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architecture portfolio WILL HINKLEY


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WILL HINKLEY • 4530 BLUEJAY AVENUE • CHEBOYGAN, MI 49721 • EMAIL HINKLEW@FERRIS.EDU • PHONE 231.420.1036


PROJECT

BREAKDOWN

SECOND FLOOR 1 HANNA’S ROOM 2 RUTH’S ROOM 3 OPEN BELOW

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LOCATION The Lowe Family Residence was designed to be built in a climatic region matching the characteristics of the southeast United States. In order to specify certain elements of the design, I focused on Tallahassee, Florida. 1

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DESIGN GOALS Welcome in natural light while preventing overheating via roof overhangs

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Provide direct access to the garden from the kitchen Develop privacy to the east and west

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Allow summer breezes to pass through the site by means of landscaping Open floorplan allowing interaction amongst family members while giving them individual private spaces Provide a view to the maple grove to the north of the property

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FIRST FLOOR

PLAN DEVELOPMENT The house was designed based off a program giving design requirements for the family as a whole as well as individually. The house was not to exceed 2800 sf and spaces were to be laid out according to an adjacency matrix.

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1 ANN’S SUITE 2 JIM’S SUITE 3 KITCHEN 4 DINING 5 LIVING 6 OFFICE 7 UTILITY 8 1/2 BATH 9 MECH 10 GARDEN STORAGE 11 EQUIP STORAGE 12 MAIN ENTRANCE 13 REAR ENTRANCE


LOWE FAMILY RESIDENCE

The Lowe Family Residence

For this junior project, students were assigned a climatic region in the United States. From there, we conducted research on vernacular styles within our regions, which led us to designing a house,based on a program for our region. Sustainable, “good” design was a major focus on the project. The southeast U.S. was my assigned region, with a focus on Tallahassee, Florida.

VERNACULAR

ARCH

ITECTURE A CATEGORY OF ARCH ITECTURAL THEORY TH AT STUDIES THE MATERIA LS, TRADITIONS, AND ST RUCTURES MADE BY EMPIR ICAL BUILDERS WITHOU T THE INTERVENTION OF PROFESSIONAL ARCHITE CTS.


ARWOOD HOTE 5 4

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I CHOSE THE NAME HARWOOD HOTEL IN ORDER TO HONOR THE HOTEL WHICH, REMEMBERED BY MANY OF THE LOCALS IN BIG RAPIDS, MICHIGAN, WAS LOCATED ON THIS SITE MANY YEARS AGO.

THIS FOUR-AND-A-HALF STORY REVIVAL OF THE HARWOOD HOTEL PROVIDES LEASABLE SPACES FOR LOCAL BUSINESSES IN ITS GROUND FLOOR COURTYARD AND A SECOND STORY DINING FACILITY, BAR NONE, PROVIDES A FULL BAR AND SEATING FOR FIFTY PEOPLE. THE THIRD AND FOURTH FLOORS ARE HOME TO TWENTYFOUR GUEST ROOMS, OFFERING TWELVE UNIQUE STYLES AND LAYOUTS, AND THE UPPER LEVEL CONSISTS OF CONFERNCE SPACE AND FOUR PENTHOUSE SUITES.

The Harwood Hotel This junior project was an adaptive re-use project. Students were to transform an existing one-story hair salon in downtown Big Rapids, MI, into a local hotel which fits into the context of the city. The Harwood Hotel, while making its presence known and serving as a beacon from afar, fits in with its surroundings and assists the other local businesses.


PERSONA RETREA

POSITIONED AT DIFFERENT LOCATIONS ON THE EDGE OF A BEAUTIFUL, OPEN FIELD, SIX PERSONAL RETREATS GIVE WRITERS THERE OWN INDIVIDUAL SPACE TO RELAX, THINK, AND WRITE, AWAY FROM THEIR ROOMS AND ACTIVITY TAKING PLACE ELSEWHERE ON SITE.

NORTH ELEVATION

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SOUTH ELEVATION

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Writers’ Retreat & B&B

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FIRST FLOOR

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MAIN ENTRANCE COMMERCIAL KITCHEN INDOOR DINING OUTDOOR DINING

SECOND FLOOR

1 BALCONY 2 LOFT DINING

IN ORDER TO MAINTAIN SOME OF THE HISTORICAL CONTEXT OF THE SITE, AN EXISTING, TWO-STORY FARM BARN WAS RENOVATED AND TRANSFORMED INTO A COMMUNAL DINING FACILITY COMPLETE WITH ALL SPACES NOTED IN THE FLOOR PLANS ABOVE. DUE TO THE FACILITY BEING USED PRIMARILY FOR EVENING EVENTS, THE LARGE GLASS WALL SEEN HERE, FACES WEST IN ORDER TO CAPTURE A PLEASANT VIEW OF THE EVENING SUN.

DINING FACILITY

For this junior project, students were to develop, in a sustainable manner, a piece of local property into a destination for writers to practice their writing skills and to attend professional seminars. Although the project had many different components, the individual writing retreats and restaurant/ communal dining area were of main focus. Due to the large plot of land the project was located on, weekly trips to the site for surverying a photography were necessary in order to select proper locations for the many components to be located.


SOUTH ELEVATION

FERRIS STATE UNIVERSITY

EAST ELEVATION


WORKING THE CURVE Ferris State Univ. Art Center

WORKING THE CURVE, THE PARTI OF THE ART CENTER, WAS THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND THE GEOMETRY OF THE BUILDING. THIS WAS TO DONE TO MAXIMIZE EXPOSURE TO THE SURROUNDING SITE AND TO GIVE THE BUILDING AN ARTISIC FEEL FROM THE EXTERIOR. THE CURVATURE OF THE

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SOUTH FACADE OF THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNED TO FOLLOW THE CURVATURE OF FERRIS DRIVE IN ORDER TO ALLOW THE BUILDING TO FIT SEEMLESSLY WITH THE SITE. THE PARTI IS CONTINUED THROUGHOUT THE INTERIOR OF THE BUILDING WITH THE CURVING OF ALL INTERIOR WALLS.

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This junior project required the demolition of an unused residence hall in the center of Ferris State University’s campus. Students were to design and develop a visual/performance art center in its place, that fits in with the character of the campus while serving as a focal point for students and members of the community,.


Car-Sharing

Research Study

In my fourth-year, senior design studio I conducted research on Car Sharing and how it could be beneficial in Big Rapids, Michigan both on and off Ferris State University’s campus. Although it was a research-based project, I learned a great deal about how to present information using infographics. In terms of presentation, I have been able to use the knowledge I learned from this project, in all of my projects which have followed.


Kevin Lynch Analysis In our senior design studio, we analyzed the city of Big Rapids and Ferris State University through a series of field studies and public surveys; helping us locate major landmarks and nodes, edges, paths, and districts. This individual project was the basis for projects that followed; including the Big Rapids Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan, shown on the following page.


BIG RAPIDS

Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan: Big Rapids, MI

BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN PLAN

BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN PLAN

In our senior design studio, our class spent three months developing a Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan for Big Rapids, MI. The process involved analyzing the existing conditions of all sidewalks and roads within the city limits, observing pedestrian and vehicular traffic flow, researching possible solutions and case studies, and formulating the final plan (shown to the right). The graphics shown on this page were part of a 125-page document, created entirely by our class, which was printed off, bound, and given to the City of Big Rapids for potential future development. Throughout the development process I was responsible for researching the existing conditions of the southwest qaudrant of the city, developing the overall concept for the plan (the Loop) which was later broken down into its many components, creating graphics for the book, and making a (.pdf) presentation which our class used to present the plan to the City of Big Rapids at a City Council Meeting.

CITY OF BIG RAPIDS by Small Town STuDio - fall 2012:

(unDer TuTelage of aSSiSSTanT ProfeSSor Paul long)

anThony amaTo Don bucholz will hinkley eric miller michael moy courTney ParkS kaTelin PoST rebecca Thayer evan weaver rachel weller

MULTI-USE PATH BICYCLE PATH BICYCLE LANE-NO PARKING

The Design Team Amato, Anthony Bucholz, Don Hinkley, Will Miller, Eric Moy, Michael Parks, Courtney Post, Kaitlin Thayer, Rebecca Weaver, Evan Weller, Rachel

BICYCLE LANE-ALTERNATE PARKING BICYCLE LANE-PARKING ONE-SIDE BICYCLE LANE-PARKING TWO SIDES ADVISORY LANE-NO PARKING

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ADVISORY LANE-PARKING ONE SIDE ADVISORY LANE-PARKING TWO SIDES SHARROWS

PHASE 1: PHASE 2: PHASE 3: THE LOOP NEIGHBORHOODS EXTENSIONS

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N fig 3: big raPiDS DemograPhic regionS (all)

fig 19: big raPiDS raDial Diagram (all)

1 MAP SHOWS BIG RAPIDS IS DENSIST IN THE DOWNTOWN AREA (1 MILE DIAMETER-CYAN) AND LESS DENSE IN THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE CITY (2 MILE DIAMETER-ORANGE). THIS INFLUENCED WHERE THE ROUTE TRAVELED. MILES

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2 MAP SHOWS THREE MAIN DEMOGRAPHIC AREAS WITHIN THE CITY: INCOMES UNDER $25K (AREAS OF IMPORTANCE), BETWEEN $25K AND $50K, AND GREATER THAN $50K.

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SMALL TOWN STUDIO

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SMALL TOWN STUDIO AND ART GALLERY

1ST FLOOR COMMERCIAL 2ND-3RD FLOORS TENNANT SPACE

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1ST FLOOR COMMERCIAL 2ND-3RD FLOORS TENNANT SPACE

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IN ORDER TO SLOW TRAFFIC THROUGH THE INTERSECTION OF STATE STREET AND MAPLE STREET, I CHOSE TO PULL THE BUILDINGS CLOSER TO THE STREETS, CREATE A RAISED INTERSECTION, AND PLACE MEDIANS IN THE CENTER OF STATE STREET, REDUCING IT FROM FOUR LANES DOWN TO TWO LANES AS YOU PASS THROUGH THE INTERSECTION. IN ORDER TO MAKE THE AREA MORE PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY, I CHOSE TO CAREFULLY REMOVE PARKING ON MAPLE STREET - WIDENING THE SIDEWALKS ON BOTH

MIXED-USE BUILDINGS

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SIDES, RAISE THE CROSSWALKS TO SIDEWALK LEVEL - GIVING PEDESTRIANS THEIR OWN ‘LEVEL’ TO NAVIGATE ON, AND UTILIZE BRICK PAVERS TO VISUALLY DISTINGUISH ALL PATHS DEDICATED TO PEDESTRIANS.

STREETS ANALYZED

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PEDESTRIAN PATHS

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Urban Re-Design Line 2 Following project the description Big Rapids Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan project came a three-week, conceptual urban re-design project. This was an individual project which involved redeveloping the sites where buildings “1” and “2” are located, designing a new building, labeled “3”, to be built on lot that is currently vacant, and redesigning the streetscape on two major collector streets in downtown Big Rapids to slow traffic and make them more pedestrian friendly. The short time-frame of the project meant only the facades of the three buildings were to be designed, with no development of interior spaces.


Charcoal

Creations

Drawing, in both my free time and in class, has always been a passion of mine. Bringing an image to life by hand, on a canvas, is not only a rewarding process, it is also a physically and mentally challenging process as well. As seen here, I have always preferred a monochromatic rendering style over a full-color image. This is not because of a lack of ability to work in color, but simply because I enjoy being able to work with shadows and color variations in order to give images a sense of realism.


Charcoal Creations Drawing from imagination, as well as still life scenes and photographs which I have taken, has always been my strong suit when it comes to drawing. Portraits on the other hand, because of my high attention to detail, have always been the most challenging for me. However, by continuosly exposing myself to drawing people, I no longer doubt my ability to represent them both accurately and realistically.


“T

rust me, you don’t want to be a carpenter; your knees and back will be shot by the time you’re forty. Do yourself a favor and design buildings , don’t be the guy who’s out there pounding nails. ” I remember my father who, like his brother and his father, was a carpenter, saying this to me when I was younger, perhaps six or seven years old. One might think that such a statement would mean very little to a seven year old boy whose interests generally involve going out for recess, playing with lego’s and tee-ball practice. Because of how much I look up to my father, I took his advice and with no guidance, began drawing floor plans of what I thought ‘cool’ houses looked like. I had no idea that what started off as a hobby would soon turn into a passion. This initial, self-taught exposure to what I thought was architecture led to four years of architectural drafting classes in high school. After graduation I entered the Architectural Technology and Architecture and Sustainability programs at Ferris State University and am presently looking forward to the opportunity to further my education with a Master’s Degree in Architecture at Ball State University. Born and raised in northern Michigan, I attended catholic school through sixth grade at which time I transferred to a public school. Attending a catholic school required me to develop a great deal of respect for those around me and taught me importance of acting with a heightened level decency and responsibility. Although these characteristics have become second-hand nature throughout the years, I have always been the inquisitive, enterprising type who likes pushing boundaries and taking chances without the fear of failing. I am not ashamed to say that I have gotten a less than desirable grade on projects because I chose to push the envelope. Even though my approach to solving the problem was perhaps a bit out of reach or even farfetched, the choice to explore was beneficial because I learned a new technique, developed a new style, or if nothing else, learned to keep my feet a little bit closer to the ground on the next project. Throughout both my academic and field experiences, whether it was redeveloping an art center into a local hotel in downtown Big Rapids, working with a city council to develop a bicycle and pedestrian plan, or being the architect of a student design-build team, I have come to realize that success in architecture requires a specific type of someone. My accomplishments in these experiences have made me realize that I am in fact, that specific type of someone, and that I enjoy being that specific type of someone. Oddly enough, I enjoy being up all night brainstorming a concept for a project, tweaking a design in Revit, bringing an image to life in Photoshop, or even offering advice to a classmate whose hit a mental block in their own design. I have never been one who is willing to ‘call it good’ when the right side of my brain goes on sabbatical or I get frustrated, because in my mind, everything can always be just a little bit better. It’s putting forth the extra effort to perfect the minor details that ultimately results in final products that I am proud to call my own. I do not enjoy architecture nor am I working towards a career in architecture because I think it’s going to make me rich someday; if I was that concerned about money I would be applying to John Hopkins University’s medical program in hopes of earning my MD. If fifteen years ago someone were to ask me why I enjoy architecture, I would have said, “Because my father said I should design buildings instead of building them.” Now, at the age of twenty-two, after completing the beginning of my journey into the architecture world, I realize that although I respect

my fathers’ advice, the real reason I enjoy architecture is because it allows me to express myself in a meaningful way which those around me can appreciate. Since I began my education in architecture I can’t count the number of times I’ve heard, “Architecture huh. You know jobs in that field are hard to come by right now. Have you considered a similar, but more stable career like facility management or engineering?” Although I do have a minor in facility management from Ferris State University, my response to that annoying, yet relevant statement is, and has always been, “Yes, and they don’t excite me. Architecture excites me; it always has, and I’m confident it always will.” I began working when I was thirteen years old, and for the past five years, have worked four jobs, a minimum of eighty hours per week when I’m not in school. I have worked at golf courses managing the pro-shop and cart fleets, waited tables at the finest restaurant in my hometown of Cheboygan, cut plenty of grass, moved furniture, and cleaned too many houses. However, despite the fact that none of them are careers, I haven’t enjoyed any of them nearly as much I enjoyed volunteering with Habitat for Humanity during my freshman and sophomore years of college. Being able to put together the puzzle that another architect created was a learning experience that I’ll always remember. I know what it’s like to have ambition and to work long and hard for the things one wants; be it money, happiness, or just a day off. In today’s society, not everyone can earn a living doing something they actually enjoy. Although I don’t know what a day in the life of an architect is like, I do know from experience what it’s like to be part of a team with a project manager, construction manager, civil engineer, mechanical engineer, and supervisor. During my junior year at Ferris State I had the privilege of being a member of the first place, design-build team at the 2011 National ASC Design-Build Competition in Chicago, Illinois. This fast-paced, twenty-four hour competition demanded that our team stay focused yet flexible, work quickly yet strategically, and most importantly, communicate. Being invited to be a member of this team helped me to appreciate the amount of work that is done by the other players in the field and to understand that it’s how well you work with these other players that ultimately determines the project’s success. I consider myself to be very fortunate to have this collaborative experience under my belt. Not only did it illustrate the importance of teamwork but it solidified the fact that architecture is where I belong. My interest in Ball State University began when Assistant Professor and Director of the MArch Professional Program, Joshua Coggeshall came to Ferris State University to give a presentation regarding Ball State University’s Architecture Program and the work that current students in the program were producing. Seeing the variety of resources available to students, hearing about the dedication from the entire faculty in regards to the students and the positive feedback from current students in the program has excited me to think that I could potentially be part of a university such as Ball State. I know I am ready to take the next step in my architectural education and I am confident that I have the potential to be an outstanding representative of Ball State University in the years to come.



Undergraduate Portfolio