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Timber Trade Federation growing the use of wood

Statistical Review 2013 Industry Facts and Figures for the Year 2012

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Statistical Review 2013

What Lies Behind the Numbers? The relatively flat performance of the timber industry in 2012, in terms of turnover and volume output, hides a year of intense activity. As this Review describes, slightly lower volumes of timber and panel products were consumed by our customers in 2012 as timber-using markets struggled to grow and output of construction – timber’s largest market – fell by over 8%. However, this relatively weak output performance disguises an industry that has been making a number of significant advances, including a strengthening of ties with its customers and specifiers; with government and internally. The Timber Trade Federation (TTF) has been at the forefront of many of these developments and high levels of activity and dedicated efforts of its staff, its industry-based committees and the involvement of members has helped protect timber sales during the longest period of economic stagnation in recent times, and ensured that the industry is equipped and ready to meet the challenges that lie ahead. To compete in today’s modern timber industry, companies are faced with a number of essential requirements, one such being the EU Timber Regulation, which would have presented many company’s operational difficulties without the TTF’s Responsible Purchasing Policy (RPP). The RPP has provided a means through which members are able to provide evidence of having carried out the necessary due diligence on their timber purchases. A similar member support activity has taken place with the Construction Product Regulation (CPR). The TTF team worked tirelessly to ensure that the trade was ready for 1 July 2013, when it became compulsory to comply with the CPR to CE Mark certain construction products arriving into the European Union or manufactured in the EU after that date. Specific guidance has been produced for members to help them understand their responsibilities under the Regulation. For the timber industry to ‘speak with one voice’ the TTF has been instrumental in the establishment of the “Timber Industry Accord”, a meeting of the main timber and timberrelated trade and professional bodies able to present a

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coherent and highly positive message to government and opinion-formers. A key message from the Accord is how the modern-day timber industry is bringing tangible benefit to the UK economy and to UK society alike. Evidence of the success of these and other measures, that are part of the many activities of the TTF, is shown through the loyalty of its many long-term member companies and the influx of many new members over the last three to four years. In 2012 alone, over 60 companies were accepted into membership. It is the number of members; the number of active committee actions; the number of staff hours worked and the number of satisfied customers behind the numbers presented in this Statistical Review that is delivering the current – and future – positive development of the timber industry in the UK.

John White, CEO

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Statistical Review 2013

Consumption by Volume and Value The volume of timber and panels consumed in the UK decreased for the second year in a row in 2012, to 13.44 million m³ from 13.69 million m³ in 2011, a fall of 1.8%. This follows a 3% fall in volume in 2011. Wood consumption in the UK has been relatively flat since the pre-recessionary peak and by the end of 2012 remained around a quarter below 2007 levels. This development of wood consumption since 2007 is shown in the following chart 1. Chart 1: UK Consumption of Wood Products 2007-2012, by Volume

This fall in volume in 2012 was accompanied by 4.6% fall in the overall value of timber and panel products consumed in the UK. Falling marginally below the £3 billion mark, the 4.6% reduction in the overall value of timber and panel products consumed was derived from the 1.8% fall in volume and a 2.8% decline in average prices. Chart 2: UK Consumption of Wood Products 2007-2012, by Value

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Statistical Review 2013

Consumption by Volume and Value by Source of Supply Within the total of 13.44 million m³ of timber and panels consumed in 2012 was 7.67 million m³ of imported consumption which was marginally higher than 7.59 million m³ in 2011.

These changes in the source of timber and panel products consumption by value has resulted in the share of domestically produced consumption falling to 37.5% of all consumption, as shown below.

UK produced consumption in 2012 was 5.77 million m³, down from the 2011 total of 6.11 million m³, a decline of over 5%.

Chart 4: Share of Imported and UK Produced Consumption 2008-2012, by Value

These changes in the source of timber and panel products consumption has led to the share of domestically produced consumption declining in 2012 to just under 43% of the total, as shown in the chart below. Chart 3: Share of Imported and UK Produced Consumption 2008-2012, by Volume

The share of wood consumption in the UK held by UK domestic producers has risen since the beginning of the recession in 2008, both in volume and value terms. However, as charts 3 and 4 show, some of the ground lost by the importing sector was retrieved in 2012 with the share of UK domestic producers falling by around two percentage points.

By value, imported consumption was only marginally lower in 2012, at £1.81 billion m³ down from £1.83 billion, a fall of 1.3%. UK produced consumption was estimated to be £1.08 billion in 2012, down from £1.20 billion in 2011, a fall of 9.6%.

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This was mostly due to the removal of some UK particleboard production with the closure of the Sonae plant in Knowsley in September 2012. For all products combined, UK produced consumption fell by 115,000m³ in 2012 over 2011 as UK produced particleboard declined by around 122,000m³. UK produced consumption fared better in other product areas, with softwood and MDF volumes higher in 2012 compared to 2011.

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Statistical Review 2013

Consumption by Volume and Value by Source of Supply Improved output of UK produced softwood was accompanied by an even higher volume increase in imported softwood volume, but lower levels of MDF were imported. Imported particleboard volume was also lower in 2012, but as reported above, this reduction was outweighed by substantially lower UK particleboard production. These changes resulted in a different composition of UK timber and panel consumption by product and source between 2011 and 2012, as shown in chart 5. Chart 5: UK Consumption by Volume, by Product and Source

Growth of imported softwood consumption at nearly double the rate of UK produced softwood consumption raised the share of imported softwood consumption to 60% of all softwood consumed in 2012, from 59% in 2011. With little hardwood produced domestically and no plywood or fibreboard produced in the UK, imports remain the main source of supply for these two product types. Imported consumption of particleboard and OSB fell by 13% in 2012, but with the closure of the Knowsley particleboard plant part-way through the year, UK particleboard production was substantially lower resulting in a fall of UK produced particleboard and OSB consumption of 19%. This had the effect of reducing the UK producers’ share of all particleboard and OSB consumed in the UK to 77%. A small rise in the consumption of UK produced MDF of 0.7% in 2012, combined with a 9% drop in imported consumption fuelled the share growth for UK producers to 53% of all MDF consumption in 2012. The net effect of these changes in 2012 was to reduce the overall market share of UK produced consumption in the UK to just under 42%, as shown previously in chart 3.

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Statistical Review 2013

Source of Supply – Country & World Region On generally lower volumes consumed in the UK in 2012, imports from Asia and Europe rose while UK produced consumption and imports from North America fell. Source of Supply – Consumption by Volume The scale of UK produced timber and panel consumption by volume, matched against other supplying regions of the world is shown in chart 6.

The fall in the share of UK produced consumption was accompanied by a fall in the share of supply from North America. Whilst the loss in particleboard volume was the major reason behind the fall in the share of UK produced consumption, the main cause of the decline in share from North America was lower softwood volumes exported to the UK. Growth in softwood imports from European supplying countries was a major factor in the improvement of Europe’s share of timber and panel products consumption in 2012 while higher shipments of hardwood plywood, especially from China, was the driving force behind the higher share of UK consumption won by suppliers from Asia.

Chart 6: Consumption of Timber & Panel Products in the UK 2012, by Volume, by World Region

The percentage change in volume by supplying region between 2012 and 2011 is shown in chart 7. Chart 7: % Change in Volume 2012/2011, by World Region

As has been revealed, UK produced consumption fell in 2012 and this change, alongside the changes in share of consumption of other world supplying regions is shown in table 1. Table 1: Share of Consumption by Volume by Source

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As shown in table 1, timber and panel products supplied to the UK from North America represented only 1.5% of total UK consumption in 2012; therefore, the impact of the large fall in volume of 11.4% shown in chart 7 above − in overall terms − is relatively small. The relative importance of the 5.5% fall in UK produced consumption is much greater however, as UK produced timber and panels account for nearly 43% of total consumption.

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Statistical Review 2013

Source of Supply – Country & World Region As reported, particleboard was the main contributor to the fall in UK produced volume while softwood was the chief cause of lower volume from North America. These and other changes in volume consumed from the UK and North America are shown in charts 8 and 9.

Chart 10: Change in Volume from Asia 2012/2011

Chart 8: Change in Volume from UK Produced Consumption 2012/2011

In 2012, around 12,000m³ more plywood, in total, exported from Asia was consumed in the UK. This increase comprised approximately 35,000m³ more hardwood plywood, much of which originated from China, and over 23,000m³ less softwood plywood, again China featuring highly, but in this instance was a major contributor to lower volumes consumed.

Chart 9: Change in Volume from North America 2012/2011

Higher volumes of fibreboard, other than MDF, were imported by the UK in 2012 from Asia. An additional 6,000m³ raised the total volume of fibreboard consumed in the UK from Asia to around 16,000m³. Chart 11: Change in Volume from Europe 2012/2011

The other two major supplying regions of the world which exhibited significant change in volume consumed in the UK in 2012, were Asia (consumption higher by 1.9%) and Europe (consumption higher by 1.6%). The volume changes behind these increases in consumption are shown in charts 10 and 11.

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Statistical Review 2013

Source of Supply – Country & World Region The substantially lower volumes of imported particleboard and OSB and MDF volumes consumed in the UK in 2012 originated from Europe. However, the overall growth in consumption of timber and panel products from Europe was mostly due to the additional 255,000m³ of softwood consumed in 2012.

Table 2: Share of Consumption by Value by Source

Source of Supply – Consumption by Value The scale of UK produced timber and panel consumption by value, matched against other supplying regions of the world, is shown in chart 12. Chart 12: Consumption of Timber and Panel Products in the UK 2012, by Value, by World Region M

The gains in volume won by Europe and Asia, as shown previously in this Review, have contributed to increases in the value share of goods supplied by these two regions. Similarly, the losses in volume from the UK and North America have helped to lower the share of consumption by value for these two regions. The changes by the value of consumption in the UK in 2012 compared to 2011, by region, are shown in the chart below. Chart 13: % Change in Value 2012/2011, by World Region

It should be noted that the values of UK produced products are estimates, as no official source of UK price levels exists. Europe remains the single largest source of supply of UK consumption, valued at a £1.38 billion in 2012, a little lower than the £1.41 billion of timber and panel products supplied in 2011. The overall value of UK produced consumption fell in 2012, from £1.20 billion in 2011 to £1.08 billion in 2012. These and other changes in the value of timber and panels consumed in the UK by region, converted to a percentage of the value of goods supplied, are shown in table 2.

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As would be expected, the reasons behind the various changes in supply by value for each of the regions of the world are the same as previously reported in the section of this Review concerned with volume. To recap, hardwood plywood from China was instrumental in driving the value of supply from Asia higher in 2012 while the falls in value from North America were as a result of lower softwood volumes. The drop in value of UK produced consumption was mainly due to the withdrawal of significant volumes of particleboard from the market with the closure of the Knowsley plant.

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Imports Imports of Softwood and Hardwood rose in 2012 as panel products volumes generally declined. A marginal growth in total import volume of 0.9% was achieved in 2012.

Chart 15: % Volume Change in Timber and Panel Products Imports 2012/2011

Chart 14: UK Imports of Timber and Panel Products 2012, by Volume

The volume of UK timber and panel imports increased in 2012 to a total of 7.81 million m³, up from 7.74 million m³ in 2011. This small increase of 0.9% masked some widely varying changes by product. Imported softwood volume rose to 4.76 million m³, an increase of 230,000m³ or 5.1%. Hardwood imports were also higher, by 13,000m³ or 3.1%. In contrast, imports of panel products were generally lower with particleboard and OSB imports the worst performer, down by nearly 12%. The relative rises and falls of timber and panel products in 2012 compared to 2011 are shown in chart 15.

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Imports A virtually identical volume of hardwood plywood was imported in 2012 as in 2011, but behind this benign performance, substantial gains in volume from some countries were counterbalanced by losses in volume by others. China increased its already dominant position in the hardwood plywood market with a 12% growth in imports in 2012 while losses in volume of between 14% and 15% were experienced by Malaysia, Finland and Russia. The exporting country achieving the highest growth in hardwood plywood shipments to the UK in 2012 was Uruguay, with volumes 38% higher. The 9% fall in softwood plywood imports to the UK masks an 11% increase in volume from Brazil in 2012 and large volume declines from Finland, China and Chile. Particleboard and OSB imports fell by 12% with Portugal, Germany and France exporting substantially less particleboard volume in 2012.

The increase in softwood imports was driven, in the main, by a 10% rise in the volume exported to the UK from Sweden. A small, 1% increase in volume was shipped from Finland, but in percentage terms, the largest increase in volume came from Ireland, raising volume in 2012 by 35%.

MDF imports were 9% lower in 2012, despite increases in volume from the Republic of Ireland and Belgium. Larger losses in volume were realised by Germany and Spain with Latvia exporting virtually the same volume in 2012 as in 2011.

As these three countries enjoyed better volumes in 2012, Latvia, Germany and Russia exported less than in 2011: volume from Latvia and Germany was 4% lower for each country, and volume from Russia was 8% lower in 2012. Imports of hardwood were higher in 2012 with greater volumes of American hardwoods consumed in the UK, up by 4%. Volumes from the Cameroon, Malaysia and Germany were also higher, by 5%, 14% and 6% respectively. In contrast to solid wood imports, and as shown in chart 15, lower volumes of panel products were imported by the UK in 2012, with the exception of fibreboard. For all varieties of plywood, imports fell 3.4% in 2012 to a level of 1.29 million m続. Hardwood plywood imports were marginally lower in 2012, down by 0.5%, but softwood plywood volumes fell by 9% and as a result, the share of all plywood imports held by softwood plywood fell from 32% in 2011 to 30% in 2012.

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Exports Led by higher exports of particleboard and MDF, export volume from the UK increased by 4.2% in 2012.

Chart 17: % Volume Change in Timber and Panel Products Exports 2012/2011

Chart 16: UK Exports & Re-exports of Timber and Panel Products 2012, by Volume

Softwood exports were lower by around 12%, hardwood by 20%, but plywood re-exports were the worst performing product in 2012, down by over 23%. The volume of timber and panel products exported from the UK in 2012 rose by around 30,000m³, or just over 4%. The volume of 0.74 million m³ in 2012 generated an export value of over £157 million. The changes in the composition of this export volume and value was almost a mirror image of the changes in imports by product. Solid wood exports fell in 2012 while panel products exports mostly increased. Chart 17 describes the scale of these changes in percentage terms.

In contrast, particleboard and OSB and MDF exports were appreciably higher in 2012, up by 14% and nearly 17% respectively and together, these products accounted for over 0.5 million m³ of exports in 2012, which represented over 70% of all UK exports. Europe was the UK’s largest timber and panel products trading partner in 2012, accounting for 92% of all exports by volume. For the other regions of the world, only the Middle East received any significant volume from the UK. The complete breakdown by world region is shown in chart 18.

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Exports Chart 18: Exports of Timber and Panel Products from the UK 2012, by Volume, to World Region

Chart 19: % Change in UK Export Volume 2012/2011, by World Region The very small volumes exported to regions other than Europe and the Middle East provide a small base which tends to produce high percentage changes and this occurred in 2012. Chart 19 shows the percentage change in exports by region in 2012 compared to 2011.

As in 2011, the most significant growth in exports was made to the Middle East, helped by regime change in some of the countries in this region. With particleboard and OSB and MDF representing the majority of UK exports, it is not surprising that strong export performance of these two products was responsible for much of the growth to the Middle East. Similarly, particleboard and OSB and MDF exports were responsible for the overall growth in UK exports to Europe. In total, the increases in the export of panel products outweighed the loss in softwood and hardwood export volume.

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Production Plant closure helps to reduce the overall volume of UK timber and panel production. Chart 20: UK Production of Timber and Panel Products 2012, by Volume

The total volume of UK production of timber and panel products in 2012 was 6.37 million m続, down from 6.66 million m続 in 2012, a fall of 4.4%. This section of the review is concerned solely with UK production. The volumes of UK produced timber and panel products that are consumed in the UK are, in broad terms, derived from subtracting exports from production. UK produced consumption and imported consumption are reviewed in the following section.

The volume of UK softwood production increased once again in 2012, for the fourth year in a row and by the end of 2012 was nearly 8% higher than the pre-recessionary level of production in 2007. Production of all other UK timber and panel products, except MDF, fell in 2012, with the percentage changes for these products shown in chart 21. Chart 21: % Volume Change in Timber and Panel Products Production 2012/2011

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Statistical Review 2013

UK Consumption of Timber and Panel Products Continued weakness of timber-consuming markets in 2012 pushes consumption lower.

Chart 23: % Volume Change in Timber and Panel Products Consumption 2012/2011

Consumption of Timber and Panel Products – By Volume Chart 22: UK Consumption of Timber and Panel Products 2012, by Volume

The extent of the changes shown in chart 23 is influenced strongly by the pattern of imports, where solid wood consumption grew and panel products consumption mostly fell in 2012.

As shown earlier in this Review, consumption of all timber and panel products by volume fell by 1.8% in 2012 to 13.44 million m³. Softwood maintains, by far, the largest share of timber and panel products consumption and the 7.96 million m³ consumed in 2012 was 4.4% higher than in 2011. The changes in consumption for all products are shown in chart 23.

The falls in particleboard and OSB and MDF consumption were exacerbated by increased levels of exports for these products – effectively diverting production away from the home market and so reducing further the level of home consumption. Combining softwood and hardwood, consumption of solid timbers rose 4.4% to 8.40 million m³ in 2012 from 8.01 million m³ in 2011, but the volume of all panel products consumed fell in 2012 by 10.7% to 5.00 million m³ compared to 5.60 million m³ in 2011. This pattern of consumption was the opposite of 2011 when panels grew and solid wood consumption fell. As would be expected, the development of volume consumption by source also followed a similar pattern. In 2012, imported consumption of solid wood rose by 5.0% as UK produced consumption increased by 3.4%. For panels, imported consumption fell by 6.0% and UK produced consumption fell by 14.9%. In overall terms, imported consumption of all timber and panel products rose by 1.1% in 2012 and UK produced consumption in total fell by 5.5%.

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Statistical Review 2013

Consumption of Timber and Panel Products – By Value Chart 24: UK Consumption of Timber and Panel Products 2012, by Value

As seen from chart 25, the main cause of the fall in the value of timber and panels consumption in 2012 was due to the removal of some particleboard supply. Were it not for the 22% reduction in value of consumption for these products, the overall value of timber and panels consumption would have been very similar to the level achieved in 2011, of around £3 billion.

The value of all timber and panel products consumed in the UK in 2012 fell by 4.6% to £2.89 billion. The value of solid timbers consumed (softwood and hardwood) at £1.55 billion in 2012, was virtually identical to the value in 2011, recording a fall of just 0.4%. The value of panel products fell substantially however, down by 9.1% to £1.34 billion in 2012. The percentage changes by value for individual products are shown in chart 25. Chart 25: % Value Change in Timber and Panel Products Consumption 2012/2011

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Statistical Review 2013

Share of Consumption by Value and Volume – By Product Chart 26: Share of UK Consumption 2012, by Volume

Chart 27: Share of UK Consumption 2012, by Value

Higher solid wood consumption in 2012 and lower overall panel consumption has led to changes in market shares for these products, both individually and for those regions of the world supplying these products.

The differing values of the many different timber and panel products consumed in the UK, which is manifest in the price of each product, have a significant impact on the overall values attained for individual products.

In 2012, softwood consumption increased and this, coupled with lower panels consumption, produced a substantial increase in the share of total consumption by volume held by softwood. From just under a 56% share of consumption in 2011, the share of softwood rose to just over 59% in 2012. A small increase, from 3.1% to 3.3% also occurred in the share of consumption held by hardwood products.

Hardwood volumes accounted for just over 3% of the volume of all timber and panel products consumed in 2012, as shown in chart 26, but accounted for over 8% of the total value of timber and panels consumption. This is due to many different and often more expensive species of hardwood used for a wide range of applications. Higher quality grades and especially tropical hardwoods tend to be of a higher value than many other timber and panel products. These higher quality hardwoods are used for a diverse set of applications; include flooring, furniture making, the manufacture of durable pallets and specialist marine defences.

As would be expected, the share of consumption of particleboard and OSB fell substantially in 2012, down to 18.5% from just over 22% in 2011. The share of other panel products by volume remained similar to 2011.

Similarly, temperate and tropical hardwood plywood tend to command a higher price and this is reflected in the 13% share of value consumption for plywood in chart 27 compared to the 9% share by volume shown in chart 26. The changes for the other products shown in chart 27 follow a similar pattern as the changes by volume with particleboard and OSB values falling appreciably in overall terms in 2012.

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Statistical Review 2013

Wood - Among the Leading UK Industries The UK economy struggled to achieve any growth in 2012 with the value of the total of all economic activity, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growing by just 0.3% over 2011.

This relative performance of these selected industries is shown in chart 28 below. Chart 28: Selected Industries Turnover, 2008 - 2012 Indexed

Some sectors of the economy fared better than others with construction and manufacturing industries among the worst performers. Construction output declined by 8.2% in 2012 and manufacturing turnover reduced by 1.3%. Construction remains below its 2008 recessionary level and manufacturing turnover has not grown in real terms since 2008, with turnover just 0.6% higher at current prices. The performance of the forestry, wood and wood products industries is consistent with the overall performance of manufacturing in the UK with industry turnover at very similar levels to that in 2008. The ability of the forestry, wood and wood products industry to maintain values during a time when its major market, construction, experienced significant losses in output is a meritable performance however and the timber industry has performed equally as well or better than many others. Selecting the rubber and plastics, furniture and the cement, lime, plaster and articles of concrete industries as industries to compare, the forestry, wood and wood products industries has managed to compete favourably in a difficult economic environment.

The relative performance of the industries selected in chart 28 has been indexed for ease of comparison, but there are large differences in the actual scale of these and other manufacturing industries in the UK. Forestry, wood and products of wood, while not the largest of manufacturing and processing industries in the UK is nevertheless of a substantial size. The provision of timber and panel products ready for use has been valued in 2012 at nearly ÂŁ3 billion in this Review, but the added value provided when these goods are sold onto the many processing, distribution and manufacturing activities that comprise the timber industry supply chain, amounts to nearly ÂŁ7 billion. These added value activities include sawmilling and planing of wood, the manufacture of flooring products, joinery, wooden containers (including pallets) and the manufacture of a multitude of other products made of wood. The addition of the estimated turnover from the forestry sector (logging, silviculture and other forestry activities) in 2012, based upon the 2011 Annual Business Survey published by the Office for National Statistics, raises the estimated total turnover of forestry and the wood-based products industry in 2012 to around ÂŁ8.5 billion.

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Statistical Review 2013

Wood - Among the Leading UK Industries The relative position of the forestry and wood products industries with other manufacturing and processing in the UK is shown in the chart below. Chart 29: Turnover of Manufacturing Industries in the UK, 2012

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The size of the timber industry in the UK, as measured by turnover, is perhaps larger than many imagine, at £8.5 billion. This compares favourably with many others, including furniture, at £6.7 billion, cement and articles of concrete at £6.2 billion and the paints, varnishes, printing inks and mastics market valued at £3.6 billion.

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Statistical Review 2013

Notes

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Timber Trade Federation growing the use of wood

Timber Trade Federation The Building Centre 26, Store Street London WC1E 7BT Tel: 020 3205 0067 Fax: 020 7291 5379 Web: www.ttf.co.uk Email Contact: nboulton@ttf.co.uk Registered in England No. 2515034 at the above office This review of the timber industry is designed to provide a summary of the main facts and figures, but also to demonstrate that the many and varied activities that comprise the timber industry make it one of real significance to life in the UK Sources: TTF – Timber Trade Federation; FC – Forestry Commission; WPIF – Wood Panels Industries Federation; timbertrends – independent analyst; ONS – Office for National Statistics Produced for the Timber Trade Federation by timbertrends. This document is produced with 80% recovered fibre and 20% virgin TCF fibre Sourced from sustainable forests and using vegetable based inks

Designed by Publications UK Ltd 54-58 High Street, Edgware, Middx HA8 7EJ Tel: 020 8238 5000 Email: info@publicationsuk.co.uk Web: www.publicationsuk.co.uk

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TTF STATS REVIEW 2013 ebook