Issuu on Google+

What does inclusion on the list of World Heritage Sites mean?

Museums

FRONTIERS OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE

Useful addresses

Several museums contain artefacts UNESCO, 4 Place de Fontenoy, from the Antonine Wall: 75352 Paris 07 SP, France www.unesco.org Hunterian Museum, University Avenue, Historic Scotland, Longmore House, Glasgow G12 8QQ Salisbury Place, Edinburgh EH9 1SH email: hunter@museum.gla.ac.uk www.historic-scotland.gov.uk www.hunterian.gla.ac.uk

The legal status of the Antonine Wall does not change. The archaeological remains of the frontier are already protected through the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 and the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997. The Antonine Wall is protected by buffer zones, mostly already designated as Green Belt, Countryside Land or Public Open Space in Council Local Plans. Inclusion on the World Heritage List is a high accolade, providing international recognition of the importance of the Antonine Wall. It does not mean that development cannot take place near the Wall but that any adverse impact on the Wall, its setting or the values which contribute to its World Heritage status would have to be taken into account in determining the application.

WORLD HERITAGE SITE

THE ANTONINE WALL

RCAHMS, John Sinclair House, National Museum of Scotland, 16 Bernard Terrace, Edinburgh EH8 9NX Chambers Street, Edinburgh EH email: info@rcahms.gov.uk www.rcahms.gov.uk email: info@nms.ac.uk

www.nms.ac.uk

East Dunbartonshire Council,

Planning, Development and Property Kinneil Museum, Kinneil Estate, Bo’ness EH51 0PR Assets, Kirkintilloch Road, Bishopbriggs

Callendar House Museum, Callendar Park, Falkirk FK1 1YR email callendar.house@falkirk. gov.uk www.falkirk.gov.uk/cultural

Where can I find out more about the Antonine Wall? The document nominating the Antonine Wall as a World Heritage Site may be consulted on Historic Scotland’s website: www.historic-scotland.gov.uk. The maps identifying all elements of the World Heritage Site were prepared by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS). They may be consulted at their office in Edinburgh, at Historic Scotland, and at Council planning offices and libraries along the line of the Antonine Wall (see Useful addresses). Additional information about the frontier and where to visit it is available on the Antonine Wall website: www.antoninewall.org and on the Map of the Antonine Wall (see Further Reading).

G64 2TR Tel: 0141 578 8640 email: pdpa@eastdunbarton.gov.uk www.eastdunbartonshire.gov.uk

Falkirk Council: Development Services, Abbotsford House, David’s Loan, Bainsford, Falkirk FK2 7YZ Tel. 01324 504950 email: planenv@falkirk.gov.uk

Auld Kirk Museum, Cowgate, Kirkintilloch G66 1AB Glasgow City Council, Tel: 0141 578 0144 Development and Regeneration Services, email: museums@eastdunbarton. gov.uk www.eastdunbarton.gov.uk 229 George Street, Glasgow G1 1QU

David J Breeze, The Antonine Wall, The North-West Frontier of the Roman Empire, Proposed as a World Heritage Site (Edinburgh 2004) David J Breeze, Edge of Empire, Scotland’s Roman Frontier the Antonine Wall (Edinburgh 2008) Map of the Antonine Wall (RCAHMS, Historic Scotland and the Hunterian Museum, Edinburgh 2008)

email: info@glasgow.gov.uk www.glasgow.gov.uk

North Lanarkshire Council, Fleming House, 2 Tryst Road, Cumbernauld G67 1JW email: corporatecommunications@ northlan.gov.uk www.northlan.gov.uk West Dunbartonshire Council, Forward Planning and Regeneration Section, Council Offices, Garshake Road, Dumbarton G82 3PU email: buildingandplanning@westdunbarton.gov.uk www.wdcweb.info

© RCAHMS

www.antoninewall.org ISBN: 978 1 904966 83 8 Published by Historic Scotland 2008

The House 7/08 H1. 577 Produced from sustainable material

Further reading

www.antoninewall.org


Best Walk

Fortlet

Rampart Base

Museums

Visible lengths of rampart & ditch

07

Best Fortlet

A907

A9

Fort

A90

Best Forts

Antonine Wall

Kincardine A 98 5

5

M 80

M

A8 72

Loch Coulter

Airth

9

Valleyfield

Dunfermline

Ca

ch d Lo mon Lo

09

6

KILSYT

Strathblane

A891

Dunbarton

Milton of Campsie

Summerston

Ke l v i

n

8 Erskine

Cleddans

M8

A8

er

Cl

2

79

Riv

A8

Cadder Balmuildy A8

Kilmacolm

Bearsden

yd e

A807

Duntocher

Bishopton

City of Glasgow

Paisley Linwood

Bar Hill Auchendavy Kirkintilloch

Wilderness Plantation M

80

Coatbridge

Hunterian Museum

N

early 2,000 years ago, the Antonine Wall was the north-west frontier of the Roman Empire. In January 2007 a proposal to make it a World Heritage Site, prepared by officials in Historic Scotland and supported by the 5 local authorities through which the Wall runs (East Dunbartonshire, Falkirk, Glasgow, North Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire), was submitted to UNESCO. In July 2008, the World Heritage Committee meeting in Quebec approved it as a World Heritage Site and the Antonine Wall became part of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site alongside Hadrian’s Wall and the German limes.

Croy Hill A8

0

i

Watling Lodge

Seabegs Castlecary Westerwood

Carriden

04

Kinneil Inveravon

Airdrie

The Antonine Wall was the frontier built by the Roman army in the years following AD 140 on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius. It ran for 40 Roman miles (60 km) from modern Bo’ness on the Firth of Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the River Clyde and consisted of a turf rampart fronted by a wide and deep ditch. Forts and fortlets provided accommodation for the troops based on the Wall as well as points where the Wall could be crossed. They were linked by a road, known as the Military Way. All these elements, together with the remains of the camps used by the Wall builders, are included in the World Heritage Site. The frontier was only occupied for about a generation before being abandoned in the 160s.

2

1

0 0

1 1

A90

4

4

Broxburn

M8

6

Livingston 2

2

M9

Bathgate

Roman miles A89

04

National Museum, Edinburgh

Armadale

0

Caldercruix

A9

Linlithgow

Maddiston

Shieldhill

Plains

r th

A803

Cumbernauld

Glenmavis

of Fo

Bo'ness

Mumrills

Rough Castle

What was the Antonine Wall?

© Hunterian Museum

A9

Glasgow Bridge

M8

M8

87

3 A80

Grangemouth

A801

Castlehill

R i ve r

M73

A8 07

Fi r t h

a r r on

Falkirk

1

M

Bridge of Weir

Carlston

Old Kilpatrick

C l yd e

C ver

LLS

Kilsyth

Lennoxtown

A8

A813

TRICK HILLS K I L PA

I HH

R

3 4

4

M8 6

10 miles

5 8

10

20 kms

Why is the Antonine Wall special? The Antonine Wall was one of the many sections of frontier which helped to protect – and define - the Roman Empire, one of the greatest states ever to have existed. It has a particular claim to being special as it was the most northerly frontier of the empire and, when it was built, the most complex frontier ever constructed by the Romans. It is also a symbol of the Golden Age of the Roman Empire, a special period recognised at the time and, much later, by Edward Gibbon in his Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.

© Hunterian Museum

A8

Denny

© NMS

A82

Bonhill

A88

e y Re s r

CAMPSIE FELLS

M

A81

1

nV

A9

r ro all

Milngavie

R i ve r

New Road Bridge

Bannockburn

Military Way


Street,EdinburghEHemail:info@nms.ac.ukwww.nms.ac.ukFurtherreadingCallendarHouseMuseum,CallendarPark,