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PLAY { GROUND } Deigning playfulness into the existing spaces

MA Interior and spatial design HIROSHI ITO / SUNG TING HSIEH


PLAY { GROUND } Deigning playfulness into the existing spaces HIROSHI ITO with SUNG TING HSIEH

Course director : Dr. Kenneth Wilder Tutor : Robin Jenkins

Chelsea College of Art and Design 16 John Islip Street London SW1P 4JU

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Table of contents

List of Figures

Introduction

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Figure 1.

Cheasea College of Art and Design lawn

Concept

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Figure 2.

Experimental Process

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System Design

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Diagram

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Plan

Figure23.

How to use the bracelets 3

The Barbican centre

Figure24.

How to use the bracelets 4

Figure 3.

Cheasea College of Art and Design stone

Figure25.

Plan of PLAY { GROUND }

Figure 4.

Deptfold high street 1

Figure26.

PLAY { GROUND } inside 1

Figure 5.

Granary square

Figure27.

PLAY { GROUND } inside 2

Figure 6.

Deptfold high street 2

Figure28.

PLAY { GROUND } inside 3

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Figure 7.

Regent park

Figure29.

PLAY { GROUND } in Chelsea college of Art and Design 1

Portability

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Figure 8.

The Royal Institute of British Architects

Figure30.

PLAY { GROUND } in Chelsea college of Art and Design 2

Location

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Figure 9.

The bus stop in Euston station

Figure31.

Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 1

Bibliography

Figure10.

A plant with a capacitivesensor

Figure32.

Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 2

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Figure11.

Lawn with a capacitivesensor

Figure33.

Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 3

Figure12.

Water with a capacitivesensor

Figure34.

PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 1

Figure13.

Pencil lead with a capacitivesensor

Figure35.

PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 2

Figure14.

Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 1

Figure36.

PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 3

Figure15.

Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 2

Figure37.

Playing at Chelsea College of Art and Design

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Figure16.

Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 3

Figure17.

Technical daigram

Playing at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design

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Figure18.

Processing code of PLAY { GROUND }

Figure19.

PLAY { GROUND } diagram1

Playing at Statue of Eros at Piccadilly Circus

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Figure20.

PLAY { GROUND } diagram1

50.51.52.53.54.

Figure21.

How to use the bracelets 1

Figure55.

Playing at Clissold Park Mansions at Stoke Newington Church Street

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Figure22.

How to use the bracelets 2

56.57.58.59.60.

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38.39.40.41.42. 7

Figure43. 44.45.46.47.48.

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Figure49.

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1. Introduction

2. Concept

Most public spaces in cities are used for functional activities (e.g. tube station, “Our society tends to dismiss play for adults. Play is perceived as unproductive, petty

roads, forecourts, sidewalks, etc...). Most people just go through these spaces

or even a guilty pleasure. The notion is that once we reach adulthood, it is time to get

and might never slow their pace to engage with the ordinary day -to-day environ-

serious and between personal and professional responsibilities, there is no time to play”.

ments around them. Thus, this experimet was attempted to create an art piece,

(Tartakovsky, M, 2012)

which has a simple appearance and could motivate people to stop and enjoy a mo-

An additional consideration is that there may also be a lack of spaces that encourage playfulness. It can be argued that many architects often fail to consider this, choosing instead to put functionality and structure ahead of other concerns. It is this paper’s position that playfulness is essential for creative civilisation and spatial design is not just about functionality, but should also be playful, curious and exciting. The central aim of this research is to design playfulness into existing spaces in order to provide playful opportunities for not only children, but also adults through exploring the concept of playful space and experience.

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ment of happiness. As the medium, music was used to trigger people’s curiosity. PLAY { GROUND }, a set of two speakers housed in a “dog-house“, aims to introduce playfulness into existing places. When people wear the designed bracelet and touch around the “dog-house“, rhythm and music will be played. 5 bracelets cause different sounds. In addition, if people touch each other, various sound will be produces. People are encouraged to collaborate and communicate via the creation of music and rhythm. We tried to set PLAY { GROUND } in different spaces; inside and outside. In our experiments it aroused people to play with their friends, and even, strangers in spaces such as a lawn, ah garden, a water fountain, a floor, a wall and other conductive materials. Wherever this item is situated, the place becomes a playful one.

Figure1. Cheasea College of Art and Design lawn, Author’s own , 12 / Apr. 2013 Figure2. The Barbican centre , Author’s own , 4 / Apr. 2013 Figure3. Cheasea College of Art and Design stone , Author’s own , 12 / Apr. 2013 Figure4. Deptfold high street 1 , Author’s own , 17 / Apr. 2013 Figure5. Granary square , Author’s own , 19 / Apr. 2013 Figure6. Deptfold high street 2 , Author’s own , 17 / Apr. 2013 Figure7. Regent park , Author’s own , 18 / Apr. 2013 Figure8. The Royal Institute of British Architects , Author’s own , 18 / Apr. 2013 Figure9. The bus stop in Euston station , Author’s own , 18 / Apr. 2013 4

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3. Experimental Process

4. System Design

Processing code;

Return the specific signal to the computer

I focused on Capacitive sensor with ‘Arduino board’1 and ‘Makey

import ddf.minim.*; Minim minim; AudioSample[] se; boolean keyState[]; void setup(){ size(1200,780); minim = new Minim(this);

This observation explores how far the sensor works in the ground.

Makey board’2 in order to create interactive system.The capacitive

se = new AudioSample[15]; se[0] = minim.loadSample(“n1.mp3”); se[1] = minim.loadSample(“n2.mp3”); se[2] = minim.loadSample(“n3.mp3”); se[3] = minim.loadSample(“n4.mp3”); se[4] = minim.loadSample(“n5.mp3”); se[5] = minim.loadSample(“n6.mp3”); se[6] = minim.loadSample(“n7.mp3”); se[7] = minim.loadSample(“n8.mp3”); se[8] = minim.loadSample(“n9.mp3”); se[9] = minim.loadSample(“n10.mp3”); se[10] = minim.loadSample(“n11.mp3”); se[11] = minim.loadSample(“tori.mp3”); se[12] = minim.loadSample(“n13.mp3”); se[13] = minim.loadSample(“n14.mp3”); se[14] = minim.loadSample(“n15.mp3”);

sensing is based on capacitive coupling, that takes human body capacitance as input. Capacitive sensors detect anything that is

Trigger various sounds

conductive. I tried searchig which material is conductive and how

1m ( from the computer )

to connect it spatial design. Through these experiments, my con-

well connected

cerned parts are both grounds and plants. 14.

Processing

Materials signal

keyState = new boolean[256]; for(int i=0; i<256; ++i){ keyState[i] = false; }

20m ( from the computer ) well connected

Makey Makey board

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} void keyPressed() { if(0<=key && key<256){ keyState[key] = true; } } void keyReleased() { if(0<=key && key<256){ keyState[key] = false; } } } void draw(){ if(keyState[‘w’%256] ){ frameRate(2); se[0].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘a’%256] ) { frameRate(2); se[1].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘d’%256] ) { frameRate(4); se[2].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘f’%256] ) { frameRate(2); se[3].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘g’%256] ) { frameRate(2);se[4].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘w’%256] && keyState[‘a’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[5].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘w’%256] && keyState[‘d’%256]) { frameRate(4); se[6].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘w’%256] && keyState[‘g’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[7].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘w’%256] && keyState[‘f’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[8].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘a’%256] && keyState[‘d’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[9].trigger(); } if(keyState[‘a’%256] && keyState[‘f’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[10].trigger();} if(keyState[‘a’%256] && keyState[‘g’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[11].trigger();} if(keyState[‘d’%256] && keyState[‘f’%256]) { frameRate(4); se[12].trigger();} if(keyState[‘d’%256] && keyState[‘g’%256]) { frameRate(2); se[13].trigger();} if(keyState[‘f’%256] && keyState[‘g’%256]) { frameRate(2);se[14].trigger();}

Earth

40m ( from the computer ) well connected Signal is not reduced by distance 12.

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Figure10. A plant with a capacitive sensor, Author’s own, 1 / Apr. 2013

Figure14. Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 1, Author’s own, 6 / Apr. 2013

Figure11. Lawn with a capacitive sensor, Author’s own, 2 / Apr. 2013

Figure15. Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 2, Author’s own, 6 / Apr. 2013

Figure12. Water with a capacitive sensor, Author’s own, 3 / Apr. 2013

Figure16. Distant experiment with a capacitivesensor 3, Author’s own, 6 / Apr. 2013

Figure13. Pencil lead with a capacitive sensor, Author’s own, 2 / Apr. 2013 Arduino board1 ;

} void stop(){

When earth pin and conductive object is connected, a signal will be sent to a computer.

Arduino is an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software.

Makey Makey board2 ;

for(int i=0;i<se.length;i++){ se[i].close(); } minim.stop(); super.stop(); }

Makey makey is a printed circuit board with an ATMega32u4 microcontroller running Arduino Leonardo firm-

ware. It uses the Human Interface Device (HID) protocol to communicate with a computer, and it can send keypresses, mouse clicks. 6

conductive object

Figure17. Technical daigram, Author’s own , 10 / Apr. 2013

Figure18. Processing code of PLAY { GROUND }, Author’s own , 17 / Apr. 2013 7


5. Diagram of PLAY { GROUND }

6. Plan

When people wear the designed bracelet

135mm Speaker ×2

and touch around the “PLAY { GROUND }“, rhythm and music will be played. The bracelets, which are connected to a com3mm Acrilic board

puter inside, are easy to fit everyone’s wrist. Figure19. PLAY { GROUND } diagram1 , Author’s own , 20 / Apr. 2013

The material of it is light iron, and covered by soft material to avoid any hurt. 5 bracelets can detect people’s conductivity and

5 Sounds

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cause different sounds. Furthermore, if people touch each other, various sounds (to15 Sounds

+ 10 Sounds

tally 15 sounds) will be produces. People are encouraged to collaborate and commu-

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nicate via the creation of music and rhythm. Figure20. PLAY { GROUND } diagram1 , Author’s own , 20 / Apr. 2013

MDF 6mm board

Figure21. How to use the bracelets 1, Author’s own , 1 / May. 2013

Figure 25. Plan of PLAY { GROUND }, Author’s own , 28 / Apr. 2013

Figure22. How to use the bracelets 2, Author’s own , 1 / May. 2013

Figure26 PLAY { GROUND } inside 1, Author’s own , 28 / Apr. 2013

Figure23. How to use the bracelets 3, Author’s own , 1 / May. 2013 21.

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Figure24. How to use the bracelets 4, Author’s own , 1 / May. 2013

Figure27. PLAY { GROUND } inside 2, Author’s own , 28 / Apr. 2013 Figure 25.

Figure28. PLAY { GROUND } inside 3, Author’s own , 28 / Apr. 2013

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5. Portability

One attempt of PLAY { GROUND } is portability. It is easy to carry and set up anywhere.

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wherever it is situated, the atmosphere will be changed to playful space. Everywhere has possibility to be a play ground.

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Figure29. PLAY { GROUND } in Chelsea college of Art and Design 1, Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure33. Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 3 , Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure30. PLAY { GROUND } in Chelsea college of Art and Design 2, Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure34. PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 1, Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure31. Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 1 , Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure35. PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 2, Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure32. Taking PLAY {GROUND} by a London bus 2 , Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

Figure36. PLAY { GROUND } in Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design 3, Author’s own , 2 / May. 2013

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5. Location

Chelsea College of Art and Design

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Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design

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Figure43.44.45.46.47.48.

Figure37.38.39.40.41.42.

Playing at Central Saint Martins College of Art andDesign,

Playing at Chelsea College of Art and Design , 40.

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Authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own ,2 / May. 2013

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Authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own ,4 / May. 2013

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Statue of Eros at Piccadilly Circus

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Clissold Park Mansions at Stoke Newington Church Street

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Figure55.56.57.58.59.60

Figure49.50.51.52.53.54.

Playing at Clissold Park Mansions at Stoke Newington Church

Playing at Statue of Eros at Piccadilly Circus , 52.

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Author’s own ,7 / May. 2013

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Street , Author’s own ,7 / May. 2013

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7. Bibliography

Tartakovsky, M(2012) The Importance of Play for Adults. Psych Central. [Internet] Available from <http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2012/11/15/the-importance-of-play-for-adults/> [Accesse 30 March 2013]

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PLAY { GROUND }