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H I STOR IC A UGUSTA N E WS

Volume 43, No. 2

fall 2017

The mission of Historic Augusta, Inc., is to preserve historically or architecturally significant structures and sites in Augusta & Richmond County, Georgia. 1 | Fall 2017

Historic Augusta News


2018 ENDANGERED PROPERTIES LIST PROPERT Y New Savannah Bluff Lock & Dam 2105 Lock and Dam Road

OWNER U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

THE THRE AT (1) The New Savannah Bluff Lock & Dam is in need of critical repairs which were mandated by Congress. The repairs keep the structure operational and prevent deterioration of the systems. (2) In order to provide passage for endangered fish species, it has been proposed to remove the Lock and Dam and replace it with a permanent, in-river rock weir which has its own significant risks to Central Savannah River Area communities. SOME HISTORY Constructed in 1937 by the US Army Corps of Engineers, the New Savannah Bluff Lock The Lock and Dam as seen from the air and Dam creates a steady, controlled 10-mile long River Pool, and it routinely minimizes flood water levels during storm events. It is important to note that Lock and Dam has been officially “determined eligible” for listing in the National Register of Historic Places by the National Park Service. The Lock and Dam would fall under the category of “structure” on the National Register of Historic Places, which is one of the five categories under the program, the most common listings being “buildings” and “historic districts”. PRE SERVATION SOLUTIONS Retaining the original Lock and Dam in its current configuration and performing the necessary repairs while constructing a modest fish bypass is the most cost-effective and protective solution that will achieve the needs of the US Army Corps of Engineers, local preservationists and historians. Listing the Lock and Dam to the National Register of Historic Places will offer an additional level of examination when federal money is spent through the Section 106 Review process.

PROPERT Y The Richmond Hotel/Richmond Summit 744 Broad Street

OWNER Privately Owned

THE THRE AT The Richmond Summit has been owned by an out of town property management company for many years. Over time, original historic character defining features such as original windows, architectural details, and interior finishes and materials may have been removed or potentially damaged beyond repair. As a contributing structure in the Augusta Downtown Historic District, retaining historical integrity is imperative for our historic resources so property owners may apply for certified historic rehabilitation tax credits to perform work on the existing historic building and apply for the financial benefits of listing to both the National Register of Historic Places and the Georgia Register of Historic Places. The Richmond Summit showing its location to

SOME HISTORY the former JC Penny Building & Albion Alley Designed by prominent Georgia architect G. Lloyd Preacher and Company, the 8-story Richmond Hotel was constructed in 1923 on the site of the Albion Hotel which burned in 1921. G. L. Miller and Company issued the bonds for the hotel’s construction as reported in the Augusta Chronicle April 30, 1922. The Richmond Hotel cost $660,000 to building and was reported to be completed for occupation January 1923. The J. B. White Estate also played a role in the development of this significant downtown property; at the time the famous Augusta Department store was located adjacent to the Albion Hotel site and was damaged by the disastrous fire. The estate invested in the hotel to prove their “faith in Augusta” and offer further improvements of the downtown infrastructure including sidewalks and streets that were fifty feet wide. The Richmond Hotel was converted into apartments in 1979 with 125 subsidized one-bedroom apartment units. POS SIBLE FUTURE USE S The Richmond Hotel should continue to serve Augusta as both a commercial and residential anchor within the Augusta Downtown Historic District. The exterior of the building still retains much of its historic integrity and would likely be able to be certified for state and federal rehabilitation tax credits. With ongoing reinvestment in the downtown corridor, there would be interest from local investors to create residential units for professionals and medical students who work at nearby cyber facilities or desire to be near the medical district. 2 | Fall 2017

Historic Augusta News


E N DA N GE R E D P R OP E RT I E S L I S T Continued PROPERT Y Historic Buildings adjacent to former Sky City Now known as 1140 Broad Street Formerly 1154-1160 Broad Street

OWNER Privately Owned

THE THRE AT After the fire that destroyed the Brislen Building in 2014 and its subsequent demolition, the two adjacent 3-story brick commercial buildings have been vacant. The empty lot, two historic buildings, and the former Sky City building were combined into one parcel and have been sold to an out of town owner with an unknown end use or plans for rehabilitation. After nearly 4 years of vacancy, Historic Augusta is concerned about not only the end use of the parcel but also the condition of the building’s original character defining features. With the combination of the parcels, is it possible that the historic buildings will be demolished for new construction with the Augusta Downtown Historic District. SOME HISTORY 1899 is the earliest City Directory listing for 1134 and 1136 Broad Street which later were renumbered as 1154 and 1160 Broad Street in 1904. 1134 was the address for Perrin & Land druggists and Dr. G. H. Lehmann. Dr. Lehmann is also indicated as living at 1134 Broad Street. 1136 Broad Street lists the W. H. Turner furniture company as occupying the space as well as being the residence of Edward Brislen. The buildings have been steadily occupied since the turn of the 20th century by a variety of retail businesses, offices, and residences.

1154-1160 Broad Street are threatened with demolition

POS SIBLE FUTURE USE S As contributing buildings in the Augusta Downtown Historic District and also listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the buildings would potentially be certified for both state and federal certified rehabilitation tax credits as income producing property. Ideally the first floor will remain commercial or retail space with the second and third floors rehabbed for apartments or as additional commercial space. They could easily be incorporated into the overall plan.

PROPERT Y 202 Greene Street

OWNER Privately Owned

THE THRE AT This prominent corner house located in the Old Towne neighborhood as suffered from neglect and deferred maintenance over the years. While it retains its historical integrity, those features are quickly deteriorating and the overall condition of the property continues to decline.

202 Greene Street

SOM E HISTORY Constructed at the turn of the twentieth century, 202 Greene Street is an excellent example of the Colonial Revival style within the neighborhood. The neighborhood was ravaged by the fire of 1916, and examples of earlier architectural styles are scarce, particularly ones this large in this corner of the district. City directory research indicates that the property has been steadily occupied since its construction. Note the outstanding character defining features including the full verandah porch, large double hung wooden windows, and hipped metal roof.

POS SIBLE FUTURE USE S 202 Greene Street should remain a single family residence in the Old Towne neighborhood. In the event the property would be income producing residential, any alterations to the floorplan should be undertaken with great care to preserve original volume of the space and character defining features and original materials. Historic Augusta seeks to work with property owners to educate them regarding best preservation practices and appropriate methods for completing work on their historic properties. We are able to point property owners in the direction of contractors or other service professionals that may be able to work towards a preservation solution, utilizing historic preservation tax incentives. Historic Augusta News

Fall 2017 | 3


ADVOCATING POSITIVE CHANGE THROUGH

Historic Preservation

H I S T O R I C AU GU S TA’ S 1 2 T H E N DA N G E R E D P R O P E R T I E S L I S T By Erick Montgomery, Executive Director

Historic Augusta’s annual Endangered Properties List is in its twelfth year. Once again we are highlighting historic resources that are a significant part of our community’s architectural and engineering legacy. By bringing attention to these irreplaceable historic sites, we hope to raise awareness among private citizens and public officials in order to save threatened properties. This year, we are naming Augusta’s New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam, a downtown hotel, two commercial buildings on Broad Street and a residential structure in Olde Town. All are highly visible in the community, and each lends special significance to its historic neighborhood. The Lock and Dam has been a fixture in Augusta for 80 years, having been constructed in 1937. It is the source of the pool that we enjoy in our downtown area. Some may remember when the water was let down to see what would occur if the dam was removed. It was an unmitigated disaster. After much public discourse, it seems plain that the Lock and Dam should be restored. We urge our elected officials on every level to make it happen. The Richmond Summit Hotel, once the pride of downtown Augusta, is not any more. The most prominent business block of our city is now subsidized housing in this once proud building. Yet, on the very same block, 22 million dollars is being invested to save and reopen the historic Miller Theater. Surely this building can again be used in a way that is positive for our downtown district. On the other end of Broad Street in the 1100 block are two excellent examples of late nineteenth century commercial buildings: 1154-56 and 1158-60 Broad Street. Much new development is currently being planned in downtown 4 | Fall 2017

Richmond Summit

Augusta, which we applaud loudly. One plan will replace the old Sky City Department Store in the 1100 block, so awkwardly and incongruently placed there in the 1960s. We urge the developer to incorporate these two handsome buildings into their overall plan for new construction on this block. Finally, 202 Greene Street in Olde Town is a poster child for buildings in the stately residential neighborhood that are deteriorating from neglect. Investment in Olde Town is slowly on the rise, but rehab of key buildings should be encouraged to attract more investment. Olde Town is the closest residential area to our downtown business district. More incentives should be provided for historic residential neighborhoods to enhance downtown living opportunities. If historic preservation was easy, there wouldn’t need to be organizations like Historic Augusta. We can all be advocates for positive change, and we hope you will voice your concern at every opportunity for these and other irreplaceable historic resources throughout Augusta. Historic Augusta News


Status of

E N DANG E R E D PR OPE R T I E S 2007-2017

IN PROGRESS: Rev. C. T. Walker House, 1011 Laney-Walker Blvd. Historic Augusta purchased the nationally significant Rev. Charles T. Walker House through our revolving fund in November 2016 and has been working to stabilize the property and begin rehabilitation. Historic Augusta received a grant from the Johanna Favrot Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation for architectural planning. We are very happy to report that the house has electricity and has had years of debris and trash removed from the interior. 2KM Architects has been engaged to prepare the as-built measured floor plans for Historic Augusta and once completed the C.T. Walker House subcommittee chaired by John Williams will make a decision regarding an end use. We look forward to working with our local partner for the project, Laney Walker Development Corporation. Stay Tuned!

SAVED!

Trinity CME Church, 731 Taylor Street Representatives from local stake-holding organizations including the Augusta Canal Authority have met continuously since July to advocate and fight for the preservation of Mother Trinity, the birthplace of the C. M. E. denomination. Atlanta Gas Light continues to prepare for demolition of this historic structure and is moving forward with an appeal of the denial of demolition from the Augusta-Richmond County Historic Preservation Commission. At this time, communication has proven to be difficult between AGL and the local stake holders. If you want this designated local landmark preserved and rehabilitated to serve our community and saved from senseless demolition, reach out to a staff member of Historic Augusta for more informtion.

2016 LIST

2011 LIST

2015 LIST

2010 LIST

2014 LIST

2009 LIST

The Benjamin Franklin Jones House, 656 Milledge Rd. The Zachary Daniel House, 448 Greene St. The Mary Warren Home, 2109 Central Ave. Congregation Children of Israel Synagogue & Court of Ordinary,

Former Augusta-Richmond County Library, 902 Greene St. Hallock Cottage, 1303 Hickman Rd. The Jacob Phinizy House, 529 Greene St.

Coleridge/Windsor Manor, 3596 Windsor Spring Rd.

The Henry-Cohen House, 920 Greene St. Old Sue Reynolds School, 3171 Wrightsboro Rd. Merry Brothers Warehouse, 901 Reynolds St.

2013 LIST

2008 LIST

525 & 527 Telfair St.

Erbelding Building, 601-603 Broad Street 2012 LIST

Dr. Scipio S. Johnson House, 1420 Twiggs St.

Historic Augusta News

Lowrey’s Wagon Works & the Confederate Shoe Factory, 912 Ellis St. Red Star Café, 533 James Brown Blvd. 2007 LIST

Sibley Mill, 1717 Goodrich St. Fall 2017 | 5


Still on the

E N DANG E R E D L I S T Historic Augusta continues to advocate for the reuse and rehabilitation of our existing historic resources throughout Augusta-Richmond County. The following is the list of buildings that remain on our list and are in need of a sensitive preservation solution:

2017 • East Central Regional Hospital, Gracewood Campus

2016 • The Penny Savings Bank Building, 1144 James Brown Boulevard • Old Engine Company No. 7, 2163 Central Avenue • The Penthouse at the Lamar Building, 753 Broad Street

2015 • Perkins-Cullum House, 510 Greene Street • Woolworth Department Store, 802 Broad Street • Bayou Building, 904 Broad Street • Kress Building, 832-838 Broad Street

2014 • Old First Baptist Church, 802 Greene Street • J. C. Penney’s Department Store, 732-738 Broad Street • Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Exchange Building, 937 Ellis Street

2013 • Bon Air Hotel, 2101 Walton Way

6 | Fall 2017

2012 • Reid Range Building, 586 Broad Street

2011 • Appleby Library Accessory Building, 2260 Walton Way • Kahrs Grocery Building, 401 Greene Street

2010 • Private Family Cemeteries

2009 • Martha Lester School, 1688 Broad Street • Jessamine Hill, 3101 Richmond Hill Road • Fifth Street Bridge

2008 • Harrisburg-West End Historic District 500 Block of Ninth Street

2007 • Denning House, 905 Seventh Street • Reynolds Street Depot, 511 Reynolds Street • St. Benedict’s Boarding School, 1220 Twelfth Street • Trinity CME Church, 731 Taylor Street • Greene Street Presbyterian Church, 1235 Greene Street

Historic Augusta News


P E R F E C T LY AG E D

H IS TOR IC AUG US TA’ S BE N E FIT AUCTION Historic Augusta’s annual benefit auction, Perfectly Aged, was held at Saint Paul’s River Room on Thursday, September 14, 2017. Highlights of the evening included a champagne tasting for sponsors at the Bronze level or higher, a live auction hosted by the Reverend George Muir, and a gracious array of delicious hors d’oeuvres prepared by local restaurants and caterers. The addition of local art in the silent auction was a huge hit, as well as the wine and beer tastings and the open Champagne Tasting bar. Thank you to everyone who helped make this event such a success! We are especially grateful to the event’s chair, Pamela Dorminey-Uros, for her tireless efforts and worthy dedication to our cause. All of the money raised supported the good work of Historic Augusta.

PRESENTING

S I LV E R

CORPORATE SPONSORS KIRBY YAWN, ROB WYNN INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS ROBERT BOVARD, BRANFORD THOMPSON SPECIAL ADVISOR ANN MORRISON ART GREG HOWARD - CHAIR, KATHRYN MCCALL, BLAKELY DOWNS, KIRBY YAWN ANTIQUES JAN HODGES BURCH - CHAIR, LIBBY MACUCH, LAURIE MCRAE TRAVEL AND EXPERIENCES PACKAGES LAUREN ROBBINS, CHAIR, JANE MARIE KINSEY CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION ASON JONES WINE ALTHEA KINGSMILL - CHAIR ALLAN BARRETT - TOAST WINE AND BEVERAGE BEER TASTING BREY SLOAN, ANN SLOAN - RIVERWATCH BREWERY EPICUREAN PAULA KNOX PUBLICITY MARTHA JEAN MCHANEY - CHAIR, DENISE TORTORETE STYLING ELAINE CLARK SMITH

Historic Augusta Inc. Endowment Trust Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Kirby • The Knox Foundation

BRONZE

A Friend of Historic Augusta • Argos Health • Augusta Iron and Steel Works, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Burch Jr. • EDTS • Elliott Davis Decosimo • Laura Irwin and Eric Smith Mr. and Mrs. W. L. M. Knox, Jr.• MAU Workforce Solutions • Merryland Properties, LLC Queensborough National Bank & Trust Rex Property & Land • Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Smith South State Bank • State Bank & Trust Taylor BMW • Trotter Jones LLP Mrs. Pamela-Dorminey-Uros and Mr. Nick Uros • Wynn Capital SPONSORS 2KM Architects • Blanchard and Calhoun Real Estate • Burnside Law Firm • C&C Automotive Casella Eye Center • CFS Architects • Cherry Bekaert • Christopher Booker & Associates, PC Dickinson Architects • Donsbach & King LLC • Gate 5 Self-Storage • Fulcher Hagler, LLP • Greg Boulus Events • Georgia Power • Mrs. Pia A. Hagler • Hagler Systems • Intellisystems • Meybohm Jackson Law Offices • Jordan Trotter • Mr. and Mrs. William S. Morris III • Pollock • Mr. T. R. Reddy Robertson Restoration • Sanford, Bruker, & Banks • Becky and Randy Smith • Dr. and Mrs. John Stewart

FRIEND SPONSORS Augusta Rental Homes • Mr. John Black • Mrs. Jacquelyn Murray Blanchard • Butler Automotive, Coca-Cola Bottling Company • Dr. and Mrs. William L. Clark • Drs. Michael and Jackie Cohen, Gold Mech Services • Hull Barrett Firm • Mr. and Mrs. William L. Macuch Mr. and Mrs. Bowdre P. Mays Jr. • Mr. Andrew Mize Historic Augusta News

COMMITTEE CHAIR PAMELA DORMINEY-UROS

BLOOMS GREG BOULUS - GREG BOULUS EVENTS INVITATIONS KITTY BEVERAGE - CHAIR, JACKIE BLANCHARD, NANCY CARR, CAROL CASELLA, ANN CLAIBORNE CHRISTIAN, MARIAN CLARK, DONNA DEAL, LYNN GEIGER, JULIE ANN HOWARD, PAULA KNOX, LISA LONG, MARTHA LONG, JANE MOORE, CHERYL O’KEEFE, JANE SCHWARTZ, NANCY STORY VOLUNTEERS RENEE ALEXANDER, STEPHANIE HERZBERG, ASHLEY HERZBERG, LOUISE PHINIZY, RAZEL FOSTER, MICHAEL WERRICK, KAITLYN ALEXANDER, JENNIFER PUTNAM-DAVIS, CALEB HAMILTON CATERERS ABEL BROWN, DIXIE RIVERSIDE, EDGAR’S GRILLE & THE SNELLING CENTER, GO WEST CATERING, LA BONBONNIERE, NEW YORK BUTCHER SHOPPE, PINNACLE CLUB, PIZZA JOINT, SILVER PALM CATERING CO, SOIREE CATERING, TWO MOMS COOKIES SPECIAL THANKS TO: AUGUSTA LINEN SERVICE & RENTALS, JOE WILLIS - BARTENDING, RANCO, SAINT PAUL’S CHURCH Fall 2017 | 7


Electronic Service Requested

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Augusta, GA Permit #152

P.O. Box 37 Augusta, GA 30903-0037

We’re on the Web! Visit us at: www.HistoricAugusta.org www.WilsonBoyhoodHome.org Contact us: info@historicaugusta.org Find us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. Instagram @historicaugusta

Historic Augusta News is published quarterly by Historic Augusta, Inc., P.O. Box 37, Augusta, Georgia 30903-0037. Offices are located at 415 Seventh Street. For more information concerning Historic Augusta, the Boyhood Homes of President Woodrow Wilson and Supreme Court Justice Joseph R. Lamar, or historic preservation activities in Augusta-Richmond County, call: Historic Augusta, Inc. Phone: 706-724-0436 Fax: 706-724-3083 Wilson House: 706-722-9828 www.historicaugusta.org info@historicaugusta.org

Front Cover: New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam, constructed in 1937.

Contributing Writers: Robyn Anderson Samantha Hargrove Erick Montgomery

Designed by:

Profile for Historic Augusta

Historic Augusta News 2018 EPL  

Special Edition: Historic Augusta's 2018 Endangered Properties List

Historic Augusta News 2018 EPL  

Special Edition: Historic Augusta's 2018 Endangered Properties List

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