWERCO

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t was closing time, and I was watching the barbers organising their stations ready for the next day. Standing there amazed, I felt the blood pumping through my body, flowing through every vein at a million miles an hour. I thought, “this must be how spider-man felt when he was bitten by the spider that turned him into a superhero.” It was at this moment I realised that I had been bitten by a bug - the barber bug!

All day the adrenaline was intense as I watched each barber work in the most explosive atmosphere imaginable. I listened to all the chatter and laughter. I saw the smiles and noticed the twinkle in the customer’s eyes. As a young teenager, it was astonishing to me. I watched the speed of their scissors, snipping away, the way their combs slipped through their fingers, their clippers buzzing away while they stepped from side to side, then to the back. It was all like a well systemised, high precision machine. Then, as if they were one, they would step back and admire the precision of the blend and accuracy of the line out, while deciding whether to taper or square the neck line of the master piece they had just created. I have never felt such passion for anything. It was at this moment I knew I would be a barber for life!

In barbering, every day is different. It is not uncommon to travel through time on a daily basis. From perfecting hot shaves from the early 1900’s, short back and sides from the 1930’s, mullets and flat tops from the 1980’s and then back to the present with today’s fashion of fades and skuts cuts. You get to work with clients from all different backgrounds and nationalities business men, trades men, and university students, right through to your favourite rugby hero or iron man. You would be surprised who walks in from time to time. You may not realise, but barbering is the second oldest profession in the world. We used to be surgeons back in the day when men would get their weekly hot shave from their local barber. This is still extremely popular today for our businessmen and men with style.

“EXCELLENCE IS NOT A SKILL; IT’S ABOUT HAVING THE RIGHT ATTITUDE.” recommend you look into this field as your pathway to the world! Someone once told me “excellence is not a skill; it’s about having the right attitude.” If you enter this business with the right attitude, you can be taught the skills to become a truly excellent barber. There are two ways to get into the barbering industry, either through a full time course or an apprenticeship. It’s down to you to decide what direction you choose. Go down to your local barbers today, sit back and watch the magic happen. I guarantee that before you know, it will be flowing through your veins too. Barbering…it’s so addictive! Rebecca Bruce Founder and owner Dads & Lads Gentlemen’s’ Barbers

Hot shaves are fascinating. You begin with a lovely heated towel gently pressed over the face to soften the whiskers. Then, out comes the trusty old fashioned shaving soap and badger hair brush. A generous lather is created on the face, ready for the infamous cut throat razor to perform its magic. Unfortunately, currently we are not allowed to sharpen our blades in the traditional way using a leather strop, but the razors we use are still just as sharp.

This day was many moons ago now, but I can remember it as if it was yesterday. Today I am still as passionate (if not more so) than on that first day. This is something that is in my blood. It is this spirit that has taken me from one side of the world to the other.

Moving your blade in the direction of the hair growth, gliding and swishing away with every precision stroke, tightening the skin by pulling it back with your other hand as your glide leaves the perfect finish - watching a barber is like watching a conductor with his orchestra.

My reward for all these years of passion for the industry is an excellent, male exclusive salon in the heart of Taranaki. I work alongside the best in the industry, and I’m thrilled by

Barbering is all about service with a smile. If you’re an energetic individual with an outstanding character who likes looking good and gets excited over hair, I strongly

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 27


LAURA SIMPSON FEATURES IN A NEW WORLDSKILLS EDUCATIONAL VIDEO

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aura Simpson is helping raise awareness about WorldSkills through a new creative video.

Laura took out the WorldSkills National title last year and went to London to compete internationally. She believes that in New Zealand there is a lack of understanding about the WorldSkills competitions.

LAURA AT WORLDSKILLS IN LONDON

“The hardest thing about WorldSkills is that most people in our country don’t understand what it actually is, so they are scared of it,” says Laura.

“This video hopefully raises awareness and simplifies the competition in a way that makes people think it is achievable and worthwhile both for their salon and themselves personally.” The video educates people in the hairdressing industry about WorldSkills and is something that can be used as a reference while preparing for the regional competitions. The video will be available from the HITO website and on our Facebook page in April.

STILLS FROM LAURA’S EDUCATIONAL VIDEO

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WORLDSKILLS

LAURA SIMPSON

– WHERE HAIR BECOMES CRAFT

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orldSkills is an exciting way for young stylists to sharpen skills and become the best at their craft.

If you think you’re the best at what you do, or you want to become the best, don’t miss this opportunity to prove it! Open to any stylist 22 years old and under on the year of the competition, WorldSkills gives you the opportunity to get some specialised industry training. Apprentices work with a trainer to learn the skills needed to compete on both a national and international stage. This year the WorldSkills Regional Competitions took place over March and April on the following dates: • Christchurch: 25th March • Auckland: 26th March • Wellington: 1st April • Dunedin: 2nd April • Whangarei: 2nd April Regional winners go on to compete in the National Competition from the 4th – 7th July in Christchurch. Then one talented winner will head to Germany in 2013 to compete in the International WorldSkills Competition. This is an exciting opportunity to represent your salon and country on a worldwide platform. To be successful in WorldSkills you need to put in hours of hard work and practice, but the end result is well worth it; your new skills and achievements will set you apart from the rest. Not only can you gain international recognition for your achievements, but your workplace will benefit too as you take everything you’ve learned back to your salon and clients. Apprentices who complete WorldSkills training have a high understanding and skill level that can help in all areas of the salon environment. They come up with a creative vision for a client and bring it to life with excellence. Laura Simpson from Scott Base in Dunedin was the winner of last year’s National WorldSkills title and represented New Zealand at the International Competition in London.

Laura says her training in WorldSkills has enabled her to stretch herself, broaden her vision and creativity, as well as develop her hairdressing skills. Since competing in WorldSkills, Laura won both the 2011 HITO Apprentice of the Year and Senior Champion at the Otago NZARH Regional Awards. At the moment she is busy preparing for her final hairdressing exam, taking WorldSkills seminars in Christchurch and Invercargill and getting ready to judge at this year’s WorldSkills Regional Competitions. On top of that, she’s based at Scott Base, bringing her worldclass skills to clients in the salon. Photographs and interviews with the winners will be available on the HITO website and on Facebook mid-April.

“TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN WORLDSKILLS YOU NEED TO PUT IN HOURS OF HARD WORK ...BUT THE END RESULT IS WELL WORTH IT.” FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 29


A STATE OF THE ART PURPOSE BUILT HAIRDRESSING ACADEMY IN THE HEART OF THE CITY OF DUNEDIN.

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hen Mandy Harrington and Annette Vaughan went into business 2 years ago they had a vision of what their business would eventually look like. Over the past 24 months their vision was made into a reality when the Harrington\Vaughan Academy of Hairdressing opened in February. Mandy and Annette wanted a place that would provide trainees with the latest equipment and training facilities but in a spacious and modern environment. From a few scratching/drawings on a scrap of paper and a napkin from a restaurant, the finished look is lush and opulent but also hard wearing. Mandy and Annette wanted a workplace that was incredibly inviting to come into and hard to leave. They believe this has been achieved, and the response from the full intake of trainees for 2012 is that they have it right.

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Harrington\Vaughan Academy of Hairdressing caters for all trainees whether they are full time trainees or HITO apprentices. Delivery of apprentice training is through a contract with HITO and they deliver day release courses and block courses for apprentices all over the South Island. Block course apprentices can stay nearby at the On Top backpackers, or in many other hotels within walking distance. Harrington\Vaughan has received excellent outcomes especially with block apprentices due to the intensive training and supplying models for practical assessments. Recently, HITO bought out an apprentice customer satisfaction survey and the results have put Harrington\Vaughan Academy of Hairdressing in the top half of Off Job training Providers in New Zealand.

Harrington\Vaughan Academy of Hairdressing is passionate about integrating literacy and numeracy in their learning sessions for HITO apprentices. As in all training providers, apprentices complete a literacy and numeracy evaluation in year 1 and are checked again in year 2 to monitor the improvement in their learning. Employers must also work with apprentices while in the salon with literacy and numeracy. Congratulations Mandy and Annette! www.harringtonvaughan.co.nz


2012 SCHWARZKOPF PROFESSIONAL HAIR EXPO AWARDS NOMINATIONS ARE OUT FOR THE 2012 SCHWARZKOPF PROFESSIONAL HAIR EXPO AWARDS. Sara Allsop and Jock Robson from Dharma in Auckland and Adrian Barclay from Venom in Invercargill. MANA DAVE

Adrian is honoured to be nominated for the prestigious award. “It feels fantastic to get through to the final four,” he says, “it’s very exciting.” Adrian, who is in his 19th year of hairdressing, couldn’t attend the event in Sydney where the nominees were announced. He ended up finding out he was down to the final four from an Australian friend at 3am New Zealand time.

ADRIAN BARCLAY

“IT FEELS FANTASTIC TO GET THROUGH TO THE FINAL FOUR... IT’S VERY EXCITING.”

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panel of 20 independent industry experts from across New Zealand and Australia spent two full days

looking over close to 200 entries before selecting finalists. They were announced in March at a cocktail event in Sydney. Nominated for New Zealand Hairdresser of the Year are four very talented stylists Mana Dave from Blaze in Auckland,

Adrian has had many people support and inspire him throughout his years in the industry. From his hairdressing heroes such as Paul Serville to his first employer George Howard who taught him “style and standards”. He attributes his success to his focus and consistency. “I’ve always been determined to make something of myself,” he says. Adrian and his wife opened Venom salon in Invercargill in 2004 and they currently employ five apprentices. He advises any young people coming into the industry to work hard and make the most of every opportunity.

“...THE COMPETITION IS VERY TOUGH THIS YEAR. IT’S A PRIVILEGE TO BE DOWN TO THE FINAL FOUR.” Mana and the team at Blaze have always taken on apprentices, and currently employ five in the salon. “I am the product of an apprenticeship,” he says.

“Life is not where you find yourself, it’s where you create yourself,” he says.

Mana believes putting yourself in an environment that nurtures the direction you want your career to take is the best path to success. He advises young apprentices to know where they want to go and work hard to get there.

“It’s up to you. Take every small step, stay focused. It takes times to climb to the top; you don’t just ‘arrive.’”

“You yourself need to be clear about your goals,” he says, “and commit your time and energy into them.”

Mana Dave from Blaze salon in Auckland is also honoured to be among the nominees.

Now in its 27th year, the Schwarzkopf Professional Hair Expo Awards is the longest running and most respected hair awards in the Southern hemisphere.

This is Mana’s 7th time as a finalist, and this year he also had the honour of being a judge for the other categories in the awards. “I got to see the scope of the submissions,” he says, “and the competition is very tough this year. It’s a privilege to be down to the final four.”

The awards represent one of the highest honours within the industry. They help to set the industry standard in New Zealand and Australia, and promote exceptional achievements both locally and to the rest of the world.

FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 31


NEW STAFF AT

KELLY HENDERSON

TRACY QUINN

LORETTA THOMPSON

LYNETTE CHAPMAN

HITO

KELLY HENDERSON A keen interest in the hair and beauty sector teamed with a passion for communicating has Kelly Henderson excited about her new role as HITO Communications and Marketing Assistant. After growing up in the Waikato, Kelly has spent the last few years in Auckland. Here she completed a degree in communication studies before going on to write for top New Zealand magazines such as REMIX. Kelly is now enjoying living in our beautiful capital city and looking forward to her future at HITO.

Twenty years on, she has owned her own salon, managed hair and beauty salons, worked in sales and spent time in the industry in London, Dublin and Sydney. Prior to coming to HITO Tracy had been tutoring beauty therapy at the Southern Institute of Technology for eight years. With all this up her sleeve, salons and apprentices in Tracy’s region can feel confident in her very experienced hands. “There are lots of changes happening in the industry at the moment and I’m excited to be involved in them,” she says.

LORETTA THOMPSON

“I’m expecting a busy, stimulating year in 2012,” she says, “and I’m particularly excited about being a part of FORMA Magazine and getting to speak to lots of interesting people within the industry.”

Loretta is passionate about coming on board at HITO in her new role as Auckland Sales and Liaison Manager.

TRACY QUINN

After beginning her career in hairdressing 19 years ago, Loretta has spent time worked for brands such as Kerastase and GHD.

Tracy is ready to bring a wealth of industry knowledge and experience into her new role as Central Sales and Liaison Manager at HITO. Tracy’s work in the industry began when she trained in beauty therapy in Palmerston North.

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Her experience includes not only the world of hairdressing but the beauty sector as well. Loretta is a trained make-up artist and nail technician and has worked as a promotional

artist for Chanel Cosmetics. She has owned her own nail business as well. “I’ve always been in the industry,” Loretta explains, “and I’m very passionate about the opportunity to continue my education and keep progressing.”

LYNETTE CHAPMAN Lynette is looking forward to working with trainees, employers and providers in her new role as Sales and Liaison Manager for the Midland region. Lynette studied education, business management and marketing at university and has had lots of experience in the industry. Her background includes working for a leading New Zealand spa, along with work in industry training, education, sales and marketing. She is ready to utilise her knowledge and experience at HITO. “I’m really looking forward to assisting with the achievement of quality national and internationally recognised qualifications in the hair and beauty industry,” says Lynette.


Great apprentices come from...

Salons can grow their own apprentices and improve productivity with a HITO Gateway Student. Contact your local school careers advisor now to find out how to support a young person and help your business grow. Visit www.hito.org.nz/gateway to see how one gateway student has grown and developed into a truly valuable employee. FORMA MAGAZINE | ISSUE 5 | 33


www.hito.org.nz


Forma Issue 6