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MAY 2016

IN THE DETAIL PERFECT POTS AND PLANTERS WILD NEW WALLPAPERS PRETTY JUGS AND PLATES

SPEEDY SUPPERS Fresh and fuss-free food

SENSATIONAL TRANSFORMATIONS HOUSES DESIGNED TO FULFIL THEIR POTENTIAL


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HERMÈS BY NATURE


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Books The interiors of Martyn Lawrence Bullard; personal responses to landscape; beautiful blooms; and a guide to tidying

Shopping Ruth Sleightholme selects decorative plates, dishes, jugs and utensils

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Notebook What’s new in furniture, fabrics, wallpaper and home accessories

Swatch Florence Rolfe presents a wild selection of the latest wallpapers

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News and views A look at London Craft Week; plus, the bestsellers launched at last year’s Milan Furniture Fair

Design ideas Bonnie Robinson collates perfectly pretty ideas for pots and planters, to create an outdoor paradise

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Rita notes Advice on planning a kitchen

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Profile David Nicholls talks to architects Bureau de Change about their solutions for a ground-floor extension in London

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Contributors

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From the editor

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VOLUME 71 앫 NUMBER 5

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Outside interests Clare Foster focuses on long-flowering perennials, and highlights garden accessories and events

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Out and about Latest launches, chic showrooms, hot buys. By Carole Annett

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In crowd Reader events and diary dates

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Art scene Painting the landscapes of Capability Brown; plus, a focus on three artists whose work portrays global events

DE COR AT I NG

LIFESTYLE

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Joint enterprise Antique dealer Max Rollitt and his wife Jane have created a relaxed base for family and work in rural Hampshire. By Ros Byam Shaw 컄

On the cover The main bedroom of a historic house in Virginia (pages 92-99), photographed by Lucas Allen. Cover stories are highlighted in colour HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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Contents continued

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EDIT: INTERIORS, GARDENS, STORIES 92

Keeping it in the family When a historic house came up for sale in Virginia, Anne Massie and her brother Will could not resist it. Some 30 years later, it remains Anne’s much loved home. By Helen Chislett

100 Spreading its wings Having once been a building at risk, Slackwood Farm in Lancashire has become a sight to behold, thanks in part to a strikingly modern curved glass extension. By Nonie Niesewand

108 Compare and contrast Designer Sarah Vanrenen was charged with refreshing a south London terrace house from the owner’s bachelor days into a second home for his young family. By Elfreda Pownall

114 Lofty ambition The Spanish architect Isabel López-Quesada has softened the industrial architecture of a former office space in New York to create a sophisticated pied-à-terre. By Dominic Lutyens

120 The knowledge Inspired by the houses in this issue, Elizabeth Metcalfe gives directions on how to achieve a similar style

122 Where the wild things are Emily Tobin meets the duo behind Forestand-Found, which makes home accessories from foraged materials

126 As nature intended Gabby Deeming creates serenely simple schemes that play on the colours and textures of natural materials

132 Muted shades Continuing our series on planting plans, Arne Maynard shares with Clare Foster his design for a softly coloured spring border

136 Peaceful coexistence Diverse habitats work as one in this Dorset garden, providing its owner with abundant opportunities to showcase a range of spectacular plants. By Noel Kingsbury

F OOD & DR I N K

144 Simple spring Louisa Carter, the writer behind House & Garden’s ‘Simple suppers’ series, recommends fresh and fuss-free dishes

From planters, fountains and statues to balustrades, porticos and follies – our stonework designs look fabulous when new and grow ever-more distinguished as they age. Browse our unrivalled collection online or call to request a catalogue.

150 Taste notes News, reviews and tips for cooks and food lovers. By Blanche Vaughan

T R AV E L

153 Sea of flowers Virginia Fraser embarks on an Aegean cruise, learning about rare native wildflowers and visiting classical ruins

154 Taking the long route David Nicholls takes the wheel to experience the variety of a classic road trip from Calgary to Vancouver

157 Designer haunts Interior designer Steven Gambrel’s New York E V E RY I S S U E

158 Stockists 159 Subscriptions How to subscribe to House & Garden in the UK and US

haddonstone.com 01604 770711

176 Tastemaker Douglas Mackie’s dos and don’ts of decorating 첸


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ANNE MASSIE Designer and painter There are two things that have been constant in Anne Massie’s life: her close relationship with her brother Will and her love of painting. As children, a summer project for Anne and Will would be to grow tomatoes and corn, and sell them to restaurants for pocket change. In their twenties, they bought and restored a historic house close to their hometown in Virginia. Years later, when it came time for another creative project, the two ‘wanted to do something we believed in’. And so McKinnon and Harris, their garden furniture company, was born. Today Anne lives with her husband in the house she and Will bought, where her other passion, painting, can be seen in almost every room (from page 92). ‘I look at the house and grounds as if I am living inside a giant painting.’ How did the idea of launching McKinnon and Harris come about? ‘My brother and I were always making things as children, so starting a business together wasn’t too far from what we have always done. We grew up with parents who were passionate gardeners and they also loved antiques, so we put those two passions together in creating McKinnon and Harris.’

NEIL MERSH Photographer Growing up with a photographer as a father is a sure way to spark interest in a curious teenager. ‘He was always happy taking pictures,’ says Neil. ‘That was very inspiring, and I always tell my own kids they should pick a job they really enjoy.’ Still enjoying life behind a camera, Neil has photographed interiors for the likes of Elle Decoration and The World of Interiors, as well as this issue’s main decoration feature (pages 126–131). Describe your own home. ‘I have recently moved from a tower block on the twentyfourth loor in west London to a little house in Tottenham. Everything’s changed: there is now a table-tennis station in the garden and a big open ireplace. It’s a colourful work in progress.’

PAUL ARCHER Architect Paul Archer’s love of architecture began at the age of 14. While visiting a planning department, he was stopped him in his tracks by a display of architectural models that was in the foyer of the building. ‘They fascinated me and I originally wanted to build models for a living,’ he says. ‘But I soon realised it would be much more fun building my own ideas rather than models of someone else’s.’ Paul has worked for firms in Bristol and Hong Kong, and back in the UK he set up on his own in 1999 to focus on residential projects. Whether it is a newbuild house in Islington or the Grade II*-listed farmhouse in Lancashire, featured from page 100 in this issue, his modern sensibility is quietly integrated into each and every project. In another life, you would be… ‘A carpenter. I would love to physically build my own house from scratch’ 첸

PHOTOGRAPHS: (MASSIE) LUCAS ALLEN. WORDS BY ARTA GHANBARI

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M AY 2 0 1 6

FROM THE EDITOR

Foraging was a part of my childhood – in fact, some of my most vivid memories are of crawling through the undergrowth looking for mushrooms, slightly frightened by what my father was going to find and suggest we eat. When I was six months old, he and my mother spent a worrying 24 hours waiting to see if what they had eaten was actually a death cap masquerading as a blusher, after reading that in dense woodland this can sometimes be the case. Summer holidays on the North Cornish coast were all about extracting whatever we could from the sea – winkles were our favourite, plucked from the rock pools and painstakingly picked from their shells with a needle, then eaten on brown bread and butter with plenty of pepper and lemon. I can even remember trying limpets and all sorts of unknown rubbery things – encouraged by my father, we thought anybody who refused to try such delicacies was decidedly wet. We gathered ‘sea spinach’ on the clifftops, which tasted deliciously salty when cooked, and when the tide was at its lowest, we poked hooks into the holes in the rocks and, if we were lucky, hauled out satisfyingly large edible crabs. Sadly now the concept of foraging and ‘wild foods’ has become so fashionable it’s almost a cliché. I hear your jaded sighs. But I hope that when you turn to page 122 to read about Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth, the pair behind Forest-and-Found, who create wonderfully muted textiles and tactile wooden objects from found ingredients, that you can’t help but be enthused by the atmospheric pictures of their work and the story behind what they do. And on page 150, our food editor Blanche Vaughan gives us her easy-to-make recipe for nettle soup. I’ve always found the concept of eating something that one is otherwise at pains to avoid rather odd, but nettle soup is delicious and very much a taste of spring – you just have to gather the horrid stingy things first. Spring is celebrated in the wonderful pictures of Braddocks Garden – a sort of sensitively enhanced, colourful, plant-filled nature – from page 136. As a child, probably fuelled by reading the likes of BB’s The Little Grey Men, I longed for a stream running through our garden and that at Braddocks is exactly the sort I wanted: meandering, other-worldly and easily crossable. The image Arne Maynard conjures for his border scheme from page 132 is equally romantic: ‘In a natural woodland edge, you get the first flush of flower before the leaves really unfold, and I wanted to create this feeling,’ he says. As I write this, I’m feeling optimistic for a sunny spring and plenty of time spent outdoors. I hope I’m right 첸

Fabric background: ‘Cubes’ (turquoise), linen/cotton, from Korla

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MAY 2016 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

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Demetrius Wallpaper. Kendall Sofa from Thibaut in Aura, Avalon Ottoman from Thibaut in Panthera. Cushions in Demetrius Applique, Temecula Embroidery, New England Plaid. Curtains in Waterford Floral.


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In which we serve RUTH SLEIGHTHOLME selects decorative dishes, jugs and utensils for pretty tabletop settings 1 Borosilicate glass jugs, ‘Incalmo’ (teal and grey, pink and grey), by Jochen Holz, £155 each, from The New Craftsmen. 2 Earthenware jug, ‘Cabbage’ (green), £45, from Oka. 3 Stoneware serving bowl, ‘Lettuce Ware’, by Dodie Thayer, £130, from Tory Burch. 4 China platter, ‘Birds’ (yellow and blue), €240, from Laboratorio Paravicini. 5 Spongeware presentation platter, ‘Clover’, £126.70, from Nicholas Mosse. 6 Porcelain presentation plate, ‘Belle de Jour’ (fuchsia and snake green), €136, from Marie Daâge. 7 Carved mvule and neem-wood spoons, from left: ‘Small Pelican’, £16; ‘Nataka’, £18; ‘Large Pelican’, £18; all from Kirsten Hecktermann. 8 Bone china platter, ‘Exemplum’ (cobalt with gold overlay), £87.50, from Cobaltum. Paper, ‘Colorplan’ (background: harvest; table and wrapping: powder green), £37 for 25 A1 sheets, from G F Smith 컄

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1 Stoneware 1.3-litre jug, ‘Splash’, by Michael Taylor, £50, from David Mellor. 2 Porcelain bowl, ‘Spiral Pattern’, by Ikat, £29.50, from SCP. 3 Porcelain spoons, €11.50 each, from Serax. 4 Creamware bowl, ‘Indigo Storm Large’, by Faye Toogood, £39.95, from 1882. 5 Terracotta salad bowl, ‘Marguerite’, by Astier de Villatte, £100, from Liberty. 6 Red clay dish, ‘Big Flower’ (blue), £135, from Irving & Morrison. 7 Terracotta platter (blue grey), by Silvia K, £79, from The Conran Shop. 8 Melamine platter, ‘Botanist’, £8, from Sainsbury’s. 9 Earthenware oval platter, ‘Hen & Border’ (blue), £54.95, from Emma Bridgewater. 10 Stained and inlaid porcelain platter, £58, from Lydia Hardwick. Background paper, ‘Colorplan’ (imperial blue), £37 for 25 A1 sheets; tabletop and wrapping paper, ‘Marlmarque’ (marble white), £18.50 for 25 B1 sheets; both from G F Smith 컄

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Luxury fired by design L O N D O N | N EW YOR K | S HAN G HAI

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1 Glass bottle, ‘Wirkkala’ (moss green), by Tapio Wirkkala for Iittala, £189, from SCP. 2 Stoneware water jug (parsnip), £57, from Arran St East. 3 Red clay bowl (yellow), £92, from Irving & Morrison. 4 Earthenware slip-trail baking dish, £150, from Paul Young. 5 Earthenware serving dishes (green, orange), by Hennie Meyer, £125 each, from Mint. 6 Ceramic bowls, ‘Sicilia’ (sunflower yellow, forest), €89 each, from Maison Sarah Lavoine. 7 Earthenware slip-trail dish, ‘Floral’ (honey), by Hannah McAndrew, £90, from The New Craftsmen. 8 Clay donabe rice pot (black) with wooden spoon, £135, from Native & Co. 9 Bamboo and stainless-steel salad servers, £45, from The Conran Shop. Background paper, ‘Colorplan’ (racing green), £37 for 25 A1 sheets; tabletop and wrapping paper, ‘Gmund Bier’ (lager), £45 for 25 B1 sheets; both from G F Smith. Glasses, plates, bowls and cutlery covered in wrapping paper throughout, from £1 a piece, from Ikea. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

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Notebook DAVID LOTHIAN; CLIFF COLGATE/SPIKE IMAGING

GABBY DEEMING shows us what’s caught her eye this month 1 Murano glass and brass wall light, ‘Orbe’ (amethyst), by Patrick E Naggar, 65 x 45cm diameter, £1,433, from Veronese. 2 Linen tea towels, from left: ‘Pincheck’, £14.50; ‘Checked’, £18.50; ‘Plaid’, £16.50, ‘Double Striped’ (red), £18.50; ‘Linen Cotton’, £16.50; ‘Double Striped’ (blue), £18.50; ‘Pinstripe’, £14.50; and linen napkin, £9.95; all from Toast. 3 Copper-plated brass ‘Copper Carafe’, 22 x 11 x 9cm, £147; resin tableware: cups, ‘Single Serving Cream & Sugar Set’ (cement), 5.5 x 5cm diameter, £38 a pair; ‘Medium Emma Tray’ (white), 36cm diameter, £163; ‘Large Justin Tray’ (white), 46cm diameter, £205; all from Tina Frey Designs. 4 Iron and enamel ‘Green Studio Set of Three Nesting Side Tables’, 46 x 50cm diameter (largest table), £195, from Oliver Bonas. 5 Steel-framed bed, ‘Desdémone’, by Soda Designers, upholstered in ‘Canvas Laine’ (rose), wool mix, 110 x 208 x 237cm, £2,983 (excluding mattress), from Ligne Roset 컄

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1 Paper vase, ‘Janus’, 29 x 26.5cm, €18.50, from Octaevo. 2 This clever paper can be hung in various ways to create different ‘striations’; all variables can be viewed on the website. White marble wallpaper, by Piet Hein Eek for NLXL, £249 a 10-metre roll, from Pad Home. 3 Steel task lamp, ‘No205’, by La Lampe Gras, 59 x 17.5cm base diameter, £295, from DCW Editions. 4 Somewhere between a mobile and a sculpture, this light would work really well over a dining table. Brass pendant light, ‘Shape Up Double Pendant’, by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio for Roll & Hill, £5,904, from SCP. 5 Iron and marble console table, ‘Fer’ (brass patina), 86 x 100 x 35cm, £2,500, from Victoria Stainow. 6 Spotted at last year’s Decorex, these beautiful textiles stood out from the crowd. Fabrics, from top: ‘Kantha Stitch’ (ochre, vert), cotton, £235 a metre; ‘Ikat Block San’ (lake, black plum), cotton/silk, £250 a metre; ‘Ikat Block Bada’ (stone), cotton/silk, £220 a metre; all by Lauren Hwang New York, from Soie de Lune 컄

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PIXELATE IMAGING; JAKE FITZJONES PHOTOGRAPHY

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SPECIAL DISCOUNTS ON OUR CLASSIC COLLECTIONS, UNTIL 30TH APRIL This April C.P. Hart is celebrating classic bathroom design, from cast iron roll-top baths to beautiful handmade brassware. Discover new products in the traditional style, get advice from our specialist designers and take advantage of discounts of up to 40% on our classic collections. Visit one of our 14 showrooms or our exciting new website at cphart.co.uk WATERLOO CHELSEA CHISWICK FULHAM NOTTING HILL MUSWELL HILL WIMBLEDON PRIMROSE HILL REGENTS PARK ROAD DARTFORD BRIDGE GUILDFORD MANCHESTER ST ALBANS TUNBRIDGE WELLS

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1 Cushions, from left: ‘Embroidered Blithfield Rossmore’ (indigo), 55cm square, £130; ‘Embroidered Blithfield Linwood’ (taupe), 40 x 60cm, £120; both by Kit Kemp and Melissa Wyndham, from Fine Cell Work. 2 This striking new light design from Gubi has multiple configurations. Powder-coated steel ‘Multi-Lite’ (from left: black/brass, all brass, chrome/white, brass/blue), by Louis Weisdorf, 36cm diameter, £405 each, from Gubi. 3 These shelves are sturdier than they look: I would love to see them used as open shelving in a kitchen. Powder-coated metal shelving system, ‘Punctual’ (dusty blue), by Wild Horses Studio, 184 x 186.2 x 42cm, £1,169, from Ferm Living. 4 Outdoor fabrics, ‘Weave On’ (from left: newsprint, americana, regatta, yachting), by Pollack, viscose mix, £236 a metre, from Altfield. 5 Jayson Home is based in the US, but it has many great upholstered designs that can be hard to find in this country, so it is worth paying the international shipping costs. Upholstered oak ‘Island Dining Bench’ (cerused oak and indigo batik), 62 x 169.5 x 45cm, $1,150, from Jayson Home. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸

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DON’T MISS GUY SALTER, founder of London Craft Week, picks his top three events Michael Ruh will be doing a glass-blowing demonstration and talk with the perfumer Lyn Harris on how a simple shape can be the starting point for glass pieces of great technical or visual complexity. It will take place in his Lambeth studio at 6 Parade Mews, SE27, on May 7, 2pm; tickets, £9.60. michaelruh.com Karen Bit Vejle is a Danish paper artist whose new and beautifully ornate large-scale work will be on show at the V&A on May 4. ‘This year I’m really pleased that about 20 per cent of our participants are international,’ says Guy. papercutart.no

Chair caner Rachael South in her east London studio

Mark Hix will be hosting a dinner and carving masterclass at Tramshed, 32 Rivington Street, EC2, on May 5 at 6pm. Knife maker Ben Edmonds will demonstrate how to make a custom knife. Tickets cost £210. blok-knives.co.uk

Behind closed doors London Craft Week offers a rare opportunity to see inside the studios of the city’s craftsmen, including third-generation restorer Rachael South ondon is packed with craftsmen hidden away behind the most unassuming of doors, but it was not long ago that much of their trade took place in the city’s streets and squares, where hawkers and peddlers would sell their wares to passers-by. Rachael South is a third generation chair caner; her grandfather, Michael South, was once a prizefighter and bare-knuckle boxer, but as his career in the ring waned, he took up chair caning. He would sit on his tool box and ply for trade, eventually teaching his son the craft, who in turn taught his daughter when she turned 14. Rachael now works from a studio in east London where the walls are lined with bundles of rushes and coils of rattan. When I

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visit, there is a handsome William IV chair, an austere Victorian ladder-back chair and a mid-century Danish chair all in various states of repair. Never without work, Rachael has now been caning for over 30 years and has three people working for her. This month, she will take part in the second annual London Craft Week – a rare opportunity to peer behind some of the capital’s closed doors. Rachael is participating in an east London studio tour, where you can see caning and rush work in action and visit the studio of shoemaker Sebastian Tarek. London Craft Week is on May 3–7. Studio tour, Friday May 6, 10am–12pm, Lighthouse Studios, 77 Shacklewell Lane, E8. Places must be booked and cost £9.60. rachaelsouth.com | londoncraftweek.com Emily Tobin 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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DEYAN SUDJIC is the director of the Design Museum, which is holding an auction at Phillips in April to raise money for the refurbishment of its new location – the former Commonwealth Institute in Kensington – opening later this year

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This month is the Milan Furniture Fair, the world’s most important design exhibition, where thousands of products are launched and new ideas are born. House & Garden discovers which of last year’s launches are fast becoming bestsellers 1 ‘Melt’ pendant light BY TOM DIXON, £370. ‘Customers have really taken to this light and it didn’t stay in stock for long. We even had a waiting list at one point,’ says Melissa Muslin, Heal’s lighting buyer. heals.com 2 ‘Pollock’ armchair BY KNOLL, £1,596. ‘This chair was launched by Knoll in Milan as a reissue of the iconic 1960 Charles Pollock design. It’s been out-selling other similar armchairs by 20 per cent,’ says Tim Ely, head of buying, furniture and lighting at The Conran Shop. conranshop.co.uk 3 ‘Langley’ stool BY DAVID CHIPPERFIELD FOR E15, FROM £500. ‘The subtle design of the “Langley” is perhaps its appeal; it’s part farmhouse, part Scandinavian, part Japanese, and very contemporary. We started stocking the stool in May 2015 and it took off immediately,’ says James Mair, director of Viaduct. viaduct.co.uk 4 ‘Copycat’ table lamp BY MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES FOR FLOS, £402. ‘This simple, beautifully executed design immediately caught my eye. It marries functionality with a strong sculptural quality. We’ve already sold the majority of the stock we ordered in,’ says Simon Alderson, director of Twentytwentyone. twentytwentyone.com Elizabeth Metcalfe MAY 2016 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK

It’s amazing how much good will we’ve had from the designers, gallerists and collectors we’ve approached about donating to the auction. Norman Foster is making a limited-edition bronze ve r s i o n o f th e ‘A r c ’ t a b l e he did for Molteni; David Gill has donated a beautiful Zaha Hadid piece; and Terence Conran has given us an Allen Jones work that was commissioned for Mezzo restaurant in London. Among the 60 or so lots, there are also pieces by Anish Kapoor, Antonio Citterio, Mario Bellini and Rolf Sachs, and Ron Arad. Our fundraising target for the new museum is £48 million. So far we’ve raised £45 million and we are hoping to close the gap. Phillips is supporting us by waiving the seller’s and donating the buyer’s premiums from each lot.

The new building has roughly three times the space of the current site. It means we can display parts of the museum’s permanent collection that have been in store for the last six years, and admission to this part of the museum will be free. Choosing my favourite piece in the collection would be like choosing a favourite child; there are about 3,500 pieces and each has its own strength. Interior design is an interesting field and in some ways uncategorisable: some people call it interior architecture, others interior decorating. It’s difficult to do monographic shows on the subject, but I think Ben Kelly is a provocative designer. It is about how people want to live and what they want to say about themselves. It is an aesthetic and a social history. Interior design is both David Mlinaric and Kelly Hoppen. The first thing I consciously bought as a piece of design was a mustard yellow Anglepoise light from Heal’s. I was 16 and it seemed to me the epitome of modernity. designmuseum.org David Nicholls 컄

A model of the Design Museum’s new location, by architecture firm John Pawson

TOBY KEANE; MUHSIN AKGUN; MICHELE BRANCO PIERO FASANOTTO

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I think the point of the Design Museum is to inspire everybody. It is also to make design part of the conversation in Britain, in the same way that contemporary art, which had been on the edges of most people’s perspectives, has become as much part of cultural life as music or sport. Design is a way to understand the world around us.

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IN THE BLUE English Heritage is celebrating 150 years of its Blue Plaques scheme. Each year it aims to install 12 plaques on the outside of buildings where notable people have lived. This year’s instalment includes plaques for the cookery writer Elizabeth David, Queen’s lead singer Freddie Mercury and the prima ballerina Margot Fonteyn, whose will be outside her former home in Covent Garden. The house of choreographer Frederick Ashton will also receive a plaque in 2016. english-heritage.org.uk DN

The plaque for prima ballerina Margot Fonteyn (below)

Webwatch GARDEN NURSERIES Jekka’s Herb Farm ( jekkasherb farm.com) started life on a small garden patch at Jekka McVicar’s home in Bristol in 1985. Over 30 years later, it has relocated to the south Gloucestershire countryside, where it offers the largest collection of culinary herbs in the UK. The website’s shopping section offers eight different seed collections, one of which is pictured above, as well as a variety of herb seeds accompanied by a helpful year chart to indicate when and how they should be sown. The minimum order for seed packets is £10. Crocus (crocus.co.uk) heaves with over 4,000 types of plants. Its plant-finder section allows you to search by type, flower colour, sun level, soil type or position. Reads Nursery (readsnursery.co.uk) specialises in rare fruit and ornamental trees such as apricot, fig and peach trees, which can be bought online to save a trip to the remote location in Suffolk’s Waveney Valley. Established in 1841, the nursery is now run by the sixth generation of the Reads family. Rose Dahlsen

Rita Konig has written about everything from ironmongery and electrical planning to paint finishes and sofas in her column for House & Garden. She is now holding a series of one-day workshops in her London home, which ofer practical advice on room layouts, choosing fabrics and picture hanging ‘to help people avoid expensive mistakes’, she explains. On May 20, Rita will be joined by Maria Speake from Retrouvius, to give advice on incorporating vintage inishes in your kitchen. Sessions for up to 10 people cost £350 per person, including lunch. Workshops will take place on April 15, May 6 and May 20; book online at ritakonig.com EM 첸 32

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CRAIG FORDHAM; CECIL BEATON

LEARNING FROM AN EXPERT


It’s pouring cofee before the world stirs. It’s settling down on soft cushions as the sun rises. It’s tearing into croissants on the terrace around luxury outdoor dining furniture. It’s visiting Leisure Plan’s showroom, and seeing how to get more from outdoor moments. leisureplan.co.uk


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GO AND SEE Trelissick Garden in Cornwall, pictured right, is famous for its rhododendrons, which are at their best at this time of year. There are over 400 acres to explore, with winding woodland paths and one of the best bluebell displays in Cornwall. Views of the Fal Estuary are the icing on the cake. national trust.org.uk

Outside Interests CLARE FOSTER finds fresh gardening inspiration

© NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/ANDREW BUTLER; TOM KING

Glow on Hang this lantern from a tree or pergola, or stand it on a terrace. Made from painted bamboo and wood, the ‘New Blake’ lantern by Broste Copenhagen has a central glass hurricane insert designed for a large candle. It is available in two sizes: large (33 x 53cm diameter, £59 plus p&p) and small (26.5 x 43.5cm diameter, £46 plus p&p), from greige.co.uk.

SHEAR JOY Jakoti Hand Shears will prove endlessly useful for clipping box, cutting back perennials, and a host of other tasks. Comfortable to use in one hand, the shears have self-sharpening carbon steel blades that will last forever. They are 30cm long and cost £26 plus p&p. handshears.co.uk

ROCK STARS New this spring from Dedon, ‘Mbrace’ rocking chairs are made from teak and a weatherproof, mesh-like weave of three fibres. Available in three colours – atlantic, spice and pepper – the chairs are wide and comfortable, and can also be bought with cushions. Matching footstools are also available. They measure 97 x 107 x 80cm and cost £1,413 each, excluding cushions, from chaplins.co.uk. 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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GARDENER’S D I A RY

May 5–8 MALVERN SPRING FESTIVAL

CLOCKWISE FROM THIS PICTURE Geranium ‘Rozanne’. Penstemon ‘Pensham Just Jayne’. Astrantia ‘Roma’

This well-known show takes place at the Three Counties Showground in Worcestershire, with a plant marquee, show gardens and garden crafts. Tickets cost £17–£35. rhs.org.uk

May 14 WOBURN ABBEY KITCHEN GARDEN STUDY DAY Led by one of the RHSqualified gardeners at Woburn Abbey, this study day covers everything from soil preparation to crop rotation. The day runs from 10am–4pm and costs £50. woburnabbey.co.uk

FOCUS ON…

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Five long-flowering perennials 1 Astrantia ‘Roma’ goes on flowering from May until October or November, with the flowers persisting as seed heads in winter. A clear, soft pink, the flowers are held on tall, wiry stems over a neat clump of foliage. Another long-flowering cultivar is ‘Buckland’, which has paler greenywhite flowers. Both grow to about 60cm. 2 Digitalis ‘Illumination’ series was bred by Thompson & Morgan by crossing a foxglove with Isoplexis canariensis, a relative from the Canary Islands. The result was a sterile and perennial plant that does not waste energy producing seed, enabling it to flower through the summer. Three cultivars are now available: ‘Illumination Pink’ (which won best new introduction at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show in 2012), ‘Illumination Ruby Slippers’ and ‘Illumination Raspberry’. 36

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PROPAGATION DAY AT BETH CHATTO GARDENS

3 Geranium ‘Rozanne’ is one of the easiest, most floriferous of the hardy geraniums, with a continual show of violet-blue flowers from May until the first frosts. Introduced in 2000, it has become one of the most popular border plants, voted plant of the centenary in 2013. An alternative for lovers of pink is Geranium ‘Patricia’, a longer-flowering relative of G. psilostemon. 4 Geum ‘Totally Tangerine’ has become hugely popular since its 2010 launch by Hardy’s (hardys-plants.co.uk). Compared to other geums, it is particularly floriferous, producing dozens of pale orange flowers on tall wiry stems. It is also longer flowering than other cultivars, in bloom from April to September and beyond. 5 Penstemon ‘Pensham Just Jayne’ produces magenta flowers from the end of May until October. Growing to about a metre, it has willowy spires of bell-like flowers and long, semi-evergreen foliage. It will withstand rain and drought, and is happy in sun or part shade. These plants are all available by mail order from Thompson & Morgan: thompson-morgan.com

A day of seed sowing, taking cuttings, and learning when and how to divide herbaceous perennials, with expert tuition from resident tutor Chrissy South. The day runs from 10.30am–3.30pm and costs £56 including lunch. bethchatto.co.uk 컄

The Best Show Garden at Malvern in 2015 by Villaggio Verde

GAP PHOTOS

very garden needs a few really good stalwarts – plants that flower happily from the end of May to the end of summer. Many are recently introduced hybrids that have been developed specifically for their longevity. Whatever the weather throws at them, they carry on flowering and, if they seem to be running out of steam, chopping them back can often produce yet another flush of flowers.

May 21


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Built to last Invest in an outdoor table that will last for a lifetime. The beautifully simple ‘Jan Table’ from Oxenwood can be made to measure. Shown here in oak with a stone top, it is also available in teak, with a stone, oak or teak top. This table is 75 x 560 x 100cm and costs £6,759.30. 01264-730801; oxenwood.eu.

These bright and cheerful watering cans are designed to twist down flat to save shed space. With the spout and rose removed, they can be clicked into the base. Made from recyclable plastic, they are 27cm tall with a nine-litre capacity. They cost £29 each, plus p&p, from colapz.co.uk.

www.heveningham.co.uk email: sales@heveningham.co.uk

Tel: +44 (0) 1420 521159

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SET SAIL IN THE SUN Kookaburra ‘Shade Sails’ are perfect for terraces or courtyards where a parasol might get in the way. Available in 10 sizes and in shapes such as rectangles, squares or triangles, and in dozens of colours, the waterproof sails are designed to be hung between poles or attached to a wall or building. A three-metre-square sail costs £75.99 plus p&p, from primrose.co.uk 첸


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OUT AND ABOUT Latest launches… chic showrooms… hot buys… CAROLE ANNETT takes note

LOOK EAST EXOTIC FLORA AND THE ORIENTAL HO-HO BIRD FEATURE IN THIS NEW WALLPAPER DESIGN FROM LITTLE GREENE, ‘PARADISE’ (DUSK). IT IS 52CM WIDE AND COSTS £131 FOR A 10-METRE ROLL. 020-7935 8844; LITTLEGREENE.COM

Carole at the revamped C P Hart showroom in Waterloo

Level playing These three-dimensional ‘Little L’ tiles, from the Tierras range by designer Patricia Urquiola for Mutina at Domus would work well on a dividing wall between a shower and basin area. They are inspired by Mediterranean craftsmanship and made of terracotta. Each tile measures 20 x 6cm, and a square metre costs £189.02. 020-7354 7000; domusgroup.com

‘Carabao’ by Arte is a textured wallcovering derived from banana tree bark. The colours pictured from let are 14023, 14004 and 14003. It is 91cm wide and costs from £119 a metre. 0800-500 3335; arte-international.com

NEWS IN BRIEF ‘My dear friend Oscar de la Renta was an inspiration,’ says Annabel Astor, of Oka. ‘My new collection is a tribute to him.’ Visit okadirect.com to see Annabel’s inspiring schemes. 컄 40

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JOSHUA MONAGHAN; FOTOGRAFICS DANNY MIGALSKI

CUSTOM DINING This aluminium outdoor table, ‘Extrados’ by Ego Paris, can be styled in all sorts of ways. Fill its inset steel trays with grass and daisies for a summer lunch, ice cubes and shot glasses for a party, or even ketchup and condiments when the family eats al fresco. It is available with a fixed or extendable top in a choice of 22 frame colours. The version pictured is in white, measures 110 x 242 x 74cm and costs from £4,218, exclusively from Leisure Plan. leisureplan.co.uk


WALLCOVERINGS REDEFINED 0845 1236805 ANTHOLOGY.UK.COM


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CURVES LIKE A SKYSCRAPER It’s easy to see the inspiration behind this new Osborne & Little fabric design: New York’s Chrysler building. Pictured in the 01 colourway, ‘Chrysler’ is made of cotton and costs £60 a metre. 020-8812 3123; osborneandlittle.com

TAKE A LEAF OUT OF THIS

This Robert Stephenson ‘Panama’ rug reminds me of a poppy-dotted lawn. It is made of wool and the weave is based on a Swedish kilim; £579.60 a square metre. 020-7225 2343; robert stephenson. co.uk 컄

PIXELATE IMAGING

For a modern take on the chandelier, look to the ‘Foliage Drum’ pendant light from Villaverde. It measures 30 x 80cm diameter and comes in a range of metal finishes. Pictured in a hand-painted silver-leaf finish, it has eight lights and costs £1,995, excluding shades. 020-7610 9797; villaverdeltd.com


The New England Kitchen Š Copyright & Design Right Mark Wilkinson Furniture

Experience the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest English handmade furniture. Kitchens, dressing rooms, media and wine rooms www.mwf.com or 01380 850 007

Unmistakably Mark Wilkinson Part of the Canburg Group


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RICHARD POWERS

Safari special lunch Join House & Garden and Aardvark Safaris for lunch at the elegant Lime Wood hotel in the heart of the New Forest, on Wednesday, May 11, 12.30–2.30pm. Lime Wood, originally a Regency manor house, was decorated by the late interior designer David Collins and has a restaurant run by chefs Angela Hartnett and Luke Holder. Guests will receive a short talk from Aardvark Safaris, detailing its tailor-made itineraries in 16 African countries, accompanied by a pre-lunch drink. This will be followed by a three-course lunch with a glass of wine in the Scullery (pictured top), part of the Hartnett Holder & Co restaurant, which is renowned for its Italian-influenced, seasonal food. Tickets cost £50 per person and include a gift bag. To book, please call the events team at Lime Wood on 023-8028 7158, or email events@limewood.co.uk 컄


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A new bathroom concept Edwins Bathrooms London 020 7221 3550 www.edwinsbathrooms.co.uk ‹ Hovingham of Harrogate 01423 529 991 www.hovinghamofharrogate.co.uk J.A.Clarke & Co Leicester 0116 251 5111 www.jaclarke.co.uk ‹ Napier Bathrooms & Interiors Edinburgh 0131 556 6166 www.napierinteriors.co.uk Obsidian Cheltenham 01242 237 241 www.obsidian.ws ‹ Soaks Bathrooms Belfast 028 9068 1121 www.soaksbathrooms.com Staffan Tollgard London 020 7952 6070 www.tollgard.co.uk ‹ Waterloo Bathrooms Co.Dublin 00 353 1 284 2100 www.waterloo.ie


HILARY JONES, BRIDGET READING, CHARLOTTE RICHMOND, OLIVIA CAPALDI, GEORGINA CAVE AND EMILY SENIOR

RACHEL BATES AND KATIE GOODWIN

Party people

L AU NC H I NG

THE LIST NICHOLAS BOYARSKY AND NICOLA MURPHY

NICHOLAS COLERIDGE

CHRISTOPHER AND ANGELA COOK

PETER MIKIC, SEBASTIAN SCOTT AND FERHAN AZMAN

TILLY AND CHARLOTTE WATERS AND EMMA HILEY

FIONA BARRATTCAMPBELL AND JAMES TAYLOR

BUTTER WAKEFIELD, LAVINIA BOLTON AND KATE SLESINGER

CLAIRE RENDALL AND ROBYN ONEILE

To celebrate the launch of our new online directory, The List, House & Garden invited esteemed guests from the world of design and decoration to a party in the gilded rooms of the Baglioni Hotel in Kensington. Guests enjoyed champagne, and floral arrangements were provided by Mystique Flowers 첸

DARREN GERRISH

Find all your design needs at houseandgarden.co.uk/thelist. For information, or to join The List, call 020-7152 3639, or email charlotte.richmond@condenast.co.uk

www.indian-ocean.co.uk

London

0208 675 4808


BESPOKE | PROMOTION

YO U R E XC LUS I V E I N V I TAT I O N

Join House & Garden and Turquoise Holidays at a Reader’s Lunch and Prize Draw to celebrate Southeast Asia’s most magical destination here are some places on earth that all keen travellers long to experience at least once in their lives. One of these mythologised spots is Thailand. As the ultimate holiday destination, the country has it all, combining ease of access and year-round sunshine with a friendly, vibrant and exotic culture, some of the most effortlessly tasty food on the planet, a rich history and a breathtaking diversity of landscapes – from jungles and hills to incredible beaches and an exciting metropolis in Bangkok to enjoy. Turquoise Holidays can help you choose between the best bells-and-whistles resorts, or intimate boutique hotels – because Thailand has them all. Specialists in tailor-made holidays to Thailand and beyond, the Turquoise team pride themselves on firsthand knowledge and honest expert advice.

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Phang Nga Bay from Six Senses Yao Noi, The Grill at The Dorchester, Elephant Hills, Khao Sok National Park and Thai longtail boats at Railay Beach, Krabi

Join us at The Dorchester The unabashed opulence of this glamorous hotel on Park Lane is simply legendary. The Dorchester has been welcoming British society for more than 70 years. Our special lunch will unfold at the Bruno Moinarddesigned The Grill at The Dorchester, which has been a London institution since the hotel first opened in 1931.

BOOK NOW The event takes place at The Grill at The Dorchester on Wednesday, May 18, 12-3pm. It will include a Champagne reception, three-course lunch, wine, coffee, petit fours and an inspiring talk about Thailand.

HOLIDAY PRIZE DRAW The event includes a chance to win a seven-night holiday to Thailand for two people including international flights from London. Tickets cost £55 per person. Book by contacting the Reservations and Host Manager of The Grill at The Dorchester, Candice Ragot on 0208 319 7127 or candice.ragot@dorchestercollection.com 쏔 TERMS & CONDITIONS 1. Cancellation period is 48 hours from payment 2. If guests do not arrive/do not cancel within cancellation period they will be charged.


New Illusion Quintesse. Contemporary style, technical innovation Beautifully engineered in the UK F O R A B R O C H U R E A N D N E A R E S T B AT H R O O M S P E C I A L I S T C A L L 01 4 5 4 3 2 8 811 | W W W. M AT K I . C O. U K | M AT K I P L C , B R I S TO L B S 3 7 5 P L


art scene

INSIDER | ART

Edited by EMILY TOBIN

Tim Scott Bolton’s painting of Kiddington Hall in Oxfordshire

HOW THE LAND LIE S Artist TIM SCOTT BOLTON discusses his new book on the landscapes of Capability Brown illustrated with his paintings, which will be exhibited at Rountree Tryon Galleries in November ancelot ‘Capability’ Brown’s life was one of continual peregrinations. His realm was England and it was he who created an enduring vision of the English country house in its parkland setting. As a landscape painter, I too travel, but often further afield. I was in Argentina when the idea of embarking on a book of paintings to celebrate the three-hundredth anniversary of Brown’s birth was put to me by Kitty and John Anderson, who live at Kirkharle in Northumberland, where Brown was born. I adore painting country estates. I can trace this right back to my boyhood in the

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Fifties, when my mother and I used to explore what were then romantic, crumbling properties in overgrown parks. Since then, much has changed. Today we live in an age of hope and new wealth, when many of the great houses and their landscapes are being restored. Capability Brown is thought to have worked on at least 150 country houses, giving me the daunting task of painting a representative selection of about a third, all to be visited – from Alnwick Castle in the north to Petworth House and Burton Pynsent in the south. The hallmarks of Brown’s legacy are the park grazed by sheep or deer, the serpentine lake and

clumps of trees. What I was less aware of, which made exploring the estates such a delight, was that, as well as being a landscape designer, Brown was an architect of follies, bridges and walled gardens. A Brush with Brown is not only my first book: it is a personal account written from an artist’s perspective. But I hope it also conveys something of the pleasure and fun I had in its creation. It dwells as much on the byways of the intriguing stories related to the various properties as to the actual work done by Capability Brown. 컄 ‘A Brush with Brown: The Landscapes of Capability Brown’ (Dovecote Press, £25) is out on April 12. rountreetryon.com HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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INSIDER | ART EXHIBITIONS IN THE AGE OF GIORGIONE The Royal Academy’s survey of the Venetian Renaissance during the early sixteenth century considers the influence of Giorgione, Titian, Giovanni Bellini and Giovanni Cariani, focusing on their expression of idealised beauty and sensuous use of colour. Until June 5; royalacademy.org.uk

T H E WO R L D O F

Manuel Mazzotti BOOKBINDER

ART FROM ELSEWHERE This touring show started life at London’s Hayward Gallery and now culminates at the Arnolfini in Bristol. Curator David Elliott brings together 70 recently acquired contemporary works by 39 internationally celebrated artists from six UK galleries. April 22–June 17; arnolfini.org.uk

Robert Mapplethorpe is well known for his studies of nudes and celebrity portraits, but f lowers also featured in his work. Mapplethorpe Flora: The Complete Flowers (Phaidon, £125) provides a deinitive collection, featuring almost 300 of his photographs, from early Polaroids to stylised blackand-white and colour prints, such as Orchid (right). 컄 BOOK

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LONG AGO AND FAR AWAY This exhibition at the John Martin Gallery in London showcases photographer Rory Carnegie’s animal images. The series was inspired by a George Stubbs painting of a zebra in English woodlands and explores ideas of relocation and belonging. All the creatures were photographed in a studio and then composited with landscapes. April 21–May 14; jmlondon.com CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Giovanni Cariani, Portrait of a Young Woman, oil on canvas. Rory Carnegie, Chapman Zebra I. Eugenio Dittborn, The 13th History of the Human Face (The Portal of H.), Airmail Painting No. 95

© ALEXANDER & BONIN, NEW YORK/ALISON BETTLES; MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BUDAPEST; ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION

³I studied mechanical engineering at Bologna University but, by the time I moved to London in 2010, I was looking for a new direction. My solution was to attend a few short courses in different disciplines: sculpture, drawing, printing and bookbinding, which I fell in love with. I decided straight away that it had to be my new career. ³I now specialise in making one-off, limited-edition books, boxes and artist’s portfolios. For me, bookbinding is a constant quest in invention. Nowadays, it is often seen as an afterthought rather than an integral part of the process. My aim is to challenge this preconception. ³I am currently working on an artist book for Hormazd Narielwalla, a London-based artist who works in collage. Hormazd uses bespoke Savile Row tailoring patterns and their antiquarian counterparts to create artworks exploring the body in abstract form. The book will have a limited-edition run of 15. ³The most impressive project I have worked on was for a designer during Milan Fashion Week for the spring/ summer 2016 collections. It was a book that was a metre high and 80cm wide, and weighed 20kg. ³One day I would like to work with Olafur Eliasson, Björk and Ai Weiwei. What I admire is their willingness to experiment, push boundaries and redefine the rules. Mazzotti Books: mazzottibooks.co.uk


INSIDER | ART

Drawn from life EMILY TOBIN profiles three artists who provide a visual record of people, places and events

The old adage tells us ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’, but can the same be said of the paintbrush? It is not just reporters and photographers that bear witness on the front line or comment on our changing towns and cities, there is a band of artists who quietly observe and record, offering a different and arguably more human perspective. Reportage is as much about the work on paper as it is about the people it allows artists to meet and the places it allows them to visit. Between them, George Butler, Lucinda Rogers and Charlie Calder-Potts have traversed the globe and set what they have seen to canvas, from prosthetic-limb clinics to pigeon sellers, military tanks, newspaper stands and car mechanics. They are as concerned with the minutiae of everyday life as they are with the broader picture, and they offer something just as valid and as powerful BUYING ART as photography, film or the written word.

LUCINDA ROGERS ‘My studio is wherever I am drawing,’ says Lucinda Rogers. ‘I work from life on streets to fields, and from restaurants to garages.’ Her work records both the intimate details and the broad views of the places she draws. Though Lucinda lives in London, New York has been a subject for over 20 years and, in that time, she has created a vivid portrait of the city. ‘Sitting on a corner for four to eight hours makes me feel part of the life of a place. Brief relationships can be made with people who occupy the same street – stallholders, shoeshiners, delivery men, sweepers and passers-by who stop to look or comment.’ Her work is characterised by vigorous lines through which she summons a sense of space; your eye scatters across the page, absorbing an atmosphere and an impression of that moment. Lucinda is exhibiting at Rook Lane Arts in Frome from April 30 to May 29. Prices start at £160; lucindarogers.co.uk

GEORGE BUTLER For George Butler, drawing is the gateway to ‘strange and wonderful places and people’. Equipped with pens, paper and palpable curiosity, he has drawn oil fields in Azerbaijan, soldiers in Afghanistan and the G20 riots in London, and has walked from Turkey across the border into Syria as an unofficial guest of the Free Syrian Army. Though his role is that of observational reporter, by his own admission, ‘accuracy can be overrated’; these aren’t photorealist depictions, but a form of storytelling that deftly captures a scene through the spare use of line and colour. These drawings condense the passing of time in one image – the beating sun, the movement of traffic, a flurry of people – and every unpredictable element influences each mark made. As George explains, ‘All cultures can understand images, but language is reserved for only one.’ Prices start at £600; georgebutler.org

CHARLIE CALDER-POTTS While George Butler and Lucinda Rogers focus on capturing a moment or an impression of place, Charlie CalderPotts delves further back. She will photograph a particular scene – be it the British Army in Afghanistan or the Yazidi refugee camp in Iraq, the streets and alleys of Armenia or the Metro in Paris – and then condense the history of the place by layering different materials over that photograph. This involves working on aluminium or vellum and applying beeswax, pastel, oils, inks and gold leaf. The resulting mixed-media images evoke the illuminated manuscripts and icons of Byzantine art; modern figures crowned with halos are a recurring motif. ‘I’m fascinated by the overlapping stories, ideas and imagery between the East and West,’ explains Charlie. ‘These have been so integrated into contemporary life that it is hard to perceive their exact origins; by digging a little bit, our shared history quickly comes to the surface.’ Prices start at £650; charlie-calderpotts.com 첸 CLOCKWISE FROM TOP George Butler, Boys on Bus Roof. Lucinda Rogers, Looking Down 6th Avenue from 53rd Street. Charlie Calder-Potts, Murmur in Their Sleep 52

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tomfaulkner.co.uk


INSIDER | BOOKS

&

Words pictures What to read: the latest books chosen by ROSE DAHLSEN

MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD: DESIGN & DECORATION Martyn Lawrence Bullard (Rizzoli, £35)

You may have to put on your sunglasses before opening this book. Martyn Lawrence Bullard is one of America’s top decorators to the stars, and lists Sir Elton John, Cher, Ozzy Osbourne, Kid Rock, Edward Norton and the Kardashians among his clients. Born in the UK, Martyn started out as a teen selling vintage ‘oddments’ at Greenwich Market. He moved to Los Angeles in the hope of becoming an actor, but dazzled instead as a TV personality on shows such as Million Dollar Decorators in the US and Hollywood Me in the UK. In this new book, he surprises constantly with the diversity of his range. He is as effortless pulling off an update of Château Gütsch, an 1880s Swiss hotel modelled on a fantasy Bavarian castle, as he is creating a ‘shagadelic groovy’ Miami beach house for fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger. He has an extraordinary facility for pattern and texture, without ever falling into the traps of heaviness or bling. Lucie Young

LANDSKIPPING: PAINTERS, PLOUGHMEN AND PLACES Anna Pavord (Bloomsbury, £20) The latest book by House & Garden contributor Anna Pavord explores various artistic and literary responses to the landscape through the ages. Anna illustrates ‘the lure of the landscape’ through her own experiences: the magnetism of the Scottish Highlands mountains; the burst of a storm and its contortion of the hills’ form; the melodious magic of a waterfall. She touches on Constable, Wordsworth and Palmer’s painterly and poetic responses to Suffolk, the Lakes, Shoreham and the Darent Valley in Kent, and includes the commentaries of ‘another band of men’ – the agriculturalists and farmers who documented the shifting states of the land. Anna recounts a particularly charming memory from her own childhood of a restless 24-hour journey to Little Haven in Pembrokeshire from Abergavenny, which reaches a crescendo when the sea comes into view; she immediately feels her head might explode – such is her visceral response. Though sparse in pictures, this is a richly researched read, with Anna suggesting it is ultimately an intuitive response that defines our experience of landscape. RD 54

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SPARK JOY: AN ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO THE JAPANESE ART OF TIDYING Marie Kondo (Vermilion, £12.99)

I’ll be honest, I’m not really the tidy sort. I find piles of books and busy surfaces rather comforting. So it was with slight fear that I approached tidying guru Marie Kondo’s new book, a guide on how to ‘tidy up once and for all’. Building on her first book on the same theme, which has sold almost five million copies, this is written with both warmth and authority. I was relieved to learn that her tidying method needn’t result in me banishing my muchloved clutter. Instead, her brand of tidying is about getting rid of only the things in your life that don’t ‘spark joy’. The second part of the book is perhaps the most useful: a tidying encyclopedia that explains, with handy diagrams, the best ways to store things: everything from how to fold tights to storing cutlery and displaying collectables. Some instructions may seem a little over the top (‘store bras like royalty’), but the message is a good one. This is a great book for anybody wanting to live more thoughtfully. Elizabeth Metcalfe

STYLING NATURE: A MASTERFUL APPROACH TO FLORAL ARRANGEMENTS Lewis Miller and Irini Arakas (Rizzoli, £30) Lewis Miller has an eye for lush, dense flower arrangements. His book is filled with simple yet beautiful flowers and draws the reader into wanting to create a masterpiece of their own. Lewis only likes to use flowers from markets, allowing easy access for the reader to buy any he suggests. You won’t find any foraged or wild flowers either – these, as Lewis describes, are not his style. His use of traditional styles and shapes with a slight twist creates interesting results, and his vases and structures fit well with his choices of old English garden flowers, like carnations, roses and peonies. But it would be good to see the arrangements in a much more natural and unstyled way, outside of the images created by the renowned photographer Don Freeman. Some of the flowers feel as if they are trapped in the style of the image and not allowed to speak for themselves. That said, the book has some charming arrangements and ideas. Whether wanting to create a feast for the eyes at home or bouquets for a wedding, amateur flower fanciers will learn a lot from Lewis. Charlie McCormick 첸


BESIDE THE SEA British brand Neptune is renowned for hand-crafted furniture, gorgeous textiles and home accessories. Four House & Garden Editors hand-pick their favourite pieces from the new Cornish-inspired spring/summer collection, which exudes grown-up seaside chic.

coastal PALETTE

THE SIGNATURE CHICHESTER KITCHEN

collection has been given a subtle, charming maritime twist. Using two house-blended paints from the Pebble family, the solid timber cabinetry has been hand-painted in the seascape hues Shale and Cobble. It’s a bright new look – and Cranbrook shiplap boarding is a refreshing alternative to tiles.

‘Contrasting textures of white on white or navy on navy can work beautifully together.’

‘A butcher’s block saves space and has so many uses – chopping, prepping, carving and serving.’ Carole Annett, Retail Editor

Gabby Deeming Decoration Director

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reate a classic coastal colour palette in any room by offsetting deep navy with crisp white. Neptune’s new Long Island sofa has a lovely beachy style. It is comfortably squashy with feather-filled cushions and practical linen covers that can be removed for cleaning or to update with a new colour as the seasons change. Mix and match Hebe and Grace scatter cushions and place hand-painted oars close by for a nod to nautical.

calming KITCHEN CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Long Island sofa in navy, with matching Hebe and Grace scatter cushions, £45 each. Oars, from £63 each

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP ABOVE Neptune kitchens start from £10,000, offering versatility and lasting materials. The Suffolk chopping block is from £895. The Chichester potboard, an alternative to a pan cupboard, from £1,100.


BESPOKE | PROMOTION

trend MEETS TRADITION CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Agatha fabric, £55 per metre. Grace cushion, £45. Hudson dining table from £1,390. Toulston chairs, £200. Wardley four-poster bed from £1,450

pretty

THE HUDSON DINING TABLE

PATTERN

‘Style your garden room with alfrescoinspired accessories such as oversized candles and potted plants.’

is a beautiful way of bringing in the concrete trend in a more classic, less edgy way, thanks to its pedestal acacia base and woven wicker chairs. It sold out instantly last year, so the collection has been expanded to encompass new shapes. Coffee and console tables transform the outdoor space into an alfresco living room.

Laura Houldsworth Retail Editor

‘There’s something indulgent about a four-poster bed – and the option of curtains adds yet more romance.’ Ruth Sleightholme, Deputy Decoration Editor

THE WARDLEY is a dreamy four-poster bed that looks decidedly lightweight, whether you plump for a hand-painted finish or a solid oak frame. The headboard can be upholstered in a wide choice of textiles from Neptune’s fabric library, but we particularly like the Gabriela ikat print in Oyster Pink that’s new this season and screen-printed here in Britain. A driftwood-style lamp and perched sailing ships are the perfect oceanthemed finishing touches.

EXCLUSIVE READER COMPETITION

Win £500 to spend on your home with Neptune. For your chance to win, simply visit neptune.com/ houseandgarden before April 30, 2016. TERMS & CONDITIONS The winner will be drawn on May 1, 2016. The voucher code can be used online or in any UK Neptune store. It must be used in one transaction and is valid for six months from the date of issue. No change will be given and any refund will be in the form of a voucher.


this is where the similarity ends

this is where the exceptional begins

Question everything, even the basics: Is this the best way to iron? Are there other ways to make toast? Our Redefine range is the expression of this philosophy, combining pioneering technology and design flair to create inspired, revolutionary products that look as good as they perform. www.morphyrichards.co.uk/redefine

Win the future of home appliances Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re giving you the chance to win the entire Redefine by Morphy Richards range. To enter visit www.morphyrichards.co.uk/redefine Draw open UK, 18+. Closes 03/06/2016. Full T&Cs online.


D E C O R AT I N G S WA T C H | D E S I G N I D E A S | R I T A N O T E S | P R O F I L E

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The walls are alive FLORENCE ROLFE presents a selection of the latest wallpapers in seabed and jungle scenes PHOTOGRAPHS ANDERS GRAMER 8

1 ‘Limewood’ (bolsover grey), 52cm wide, £115 a 10-metre roll, from Liberty. 2 ‘Byron Bay’ (celadon), by Manuel Canovas, 68.5cm wide, £120 a 10-metre roll, from Colefax and Fowler. 3 ‘Palais Royal’ (vert billard), by Christian Lacroix Maison, 52cm wide, £65 a 10-metre roll, from Designers Guild. 4 ‘Wood Grain’ (black and white), 53cm wide, £70 a 10-metre roll, from Cole & Son. 5 ‘Le Zebre’ (black), by Brunschwig & Fils, 61cm wide, £276 an 11-metre roll, from G P & J Baker. 6 ‘Zebrawood’ (emerald), 52cm wide, £80 a 10-metre roll, from Cole & Son. 7 ‘Seafern’ (emerald), 52cm wide, £80 a 10-metre roll, from Cole & Son. 8 ‘Spatterware’ (aqua), by Brunschwig & Fils, 69cm wide, £116 a 9-metre roll, from G P & J Baker. 9 ‘Parquet’ (verdigris), 68.5cm wide, £78 a 10-metre roll, from Osborne & Little 컄 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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DECORATING | SWATCH

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1 ‘Kristina’ (rose symphony), 52cm wide, £90 a 10-metre roll, from Liberty. 2 ‘Tessella’ (BP3607), 53cm wide, £86 a 10-metre roll, from Farrow & Ball. 3 ‘Crémaillère’ (fuchsia), by Raoul Dufy, 130cm wide, £70 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 4 ‘Polka Stripe’ (rouge), 52cm wide, by Tapet Café, £112 a 10-metre roll, from Tissus d’Hélène. 5 ‘Ogee’ (passata), by Jim Thompson, 52cm wide, £80 a 10-metre roll, from Fox Linton. 6 ‘Crochet’ (lemon), by Raoul Dufy, 134cm wide, £65 a metre, from Christopher Farr Cloth. 7 ‘Simon’ (chantilly cream), 52cm wide, £80 a 10-metre roll, from Liberty. 8 ‘Bombay’ (fuchsia), by Brunschwig & Fils, 69cm wide, £180 a 9-metre roll, from G P & J Baker. Laser-cut shapes throughout, from £50, from Cutlasercut. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸 60

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Chimneypieces | Lighting | Furniture

T +44 (0) 20 7730 2122 | jamb.co.uk


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DESIGN IDEAS

Pots and planters

ANDREW MONTGOMERY

All plants bright and beautiful, all pots great and small… BONNIE ROBINSON presents a selection of ways to turn your garden into an earthly paradise

ABUNDANT SPLENDOUR Gardener Christopher Lloyd surrounded the fifteenth-century entrance at Great Dixter with a forest of pots so that those leaving the house would be surrounded by the verdant splendour of the garden. This is a tradition upheld by his successor, head gardener Fergus Garrett. Each plant is in a separate pot, so when something is past its prime it can easily be moved elsewhere. Grouping pots also has practical advantages: they need less watering as they dry out much more slowly and taller plants are supported by their neighbours. ‘Pots are a lot of fun. If you do something outrageous, you can quickly cover your tracks,’ Fergus wrote in The Guardian. greatdixter.co.uk 컄

HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

PUT ON A SHOW GREAT BAYS At Taddington Manor, the door to the 1844 Cotswolds barn is flanked by glossy standard bay trees. These are planted in Architectural Heritage’s large square copper planters – a design based on an antique Victorian example. Measuring 60 x 89.5cm square, they cost £1,920 each. The clipped bays are about the same height as the door, adding to the satisfying orderliness of the scene. architectural-heritage.co.uk

All for auriculas

From leafy climbers to colourful foliage, place a pair of pots by the front door to create a memorable entrance HAVE A HALF These semi-circular, ribbed planters from Bulbeck Foundry are perfect for climbers, as they can be pushed flush against a wall. Here they add a softening leafiness to what would be a rather austere combination of paving and brickwork. Bulbeck Foundry in Cambridgeshire casts traditional English leadwork and its range of planters can be made to any size. These measure 59.7 x 62 x 31cm and cost £1,050 each. bulbeckfoundry.co.uk

COLOUR ME PERFECT Pots of pink hydrangeas welcome visitors to this Dorset country house. These shrubs are thirsty and need plenty of nutrients, but they can be ideal for planting in containers of at least 45cm in diameter if you want to have more control over their colour – apart from white varieties, hydrangeas go pink in alkaline soil, blue in an acidic soil or mauve if the pH is neutral. To achieve your desired colour, first do a pH test on your soil and then add ground limestone or chalk to make it more alkaline for pink, or coffee grounds or an ericaceous fertiliser to add acidity for a dazzling blue.

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Vibrant violas At Greys Court in Oxfordshire, a symphony of tiny pots, home to uniform purple violas, is displayed in a simple shelving unit with a pitched roof, made by the head gardener. If you are looking to purchase your own collection of violas, head to Victorian Violas – the ‘Martin’ is a similar shade. nationaltrust.org.uk victorianviolas.co.uk 컄

SIMON UPTON; JONATHAN BUCKLEY; © JASON INGRAM/NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES

make an ENTRANCE

Garden designers Isabel and Julian Bannerman had a free-standing plant theatre made for their own garden. In April and May it is filled with Isabel’s collection of auriculas, but in February and March it is a snowdrop lover’s fantasy. Auricula theatres were all the rage in the eighteenth century, when the plants were status symbols. The only existing original auricula theatre from this period can be seen at Calke Abbey. An array of fritillaries, narcissi, polyanthus or dwarf irises would also look lovely in a theatre. bannermandesign.com nationaltrust.org.uk


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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

MAKING THE MOST Even if you do not have a garden, you can still use pots to make a pretty display. Follow the example here, where garden designer Jinny Blom has lined the steps up to the front door with small terracotta pots. Use a trailing flower, such as the white bacopa here, for a softer, more organic look. jinnyblom.com

WALLS THAT MOVE In place of a wall, garden designer Arit Anderson of Diamond Hill Garden Design has positioned a trellis screen above a metal planter for climbing jasmine to grow on this balcony. Garden Requisites offers a range of similar panels: the ‘Metal Garden Trellis’ starts at £100. diamond-hill.co.uk garden-requisites.co.uk

keeping it SMALL A display of pots can work wonders in lieu of a garden

A FEAST OF FRESH PRODUCE On their London balcony, Charlie McCormick and Ben Pentreath have used pots to create a small kitchen garden to grow everything from salad and beans to tomatoes and peppers. ‘It can be a challenge growing vegetables on the roof,’ explains Charlie. ‘The pots dry out easily and it can be difficult getting access to water.’ To prevent this, Charlie has installed an automatic sprinkler system. Easy Garden Irrigation has a good selection; its ‘Micro Jet System Starter Kit’ costs £29.99. mccormick.london | easygardenirrigation.co.uk 컄

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CHARLIE HOPKINSON; MARIANNE MAJERUS; JAKE CURTIS

DEFINE THE SPACE On this roof terrace in London, garden designer Charlotte Rowe has used a rectangular planter to give structure to the space. The three olive trees, underplanted with rosemary, separate the cedar seating nook from a dining area on the terrace. charlotterowe.com


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DECORATING | DESIGN IDEAS

A time for REFLECTION Use planters to create mini pools or to grow water plants

Planters needn’t take conventional forms. Garden designer Marianne Jacoby has used old metal cauldrons to contain a selection of herbs (pictured top). The ring handles allow them to be moved around more easily. Petersham Nurseries’ metal ‘Rice Pot’, £65, would create a similar effect. In her Dublin garden, Helen Dillon plants everything from tulips and roses to beans in these large galvanised dustbins, preferring their cool grey colour to that of terracotta against the limestone paving. To create drainage holes, she takes a small sledgehammer to the bottom of the bins and then follows with a hammer so that any sharp edges are pressed back. The bins are then raised slightly so that a seal is not created against the paving. petershamnurseries.com dillongarden.com

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INDUSTRIAL EDGE The designer Tom StuartSmith has dotted his own courtyard garden with Corten steel tanks. In summer, these inky pools reflect the naturalistic planting; in winter, they provide structure when the water freezes. The Pot Company sells similar Corten steel ponds in custom sizes. tomstuartsmith. co.uk | thepotco.com PONDER THIS If you don’t have space for a pond, this glass-reinforced concrete ‘Discus’ planter from Urbis Design can be made with a waterproof coating for aquatic plants such as pygmy waterlilies. It measures 46 x 120cm diameter and costs £950.40. urbisdesign.co.uk These ‘Citadel’ planters from Capital Garden Products would not look out of place in the Alhambra. Made from fibreglass to hold water, they come in small (28 x 61cm diameter), medium (36 x 85cm diameter) and large (45 x 100cm diameter) sizes, and are available in stone, gloss black or copper blue finishes. Prices from £100. capital-garden.com 컄

HELEN DILLON; ANDREW LAWSON; MARIANNE MAJERUS

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Pots of PERFECTION From traditional terracotta to modern metal, these are a few of our favourite planters Metal ‘Diablo’, 90 x 58cm diameter, £380, from Petersham Nurseries. petershamnurseries.com

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Ceramic ‘Large Truro’, 25 x 18cm diameter, £34.95, from Boskke. boskke.com

Zinc ‘Berne Bath Planter’, 22 x 76 x 28cm, £48, from Rowen & Wren. rowenandwren.co.uk

Terracotta ‘Cono Alto’, 80 x 40cm diameter, £339, from The Chelsea Gardener. chelseagardener.com

‘Ivyline Medium Rattan Planter ’, 32 x 34cm diameter, £39, from John Lewis. johnlewis.com

Terracotta ‘Beehive Planter’, 65 x 65cm diameter, £345, from Pots and Pithoi. potsandpithoi.com

Painted oak and cast-iron ‘Château de Versailles’, 50 x 50cm square, €2,106, from Jardins du Roi Soleil. jardinsduroisoleil.com

Terracotta ‘Vaso Alzata’, 60 x 80cm diameter, £625, from Italian Terrace. italianterrace.co.uk

Copper ‘Ribbed Box’ (dark grey), 60 x 60cm square, £2,016, from Bronzino. bronzino.co.uk

Galvanised metal ‘Vintage Dolly Tub’, 52 x 47cm diameter, £169, from The Balcony Gardener. thebalconygardener.com

Cast stone ‘Key Planter’, 30.5 x 30.5cm square, £99, from Haddonstone. haddonstone.com 첸

MAY 2016 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


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DECORATING | ADVICE

Rita in the kitchen of her west London flat with her daughter Margot

Rita Notes

RITA’S PICKS

RITA KONIG believes the decoration of a kitchen should be as personal as the rest of a house PHOTOGRAPH CRAIG FORDHAM

HOB ‘Ideal for putting together your own kitchen.’ Stainless steel hob, ‘PX140’, by Linea, 39.5 x 100cm, £689, from Smeg. smeguk.com

TILES ‘I love the wallpaperlike pattern of these.’ Terracotta tiles, ‘1903’ (bordeaux), £305 a square metre, from Made A Mano. madeamano.com

STYLING: ARTA GHANBARI

ISLAND UNIT ‘Much pricier than the Smeg hob, but it does it all and is so beautiful.’ Stainless steel ‘Alpes Kitchen Island Unit’, by Alpes Inox, 92 x 132 x 125cm, from £15,485, from The Conran Shop. conranshop.co.uk

is easy to access for laying the table without anyone getting in the way of the cook or the person washing up. I also like separating the hob and the oven. My hob is on a stand-alone counter with shelving underneath for the saucepans. I prefer to give an island a different treatment to the rest of the kitchen to save having acres of the same surface have always had my builder make my – mine is painted a different colour and has a kitchens as I have never had the budget stainless-steel top instead of Corian. You might to use a specialist kitchen company and also choose to have an island higher than your have never wanted to buy one ‘off the counters to make using it more comfortable. shelf ’. If you have a good joiner and your Visually, the most important thing is for the kitchen plan is fairly simple, there is no kitchen to be in keeping with the rest of the reason why this is not possible, especially house. You don’t want to go into your kitchen and if, like me, you prefer the non-built-in look. I find feel that, rather like Mr Benn, you have gone wall-fitted cupboards make the room heavy and through a door and arrived in a foreign land. A I end up never using anything that is in them. I kitchen can feel slightly alien if a specialist much prefer open shelves – although you have to kitchen designer is working on it in isolation to be strict about not cramming them with stuff. the rest of the house, so it is important to remain My kitchen has very little in the way of actual involved in all the details. cabinetry. I have open shelves Check the elevation drawings under my counters and the You don’t want to go into carefully. As an example, rest is mostly appliances hidthe kitchen and feel you’ve kitchen counters come in a den behind integrated doors. arrived in a foreign land standard height to accomIf you are using a standard modate appliances, so make kitchen from a company such sure you know how they will fit with your windows as Howdens (howdens.com), it is good to mix it and alter your design if necessary. with a custom counter; a two-inch-thick Corian Do not feel you that have to have the entire or wood counter will elevate it from the ordinary. package straight out of a brochure. You can bring I also love Formica (formica.com); we recently your own style to the party: hang art, choose made a black Formica worktop for a client, which patterned tiles and interesting pendant lights was incredibly smart and well priced. Make sure rather than spots, hang wallpaper and leave you opt for a shiny finish with edges at a sharp space for furniture – a vintage dresser can look 90-degree angle – I cannot bear a bullnose edge. really great, even in a modern kitchen. The When determining your kitchen’s layout, think French House (thefrenchhouse.co.uk) and hard about how you will move around it. I make Decorative Collective (decorativecollective.com) sure that the dishwasher and bin are on either are good sources. There are plenty of opportunside of the sink. I like the cutlery drawer to be ities to grab back some personality while creating away from the main action (the stove and the a slick, modern kitchen 첸 sink) and ideally close to the dining area, so it

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DECORATING | PROFILE

Bureau de Change DAVID NICHOLLS talks to the architects about their solutions for a ground-floor extension in London PHOTOGRAPHS MICHAEL SINCLAIR

t would be doing Katerina Dionysopoulou and Billy Mavropoulos a disservice to pigeonhole their firm Bureau de Change as ‘an expert in kitchen extensions’. The truth is that the scope of their work is far broader than that, and I suspect they could turn their creative solutions to just about anything. But, by heck, this pair do a mean kitchen extension, an example of which is the highlight of a recently completed project in north London. A Victorian terrace house, it had a traditional layout, with a sitting room at the front, a dining room behind it and a stubby and narrow kitchen down some stairs at the back. The brief for a large, open-plan kitchen-dining area with a connected sitting room and views of the Grade-II-listed parkland that backs onto the ARCHITECTS garden was clear. But it did present challenges. The owner wanted to work with a young architecture practice and soon came to appreCLOCKWISE FROM TOP ciate the energy and enthusiasm that came New storage cupboards with employing Bureau de Change. ‘I loved in the hallway. Katerina and Billy by a wall of their ideas, and they are great in person,’ she concealed storage in the says. ‘You can tell so much from the vibe people dining area. Near-black give you.’ Katerina and Billy are certainly an surfaces accentuate the impressive and charming double act, fizzing ceiling’s zigzag design with personality as well as ideas. Bureau de Change designed a full-width extension taking in the side return to house the new combined kitchen and dining area. It required digging down an extra 40cm to comply with council height restrictions. The former dining room became an informal sitting room and its back wall was completely removed. 컄

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NEED to KNOW Katerina Dionysopoulou and Billy Mavropoulos met in 2006 while working for Foster + Partners. Both architects are from Athens and finished their education in London: Katerina at The Bartlett School of Architecture and Billy at the Royal College of Art. They set up Bureau de Change in 2012. ‘We both have such long surnames that people wouldn’t know how to pronounce,’ Katerina says explaining the choice of name. Its office is in Clerkenwell, where Katerina and Billy lead a team of eight. They are currently working on projects including a newbuild in the Cotswolds, a residential and commercial development in Kings Cross and a house in North Carolina. Last year, Bureau de Change designed a furniture range for Efasma. 020-3287 6547; b-de-c.com

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DECORATING | PROFILE Now it is open to the extension, which is reached by wide terrazzo steps. Maintaining the more formal sitting room at the front of the house, there is now a deep, L-shape, split-level, open-plan space at the back. ‘Often the problem with extensions is that they create dark spaces further inside the house,’ says Billy. The fact that the owner wanted to sit on a sofa watching television in the new sitting room and still be able to see the tops of the tall trees in the park beyond required some clever thinking. ‘We had been researching accordion and fan structures for roofs at the time,’ says Katerina. ‘It became a real inspiration for this project.’ Their roof design dramatically zigs and zags away from the house; the planes that were created were set with five wide skylights. It allows light into the space and permits the desired view. These stark white facets became one of the defining features of the design. They are repeated on a wall of concealed storage behind the dining table, and elsewhere have been accentuated by painting adjacent surfaces a near-black shade. It is a crisp and modern space, rigidly structured but with a sense of movement. What is pleasing is how Bureau de Change has added the new without erasing the old. Built-in storage in the back sitting room stops short of the ceiling so that the original cornice is still visible. Behind the cooker, they specified white unglazed brick tiles, which complement the original white-painted brickwork on the other side of a supporting column. It is this sensitive and thoughtful approach, combined with original ideas, that makes Bureau de Change a particularly sophisticated architecture practice. And Katerina and Billy’s ambition and talent make them far more than just masters of the kitchen extension 첸

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FROM BELOW An inset strip of light follows the shape of the zigzag roof. Unglazed white brick tiles have been used behind the cooker, reflecting the white-painted bricks on the wall

Added insight What’s a common mistake you notice with house extensions? The relationship between the existing and the new is important. Sometimes it can feel like the extension hasn’t been designed in dialogue with the existing house. What’s a budgetsaving trick you would recommend? You don’t need to spend a lot on white paint or very light shades – we often use Dulux. For the richer, darker colours, we choose paint from Farrow & Ball, such as its ‘Black Blue’, which is more expensive but has more depth. Share a name from your contact book. Our tile supplier Craven Dunnill in Shropshire (cravendunnill.co.uk) always has just the right thing for a project. We used it for the bathrooms in this house.


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LIFESTYLE TEXT ROS BYAM SHAW PHOTOGRAPHS PAUL MASSEY

JOINT ENTERPRISE Relocating to a house and farm buildings in rural Hampshire six years ago, the antique dealer and decorator MAX ROLLITT and his wife, movement therapist JANE WATSON, have created a relaxed base for their family and their work

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LIFESTYLE

ax Rollitt’s earliest memory of a lane that wends its way through Avington beside the wide ribbon of the River Itchen is trudging along it as a Boy Scout about 40 years ago. ‘We stopped near the farm and ate some nasty beef sausages,’ he says. More recently, he would regularly cycle along the route on the nine-mile ride from his townhouse in Winchester to his antique shop in The Old Telephone Exchange in Alresford. Six years ago, he and his wife Jane Watson and their three sons – Edward, now 17, Alfie, 15, and William, 12 – moved from Winchester to live on this lane, in a neat brick and flint farmhouse. Most of the land belonging to the farm was sold separately, but Max and Jane bought 10 acres, as well as the farm buildings opposite the house. The grain store has been Max’s showroom since January 2015. Across the yard, the old dairy has been converted into a consulting room and studio, where Jane works as a practitioner of the Feldenkrais Method – a movement, breathing and posture-based therapy. From the window of the consulting room, you can watch a pair of magnificent pigs, Betsy and Madame Whiteboots, foraging in the mud and grass. A cat called Sushi, a Parson terrier named Beano and Ginny the English pointer complete the household. Max and Jane were both brought up in Winchester 컄

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT A view of the converted barn, which houses Jane’s consulting room and studio, and the farmhouse on the right. Jane practising the Feldenkrais Method on a client in her studio. Max, Edward and William walking with dog Beano along the River Itchen


TA I L O R E D G L A S S A R C H I T E C T U R E & I N T E R I O R S C A U L F I E L D C O M PA N Y. C O . U K | 0 1 1 3 3 8 7 3 1 1 8


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LIFESTYLE

The interior is a typical Rollitt mix of clean-lined, high-quality antiques but did not meet until they returned as adults and were introduced through mutual friends in a pub. ‘Max announced he was going trekking in Nepal,’ says Jane, ‘I had a gap in my schedule at exactly the same time in December, so on the spur of the moment I said I would go with him. We saw each other twice between that first meeting in May and the airport. While we were away, I decided I wanted to marry him.’ They may have grown up in the same city, but their paths were very different. Jane’s childhood passion for ballet developed into a love of physical theatre. She studied in Paris and learned butoh dance in Tokyo, then spent some time in Hong Kong and Sydney, where she set up her own theatre company, Watson & Co, before eventually returning to the UK. ‘At one point, I worked with a director who started every rehearsal with a session of Feldenkrais. I realised that afterwards we all felt much more alive, creative and in our bodies. It inspired me to train to teach the Feldenkrais Method. But it is only 컄 OPPOSITE The morning room is filled with an eclectic mix of antiques. THIS PAGE Ginny the English pointer in the kitchen (top), which is decorated with simple wooden furniture, such as an antique cupboard in its original paint and a Windsor bench designed by Max (bottom right)


LIFESTYLE CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Layers of pattern decorate the main bedroom, which is lined in Pierre Frey’s ‘Sans Papillons’ wallpaper. Chickens in the garden. Alfie feeds pigs Betsy and Madame Whiteboots. The sitting room

since we came here that I have concentrated on it fulltime and given up my job as senior lecturer in performing arts at Winchester University.’ Feldenkrais is a therapy that improves movement and posture, and can relieve stress and pain by retraining the brain through a progression of gentle exercises. Individual sessions take place in her consulting room at Yavington Studio, and three times a week she holds classes for up to 12 people in the big studio, also on the farm. Max has also benefited from Jane’s knowledge and skills. A keen long-distance cyclist, four years ago he had a serious accident when he was dragged under a passing lorry, which left him seriously injured. Jane practised the Feldenkrais Method with Max during his recovery from the accident; now fully recovered, he is planning to cycle to Rome to raise money for the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Air Ambulance, which he credits with helping to save his life. Despite the fact that Max works as an interior decorator, with up to three projects at any one time running alongside his antiques and furniture-making businesses, when it came to furnishing and decorating the farmhouse, Max and Jane collaborated. ‘I have been learning the trade since the age of seven,’ Max says. ‘I used to sit on the stairs in my mother’s antique shop in Winchester and listen to her sell for a profit a piece she had just bought down the road. It was a masterclass in salesmanship.’ Neither school nor university was a success, he says, and after 컄 84

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LIFESTYLE

an interlude ‘living as a hippy on a hill in Wales’, Max discovered a liking for furniture design and went on to do a course in joinery. When he left Rycotewood Furniture Centre, he started an apprenticeship with Winchesterbased furniture restorers Frearson & Hewlett, working with the man he now employs as a restoration expert. ‘It was the best education,’ Max says. ‘All the top London dealers came in, and the work made me fanatical about craftsmanship and patination.’ In 1993, he opened his own shop in Winchester and a couple of years later invested in a stand at Olympia. The investment paid off, and his client base expanded to include American as well as British admirers of his eye for quality and scale. ‘I view thousands of antiques every week,’ he says, ‘but only buy perhaps three things. I look for beauty, for purity of design and for authenticity.’ Over the years, he has bought pieces so desirable he has had them reproduced. He is best known for his range of sofas copied from eighteenthand nineteenth-century originals, and a recent addition to the bespoke range is ceramics. ‘I have always sold to decorators – people like Axel Vervoordt, Colefax and 컄 CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Max with his assistants Nina Matengu and Lynette Healy in his antique showroom in the former grain store on the farm. The workshop of restorers Frearson & Hewlett near Winchester, where Chris Frearson works on a Georgian card table. Max beside an eighteenth-century bust at his showroom’s entrance 86

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LIFESTYLE

‘I look for beauty, for purity of design and for authenticity in pieces’ Fowler, and Michael S Smith. When I was first asked to decorate a house, it seemed like a natural progression with my passion for furniture. ‘The shop is my decorating arsenal,’ he continues. ‘I can raid it to find things for clients and, if something doesn’t work, I can take it back again.’ The interior of his own house, with its eighteenth-century cottage proportions and simple architectural detailing, is a typical Rollitt mix of clean-lined, high-quality English antiques, with an armchair, a sofa, a Windsor bench and a kitchen table from his own workshops. He is particularly good at colour, making unexpected combinations like mauve and royal blue work. Antique textiles add richness and texture. The house is on a modest scale, in which a central hall leads to the sitting room on the right and the morning room on the left, with the kitchen behind and four bedrooms upstairs. Being six foot four, Max is always in danger of banging his head in the house, but in the showroom there are high ceilings and 460 square metres in which he can indulge his taste for large-scale, architectural pieces. The industrial chic of the zinc cladding and rolldown metal shutters gives way inside to some spectacular pieces of furniture, such as a huge pedimented bookcase circa 1770 from Walpole House. ‘We had a dream of living the rural idyll,’ he says, surveying his aesthetic empire. It has worked out pretty well 첸 Max Rollitt: 01962-791124; maxrollitt.com Yavington Studio: 01962-779295; yavingtonstudio.co.uk ANTICLOCKWISE FROM TOP Max and Lynette by a George III bookcase from Walpole House in the showroom (also bottom left). Michele Wyatt upholstering a headboard in the workshop

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EDIT Inspirational INTERIORS, beautiful GARDENS, fascinating people, compelling stories

PAG E

CLAIRE TAKACS

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Emerg ing leave s of G unnera manicata and yellow Pr imula prolife ra flowers in a Dorset garden

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Keeping it in the family

Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection of creamware plates takes pride of place on the octagonal walls of the drawing room, along with two of her own large oil paintings. The paintings were created for a joint exhibition by Anne and her artist mother, Anne Adams Robertson Massie


When this historic house came up for sale in Virginia, Anne Massie and her brother Will could not resist it. Some 30 years later, their impulse purchase remains Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much loved home TEXT HELEN CHISLETT | PHOTOGRAPHS LUCAS ALLEN

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or the artist Anne Massie, the day she set eyes on her late-eighteenthcentury house in Virginia was ‘prophetic’. It is no wonder she uses such an emotive adjective when she tells the story: ‘My brother Will and I were visiting our parents in our hometown of Lynchburg, Virginia, after having bought a property together in Richmond, a two-hour drive east. We were in our early twenties and had neither the money nor the time for another property.’ However, when Anne and Will heard that a historic house in nearby Locust Grove was for sale, they could not resist driving by to see it. ‘Needless to say, we fell in love with it there and then.’ She and Will decided they had to buy the house, although she says it was ‘crazy’ given they were both so young. Built as a small plantation house, perhaps as early as 1758, with later additions in the American Federal style, it was used as a hunting lodge in the early twentieth century. By the time Anne and Will had bought it in 1988, it was empty and in need of an update, but the condition was fundamentally sound. The house has changed shape over the years. ‘It had a side hall originally and was essentially a two up, two down,’ Anne says. ‘In the 1830s, it seems that two more rooms were added on both floors, making the hall central.’ The drawing room was altered in the Thirties into the shape of an octagon, by walling off the four corners of the room. These corners now house hidden storage cabinets, accessible from the hall, and two recessed radiators. For the first six years or so, Will and Anne visited every weekend they could and, together with their parents, set about renovating both the house and the garden. In 1994, after Will had married his wife, Alice, and had their daughter, Ella, he bought Anne out of her share. ‘Will and Alice updated all the plumbing and electrics, added a bigger back porch and put the pool in,’ says Anne, who moved back to the house 12 years ago. ‘What is now my painting studio was their pool house.’ The house was not the only project Anne and Will undertook together. In 1991, they embarked on an even bigger endeavour by founding the garden furniture company McKinnon and Harris (named after their two grandmothers, both ardent gardeners). Over the past 25 years, their workshop in Richmond has handcrafted garden furniture in powder-coated aluminium. Will and Anne design every collection together, often testing new ranges in the garden of the house. Anne describes the garden as ‘a laboratory for living outdoors; we obsess over every detail and here you can really see what works best’.

F

The library, in the oldest part of the house, contains some of Anne’s favourite pieces, including the landscape paintings over the chimneypiece, by Jimmie Kyle, and a pink marble horse’s head sculpture by Rafael Alfonso Umaña Mendez, which sits among family photographs on a sideboard. The Federal-style bookcases were designed by the Charlottesville architect Robert E Troxell HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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OPPOSITE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A view of the hall from the library. Behind the library is the kitchen, which has worktops made of locally quarried Virginian soapstone. At the far end of the dining room, a door leads into the new wing; the door to the left leads to the drawing room. THIS PAGE Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection of antique textured pottery is displayed in the back porch

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In 2004, the house changed hands again. Will and main bedroom, in which joyous curtains of pinkhis family were so firmly established in Richmond and-white linen inject a happy jolt of colour, and a that the four-hour round trip to Locust Grove bathroom. The lower floor of the extension houses a was becoming more and more infrequent, so Anne family room with a fireplace, a laundry room and a decided to buy the house back from her brother. After potting area with a basin. marrying Alex Winstead in 2009, she added the It is outside where Anne spends her most enjoyable front portico and a new two-storey extension on the time, either working on her much loved garden or left of the house, and they set about renovating the in her cottage ornée of a studio. What delights her grounds, planting 20 heirloom apple trees and 55 most is the wildlife that shares her landscape – from native trees in one season alone, including the cedars owls and snapping turtles to raccoons, wild turkeys that now line the drive. and deer. Of her home, Anne says, ‘It has been such Anne also transformed the look of the interior. a part of me for nearly 30 years that I cannot think She has a natural sense of colour – as can be seen in now of ever living anywhere else. When I first bought the pictures she paints. From the hall – the oldest it back from Will, everything I had was white because part of the house – you turn left into the calm oasis of I was terrified of making a mistake. Now I have the octagonal drawing room. It is decorated with learned that life here is like living inside a wonderful Anne’s collection of creamware plates, found objects painting in three dimensions’ 첸 and two huge panels that she painted herself. Behind this is the dining room, with its 1830s Federal McKinnon and Harris: 020-7349 9085; chimneypiece and heart-pine panelling, which was mckinnonharris.com almost certainly cut down from the woodland that surrounded the house. The furniture in here includes fine pieces passed down through maternal and paternal lines, such as the early-nineteenth-century walnut corner cabinet. On the wall are magnificent landscape paintings of Italy, Greece and Virginia by Anne’s late mother, Anne Adams Robertson Massie, as well as more works by Anne herself. On the other side of the hall is the original panelled library at the front of the house, which is decorated with kilim rugs, crewelwork chairs and bohemian banded curtains made from an assortment of linens and complemented perfectly by the art that is hung floor to ceiling. The pieces Anne loves most include a pink marble horse’s head by the sculptor Rafael Alfonso Umaña Mendez and the landscapes over the Georgian mantel by the artist Jimmie Kyle, both connected with Lynchburg. As she explains, ‘Lynchburg is a little hidden secret inhabited for generations by highly creative people – all of the artwork in this room is by Virginian artists, many of them friends and family.’ The library leads to the kitchen, hung with pots and vintage baskets. Then from the rear of the hall, you walk out into the back porch, which is, in effect, an outdoor room complete with a piano, armchairs and some of Anne’s collection of antique, highly textured pottery. OPPOSITE FROM TOP Bright curtains add colour to the otherwise neutral main Back in the dining room, a doorway bedroom. The front of the house; the earliest part is to the right of the entrance, leads to the new wing. Here is the while the 2011 extension, which includes a lower ground floor, can be seen to the study, which in turn leads to the left of the building. OPPOSITE Anne painting in her studio, formerly the pool house HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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Spreading ITS WINGS TEXT NONIE NIESEWAND PHOTOGRAPHS MICHAEL SINCLAIR LOCATIONS EDITOR LIZ ELLIOT

Having once been a building at risk, Slackwood Farm in Lancashire has, under its new owners and a team of architects, become a sight to behold, thanks in part to a strikingly modern curved glass extension 100 MAY 2016 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK


BOTH PAGES As the owners are keen birdwatchers, architect Paul Archer designed a spiralling glazed garden room with panoramic views. Vitra’s ‘Grand Repos’ chairs and footstools furnish the interior, while a glass circle covers an old well


unkered down on a hillside in Lancashire, a contemporary glazed circular extension to a listed seventeenth-century farmhouse has landed as lightly as a rarely sighted bittern in the Leighton Moss nature reserve it overlooks. Slackwood Farmhouse was on the English Heritage (now Historic England) Heritage at Risk Register when birdwatchers Angela and Adrian Waddingham bought it five years ago. Living in London – where Adrian is a consultant actuary and was, until 2014, Sheriff of the City – the couple planned to use it as a holiday home before eventually retiring to Lancashire. One of the first things they did was bring in the conservation architect Elaine Blackett-Ord, who made two of the barns habitable. Elaine recommended they work with the architect Paul Archer, whose portfolio is a hymn to the modern aesthetic. As it happened, Paul was familiar with the area through his excursions as a mountain walker. ‘Although the farmhouse looks like a two-storey house, it is actually four storeys and felt top heavy with bedrooms,’ says Adrian. The Waddinghams decided to build an extension to provide them with more ground-floor space and discussed the matter with English Heritage. ‘They didn’t want anything pastiche, but modern and cutting edge,’ Paul recalls. His design included a glazed rectangular structure to house the dining area, which links the house to the new curving glass and zinc ‘garden room’. With its high walls and glass ceiling, this space solved the problem of not having a THIS PAGE FROM ‘proper dining room’. Angela and Adrian are both keen TOP Sheep in the twitchers, and the garden room, with only half-height fields surrounding the walls, offers a good 360-degree view. farm. The cow shed. Appearing smaller than it really is has earned OPPOSITE A glass Slackwood Farmhouse a Grade II* listing. It is an early link houses the dining example in northern England of a double-pile house, area, and connects so called because it is two rooms deep along the width. the main building The discovery of a Bronze Age dagger in the plaster to the garden room above the Jacobean staircase was exciting. So, too, was extension, blurring the line between uncovering a small window in the loft, originally indoors and out intended for owls to fly in and catch mice. In his The Buildings of England guides, architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner described Slackwood Farmhouse as having ‘mean windows’. However, an infrared scan conducted by an English Heritage archaeologist revealed it actually had additional ones that had been bricked up by the Georgians. These were unblocked and the façade is now illuminated by a line-up of wooden-framed windows. By using local craftsmen in wood, stone and metal, Angela and Adrian have upheld the vernacular architecture. Even the cattle grids were made in nearby Carnforth, from whence came the reclaimed flagstone flooring and the handcrafted kitchen. The slate floors, walls and roofs came from a Cumbrian quarry. An old yew tree cut into wooden shingles was used to create a sliding panel in the glass dining room. The glass extension follows the curves of the landscape as smoothly as a dry-stone wall. ‘Inside, it feels as if you’re sitting in the landscape,’ says Paul. Getting those curves in glass was a challenge. Every detail of the concrete foundations upholding the swooping glass walls was resolved with architectural-glazing company Cantifix. ‘Just as a gliding swan looks so elegant and graceful, below water it is paddling like hell,’ Paul says, describing the hidden engineering. Four steel posts support the zinc roof, chosen because it weathers to a greenish-grey like Cumbrian slate. Flat-topped, the roof flips up a little on either side, and a water channel runs its length, to

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Some 400 years have passed between the building of the farmhouse and its twenty-first-century extension, yet they complement each other like birds of a feather


OPPOSITE The sitting roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original fireplace is now fitted with a wood-burning stove; the doorway leads through to the glass dining room and garden extension, where a sculpture of a man by Sean Henry sits. THIS PAGE Exposed beams, an Aga and simple wooden furniture create a farmhousekitchen look

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT The Jacobean staircase leads up to the bedrooms. A Jacob’s ladder accentuates the double-height proportions of a spare room. The main bathroom has a walnut shower pod designed by Paul

negate the need for guttering and direct rainwater into a bird bath hollowed into the grasslands. Hidden fins support the glazed beams in the dining room, while wiring hidden inside these light pendants above the table. Angela and Adrian were determined to be as green as possible. First they removed over 3,000 rubber tyres from a massive silage pit and filled it with soil, before planting an orchard of English apples, pears and plums. They dug a borehole, as the house was unplumbed, put solar panels on the slate roof of the old cowsheds, and installed a single wood-chip boiler and underfloor heating in the farmhouse. Robust and rustic furnishings follow Adrian’s reminder that ‘it was a yeoman’s working farmhouse – nothing fancy’. Over five years, Angela searched out original pieces made by Lancashire furniture maker Gillows, which merged with Waring of Liverpool in 1897 to form Waring & Gillow. An old slaughter stone table for making black pudding, which was discovered downstairs during building work, remains in the cloakroom. For the modern extension, they have chosen contemporary furniture, including ‘Grand Repos’ pieces by Antonio Citterio for Vitra. Throughout the house, Earthborn paints, made from clay-based pigments, provide a chalky grey and cream background to a fine collection of English art, including Cumbrian artist Percy Kelly’s paintings of towns and villages. One wall in every bedroom is anchored with a strong colour – forest green, earth brown, bronze or moody blue. Some 400 years have passed between the building of the farmhouse and its twenty-first-century extension, yet they complement each other like birds of a feather 첸 Paul Archer Design: 020-3668 2668; paularcherdesign.co.uk Blackett-Ord Conservation: 01768-352572

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Old meets new in the restored barn, where an antique gym horse and oak settle bought in Cumbria sit below the spiralling staircase designed by architect Elaine Blackett-Ord

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COMPARE AND Charged with refreshing a south London terrace house from the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bachelor days into a second home for his young family, designer Sarah Vanrenen chose a simple palette enlivened by splashes of colour and pattern

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CONTRAST TEXT ELFREDA POWNALL PHOTOGRAPHS TIM BEDDOW

The sitting room has a muted palette, punctuated by flashes of bold pattern on the sofa cushions, which were covered in leftover fabric from Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cupboard, and a pair of Irving and Morrison stools covered in a zigzag print

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hen she was a child, Sarah Vanrenen told her mother, ‘I’m never going to be an interior designer.’ But this charming house in a south London terrace, its interior newly decorated by Sarah, is proof that we do not always know our own minds when we are 10 years old. Sarah’s mother, the interior-design doyenne Penny Morrison, simply led by example, designing beautiful and constantly changing houses for the family. It was the drearier aspects of the job that bored the young Sarah. ‘I was dragged round antique shops and spent hours sitting outside, guarding the car or looking out for parking wardens, because half the stuff was in the boot and the rest still in the shop.’ She now has a thriving interior-design business of her own, which she started 12 years ago, though at first she resisted her fate, with jobs at Christie’s in the clocks and watches department, and then as a handbag designer. ‘I’ve grown up with decorating; you just imbibe it,’ Sarah says. ‘It took a while, but now I’m really passionate about it.’ The owner had already lived in his house for 10 bachelor years before he called in Sarah. ‘The house was looking tired and grungy,’ he says. ‘It was all red chenille, dark furniture and kilims.’ He now lives mainly in Australia, returning to England occasionally for his work, and to bring his young family back for holidays. He wanted a fresh, lighter look for his London base, and was keen to incorporate the clean, modern lines and simplicity of Australian houses. ‘He is also very much an Englishman, and wanted a calm, comfortable house that felt English, too,’ says Sarah. When it came to the design, Sarah had two pieces of luck. First, the house is half a size wider than its terraced neighbours, which meant she was able to create two generous, well-proportioned rooms on the ground floor, by knocking down walls and taking over part of the garden with an extension at the back. The front door opens onto a narrow hall, but the house then seems to expand as you turn right into the spacious sitting room. Turn left out of this room through double doors and you arrive in a large, open-plan kitchen and dining room. In warm weather, when the doors along the back wall are completely folded back, the small garden – designed by Henrietta Norman – becomes part of the room. Sarah’s second stroke of luck was a set of paintings by the client’s grandfather, Howard Dietz, a vice president at MGM Studios in Hollywood in the Thirties, who is credited with creating its roaringlion logo. He also wrote musicals, worked on plays in New York and wrote lyrics for songs – notably That’s Entertainment and Dancing in the Dark, a favourite with couples during the Second World War.

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THIS PAGE FROM TOP An opening leads to the entrance hall from the sitting room. A console table and lamps from Julian Chichester sit under a painting by the owner’s grandfather, Howard Dietz. OPPOSITE FROM TOP Facing this, another Howard Dietz painting hangs above the ‘Burlington’ chimneypiece from Chesney’s. From here, double doors lead to the kitchen and garden beyond 110

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‘The owner is very much an Englishman and wanted a house that felt English’ Sarah was able to design the rooms around his paintings – for example, echoing the shades of green in one above the sitting room chimneypiece in the velvet-covered ottoman that faces it. The walls, painted in Farrow & Ball’s ‘Skimming Stone’, and the neutral sofas and curtains were her response to the client’s request for calm, but then Sarah has brought in a bit of fun with clusters of bright cushions on the sofas, a geometric-patterned rug from Robert Stephenson and a black-and-white zigzag fabric on a pair of chunky stools. On either side of the chimneypiece stands a pair of antique demi-lune tables with mirrors above them – a classic Georgian arrangement that would make an Englishman returning from the other side of the world feel completely at home. In the dining area through the doors, Sarah has mixed different eras: a Sixties brass light fitting hangs above a modern wooden dining table, surrounded by bobble dining chairs, which, though new, hark back to styles of the late nineteenth century. An oversize mirror, a Provençal fruitwood cupboard and an ingenious wine rack, designed by Sarah and painted to match the walls, make up this ensemble. If a neutral backdrop with bright touches is the watchword downstairs, upstairs the theory is reversed: Sarah has chosen a strong peacock blue for the main bedroom walls. ‘Bedlinen should be crisp and white,’ she says. She used Prêt à Vivre’s ‘Bruges’ linen in oyster (a favourite fabric of hers) for the headboard and bed valance, and the blue brings all this white into relief. She follows the same idea of contrast in the first-floor bathroom, where dark Grigio Carnico marble and strong green walls work well in a small space, balanced with white sanitaryware. By contrast, in the main bathroom, mirrored cupboards bounce the light around and give the illusion of a bigger space, while concealing extensive storage. ‘There are rows of highly polished shoes in there,’ says Sarah. The owner loves the look and comfort of Sarah’s design: ‘It was fantastic to specify exactly what we wanted for the sofas, for example, and get it.’ He is grateful, too, that she brought out his own taste, in a supportive, encouraging way, instead of imposing her own. And now that he is having a house built for his family in Australia, he realises to his cost quite how clever Sarah was at avoiding potential mistakes. ‘She spotted the glitches before they happened,’ he says ruefully. This seems to come easily to Sarah, who has come a long way since she sat, twiddling her thumbs in her mother’s car full of treasures 첸 Sarah Vanrenen Designs: 07778-354816; vanrenendesigns.com

OPPOSITE BOTH PICTURES In the kitchen and dining room, high-gloss units designed by Sarah meet a wooden table and chairs from Julian Chichester; the Romo fabric on the chairs echoes the table’s circular shape. The garden becomes part of the room once the doors are folded back. THIS PAGE FROM TOP The main bedroom is painted in ‘Blue Verditer’ by Dulux, which contrasts with the headboard covered in Prêt à Vivre linen. The main bathroom HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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In the open-plan living space, cast-iron columns and different floor levels demarcate the sitting and bedroom areas. These are further divided by two Forties metal screens. The door to the left of the bedroom leads to the bathroom

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Lofty ambition The Spanish architect Isabel López-Quesada has softened the industrial architecture of a former office space in New York to create a sophisticated pied-à-terre for its new owners

TEXT DOMINIC LUTYENS PHOTOGRAPHS MONTSE GARRIGA LOCATIONS EDITOR LORETO LÓPEZ-QUESADA

etting older need not entail becoming staid or set in one’s ways. Take the couple who c o m m i s s i o n e d th e Madrid-based architect Isabel López-Quesada to design their compact but light-suffused loft in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighbourhood. The owners – a Spaniard who works in finance and his French partner – spent much of their youth gallivanting around New York. Now, decades on, they are all for imbibing its funky vibe again. ‘They’d lived in Upper Manhattan when they got married in the late Eighties, then moved to Spain,’ Isabel explains. ‘But they recently decided to buy a new home in New York – this time downtown, which is more fun.’ These days, the couple, who are mainly based in Madrid and have three children, live a more peripatetic lifestyle – they also have a home in Megève – and wanted their New York pad to be a comfortable pied-à-terre. ‘They were after a small and sophisticated place where they can come and go as they please and rest between

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BOTH PAGES A large painting by Aaron Young picks up on the grey tones of the loftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial elements. Velvet and leather armchairs shipped from Paris add warmth to the sitting area, and reflect the colour of the walnut kitchen and dining table (opposite)

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Despite the loftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open-plan design and industrial aesthetic, it is a resolutely chic and grown-up space

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trips,’ says Isabel, who has a long-standing relationship with the couple. She has designed their homes in Spain and France, their son’s Spanish apartment and a shop they once owned in Madrid, so it’s hardly surprising that she was also brought on board to undertake this project, which took five months to complete. Mirroring the couple’s enthusiasm for recapturing their younger days was their desire for a modern home. ‘We thought that it would be fun if we tried something different, a leap from our other, more conventional homes,’ the owner says. ‘But while liking the idea of a loft, we wanted it to feel elegant.’ Indeed, despite the loft’s mainly openplan design and edgy industrial aesthetic, it is a resolutely chic and grown-up space. In contrast to the raw look of its industrial shell, it boasts sumptuous touches aplenty, from a bench covered in inky black velvet to walnut kitchen units in a rich tobacco brown finish – no standardissue, wall-to-wall stainless steel here. Previously, the loft – measuring just under 100 square metres – was a ‘blandly monochrome, charmless office’, recalls Isabel. Now, as you enter it, you encounter a large, roughly square, open-plan space, the majority of which is sunk three steps down. Steel columns create a subtle division between the ‘sitting room’, which

is under the window, and the dining and kitchen areas, which run along the inside wall of the loft. The ‘bedroom’ is just to the left of the door and raised up on the same level as the entrance. This elevation feels quite dramatic – a bit like a mini-stage. It also separates the bedroom from the sitting area, as does a pair of fixed Forties metal room dividers that have a decorative latticework pattern. Just off this main space, at one side of the bedroom area, is a passage that leads to a walk-in wardrobe and a large vanity unit, beyond which are two mirrorfronted doors. The one on the left leads to a lavatory, the one on the right to a shower. Isabel was principally guided by the loft’s architecture when designing its layout. ‘It was largely determined by the existing structure, with the position of the cast-iron columns and beams telling me how to distribute the areas in the openplan part. The exposed ceiling is original. But I installed new air-conditioning ducts and pipes for electric cables to reinforce the high-tech feel.’ There are retro, industrial-chic radiators underneath four large windows running along the entire length of the loft, though these are practical, too, providing buffers against New York’s bitterly cold winters. The windows are another one of the

original features that Isabel capitalised on. ‘I positioned the seating near them to make the most of the daylight and create a good place for reading and relaxing,’ she says. She has also wittily played with grey paint to trick the eye into perceiving wood as metal. ‘I painted the frames the same colour as the columns to accentuate the industrial look.’ Conversely, a dovegrey rug in the same area softens the smooth, hard surface of the polished concrete floor, which Isabel installed throughout the apartment. While Isabel has masterminded the project, its design was very much a collaborative endeavour with the owners. ‘We always work very closely together,’ says the owner. ‘We discuss the furniture with Isabel, though we choose the artwork ourselves.’ This includes a huge, idiosyncratic canvas by the American painter Aaron Young and works by such Catalan artists as Dalí, Antoni Tàpies and Josep Maria Sert, all of which the couple inherited. The latter are hung in an appealingly haphazard cluster near the bed. The resulting space looks satisfyingly, robustly industrial, yet undeniably personal and comfortable 첸 Isabel López-Quesada: isabellopezquesada.com

OPPOSITE The concrete bed, which echoes the polished concrete floors throughout the loft, is softened by a headboard covered in Loro Piana cashmere and a wolfskin throw bought in Italy. Isabel’s studio designed the simple blinds, which are made from Philippine rattan with a velvet ribbon trim. THIS PAGE FROM LEFT A loo and shower are enclosed behind antique-mirror-fronted doors in the dressing and vanity area; the washbasin stand is made of steel and has a Zimbabwe black granite top. A cluster of artworks by Catalan artists including Salvador Dalí, Antoni Tàpies and Josep Maria Sert hangs to the left of the bed; to the right, a large portrait by Jordi Alumá hangs above a small oak bureau (right)

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The

K NOW L E D G E

1

2 2

1

Keeping it in the family

When this historic house came up for sale in Virginia, Anne Massie and her brother Will could not resist it. Some 30 years later, their impulse purchase remains Anne’s much loved home

Spreading ITS WINGS

3 3

Having once been a building at risk, Slackwood Farm in Lancashire has, under its new owners and a team of architects, become a sight to behold, thanks in part to a strikingly modern curved glass extension

KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY Pages 92-99

SPREADING ITS WINGS Pages 100-107

1_FAUX CORAL

2_MIRROR

3_FABRIC

1_CHAIR

2_FABRIC

3_COFFER

Anne Massie has placed a piece of white coral on a table in the drawing room of her Virginia house, which complements the pebbles and antler also displayed on the table. India Jane’s ‘Windley Key Faux Coral’ would achieve a similar effect. Made of hand-finished resin, it measures 14 x 25 x 18cm and costs £65. 020-8799 7166; indiajane.co.uk

Fine giltwood mirrors hang on the walls of the drawing room. Particularly charming is the Robert Adamstyle oval mirror on the wall opposite the windows. English Georgian’s ‘George III Hepplewhite Oval Mirror’, an antique reproduction, is remarkably similar, with a classical urn cresting. It measures 124.5 x 53.3cm and costs £3,978. 020-7351 4433; englishgeorgian.com

In her bedroom, Anne has used Penny Morrison’s bold ‘Haveli’ fabric for the curtains. She had the linen custom-dyed in her favourite shade of pink, but the standard red colourway pictured here is not too dissimilar. It is available in four other colours – yellow, blue, beige and a lighter pink – and costs £138 a metre. 01547-560460; pennymorrison.com

The dining chairs in the Waddinghams’ Lancashire farmhouse are Philippe Starck’s ‘Masters’ chairs for Kartell. Made from polypropylene, the chair is a homage to twentieth-century designs by Eames, Jacobsen and Saarinen. It’s available in six colours from Heal’s; the one shown here is in mustard. It measures 84 x 57 x 47cm and costs £154. 020-7636 1666; heals.com

The Odd Chair Company upholstered the sofas in the sitting room. Despite their different appearance, they are both covered in Colefax and Fowler’s reversible ‘Lanark Plaid’ – the sea green colourway has a rusty red reverse. The wool fabric comes in 13 other colours and costs £97 a metre. 01772-691177; theoddchaircompany. com | 020-8877 6400; colefax.com

Angela and Adrian have furnished the farmhouse with pieces of antique furniture, such as the carved chest in the sitting room. Tim Bowen Antiques in Carmarthenshire specialises in country furniture. Currently available is this ‘Small Oak Coffer’, which would not look amiss here. It measures 59 x 105 x 25cm and costs £1,575. 01267267 122; timbowen antiques.co.uk

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Inspired by the houses in this issue, ELIZABETH METCALFE gives directions on how to achieve similar style 2

1 2

1

3 3

COMPARE AND Charged with refreshing a south London terrace house from the owner’s bachelor days into a second home for his young family, designer Sarah Vanrenen chose a simple palette enlivened by splashes of colour and pattern

Lofty ambition

CONTRAST

The Spanish architect Isabel López-Quesada has softened the industrial architecture of a former office space in New York to create a sophisticated pied-à-terre for its new owners

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PIXELATE IMAGING; NATALIA SLEPOKUR/INDIA JANE LONDON; BARRY MACDONALD

COMPARE AND CONTRAST Pages 108-113

LOFTY AMBITION Pages 114-119

1_LAMP

2_CHAIR

3_TILES

1_SCREEN

2_FLOORING

3_SIDE TABLE

Designer Sarah Vanrenen has placed a pair of Tyson’s ceramic lamps in the main bedroom of this south London terrace house. Tyson offers a great selection of table lamps, and the ceramic pearl glaze on this catches the light beautifully. Including the tapered square linen shade, the lamp measures 100 x 36cm square; a pair costs £1,698. 020-7720 9331; tyson.london

The ‘Bobbin’ carver chairs and side chairs in the dining area are from Julian Chichester, and are covered in Romo’s ‘Quintus’ fabric. The chair is a modern take on spool-turned furniture, which dates back to the seventeenth century. The oak carver chair pictured measures 89 x 60 x 47cm and costs £943, excluding fabric. 020-7622 2928; julianchichester.com

The bathroom floor is tiled in Popham Design’s geometric ‘Hex Target’ tiles. Available in the company’s vast colour palette, these cement tiles are handmade in Morocco and are available through Ann Sacks. They measure 23 x 20cm each and prices start at £150 a square metre. pophamdesign.com 020-3055 0802; annsacks.com

In this open-plan Manhattan loft, two large Forties French lattice screens demarcate the sitting area and the bedroom. Quindry is currently selling a pair of smaller, but similar, Forties French grills, one of which is pictured. Made from cast iron with metal studs, each screen measures 140 x 48.5cm. The pair costs £1,250. 07958517017; quindry.net

Isabel López-Quesada chose polished concrete for the floors. Munncrete is a new polished cementporcelain coating, which is only 2–3mm thick, but has the appearance and robustness of concrete. Pictured here in grey, it can be tinted to any colour and applied to almost any surface. From £139.20 a square metre. 020-7736 9876; munncrete.com

The two chrome tables with smoked mirror-glass tops in the sitting area are bespoke pieces. For a smart alternative, try Birgit Israel’s ‘Frame’ side table, which comes in a range of finishes and sizes. The one pictured here, with a black frame and darkened glass top, measures 45 x 60cm square and costs £1,560. It can also be ordered in a bespoke size. 020-7376 7255; birgitisrael.com 첸

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Where the wild things are Combining foraged materials with traditional techniques, the duo behind home accessories company Forest-and-Found create beautiful and useful pieces imbued with artistry TEXT EMILY TOBIN | PHOTOGRAPHS MICHAEL SINCLAIR

OPPOSITE Abigail Booth in front of a patchwork quilt, which she dyed using oak galls. THIS PAGE Max Bainbridge in woodland at the Hollow Ponds in Whipps Cross, north London


TOP ROW FROM LEFT Abigail and Max collecting gorse flowers. Calico dyed with indigo. Max whittling a spoon. Abigail in the workshop with her dye vats. MIDDLE ROW FROM LEFT A finished cushion. The pair in their Walthamstow studio. Unbleached and dyed yarns hanging up ready to be used. A white oak bowl. BOTTOM ROW FROM LEFT Max in their garden. Finished spoons and a butter knife. Adding wood chippings to a dye vat. Walking by the Hollow Ponds 124

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alk through the woods with Max Bainbridge and Abigail Booth – the pair behind Forest-and-Found – and you will learn that you are never far from something useful. Where others see weeds, they spy vital materials. A fallen birch branch can be whittled into a spoon, jolly yellow gorse flowers make an excellent natural dye, and a gnarled oak gall the size of a marble is so packed with tannin it produces a rare black ink. Foraging is often presumed to be a rural pursuit, but Max and Abigail find ample supplies not far from their north London doorstep. Much of the wood used for Max’s turned bowls and carved spoons began life in Epping Forest, while Abigail’s graphic quilts and cushions are dyed using bark, flowers and plants gathered locally. The couple met at Chelsea College of Arts, where they both studied fine art: Max made large wooden sculptures and Abigail created installations using found objects. They graduated in 2013 into an art world that was still suffering the effects of the recession. ‘It was a difficult time for young artists,’ says Max. ‘We didn’t want to abandon everything we’d learnt, but also needed to earn a living. It seemed impossible.’ That was until the pair spent a rainy August holed up at Max’s family’s house in France. Max honed his woodworking skills, while Abigail taught herself patchwork and quilting using a book, an old Singer sewing machine and a stash of French linen. The pieces they made became the foundations of Forest-and-Found: chopping boards, spoons, bowls, cushions and quilts with a decidedly Quakerish look. In order to fund the business, they did the odd bit of furniture restoration. ‘We’d buy something, do it up and sell it on eBay,’ explains Abigail. ‘With that extra £500, we could buy a car-boot load of wood, a lathe or a sewing machine.’ They now work with the Forestry Commission to source sweet chestnut, oak, birch and holly from Epping Forest; any walnut comes from a local furniture designer’s offcuts. ‘We spotted him burning heaps of the stuff at a barbecue,’ says Max. ‘Now he hands over anything he can’t use and we get the most fantastic pieces in unusual shapes, which can determine the design.’ But the wood only does so much of the work. ‘It’s also about decision making and knowing when to stop,’ explains Max. ‘If a beautiful whorl appears on the end of a spoon, do you keep carving to get a good shape, or do you stop so that lovely detail doesn’t disappear?’ Max works slowly to transform an oblong length of wood into something fine and functional. He uses knives and chisels to carve deceptively simple forms, chipping away to make the fragile transition between the handle and the bowl. In a pleasingly cyclical process, Abigail uses Max’s wood shavings to dye her fabrics. Certain woods contain a lot of tannin, which acts as a natural mordant; the heartwoods of different trees create different colours when soaked in water and left to ferment – Brazilwood produces a deep magenta, plum wood makes pink and walnut creates yellow. If a metallic salt is added to the dye bath, the colour will swing from grey to green. Abigail sources her unbleached calico from a mill in Leeds. She submerges lengths of the fabric into her dye vats and, with each dip, the colour intensifies. She uses a quilting ruler and a rotary cutter to form her bold geometric shapes, which are inspired by English heraldry. Yarn tends to stay undyed and each white stitch against the coloured fabric has a graphic effect. ‘I use colour sparingly,’ she says. ‘When a piece of fabric comes out of the bath, it might look horrible, but it’s all about perception. Put that scrap next to another colour and it might change into something amazing.’ Nothing goes to waste. With a characteristically gung-ho spirit, Max and Abigail battled the elements to build their workshop during some of last winter’s fiercest winds. Thankfully, it remains in one piece, standing at the back of their Walthamstow garden, where there is a constant hum of activity. Strings of calico hang up to dry, coloured by plume poppies, onion skins, tea and indigo. Vats of dye brew, the lathe thrums and, slowly but surely, Max and Abigail achieve their goal of creating objects for an eager audience. Forest-and-Found supplies a few select retailers across the UK, including Botany in east London and The Future Kept in Sussex. ‘When we were at art school, we wanted to make things that would have some interaction with people, but rarely saw that impact,’ says Max. ‘Now we’re making pieces that might be as rudimentary as a bowl or a blanket, but that people will use everyday. That’s what we love most about being craftspeople’ 첸

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‘We’re making pieces that people will use everyday. That’s what we love most about being craftspeople’

Forest-and-Found: forest-and-found.com HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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as nature intended GABBY DEEMING looks East to create serenely simple schemes that play on the colours and textures of natural materials, from wood to wicker PHOTOGRAPHS NEIL MERSH OPPOSITE WALLS Fabric on screens, ‘Charvos’ (charcoal), linen, £90 a metre, from Thorody. Curtain, ‘Luna’, silk/ viscose, £150 a metre, from Margo Selby. FLOOR Reclaimed terracotta tiles, 15 x 30cm, £109.82 a square metre, from Fired Earth. FURNITURE Pine and burr-walnut table, 78 x 103cm diameter, £4,500, from Rose Uniacke. ACCESSORIES Handmade willow ‘Foraging Bag’, by Annemarie O’Sullivan, £440, from The New Craftsmen. Walnut vase (on screen), by Julian Watts, £135, from The Cold Press. Vintage black and white postcard, from £2 for similar, from UK Old Postcards. ‘Tall Bamboo Storage Jar with Lid’, £16; ‘Hakusan Ceramic Butter Container’, £28 for half size; both from Native & Co. Repen marble ‘Radio Vase Tall’, by Anna Badur, 66 x 20cm diameter, £2,350, from Mint. Chestnut and willow ‘Garden Trug No 8’, by Cuckmere Trug Company, £115, from The New Craftsmen

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THIS PAGE TOP LEFT ‘Pressed Terracotta Lampshade’, by Lydia Hardwick, 11 x 22cm diameter, £150, from Granby Workshop. TOP RIGHT Bamboo picnic basket, £45; ‘Hakusan Ceramic Butter Container’, £35 for full size; bamboo nail brush, £2.50; ‘Fish Soap’ (white), £28; all from Native & Co. Wallpaper, ‘Shirakawa’ (02), by Elitis, 110cm wide, £199.80 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. Cotton scarf, by Khadi and Co, £107, from Designers Guild. Vintage pine coffee table, 26 x 77 x 42cm, £264, from Larusi. LEFT Welsh hazel basket, by Ruth Pybus, £265, from The New Craftsmen. Block-printed cotton napkins, from top: ‘Japan Wave’ and ‘Japan Square’, £16.50 each, from The Conran Shop. Fabric, ‘Purple Haze’, by Jennifer Shorto, linen/cotton, £150 a metre, from Redloh House Fabrics. Linden wood cups, ‘Cara’, £55 each, from Native & Co. Cherrywood dishes, by Takashi Tomii, £45 each, from The Cold Press. Stoneware plates, ‘Grey Glaze’, by Kasper Würtz, 16cm diameter, £30 each; and 26cm diameter, £55 each; from Sigmar. Disposable wooden chopsticks, £3 for 40, from Thejapaneseshop.co.uk. Cherry-wood and steel day bed with printed-linen-covered mattress (seen as background), by Louisa Loakes and William Waterhouse, 35 x 200 x 70cm, £3,800, from The New Craftsmen. OPPOSITE WALLS Cork wallcovering, ‘Pear A-F’, 140cm wide, £60 a metre, from StudioTex. Ceiling paint, ‘Squid Ink’, £42.50 for 2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Paint & Paper Library. Bronze and leather ‘Rotating Wall Light’, 50 x 86.5cm , £4,320, from Rose Uniacke. FURNITURE Ceramic stools, ‘Monolithic’, by Apparatu, from 30 x 20cm diameter, £150 each, from Viaduct. Day bed, as before. ACCESSORIES Wool cushion (at head of bed), by The Good Shepherd, £180; hand-block-printed linen cushions, by Louisa Loakes, £165 each; both from The New Craftsmen. Wool and Latex bag (on floor), by Luisa Cevese, £110; cashmere scarf, by Kashmir Loom, £95; both from Designers Guild. Vintage black and white postcards, from £2 each for similar, from UK Old Postcards

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There is a warmth and versitility to cork; this wallcovering can also be used as an upholstery fabric


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OPPOSITE WALL Paper-backed fabric wallcovering, ‘Acer’ (red wood), 136cm wide, £90 a metre, from Zoffany. FLOOR Jute rug, ‘LT11’, with border in ‘Linen Twill’ (nutmeg), 250 x 200cm, £342.60 as seen, from Crucial Trading. FURNITURE Powder-coated steel desk, ‘TTA’, by MA/U, 73.2 x 180 x 90cm, £1,801; powder-coated steel and stained-ash chair, ‘Uncino’, by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec for Mattiazzi, 82 x 57 x 54cm, £895; both from Viaduct. ACCESSORIES ‘Round Water Hyacinth Basket’ (on floor), £39, from Toast. Hanging baskets, from left: oak swill round basket, by Owen Jones, £150; willow ‘Foraging Bag’, by Annemarie O’Sullivan, £440; Welsh hazel basket, by Ruth Pybus, £265; willow trug, ‘Jekyll’, by Hilary Burns, £210; chestnut and willow ‘Garden Trug No 8’, by Cuckmere Trug Company, £115; all from The New Craftsmen. Paulownia-wood and steel ‘Toolbox’, by Keiji Ashizawa, £1,040, from Clerkenwell London. Metal task lamp, ‘Ranarp’ (nickel plated), £39, from Ikea. THIS PAGE WALLS Wallpaper, from left: ‘Sansui’ (snow peaks), 136cm wide, £55 a metre, from Zoffany; ‘Shirakawa’ (02), by Elitis, 110cm wide, £199.80 a metre, from Abbott & Boyd. Ceiling paint, ‘Squid Ink’, £42.50 for

2.5 litres matt emulsion, from Paint & Paper Library. Fifties cast-iron mirror, 51 x 49.5 x 4cm, £1,290, from Quindry. FURNITURE Vintage elm coffee table (used as bench), 42 x 120 x 55cm, £660, from Larusi. LivingTec composite and steel bath, ‘Stand’, by EX-T, 51 x 160 x 70cm, £6,334.43, from C P Hart. Oiled acacia ‘Platform Bed’, 15 x 164 x 213cm, £595; tatami mats, £95 each; cotton/polyester double mattress, ‘Comfort’, £395; all from Futon Company. ACCESSORIES Bamboo dipper (on hook), £20; paper lantern, £45; small bamboo bath brush, £8.50; bamboo picnic basket, £45; all from Native & Co. Vintage patinated-brass hooks, by Carl Auböck, £1,050 for 6, from Sigmar. Cotton gown, ‘Japanese Ikat’, £95, from Toast. Linen towels, ‘Ecuador’, by Teixidors, from £55, from Esensual Living. Vintage black and white postcards, from £2 each for similar, from UK Old Postcards. Merino wool and silk blankets (on table and bed), ‘Urano’ (blue and grey), by Teixidors, £170 each, from Nicole Farhi Home. Hand-woven sisal baskets, from £16 each, from The Basket Room. Linen sheet, ‘Washed Linen’ (chalk), double/king, £159, from Larusi. For suppliers’ details, see Stockists page 첸


muted SHADES

In the second of our series of planting plans, ARNE MAYNARD shares with Clare Foster his design for a softly coloured spring border that flowers in late May, before giving way to lush foliage PHOTOGRAPHS SABINA RÜBER | ILLUSTRATIONS VIOLA LANARI

xplaining his choice of plants, garden designer Arne Maynard says, ‘I wanted to create a border that bridges the gap between late spring and early summer. In a natural woodland edge, you get that first flush of flower before the leaves really unfold, and I wanted to recreate this feeling. It’s a border that does its thing in late May and then becomes a calm, green, shady spot, in contrast to other more flowery areas of the garden. I particularly love this type of border.’ Arne’s beautifully tuned herbaceous planting has a soft palette, with creamy yellows, pale blues, lavender, zingy lime green and dashes of apricot orange against the backdrop of a hornbeam hedge. It is a natural-looking scheme that mimics the freshness and the feeling of a woodland edge under a dappled canopy of yellow Magnolia ‘Butterflies’. ‘It’s an under-storey planting,’ he says. ‘It could be anywhere – in a hazel coppice, on the edge of light woodland, or against the north-facing wall of a house. It’s cool and sophisticated – not too bright.’ Putting together plants is second nature for Arne, who admits that he hardly ever draws out formal plans for his clients. ‘I will have worked out my list of species and quantities, and done a mood board for the client, but then I always lay out my plants by eye,’ he says. ‘I like using them like a paintbrush, creating a picture and placing them in a way that feels natural. I set the most dominant plants out first – in this case it would be the peonies – and then work downwards in size or dominance.’ His choice of plants is based on a number of criteria. First comes the location and finding plants that will thrive in those conditions. Secondly, he looks at flowering 132

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time, then colour and then form. ‘I make sure I have a variety of plant or flower shapes. For example, I have the spires of the digitalis and the veronica here, to contrast with the more rounded shapes of the peony and the geranium. Then there are the fillers, plants like bupleurum and smyrnium with more delicate flowers, which I plant as if they have seeded themselves. These are the volunteer plants, the self-seeders that come back year after year and keep the border natural and interesting. I love the fluidity that they bring, and the excitement of not knowing what’s going to happen from one year to the next.’ There are certain combinations or pairs of plants that work particularly well together. ‘The colour of the bupleurum flowers picks up the colour on the inside of the digitalis, and there’s a lovely contrast between the structure of each plant, with the spires of the digitalis coming up through all those floaty metallic flowers.’ The other partnership Arne highlights is between Paeonia mlokosewitschii and Veronica gentianoides: ‘They flower at the same time, so you get that lovely washed-out pale blue of the veronica with the yellow peony, and their contrasting flower shapes. And the veronica has almost exactly the same shade of yellow in the eye if you look at it closely.’ Foliage provides different textures and shades of green, and an overall sense of lushness in this border. ‘The quality and variety of the foliage is just as important as the colour combinations and shapes and sizes of the flowers,’ says Arne. ‘For example, the leaves of Valeriana pyrenaica give some density to the scheme, providing a good foil for aquilegias or the ferny foliage of the polemoniums.’


An artist’s impression of the spring border created by Arne Maynard, with natural-looking planting in a soft palette under the dappled canopy of a Magnolia ‘Butterflies’ tree

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ARNE’S BORDER PLANT LIST 1_VALERIANA PYRENAICA ‘This doesn’t grow as tall as its relative V. officinalis, but it will elevate certain areas within the border, with its lush heart-shape foliage and dusky pink flowers.’ 2_VERONICA GENTIANOIDES It produces delicate 75cm spires of the palest blue flowers that last from late spring to early summer. 3_BUPLEURUM LONGIFOLIUM This is an excellent filler plant, with clusters of small, understated flowers in shades of greeny bronze. 4_SMYRNIUM PERFOLIATUM Another good filler with small umbels of lime-green, starry flowers. A biennial, it will seed around to create its own path through the border in due course. 5_PULMONARIA ‘OPAL’ This has flowers in the same opalescent blue as the Veronica gentianoides, held above rounded hummocks of silvery spotted leaves. ‘The silvery leaves and icy blue flowers have a reflective quality, which provides a foil for other plants.’ 6_DIGITALIS GRANDIFLORA ‘This foxglove is a lovely buttery yellow with a brown flush in the throat. It’s quite perennial, and also longer flowering than D. purpurea.’ 7_AQUILEGIA X HYBRIDA ‘GREEN APPLES’ Its lime-green buds open to greeny white double flowers. A useful plant that will lighten up dark corners as it seeds itself around. 8_GERANIUM SYLVATICUM ‘ALBUM’ ‘This is such a lovely pure white, and it will bring flashes of light to the shady areas.’ 9_POLEMONIUM ‘LAMBROOK MAUVE’ ‘A real cottage-garden plant, it reminds me of when I gardened as a child. I love this cultivar, a lovely dirty pink lilac that goes well with yellow.’

FROM TOP Paeonia mlokosewitschii, also known as Molly the Witch (11). Valeriana pyrenaica (1). Pure white Geranium sylvaticum ‘Album’ (8) 134

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10_LATHYRUS AUREUS An unusual member of the pea family with apricot-orange flowers against fresh green foliage – the orange is subtle rather than bright. ‘It’s a lovely plant that I use quite a lot with purple hazel.’

11_PAEONIA MLOKOSEWITSCHII ‘Also known as Molly the Witch, this is one of my favourite peonies. Even before it flowers, it is beautiful, with purple-brown shoots and metallic leaves, followed by fat round buds and very pure, lemon-coloured flowers.’ 12_ANEMONE ‘WILD SWAN’ This has the palest lilac-white flowers that nod in the wind to reveal the wonderful darker streaks on the underside of the petals. It flowers from May through the whole of summer. 13_HE SPERIS MATRONALIS VAR . ‘ALBIFLORA’ A white-flowered hesperis that grows to about 50cm, with stems of scented flowers. ‘I often use it in planting schemes, particularly new borders, as it makes a good display even in the first year.’ 14_PHLOX DIVARICATA ‘CLOUDS OF PERFUME’ ‘A nice early phlox, very delicate and floaty, with wiry stems and pale lavenderblue flowers. It goes very well with the lunaria.’ 15_CONVALLARIA MAJALIS The classic lily of the valley, this is used for its scent and for padding out the planting scheme at the end. 16_LUNARIA REDIVIVA A perennial honesty with lilac-white flowers, large soft-green leaves and long seed pods with pointy ends, unlike the more rounded pods of the annual honesty. ‘The flowers have a slightly almondy smell.’ 17_MAGNOLIA ‘BUTTERFLIES’ A cross between M. acuminata and M. denudata. ‘It has an upright habit and beautiful non-fading yellow flowers, giving the appearance of a brightly lit candelabra that will extend the evening light’ 첸

Arne Maynard Garden Design: 020-7689 8100; arnemaynard.com. Most of these plants are available to buy through crocus.co.uk with a 10 per cent discount for House & Garden readers. Quote ‘90166’ (offer valid from April 1 to May 31)


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Phlox divaricata ‘Clouds of Perfume’ (14). Aquilegia x hybrida ‘Green Apples’ (7). The buttery yellow foxglove Digitalis grandiflora (6). The delicate flowers of Veronica gentianoides (2). Convallaria majalis (15). Lunaria rediviva (16). Pulmonaria ‘Opal’ has icy blue flowers and silver-spotted leaves (5). Anemone ‘Wild Swan’ (12). Greeny bronze Bupleurum longifolium (3) makes an excellent filler plant (centre) HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016 135


Diverse habitats work as one in this garden in Dorset, providing its owner with abundant opportunities to showcase a range of spectacular plants TEXT NOEL KINGSBURY | PHOTOGRAPHS CLAIRE TAKACS

Towards the centre of the garden, there are two ponds surrounded by mature balsam poplar trees; one of the ponds is linked to a bog garden


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hen we first saw it, we were impressed by how well it fitted into the landscape,’ says Roger Newton of the house in Bridport, Dorset, that he and his wife Doreen have lived in since 2005. The garden, too, feels as if it belongs in its place. Mature trees help knit it into its surroundings. The rare black poplar grows on the river banks and they have inherited various trees planted in the Sixties by a previous owner, including a gingko on the front lawn, a Japanese maple and a good-size metasequoia. All provide a framework for a classic – but at the same time contemporary – British ‘plantsman’s garden’. The term ‘plantsman’s garden’ is sometimes a warning for a horticultural stamp collection. Here at Braddocks, however, Roger’s gardening passion has created something far more enticing: a range of habitats that all seem to be naturally there. Each is full of plant life – some of it common, some not so common, some rather special indeed, but all co-existing and complementing each other. Roger’s overriding passion is magnolias, camellias and other plants that need acidic soil. Indeed, he says he ‘chose the garden for its acidic soil’, which is however 2.8 acres of heavy clay. Its water-holding qualities can be valuable, but not suitable for everything. Therefore his love of springflowering shrubby species is indulged by membership of the RHS Rhododendron, Camellia & Magnolia Group. A pair of ponds draws the eye towards the centre of the garden. One was here already; the other Roger had dug and linked to an artificial stream and, crucially, a bog garden, which provides an important habitat for some of the most spectacular planting. The 25-metre-long bog garden shares a liner with the new pond, but is separated from it by a line of stones holding back a layer of soil. It is home to the giant leaves of Gunnera manicata, the very early flowering OPPOSITE A shaded and damp border plays host to several species of primula, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning Light’, Trollius yunnanensis and Magnolia stellata ‘Royal Star’. TOP Meconopsis ‘Crewdson Hybrid’ HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016 139


Lysichiton americanus – or skunk cabbage – and, in early summer, hosts of brightly coloured candelabra primulas. Native to yak-grazed wet meadows and streamsides in the Himalayan region, these primulas are some of the most vibrant of garden perennials, but are not always easy to grow. Here, they reach to over a metre high and self-sow even beyond the bog garden. An area of wildflower meadow is another important habitat. Like many gardeners, though, Roger found that developing it was not straightforward. He has used the semi-parasitic wildflower yellow rattle to reduce grass growth; it works, but he says ‘the soil is very fertile and damp – perfect for grass – so I have to buy half a kilo of yellow-rattle seed every winter to keep the population topped up’. With the yellow rattle reducing grass vigour, wildflowers like the vibrant pink ragged robin, globe flower, valerian and meadow cranesbill all flourish. Roger has added several species of crocus, too, along with the striking purple Gladiolus byzantinus and species of camassia. ‘The first orchids appeared two years ago,’ he says. The arrival of these beautiful but mercurial wildflowers cannot be planned, only facilitated, and then it has to be waited for – like a blessing from the gods. Most innovative is a prairie area, where late-flowering perennials have been grown from seed and then planted out as plugs. ‘They are so vigorous that there is now very little weedy grass growth,’ says Roger. Aster novi-angliae flourishes, along with Eryngium yuccifolium and Echinacea purpurea, which many struggle with, but here forms ‘good solid clumps and sometime sows itself ’. There are some miscanthus grasses, too, which provide interest until they are cut down in late THIS PAGE FROM TOP Dwarf conifers and heathers are grown in a bed cut into the top lawn. The woodland garden. OPPOSITE Rosa ‘Darcey Bussell’ grows in the shade of a Japanese cherry tree beside the stream

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‘I really love the purity of meconopsis colours: blue, blood red and perfect white’


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winter, and at one end there is a transition zone towards more shrubby vegetation, including species roses, which have plenty of decorative hips for the winter. The prairie has been a particularly good place to appreciate one of Roger’s goals: ‘To let plants do their own thing.’ Some of the most vivid colour at Braddocks comes from meconopsis and gentians, flowering perennials that have a reputation for being difficult in the south of England. ‘I really love the purity of meconopsis colours,’ says Roger. ‘Meconopsis grandis, as blue as you can get; the blood red of M. punicea; M. superba, the most perfect white.’ Along with the autumn-flowering gentians – a selection of vivid blues at a time when such colours and profusion of flower are rare – meconopsis are more usually associated with Scottish gardens, with their cool, light summers. Roger thinks the humidity provided by the small river, which snakes around the outer perimeter of the garden, and what is, for Dorset, the relatively high rainfall of his microclimate both help. He also provides additional mist irrigation, and grows some plants in raised beds to make sure they get perfect drainage, with soil made lighter by the leaf mould from fallen leaves. Braddocks opens for the National Garden Scheme and for garden clubs by appointment. ‘Gardening can be a lonely hobby,’ says Roger. ‘So it is nice to share with other gardeners.’ The rich array of plant life here and the skilful way it is integrated into both appropriate habitats and the wider landscape make this garden a joy – and a welcome up-todate addition to a well-established British tradition 첸 Braddocks Garden will be open on Tuesdays May 10, June 14 and July 12, 2–5pm, as part of the National Gardens Scheme (ngs.org.uk). It is also open by appointment until October – to book, call 01308-488441; braddocksgarden.co.uk OPPOSITE A grassed path borders the bog garden and the wildflower meadow, where Geranium pratense, lesser knapweed, oxeye daisies and meadow buttercups flourish. BELOW Meconopsis ‘Huntfield’

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F O O D & DRINK R E C I P E S | TA S T E N O T E S


FOOD & DRINK | RECIPES

Opposite GRIDDLED LAMB CUTLETS WITH QUICK ROMESCO This page RICE SALAD WITH RADISH, SPRING ONION AND AVOCADO

Simple spring LOUISA CARTER, the food writer behind House & Garden’s long-running ‘Simple suppers’ series, recommends six fresh and fuss-free seasonal dishes. Recipes serve 6 PHOTOGRAPHS JONATHAN GREGSON | FOOD PREPARATION AND STYLING ROSIE REYNOLDS | PROP STYLING JOANNA HARRIS

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FOOD & DRINK | RECIPES Left BAKED BASQUESTYLE CRAB WITH SHERRY

RICE SALAD WITH RADISH, SPRING ONION AND AVOCADO Yuzu is a citrus fruit used in Japanese dishes that has an intense acidity and potent zing – somewhere between lime and grapefruit on the mouth-puckering scale. The bottled juice is available in larger supermarkets or Asian supermarkets. If you can’t find it, use freshly squeezed lime juice instead. Sushi rice is slightly sticky, but long-grain white or brown rice or short-grain brown rice would also work. For the rice or grapeseed oil • 250g sushi rice • 1tbsp grated • 4tbsp rice vinegar root ginger • 2tsp sugar For the salad For the dressing • 200g radishes, • 3tbsp yuzu or freshly thinly sliced squeezed lime juice • 1 bunch spring onions, • 3tbsp tamari or thinly sliced soy sauce • 2 large avocados, • 2tbsp toasted flesh diced sesame oil • 3tbsp toasted • 2tbsp sunflower oil sesame seeds 1 Rinse the rice well under cold water, then place in a pan with 1 litre cold water and a pinch of salt. Bring to the boil, stir, cover with a lid and simmer for 10–15 minutes, or until just tender but still slightly firm (don’t overcook or it will become sticky). Drain off excess liquid, cover the pan with a tea towel and set aside. 2 Mix together the vinegar, sugar and 1/2tsp salt. Pour this over the still-warm rice and gently fold through using a fork. Leave to cool completely. (This can be prepared the day before, then spread on a plate and kept covered in the fridge.) 3 Mix all of the dressing ingredients together and set aside. To assemble the salad, combine the rice with all but a quarter of the radishes and spring onions. Divide between 6 bowls and top with the avocado, and remaining radishes and spring onions. Spoon over the dressing and scatter with sesame seeds.

each) with butter and then place on a baking sheet. 2 Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add the onion and fry for about 3–4 minutes until softened and golden. Stir in the garlic and cook for 1–2 minutes, then stir in the tomatoes, chilli powder and a pinch of salt. Simmer this for 5 minutes, until the tomatoes are soft and sticky. 3 Pour in the sherry and 2tbsp boiling water, let it bubble for a minute, then stir in the crab meat, half the parsley and some freshly ground black pepper. Cook for 1–2 minutes until heated through, then spoon into the ramekins. Top with the breadcrumbs, the remaining parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Cook for 8–10 minutes until bubbling at the edges.

BAKED BASQUE-STYLE CRAB WITH SHERRY Traditionally cooked in the shell, this version uses ready-prepared crab meat baked in ramekins. For a less rich version, use half crab and half white fish (sustainable hake, cod or bream); add the fish with the tomatoes and, once cooked, flake it in the pan before you add the crab. You can buy fresh crab meat in packets, or ask your fishmonger for dressed crabs. A medium crab yields roughly 200–250g meat. • 75ml (5tbsp) • 25g butter Manzanilla or • 3tbsp extra-virgin other dry sherry olive oil, plus • 450g fresh crab extra to serve meat (mixture of • 1 medium onion, white and brown) finely chopped • 4tbsp finely • 1 fat clove garlic, chopped parsley finely chopped • 300g ripe tomatoes, • 6tbsp fresh breadcrumbs finely chopped • 1/4–1/2tsp chilli powder To serve A green salad 1 Heat the oven to 200˚C/fan oven 180˚C/mark 6. Grease 6 ovenproof ramekins (about 150ml capacity

TWICE-COOKED PURPLE SPROUTING BROCCOLI WITH CHORIZO This takes only 20 minutes to cook, turning broccoli into a richer, more interesting version of itself. It is good served on toasted sourdough, or tossed through pasta, with a generous grating of pecorino or Parmesan. If you can’t get purple sprouting, use common (calabrese) broccoli. You can buy good cooking chorizo at Brindisa and good butchers. • 12–18 cooking chorizo • 3 cloves garlic, sausages, or spicy thinly sliced pork sausages, halved • 1tsp dried chilli flakes • 750g purple • Finely grated sprouting broccoli zest of 1 lemon • 125ml extra-virgin To serve Toasted olive oil sourdough 1 Heat the oven to 220˚C/fan oven 200˚C/mark 7, or the grill to medium-high. Roast or grill the sausages for 15–20 minutes, turning occasionally, until cooked. 2 Cut the florets off the broccoli. Thinly slice the stalks into 0.5cm-wide slices (if the stalks are thicker than a finger, slice them in half lengthways

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first). Roughly chop the leaves. Bring a large pan of well-salted water to the boil. Add the broccoli, including stalks and leaves. Boil for 7–10 minutes, until completely tender. Scoop out a large mug of the cooking water, then drain the broccoli. 3 Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan or flameproof casserole over a low-medium heat. Add the garlic and chilli and fry gently for 2–3 minutes to just infuse the oil; be careful not to let the garlic brown. 4 Add the broccoli to the pan with a generous pinch of salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper. Increase the heat to medium and fry for 10 minutes, stirring often and adding the odd tablespoon of reserved cooking water. You’re aiming for a soft, almost mashed texture – but not quite a purée. Keep warm, adding more cooking water if needed, until ready to serve. Stir through the lemon zest. 5 Serve the broccoli and sausages with the sourdough toast - drizzle the toast with olive oil and, if you like garlic, rub it first with a raw garlic clove. GRIDDLED LAMB CUTLETS WITH QUICK ROMESCO Making a true romesco is a little laborious: this is my quick and every-bit-as-good version. The smoky red sauce also goes well with seafood, especially prawns or grilled white fish. I sometimes serve it as a dip, with grissini and raw fennel. La Chinata makes an excellent sweet smoked paprika, which I use in place of the traditional dried nora peppers. It is available from Brindisa, Ocado or good delis. For the lamb For the romesco • 12-18 medium • 300g cherry lamb cutlets tomatoes • Juice of 1 lemon • 1 large red romano • 4tbsp extra-virgin pepper, deseeded, cut olive oil into 5cm pieces 컄


FOOD & DRINK | RECIPES • 6 cloves garlic, • 2–3tsp red-wine peeled vinegar • 5tbsp extra-virgin For the spring onions olive oil • 3 bunches jumbo • 2tsp sweet salad onions (approximately smoked paprika 12), halved • 45g dense white lengthways, or or brown bread 6 bunches small (ciabatta, sourdough spring onions or country-style loaf), torn • 2 lemons, halved • 60g almonds • 2tbsp extra-virgin • 30g hazelnuts olive oil 1 For the lamb, toss the cutlets in the lemon juice, olive oil and freshly ground black pepper. Set aside at room temperature while you make the romesco. 2 Heat the oven to 220˚C/fan oven 200˚C/mark 7. Mix the tomatoes, pepper, garlic and olive oil with some salt in a roasting tray. Roast for 10 minutes, then remove the garlic when it is soft and golden. Continue to roast the tomatoes and pepper for a further 5 minutes, then stir in the paprika and bread. Spread the nuts on a separate baking tray and put both trays in the oven for 5–10 minutes until toasted. 3 Scrape all of the ingredients into a food processor, along with juices from the roasting tray. Add back the roasted garlic, with 2tsp red-wine vinegar and 1tbsp boiling water, and blitz to a rough paste. Add more boiling water if needed to give the consistency of a thick pesto. Add more vinegar and salt to taste. 4 For the spring onions, heat a large griddle pan until hot. Toss the spring onions and lemons in the oil with a pinch of salt and griddle for 2–3 minutes, or until charred in places on both sides and soft (a little longer for jumbo salad onions). Transfer to a plate, cover and keep warm in a low oven. 5 Cook the cutlets on the griddle for 2–3 minutes on each side until cooked but a little pink. If you need to cook in batches, cover with foil and keep warm in the oven while you cook the rest. Squeeze the charred lemons over the lamb, then serve with the spring onions and romesco alongside. ORANGE AND RICOTTA CAKE WITH VANILLA-BAKED RHUBARB This can be eaten warm, when it has more of a sponge-pudding texture, or cold. Spelt flour has a nutty flavour, and is available in most supermarkets; I particularly like Doves Farm Organic Wholemeal Spelt Flour or Sharpham Park Organic Wholegrain Spelt Flour. You can make the cake and rhubarb up to two days ahead, if serving warm; if served cold, the cake is best eaten on the day it’s baked. For the cake • 175g wholemeal or • 250g ricotta, excess wholegrain spelt flour water poured off • 11/2tsp baking powder • 100g butter, melted, • Finely grated zest plus 15g for greasing of 2 oranges, • 2tbsp demerara sugar plus 1tbsp juice • 140g golden • 1tsp vanilla extract caster sugar For the rhubarb • 2 large eggs • 600g rhubarb 148

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• 60g golden • 1 vanilla pod, caster sugar halved lengthways (or more if the To serve rhubarb is tart) 200g crème fraîche 1 For the cake, heat the oven to 180˚C/fan oven 160˚C/mark 5. Sit the ricotta on a few pieces of kitchen towel to absorb some moisture, ideally for at least 10 minutes. Line the base of a 20–21cm loosebottomed cake tin with baking parchment. Grease the parchment and sides of the tin generously with melted butter, and sprinkle with demerara sugar. 2 In a mixing bowl, using handheld electric beaters or a balloon whisk, whisk together the ricotta and golden caster sugar for a minute until smooth, then add the eggs and whisk for a further 30 seconds until smooth and pale. 3 Sift in the flour and baking powder (tip any bran in the sieve into the cake mixture) and use a large metal spoon to partially fold in the flour (just a couple of stirs), then add the orange zest and juice and vanilla extract. Gently fold together until just combined. 4 Scrape the batter into the tin, place on a baking sheet and bake for 45 minutes or until risen and deep golden. It is ready when a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean. Cool in the tin for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack. 5 For the rhubarb, trim any tough ends from the stalks and cut the stems into 5cm lengths. Spread in a single layer in a large baking dish or roasting tin. Sprinkle over the sugar and tuck in the vanilla pod. 6 Cover the dish with foil and bake in the oven for 15 minutes. Uncover and cook for a couple more minutes until tender but just holding its shape. You want the juices to be the consistency of a thick cordial; if they are too thin, strain into a small pan and boil for a few minutes until reduced. Set aside to cool. 7 Serve the cake and rhubarb warm (either fresh

from the oven or reheated), with crème fraîche and the rhubarb syrup on the side. To serve cold, place the cake on a serving plate, spread the top with the crème fraîche, then pile the rhubarb on top. Drizzle over the rhubarb syrup, letting it spill down the sides. CHOCOLATE AND SALTED CASHEW COOKIES These cookies taste even better the next day. I like the creaminess of a good-quality milk chocolate alongside the cashew nuts, but by all means use dark chocolate, or a mix of both. Makes 18 cookies • 75g unsalted cashew • 60g icing sugar nuts, roughly chopped • 1tsp vanilla extract with some left whole • 250g plain flour • 250g good-quality • 2tbsp cocoa powder milk chocolate • 1tsp baking powder • 250g unsalted • 1/2tsp flaked sea salt butter, softened (such as Maldon) 1 Heat the oven to 190˚C/fan oven 170˚C/mark 5. Line 2 large baking sheets with baking parchment. Spread the cashews on one of the trays and toast in the oven for 5 minutes, or until golden. Leave to cool. 2 Melt 50g of the milk chocolate in a bowl set over a pan of simmering water and set aside to cool slightly. Break the remaining 200g into 1cm squares. 3 In a mixing bowl, beat the butter until smooth, then beat in the icing sugar followed by the cooled melted chocolate and vanilla. Sift in the flour, cocoa and baking powder, and mix well. Finally mix in the cashews, salt and chocolate squares. 4 Take large tablespoons of the mixture (weighing about 50g), roll into balls and place on the baking sheets, leaving a gap of at least 5cm between each ball. Bake for 12–15 minutes, until firm at the edges but still a bit soft in the centre. Use a palette knife to transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Once cool, they will keep in an airtight container for 3–4 days 첸


SOMETHING TO DRINK For the baked crab, La Gitana is always my go-to Manzanilla: BodegasHidalgo La Gitana Manzanilla Sherry, £8 for 500ml, from Sainsbury’s. It’s an ingredient in the recipe and you can drink the rest with the finished dish. Its flavours of fresh nuts, green apple and the sea are a great foil for the rich crab. Just remember, it should be served cold; store it in the fridge and think of it as a white wine (it is 15% ABV), so best consumed within a week. If you’re having trouble finishing it, it would work with the rice salad, too. A spicy Rioja would stand up to the paprika in both the chorizo with the broccoli and the lamb’s romesco sauce: Viña Diezmo JT Joven Tinto Bodegas Casa Primicia 2013, £8.95, from Lea & Sandeman. For the orange and ricotta cake, you could continue on a Spanish theme with a Moscatel: Emilio Lustau Moscatel Superior Emilín, £17.36, from Thedrinkshop.com. The soft sweetness is well balanced with acidity and perfect with fragrant orange. Blanche Vaughan


TA S T E NO T E S News, reviews and tips for cooks and food lovers, by Blanche Vaughan

LOTS OF LEAVES Stinging nettles are an iron-rich wild ingredient, and now is the time to forage for them to catch the irst sprouting leaves. Wear gloves to pick off the top four bracts (about 10cm from the top). A few minutes of cooking will remove the sting.

Nettle soup Chop 1 leek, 2 carrots and 2 sticks of celery and soten in 40g butter in a saucepan over a medium heat. Add a carrier bag full of nettles, grated nutmeg, salt and pepper. Stir to wilt the leaves, then pour in 1.5 litres chicken stock. Cook for 20 minutes then liquidise. Serve with another sprinkling of nutmeg and a dollop of crème fraîche. Serves 4

Posh potatoes Potatoes and truffles work in harmony in Torres Black Truffle crisps. Not only are the potatoes crisped to perfection, but the dusting of truffle lavour takes them to a new dimension. There’s also a caviar version to try. A 40g bag costs £1.75 and is available from Finefoodspecialist.co.uk.

EASY OVEN No room for a wood-fired pizza oven? The stainless steel ‘Chadwick Oven’, with its sleek chrome finish, sits on top of a domestic gas ring and will bake a pizza in four minutes. The genius design includes a stone shelf for the ultimate crisp base and a lid to keep temperatures high. It measures 14.7 x 46 x 36cm and costs £385. Fast food has never looked so tempting. chadwickoven.com 150

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FOOD & DRINK | TASTE NOTES

A TALE OF TWO CITIES Hailing from Brooklyn, New York, and now with a shop in London’s Shoreditch, Mast Brothers is leading the way for hipster chocolate. Flavours include smoke, almond, sea salt, olive oil and sheep milk. What’s more, the packaging is just as good as the contents. A 70g bar costs £7. mastbrothers.com

Best of basics Eve O’Sullivan and Rosie Reynolds’ The Kitchen Shelf (Phaidon, £24.95) is all about using store-cupboard ingredients as the basis for a meal – you can transform one or two fresh ingredients using your essentials. There are recipes for spiced dips and salads made with chickpeas, peanut butter and chocolate chip cookies, coconut-milk ice cream, stufed latbreads and vegetable curries.

BERRY NICE Pop ready-grown strawberry plug plants into window boxes and hanging baskets now. Next month, they will be ready to eat with sugar and cream. Try Victoriana Nursery Gardens, where ive bare-root ‘Royal Sovereign’ strawberry plants cost £7.50. victoriananursery.co.uk

Add a drop These elixirs and bitters can be served straight, with ice, diluted in tonic water or added to cocktails. American company Fee Brothers, available through Master of Malt (masterofmalt.com), sells a range of bitters in 150ml bottles. I particularly like the Plum (£10.96), Orange (£11.44) and Rhubarb (£9.94) flavours. A couple of drops will liven up any drink. Italy’s Santa Maria Novella has bottles of liqueurs made to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century recipes. The Alkermes, pictured here, contains essences of spices, rosewater and orange blossom and costs £22 for a 100ml bottle (smnovella.it) 첸

PIXELATE IMAGING; SHUTTERSTOCK

TOP TABLEWARE The Leach Pottery in St Ives is one of my favourite places to buy kitchen and tableware. Its standard ware (above right) comes with beautiful glazes, including creamy blue dolomite, red-brown and black tenmoku, and sot green ash. I also like the porcelain in a Chinese-style glaze called Ying Ching (above let). Pieces start at £15. Leach’s recently launched git list service means you can create a wish list online to share with friends and family – ideal for weddings and birthdays. leachpottery.com

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VIRGINIA FRASER EMBARKS ON AN AEGEAN CRUISE, OFFERING THE DUAL PLEASURES OF LEARNING ABOUT RARE NATIVE WILDFLOWERS AND VISITING CLASSICAL RUINS or the botanical enthusiast, spring is an ideal time for Patmos. Having been driven by bus to the austere monastery of St a cruise of the Aegean: the blossom is at its best, the John the Theologian at the highest point of the island, we walked down native Judas tree resplendent and the wildflowers in to the harbour. Following an old mule path through a landscape flecked full bloom. Our 12-day tour, comprising 16 passengers, with wild anemones, we passed the Cave of the Apocalypse on our way. had a dual focus: wildflowers and classical ruins. With Our next stop, the island of Samos, seemed dramatically different distinguished botanist Martyn Rix and the classicist in scale – its mountainous terrain perfect for serious botanisers. One James McKay at the helm, our group of travellers included several day, some of us hired cars and drove into the mountains in search serious botanists, an ex-president of the RHS and a botanical waterof rare fritillaries, orchids and irises, pausing for a picnic lunch with colourist. The rest of us had simply come to learn and sightsee. a panoramic view of the eastern Aegean. The next day took us to After a flight to the Turkish town of Izmir, we spent three days the 1,000-metre-long Tunnel of Eupalinos – which was also used as travelling and sightseeing, commencing with a journey to the ruined an aqueduct – and the lonely ruins of the Temple of Hera, built on Graeco-Roman city of Ephesus. The city is famous for its monumental marshland amid drifts of wild gladioli. theatre, where the Ephesians heckled St Paul. Next we visited the The last port of call came after a night at sea. The rugged island of Chios Temple of Zeus in the ancient city of Euromos which, sensitively is known as the alleged birthplace of Homer and as a great fifteenthrestored, sits in a silvery cluster of olive trees. And finally, before century Genoese trading centre for gum mastic – the aromatic resin boarding our boat in Bodrum, we paid homage to the one-time existproduced by the Pistacia lentiscus tree. The medieval village of Pyrgi, ence of the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus – one of the Seven Wonders celebrated for its black and white graffito architecture – the process of of the Ancient World. scratching or engraving writing or imagery on a wall – was one stopping The Aegean Clipper awaiting us was well designed, with 12 twin or point; another was the exquisite Byzantine monastery of Nea Moni, double en suite cabins and a variety of decks for sunbathing and readformerly the wealthiest and best known monastery in the Aegean. ing. The attentive staff of six included an accomplished cook who With a final day to relax on Chios, my fellow travellers went their own plied us with grilled seaways: some continued food dishes, aromatic their pursuit of wildflowtagines, delicious salads ers and others relaxed on and sesame breads. Westminster Classic Tours (020-8785 3191; westminsterclassictours.com) the boat. It was a wrench Leaving Turkey for offers several cruises a year to Turkey and Greece. A similar trip costs to leave, a light swell carGreece, our first stop was from £2,495 per person for 12 nights, full board, excluding flights. Single rying us back to Turkey, the Dodecanese island of supplements are extra. Martyn Rix, accompanied by James McKay, is leading homeward bound 첸 a botanical tour in the Aegean and southern Turkey on October 18–22 2016.

PETER SOMMER TRAVELS

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The Aegean Clipper cruises past Greek islands in the Aegean Sea

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Ta k i ng the long ro ut e THE JOURNEY FROM CALGARY TO VANCOUVER ON CANADA’S WEST COAST IS A CLASSIC ROAD TRIP. DAVID NICHOLLS TAKES THE WHEEL TO REDISCOVER THE PROVINCE THAT HE GREW UP IN, BUT NEVER REALLY EXPLORED

CALGARY STAMPEDE; SHANE KUHN/INFOKUS DESIGN; BARRETT & MACKAY/GETTY IMAGES; ALL CANADA PHOTOS/ALAMY; JOHN ELK III/GETTY IMAGES; SHUTTERSTOCK

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Cowboys at the Calgary Stampede rodeo show. Emerald Lake in Yoho National Park, British Columbia. The vineyards of Nk’Mip Cellars. Hikers at Johnston Canyon. A view of Vancouver’s West End


TRAVEL | CANADA

t is day three of our road trip across British delivers exactly what its name promises – a strikingly Columbia and I’m struck by an unusual green, glacier-fed lake on the edge of which sits thought: we must stop endlessly com- a scattering of timber cabins. Their modest look menting on the extraordinary beauty. It’s belies a world-class hotel. Canoeing across the not that we have become inured to the lake’s mirrored surface as the sun dips behind the epic scale of the place, or the way each mountains is a truly memorable experience. twist and turn of the drive through the And then we begin our descent from the Rockies, Rocky Mountains reveals yet another dizzyingly gor- travelling south into a landscape where glaciergeous landscape. Rather, I notice the driving portions peaked mountains give way to sun-scorched hills. of our road trip – forgiving stints of no longer than two Down, down we drive, through the town of Revelstoke or three hours at a time – are largely conducted in to the vineyards and golf resorts of Kelowna, where silence, punctuated with occasional exclamations of the air is dry and temperatures climb. We pause for a wonder. Oh, the tedium of the awe-struck traveller. night on the edge of Okanagan Lake at the Sparkling Although I’ve lived in London for half my life, I’m Hill Resort, then continue further south to Osoyoos actually from this neck of the woods. The eight days which, like many places in the province, takes its on the road, starting in Calgary, are a pilgrimage to name from the languages of the local First Nations my hometown just outside Vancouver. At a touch people: Kelowna, for example, means ‘grizzly bear’; over 600 miles, it’s almost exactly the same distance Osoyoos, ‘meeting of the waters’. At over 40°C, it as John o’ Groats to Land’s End. is so hot that a dip in Osoyoos Lake fails to bring While I’d find it hard to recommend Calgary as the refreshment we hoped for; more effective is somewhere to linger, there are 10 days in July that the terrace of Nk’Mip Cellars, the country’s first prove an exception to the rule. This is when the aboriginal-owned winery, where cooling mist city hosts the Calgary Stampede, one of the largest machines and chilled Chardonnay do the trick. rodeos in North America, and take this as you will – From here it’s due west to Vancouver, the city one of Canada’s largest cultural events. We see real ranked as offering one of the best qualities of life in cowboys and plenty of pretend ones – easy to spot in the world. And Vancouverites certainly do love their their spanking new Stetsons (mine included). The city. I was almost embarrassed by the enthusiasm of atmosphere is as electric as the neon signs promis- my compatriots – whether it was the porter at the ing deep-fried Oreos and chocolate-dipped bacon. elegant Wedgewood Hotel or the cheese seller at The main attraction is, of course, the daily rodeo Granville Island Public Market, everyone shows an schedule: chuck-wagon races and bull riding seem infectious love of the place. With calm beaches curvdangerous and exhilarating; steer wrestling and calf ing along the edge of the city and the mountains a roping are at times uncomfortable viewing. mere hour’s drive away, I can hardly blame them. After 48 hours we set our sights west, get in our Vancouver is the ideal spot from which to enjoy SUV and leave the comforts of the Fairmont Palliser the lower mainland of British Columbia: venture to hotel for the open road. Before long, a serendipitous Vancouver Island, take a cruise up to Alaska, or cross wrong turn leads us to Johnston Canyon, where we the border to the United States. Should you do the enjoy ice cream and an hour-long amble along easy latter, you’ll pass through White Rock, the impossibly trails to its waterfall climax. We stop in Banff, up in the pretty seaside town where I grew up. This is where mountains, with its pretty chalet-style buildings – we head, straight to the beach dominated by the and buy thermals for the more arduous hike the enormous white boulder from which the town takes next day. The destination is its name. The rock features Field, our first stop in British in one of the legends of the banff Emerald Lake Columbia, where we spend local Semiahmoo people Calgary a day on a guided climb about White Rocks’ origins, exploring the fossil beds and involves love, prinKelowna of Mount Stephen – an cesses and sea gods. For vancouver white rock osoyoos 800-metre ascent through me, it’s a familiar tale from 500 million years of history. my childhood and, after seattle We spend two nights at eight days on the road, I united states Emerald Lake Lodge, which know I am home 첸 portland

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Canada

David Nicholls stayed at: Fairmont Palliser in Calgary (fairmont.com); Emerald Lake Lodge in Field (emeraldlakelodgehotelfield.com); Sparkling Hill Resort in Vernon (sparklinghill.com); Walnut Beach Resort in Osoyoos (walnutbeachresort.com); and Wedgewood Hotel in Vancouver (wedgewoodhotel.com). For car hire go to Avis (avis.ca), and for more information on British Columbia, visit destinationbc.ca.

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Schemes celebrating Seventies Palm Beach style

Sally Clarke’s delicious, seasonal dishes for summer

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TRAVEL | DESIGNER HAUNTS FROM FAR LEFT Steven Gambrel. The exterior of Jeffrey’s Grocery in the West Village. Art and objets on sale at The End of History. A plate from John Derian (below)

ask a local

AS TOLD TO EMILY TOBIN. NEW YORK EDITION PHOTOGRAPH: NIKOLAS KOENIG

SHOPPING Kimcherova (kimcherova.com) is a treasure trove for unique furnishings and lighting. Factor this in as a break from the art galleries when touring Chelsea’s art district. A little further south is P E Guerin (peguerin.com), where you must be sure to make an appointment. The store has been in Greenwich Village since 1892 and is packed with over a century’s worth of hardware. The End of History (theendofhistoryshop.blogspot.co.uk), on Hudson Street, is a minute store with a wonderful collection of the most stylish vintage objects – it’s a well-kept secret among interior designers. Three Lives & Company (threelives.com) is a West Village institution. Located on a quiet street corner, this bookshop has been around for decades. After a few minutes spent perusing its shelves, you’ll feel like a true local bohemian. A short cab ride to the East Village will bring you to three John Derian shops (johnderian.com), which, in my view, are some of the most charming shops in the city, full of curiosities and artful displays. Similarly eccentric is Olde Good Things (ogtstore.com) on East 16th Street, where there is a great mix of architectural salvage, furniture, mirrors and lighting. It also has three other shops in the city. If you are in that part of town, I would highly recommend the Merchant’s House Museum (merchantshouse.org). It is a mustsee for anyone interested in nineteenth-century New York and really helps one understand the evolution of commerce in this city. CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT Three Lives & Company bookshop is in the heart of Greenwich Village. The John Derian shops are famous for decoupage plates. Oysters and a Bloody Mary at Jeffrey’s Grocery. A room at The New York Edition. Textiles from John Derian

INTERIOR DESIGNER STEVEN GAMBREL SHARES HIS FAVOURITE PLACES TO SHOP, STAY AND ENJOY A BLOODY MARY IN THE CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS PHOTOGRAPHS BALL & ALBANESE

FOOD AND DRINK Buvette (buvette.com) is a charming café on a quiet residential street in the West Village. It is great for a delicious breakfast and coffee surrounded by creative, stylish people. Jeffrey’s Grocery (jeffreysgrocery. com) is only a couple of blocks away and is the perfect place to while away a Saturday afternoon with oysters and a Bloody Mary. Also in that neck of the woods is Sant Ambroeus (santambroeus.com), an Italian restaurant that is my go-to evening spot, with its buzzy European crowd and delicious food. I like to spend as much time as possible with my dog, Sailor, so she often comes with me for fireside drinks at the cosy lobby bar in The Marlton Hotel (marltonhotel.com).

ACCOMMODATION Once the tallest skyscraper in Manhattan, the Metropolitan Life Tower, a stone’s throw from Madison Square Park, reopened last year as The New York Edition (editionhotels.com) with Ian Schrager at the design helm. Its 273 rooms are smart and sophisticated and there’s a top-notch restaurant overseen by British chef Jason Atherton. Double rooms cost from £350 a night 첸 HOUSEANDGARDEN.CO.UK MAY 2016

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sto c k i sts Merchandise from these companies is featured editorially in this issue. Information is checked at the time of going to press, but House & Garden cannot guarantee that prices will not change or items will be in stock at the time of publication.

ESENSUAL LIVING 07599-860880; esensualliving.com FARROW & BALL 01202-876141; A–B farrow-ball.com ABBOTT & BOYD FERM LIVING 020-7351 9985; 00-45-7022 7523; abbottandboyd.co.uk fermliving.com ALTFIELD 020-7351 5893; altfield.com FINE CELL WORK 020-7931 9998; ARRAN ST EAST finecellwork.co.uk arranstreeteast.ie FIRED EARTH THE BASKET ROOM 01295-814396; 07853-158625; firedearth.com thebasketroom.com FLUX 0161-408 0260; C–D fluxstokeontrent.com CHRISTOPHER FOX LINTON FARR CLOTH 020-7368 7700; 020-7349 0888; foxlinton.com christopherfarrcloth.com FUTON COMPANY CLERKENWELL 0845-609 4455; LONDON futoncompany.co.uk 020-3826 1142; clerkenwell-london.com G–H THE COLD PRESS G F SMITH 01263-711145; 020-7394 4660; thecoldpress.com gfsmith.com COLE & SON G P & J BAKER 020-7376 4628; 01202-266700; cole-and-son.com COLEFAX AND FOWLER gpandjbaker.com 020-8874 6484; colefax.com GRANBY WORKSHOP granbyworkshop.co.uk THE CONRAN SHOP GUBI 0844-848 4000; 00-45-3332 6368; conranshop.co.uk gubi.com C P HART 0845-873 1121; I–J cphart.co.uk IKEA CRUCIAL TRADING 020-3645 0000; 01562-743747; ikea.com crucial-trading.com IRVING & MORRISON CUTLASERCUT 020-7384 2975; 020-3490 9886; irvingandmorrison.com cutlasercut.com THE JAPANESE SHOP DAVID MELLOR thejapaneseshop.co.uk 020-7730 4259; JAYSON HOME davidmellordesign.com jaysonhome.com DCW ÉDITIONS dcw-editions.fr K–L DESIGNERS GUILD KIRSTEN 020-7893 7760; HECKTERMANN designersguild.com 07887-680672; kirstenhecktermann.com E–F LABORATORIO ELITIS PARAVICINI 00-05-61 80 20 20; 00-39-02 7202 1006; elitis.fr paravicini.it EMMA BRIDGEWATER LARUSI 01782-407733; 020-7428 0256; larusi.com emmabridgewater.co.uk 1882 020-3002 8023; 1882ltd.com

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Embroidered linen cushions, from left: ‘Knightling’, ‘Fullerton’, 45cm square, £40 each, both from Sloane Collection


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East London loft apartment, on sale through Savills Shoreditch; guide price ÂŁ1.75 million

Facing the headwinds *HWWLQJ DGYLFH ZKHQ EX\LQJ SURSHUWLHV LQ GLIIHUHQW ORFDWLRQV FDQ JLYH \RX WKH DGYDQWDJH LQ WRGD\¡V FKDQJLQJ PDUNHW UHSRUWV 5RVHPDU\ %URRNH For many, owning a country retreat and a home in the city is the ideal. Also high on the agenda is the ability to purchase a buy-to-let property as a safe haven for cash and as forward planning for children. But the recent increases to stamp duty on second properties have made this more traditional investment route appear fraught with problems and expense. Added to this is the spectre of an upwards shift in interest rates and an imminent referendum on Europe. But it does not have to be all doom and gloom. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This change in stamp duty will undoubtedly have an impact but, by empowering those with a real need to buy over more discretionary buy-to-let investors, it should give some much-needed balance to a market that has become increasingly polarised,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says James Watts, a buying agent at one of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest buying agencies, Prime Purchase. While this could be an unexpected positive, what it does mean is that having the best advice to make the right purchase is ever more salient. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to be the experts, but also the voice of reason,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says Lindsey Webb, a buying agent in the London office. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to make an emotional decision when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a new home, but we

offer objective advice, based on years of experience in our respective markets.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Engaging a buying agent can be a vital tool in levelling the playing field between buyer and seller, but where Prime Purchase excels is having a team that can move seamlessly between the various nuances of a family search. With teams in London and the country, they offer a wide geographic coverage and knowledge base â&#x20AC;&#x201C; taking in everything from the estate with shoot, the commuter-belt home and chocolate-box cottage, to the investment flat in an up-and-coming area or the perfect pied-Ă -terre next to the best restaurants. They work together with clients over months and even years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially as a familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs grow and change â&#x20AC;&#x201C; always working to ensure that the investment is as sound as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The ability to move fluidly between markets has become a common need for our clients,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says James Shaw, who is based in the Chilterns. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In an industry that depends so much on trust, our capacity to offer good advice and to seek best in class across different parts of the country means we can effectively provide a service for life.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; For further information call 020 7881 2388 or visit www.prime-purchase.com

For sale through Savills Henley; guide price ÂŁ5.25 million

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW Prime Purchaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lindsey Webb, James Shaw and James Watts. ABOVE Yewden Lodge, Hambledon


LONDON

On your doorstep... Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grab brunch Live close to our favourite brunch locations

The wishlist Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most sought after properties

We speak to Pam White Knight Frank Moving Services

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Welcome to LONDON VIEW Cosmopolitan and cultured, historic and contemporary, London offers endless variety and is always changing. Much the same can also be said about the Capitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascinating and evolving property market.

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Prime Central London, which in recent years has had strong price growth, has seen only small rises and even some small falls in the year end to January 2016. Meanwhile newly fashionable areas in the east of the Capital, such as the City & City Fringe and Islington have enjoyed stronger growth at 7.5% and 7.7% respectively, though this is less than recent years. The volatile nature of global financial markets so far this year, has given some buyers pause for thought, yet there has also been evidence of added impetus from buyers looking to buy ahead of the stamp duty changes this April. Similarly, rental growth has levelled off with moderate 1% to 2%increases in the year end to January 2016, as more tenants let for longer or relocate outside the capital. Longer term however, rental demand is robust as the number of households renting in the private sector in London has doubled over the last ten years. In the new development arena, new apartments and homes offering a high standard of amenities, including concierge services and gyms, are always popular and Knight Frank has both sales and lettings offices in key developments such as One Tower Bridge, Goodman’s Fields and The Plimsoll Building in King’s Cross. Overall, the picture for the year ahead is one of stability with small but steady increases, as the capital’s property market changes. Just like London, in fact. With Spring upon us, it’s fitting that this issue looks at an assortment of superb roof terraces and popular local weekend eateries within the Capital. We also introduce you to our newly developed, all-encompassing Moving Services and showcase a selection of our finest properties. Noel Flint, Partner, Head of London Sales Tim Hyatt, Partner, Head of London Lettings

Contents 04

On top of the world Exclusive roof terraces

06

The wishlist

08

On your doorstep…

London’s most sought after properties

Let’s grab brunch

10

We speak to Pam White Knight Frank Moving Services

Advertisement Feature | 3


On top of the world Hidden away from inquisitive eyes, London’s roof terraces are a secret world where the lucky few can soak up the views and the sunshine at their leisure.

In a city as densely populated as ours, they’re the perfect space to relax and entertain – and with the summer not too far away, a private terrace is also a selling feature that’s really coming into its own. When the fickle English London weather allows, the roof terrace adds another room to your home – one where you can fire up a barbecue for the family, throw a party or simply enjoy a sundowner after a long day at the office. Like the homes they’re perched atop, many terraces are wired for sound and boast sophisticated mood lighting. Add some planting and even a patch of grass if you have the space – the synthetic version is now a dead ringer for the real thing – and

1

you have yourself a fully-fledged roof garden. If the square footage stretches to it, you can also consider additions such as an outdoor kitchen and well-stocked bar, making the terrace feel like an extension of the home. For those who don’t mind sharing, London’s modern developments often give residents access to a luxuriously appointed communal roof terrace. Reaching ever higher, they provide some of the best panoramas to be had anywhere in the Capital. River views are particularly prized, along with terraces that look out onto the royal parks. But any kind of outlook is a wonderful thing – even if your vista is a sea of rooftops, it’s still an uplifting sight and one that’s quintessentially London.

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“When the English weather allows, the roof terrace adds another room to your home”

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4

St Marks Place

Cadogan Place

Eyot House

Kidderpore Avenue

Guide price: £925 per week Knight Frank Notting Hill, lettings +44 20 3463 0320

Guide price: £4,350,000 Knight Frank Knightsbridge, sales +44 20 3463 0234

Guide price: £795 per week Knight Frank Tower Bridge, lettings +44 20 3328 6540

Guide price: £2,000,000 Knight Frank Hampstead, sales +44 20 3463 0127

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LE T TINGS

CASHMERE HOUSE | Guide price: £800 per week

MOTCOMB STREET | Guide price: £650 per week 2

Knight Frank Aldgate, +44 20 8022 4035

Knight Frank Belgravia, +44 20 3463 0242

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wishlist

KING’S ROAD | Guide price: £895 per week

NARBONNE AVENUE | Guide price: £825 per week Knight Frank Clapham, +44 20 3463 0077

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2

MONTEVETRO | Guide price: £645 per week

SALUSBURY ROAD | Guide price: £650 per week Knight Frank Queen’s Park +44 20 3463 0048

Knight Frank Knightsbridge, +44 20 3463 0235

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Knight Frank Riverside, +44 20 3463 0062

2


SALE S

GLOUCESTER MEWS WEST | Guide price: £2,800,000

CRESCENT PLACE | Guide price: £4,950,000 4

Knight Frank Hyde Park, +44 20 3463 0240

Knight Frank Knightsbridge, +44 20 3463 0234

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“A hand-picked selection of beautiful properties available this Spring for sale and to let across the Capital”

CARRINGTON HOUSE | Guide price: £1,450,000 Knight Frank Mayfair +44 20 3463 0229

ELGIN AVENUE | Guide price: £1,300,000 1

TOWER BRIDGE WHARF | Guide price: £1,250,000 Knight Frank Wapping +44 20 3463 0226

Knight Frank St John’s Wood +44 20 3463 0233

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RIDGWAY GARDENS | Guide price: £7,250,000 1

Knight Frank Wimbledon +44 20 3463 0355

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On your doorstep... let’s grab brunch!

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GREEN STREET | Guide price: £775 per week Knight Frank Mayfair, lettings +44 20 3463 0230

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NAC 41 North Audley Street Mayfair W1K 6ZP

Mews of Mayfair 10 Lancashire Ct Mayfair W1S 1EY

This stunning bistro in the heart of Mayfair offers French sharing plates against a relaxed setting of whitewashed brick walls, banquette style seating and contemporary lighting. Indulge in the ultimate breakfast sandwich English muffin or for those who have a sweet tooth, the honey chocolate French Toast.

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Subtly tucked away down a mews close to Bond Street, the Sunday Roast and Toast menu offers bottomless Bloody Mary’s, Bellini’s and Mimosa’s paired with modern and delightful dishes in a chic and timeless setting.

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“One of the benefits of living in London is that, whichever postcode you call home, you’ll almost certainly have a generous helping of fantastic brunch spots right around the corner”

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DEERBROOK ROAD | Guide price: £1,250,000 2

Knight Frank Dulwich Village, sales +44 20 8022 4036

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Le Chandelier 161 Lordship Lane East Dulwich SE22 8HX

Great Exhibition 193 Crystal Palace Road East Dulwich SE22 9EP

Inspired by vintage salons, this Tea House café, boasts its very own Tea Master with a range of 34 teas to choose from. Paired with ‘eggs all day’ or their beautiful pastries, it’s a perfect brunch spot for tea enthusiasts.

Sundays from 11am, this cosy East Dulwich pub offers unlimited Mimosa’s or Bloody Mary’s to a grateful local crowd. The brunch menu is hearty and traditional, spanning everything from the full English to Eggs Benedict and Scotch pancakes.

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Moving in style The thought of moving house can be a daunting and time-consuming experience, but Pam White can help take all the worries and hassle away.

Knight Frank’s bespoke Moving Services can undertake all the time consuming administration involved in changing home. “It is someone to walk you through every step of the process”, says Pam White who runs the facility. No task is too small or too large. The organisational support can vary from sourcing removal firms, to sending out change of address notifications, to arranging for a precious chandelier to be taken down. “Clients may just ask me to spend a day assisting with their moving-related admin or they might ask me to organise the entire move for them”, says Pam. “If you haven’t been in your loft for thirty years and you have to move, it can feel very overwhelming”, she says.

Flexibility is the backbone of the charged-out service. Pam or one of her consultants visits clients at their convenience, even if that is in the evening or at work. Nor do clients have to give up precious time to be present during the upheaval. Time-poor professionals or in fact anyone wanting a more stress-free and easier home transition will find the service invaluable. “I can take away all the lengthy jobs and the anxiety, which people find very supportive, both practically and emotionally”, says Pam. Further support is also available after a move, with unpacking or sourcing builders, architects or interior designers as Pam has “a black book bulging with contacts”. Moving Services is currently across Knight Frank’s south-west London offices with plans to roll out across the Capital. PAM WHITE Knight Frank Moving Services +44 20 8022 6171 pam.white@knightfrank.com

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clients may just ask me to spend a day assisting with their moving-related admin or they might ask me to organise the entire move for themâ&#x20AC;?

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KnightFrank.com/londonview +44 20 8022 6171

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Advertisement Feature | 12


T H E

ridge S U N N I N G D A L E

SHOW APARTMENT NOW OPEN 1 0 L U X U R I O U S M A N S I O N A PA R T M E N T S Every element, every angle, each proportion has been

• Concierge service

carefully created to make this a home of timeless elegance;

• Secure basement parking

one that is light and tranquil, calm and comfortable

• Luxury specification

- a home that is as impressive as it is intimate.

• From award winning developerHalebourne Group

R I D G E M O U N T

R O A D

S U N N I N G D A L E

VIEWING BY APPOINTMENT - PLEASE CONTACT apearson@savills.com 01344 295375 savills.com

rw@bartonwyatt.co.uk 01344 843000 bartonwyatt.co.uk

www.halebournegroup.co.uk


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Wilkinson Eyreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design for Gasholders is a feat of engineering

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THE DOS AND DON’TS OF DECORATING, ACCORDING TO

Douglas Mackie The interior designer established his practice in 1995 and is known for skilfully integrating artwork and furniture in his schemes. He also has his own furniture collection Lampshades should be dense, with the light mainly cast downwards. When choosing a lampshade, try drawing the shape of it on paper with the lamp base before buying it or, if in doubt, buy a cheap paper shade that is the same size first to check the scale. • Rugs in a contemporary setting should be seen and not heard – art should be on the walls, not the floor. Use subtle textured wools, Moroccan berbers or coarse woven sisals. The French company La Manufacture Cogolin makes wonderful wool carpets and Christopher Farr has subtle wool weaves (1). • The greatest tool at your disposal is colour. Enjoy it, experiment with it and do not just stick to pale shades. There is nothing more wonderful than entertaining in a deep-blood-red library with glazed walls (2). • Even in a dimly lit room, there should always be a good light to read by. The ‘Chantecaille’ floor lamp by Christian Liaigre is the best on the market (3). • Keep curtains simple. I love to use wool cloth; it drapes perfectly and bizarrely costs less than linen. If budgets are tight, you do not have to line it. A W Hainsworth has a good range. • Always check the scale of the seating when choosing furniture. Even a rough sketch, with the relative sizes and heights of the chairs and sofas, can save costly and ugly errors. (4) • Have fun with flowers. Armfuls of foliage are inexpensive but add impact. • Art should be the focal point of any room. Consider using mounted antique textiles, screens or lithographs instead of paintings. Good art can cost a fortune, but there are wonderful textiles that can create extraordinary impact in a room for a few hundred pounds (5 and 6). • Don’t be afraid of a bit of ‘bad taste’. Many rooms are strangled by trying to be too tasteful for their own good. Be bold, buy what you love and do not worry about what the neighbours will think. Idiosyncrasies and juxtapositions bring rooms alive. dmackiedesign.com 첸

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1 Wool and silk carpet, ‘Senneh’, £1,000 a metre, from Christopher Farr. 2 Richly coloured glazed wallpaper in Douglas’s study. 3 ‘Chantecaille’ floor lamp, £2,460, from Christian Liaigre. 4 A project drawing by Douglas. 5 A Sixties Japanese screen in a house in Holland Park. 6 A Lowry painting is a focal point in this room designed by Douglas

AS TOLD TO EMILY TOBIN. PHOTOGRAPHS: LUC BOEGLY; SIMON UPTON/THE INTERIOR ARCHIVE; STEPHAN JULLIARD; GARY HAMILL

There is nothing more wonderful than entertaining in a deep-blood-red library with glazed walls

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Please turn the page to view Supplement


S R I L A N K A | L O N D O N | D O M I N I C A N R E P U B L I C | C H I L E | N E W Y O R K | P U G L I A | K E N YA

A guide to the most BEAUTIFULLY DE SIGNED HOTEL S in the world


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f there is one thing that I have learned in the decade or so of editing Hotels by Design, it is this: good design is more than skin deep. All too often hotels fall into the trap of style over substance, concentrating superficially on the cosmetic aspects of design at the expense of the bare bones. Good hotel design is not simply about what looks nice – the fabrics, furniture, materials and light fittings – but rather about mundane things like function, practicality and build quality. What’s the point of having a beautiful bed sumptuously dressed if the bedside lights aren’t bright enough to read by? Why have a desk without a plug socket for a computer or mobile phone? Why have a state-of-the-art shower if it floods the bathroom and you have to use all the spare towels to mop the floor? Why design a cupboard where the hanging rail is so low down you can’t hang a dress or a suit and why would you ever put an air conditioner directly above a bed? Believe me, I have encountered all such problems and some with annoying regularity. But then what joy when a hotel gets it right and all those tricky components come brilliantly and faultlessly together. You feel happy, you feel inspired, you feel comfortable, cosseted and content. You feel like you want to live in a hotel forever and ever. This year’s Hotels by Design aims to make you feel just like that.

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Contributors News Pamela Goodman reveals what’s happening in hotel design Breaking new ground Miami, Puglia and Rajasthan have been given new life by visionary hoteliers. By Kate Patrick Objects of desire Laura Houldsworth selects details from the most stylish hotels that you can buy to recreate the look at home View from the top The rise of rooftop hotel bars and restaurants proves that the only way is up. By Emma Love Trading places Martin Brudnizki’s talent for creating interesting, welcoming interiors has led to prestigious design projects in the UK and overseas. Here he talks about the secrets of his success At a glance What in the world is going on with hotels? Soul sanctuary Away from Sri Lanka’s bustling south coast, Tri hotel is an oasis of calm and wellness. By Pamela Goodman Cabinet of curiosities Based around the roguish character of its fictional owner, The Zetter Townhouse in Marylebone combines playful eccentricity with a great sense of style. By Rose Dahlsen From plot to plate Clare Foster visits The Pig near Bath, where there is a productive kitchen garden and a waste-nothing ethos Oh so Soho A look at the history of Soho House, which in two decades has grown into a worldwide empire. By Alice B-B Beauty and the beach On the north coast of the Dominican Republic, a new boutique hotel offers the best of the country’s azure waters and tropical jungle in a remote setting. By Lucie Young Making a statement Four hotels that will take you to another world Design inspiration Captivating images from hotels around the world of striking staircases, tents, beds and pools Q & A Interior designer Tara Bernerd on her style formula, current hotel projects and dream commissions THE ISLAND SETTING OF TRI HOTEL, SRI LANKA, PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOSHUA MONAGHAN

Pamela Goodman, Travel Editor

Editor Hatta Byng | Supplement Editor Pamela Goodman | Art Director Jennifer Lister | Deputy Art Director Joshua Monaghan | Picture Editor Owen Gale | Sub-editors Bethan Hill, Arta Ghanbari Publishing Director Kate Slesinger | Associate Publisher Lucy Walford | Advertisement Manager Emma Hiley | Senior Account Managers Emily Elliott, Francesca Londoño-Brasington | Sales Executive Marina Connolly | Regional Office – Sales Director Karen Allgood | Head of Bespoke Zoë Levey | Art Director, Bespoke Petra Manley-Leach | Special Projects Editor Kate Crockett | Acting Special Projects Editor Lydia Bell | Projects Manager Louisa Parker Bowles | Acting Projects Manager Natasha Long | Copyright © 2016 The Condé Nast Publications Ltd, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Colour origination by Tag: Response. Printed in the UK by Wyndeham Group. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly forbidden. Not for resale | Cover photograph Ngoc Minh Ngo

House & Garden | May 2016


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contributors NEW EDITIONS VOGUE ON DESIGNERS

RUSSELL SAGE DESIGNER Fashion and interiors are passions that have remained with Russell Sage from a young age. After completing a BA in fashion at Central Saint Martins, he ran an interiors business in the West Country for four years, before making the move to Mulberry’s design team. From there on, he landed a gig doing up the interior of an LVMH business, followed by projects for Gordon Ramsay and The Goring Hotel. ‘I fell in love with interiors again and fully committed myself to it.’ Twelve years on, he has been behind the most prestigious restaurants, hotels and members’ clubs in the UK and abroad, including The Zetter Townhouse, featured from page 52.

AVAILABLE NOW EMMA LOVE WRITER

As an aspiring writer, Emma Love got her foot in the door while doing work experience at Vogue magazine, before going solo as a freelance writer eight years ago. She has been published in the likes of The Daily Telegraph and The Guardian, with a focus on design and travel. The latter has sent her to enviable destinations and equally desirable hotels to inspect. One reoccurring flaw? ‘It’s annoying when the lights and gadgets in hotel rooms are so complicated that you can’t work them.’ She set her sights high to discover the best hotel rooftops, from page 27.

JAMES WATERWORTH DESIGN DIRECTOR

LUCIE YOUNG WRITER

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‘I love writing about creative people, whether they are artists, designers, students or Oscar winners,’ Lucie says. And she has been doing just that for this magazine and the likes of The New York Times and Elle Decoration. Her breakthrough moment came when she discovered New York and, having fallen deeply in love with its ‘crazy energy’, she made the move from the UK in the Nineties with a single suitcase and zero prospects. Luckily, it has worked out well. Here, she uncovers the creativity behind a boutique hotel in the Dominican Republic, from page 64 첸

House & Garden | May 2016

PHOTOGRAPH: (WATERWORTH) JOSHUA MONAGHAN. WORDS BY ARTA GHANBARI

‘My sister used to work for Condé Nast and would send The World of Interiors and House & Garden to my school, which inspired me to pursue design,’ James says. This preliminary interest was followed by a course at KLC, which led to an opportunity with designer Martin Brudnizki (who features in ‘Trading places’, from page 35). Within about a year, James’s careerchanging moment came: ‘I was asked to set up Martin’s US arm in New York’, and thus came his first encounter with members’ club group Soho House, where he is now European design director. Read the Soho story from page 60.


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Shop CollectionM, the retail arm of budget hotel chain CitizenM, will open within its new Tower Hill hotel this summer, selling books, travel essentials, art, prints and decorative accessories. citizenm.com

DESIGNER NEWS

Hotels bydesign

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NEWS PA M E L A G O O D M A N R EV E A L S W H AT IS HAPPENING IN HOTEL DESIGN

Thomas Heatherwick has reimagined Cape Town’s Grain Silo Complex at the V&A Waterfront, which will house the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa and a 28-room hotel with a rooftop swimming pool. heatherwick.com waterfront.co.za

OPEN FOR BUSINE SS

MARK HARRISON; RICHARD BOOTH; SEBASTIAN POSINGIS

Martin Hulbert has set to work on a rolling transformation of the interiors at country-house hotel Grove of Narberth in Pembrokeshire. martinhulbertdesign. com | thegrovenarberth.co.uk

The ski season may be drawing to a close, but there’s always next season to try out this year’s new beginnings. First up is WHITE 1921 (white1921.com) in Courchevel 1850, from the less expensive offshoot of LVMH’s Cheval Blanc brand. The 26

simple and stylish rooms start at €290 a night B&B. Then there’s TERMINAL NEIGE TOTEM (terminal-neige.com), pictured above, in Flaine, from the Sibuet family. The building is no beauty (think Sixties Brutalism) but the interiors

TIME FOR TEA Ceylon Tea Trails almost single-handedly put Sri Lanka’s exquisite tea country on the tourist map when it began converting four former plantation owners’ bungalows into small hotels back in 2005. Now four has become five with the launch of the DUNKELD BUNGALOW, spectacularly positioned some 300 metres above Castlereagh lake, with panoramic views of undulating, tea-covered hillsides and the expansive, island-studded lake itself. The four-bedroom hotel, which also includes the separate one-bedroom Owner’s Cottage, pictured right, is characterised by its green corrugated roof and wrap-around veranda, and has immaculate landscaped gardens dominated by two vast, orange-flowered African tulip trees. Interiors hark back to days of old – shiny wooden floors, wicker furnishings, four-poster beds, free-standing baths, lazy ceiling fans and open fires. Then there are drinks trolleys, Scrabble, snooker, Marmite, tea cosies, fine bone china, cucumber sandwiches and lashings of tea. It is genteel, old-fashioned, otherworldly and utter bliss. Rooms start at $720 a night – minimum two-night stay – on a full-board basis (teatrails.com). For a wider Sri Lankan itinerary, try Audley Travel (01993-838000; audleytravel.com) 컄 House & Garden | May 2016

display an ethnic, industrial chic. From €150 a night B&B. In Crans-Montana, CHETZERON (chetzeron.ch) is a high-altitude former gondola station with 16 rooms, a three-tier terrace and panoramic views. Rooms start at CHF300 a night B&B.


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Hotels bydesign DESIGNER NEWS

André Fu, the Hong Kong-based architect and designer, is involved with the creation of Villa La Coste on the Château La Coste estate – a futuristic Provençal winery that celebrates food, design, art and architecture. afso.net chateau-la-coste.com

PEOPLE IN GLASS HOUSE S com), pictured above, with a glistening prismatic glass façade and interiors dripping with crystal chandeliers. In France’s Alsace region, VILLA RENE LALIQUE (villarenelalique. com), the Twenties house where Lalique and his family stayed

when visiting their factory, has opened its doors as a six-bedroom hotel with superlative restaurant. Central to the concept is the wine cellar, where 20,000 bottles are concealed behind 14 crystal panels, designed by Lalique in collaboration with Damien Hirst.

ATTENTION TO DETAIL My notebook was out ready to record those important details – the perfect South Kensington location, the 126 rooms all individually decorated, the contemporary art, the fine Town House restaurant and bar – when I found myself instead reaching for my phone to take photographs of the bookcases, the sofas, the colour of the walls… In the true spirit of this supplement, THE KENSINGTON HOTEL fulfilled all the criteria of a place of design inspiration; a home from home that, quite literally, fuelled my imagination with what could be achieved should I finally let the builders through my front door. The hotel was brimful of contented guests and there was barely a free table in the bar or at breakfast. This is a beautifully refurbished gem of a hotel, right up there with the best of London’s addresses. Double rooms start at £200 a night, room only (020-7589 6300; doylecollection.com/kensington)

Michaelis Boyd is behind the interiors at The Williamsburg Hotel, Brooklyn, which opens in July. michaelisboyd.com | thewilliamsburghotel.com

Canadian design duo Yabu Pushelberg are hard at work at the new Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown, incorporated within an 82-storey tower. yabupushelberg.com fourseasons.com

Situated in rural south-eastern Mallorca, CAL REIET is a holistic retreat with 15 bedrooms and suites set in lush Mediterranean gardens. These have been reimagined by British designer Graham Lloyd-Brunt and are a feast for the senses, with courtyards and terraces surrounded by scented oleander, bougainvillea and rosemary, and orchards of olives, figs and pomegranates. Rooms start at €275 a night. calreiet.com 컄 House & Garden | May 2016

ED REEVE; ERIC LAIGNEL; SIMON BROWN; THOMAS WHITESIDE

Following the many famous fashion houses that have turned their hands to hotel design, two of the biggest names in crystal have made the leap. Bang opposite MoMA in Manhattan is the BACCARAT HOTEL & RESIDENCES (baccarathotels.


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Hotels bydesign

A B OX O F T R I C K S

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ert & May, which is currently best known as a purveyor of encaustic tiles, launched a new arm to the business in 2015: Bert & May Spaces. It comprises two elements: Bert’s Barges and Bert’s Boxes. The first consists, at present, of Lyris, a one-bedroom floating barge hotel moored on a quiet stretch of Regent’s Canal in Hackney. The second is a very clever reinvention of the prefabricated living space. At Decorex 2015, the first of Bert’s Boxes was snapped up

by the foodie bolt-hole group The Pig. It has since been positioned in its Brockenhurst grounds and furnished in keeping with the rest of the hotel to provide a beautiful stand-alone, eco-friendly bedroom, bathroom and sitting room (both pictures below). Bert’s Boxes come in four sizes (‘Teeny’, ‘Little’, ‘One-bedroom Big’ and ‘Two-bedroom Big’) and two functions (‘Wash Box’ bathrooms and ‘Sleep Box’ bedrooms) and are the template for what Bert & May’s founder and creative director Lee Thornley says he hopes

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will become an empire built on small-space living. Lee’s other dream is to expand Bert’s Barges, either with additional hotel barges added to the existing site, or floating versions of Bert’s Boxes. He also wants to create a small rural Bert’s Box hotel in the same prefabricated mould, which he describes as a sort of ‘Soho Farmhouse meets Center Parcs hybrid’. Bert & May Spaces: 020-3744 0766; bertandmayspaces.com. One night in Bert’s Box at The Pig in Brockenhurst (thepighotel.com) costs from £395 a night, room only

SIX OF THE BEST WEBSITES FOR RESEARCHING AND BOOKING HOTELS i-escape.com A hand-picked selection of hotels, B&Bs and villas, each individually reviewed. Chicretreats.com A collection of hidden gems and boltholes around the world. Become a member to get special rates. Mrandmrssmith.com Extremely userfriendly website with good category divisions, useful reviews and photographs. Designhotels.com A global selection of up-to-the-minute, contemporary hotels for serious design addicts. Tablethotels.com Clean, comprehensive website of vigorously vetted hotels, with plenty of perks.

GOT CABIN FEVER? ONE MORE TO TRY...

Dorisanddicky.com The best for budget boutique hotels, which cost no more than about £100 a night 첸

THE BOTHY PROJECT in the Scottish Highlands was constructed as part of an initiative, also called The Bothy Project (thebothyproject. org), to establish artists’ studios in isolated locations. It sleeps two and comes with a woodburning stove and outdoor shower. It is available for rent April–September through canopy andstars.co.uk. From £85 a night

House & Garden | May 2016

JOHNNY BARRINGTON

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Shop Beautiful Marrakech hotel El Fenn has a new concept store with a curated selection of fashion and accessories, as well as products from local designers. It also includes a bar and restaurant. el-fenn.com


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House & Garden | May 2016

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Hotels bydesign

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rgentine entrepreneur Alan Faena and his business partner Len Blavatnik, who had previously developed the docklands in Buenos Aires to become one of the most valuable stretches of real estate in the city, turned their sights to Miami three years ago. Their ambitious $1 billion project will turn six oceanside blocks into a cultural capital with luxurious knobs on. Miami has responded warmly to the initiative and officially named the strip Faena District – the second such designation in the city’s history. Alan and Len went large and colourful with their concept. First to open was Faena Hotel Miami Beach, formerly the historic Saxony Hotel, with interiors by film director Baz Luhrmann and his wife, the Oscar-winning costumier Catherine Martin. Then there’s Faena House, an A room at Faena Hotel Miami Beach 18-storey condo by Foster + Partners, with a penthouse that sold for $60 million; Faena Forum and Faena Bazaar, cultural instibathrooms, and a cathedral of an entrance hall with a view tute and retail experience respectively, by Rem Koolhaas; through the back glass wall to the sea and eight enormous Faena Versailles, two residential towers by Brandon murals by Argentine artist Juan Gatti. Alan has likened Haw and William Sofield; and finally, Casa Claridge’s, the space to the Sistine Chapel, saying it will show people a beachside guest house. in 100 years how life was lived in Miami today. The hotel It’s fitting that Miami, with its strong Hispanic bent, comes with an opera-house-style theatre that puts on should empathise with ideas from the South – especially live cabaret, a super-luxury spa with South Americanwhen South American notions of hospitality dovetail with inspired treatments, and a roster of award-winning chefs, Miami-American concepts on luxury and art. It’s also an including Argentine Francis Mallmann, who will preside inspiring and ambitious piece of holistic – and expensive over the restaurant, Los Fuegos. Hola, Miami! 컄 – community planning, encompassing new buildings and revitalised historic properties. For the 169-room hotel, Alan, Baz and From left: The exterior of Casa Claridge’s. Spacious Catherine have created a look that conjures bathrooms in Faena Hotel come with ocean views up the glamour of Fifties Miami Beach – artdeco details, gold-leaf ceilings, hardwood floors, sumptuous red velvet, cool blue-tiled

House & Garden | May 2016


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Hotels bydesign

F cus n... R A JA S T H A N

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omewhere between the grand former palaces reinvented as five-star accommodation and the few-frills, family-run guest houses in havelistyle buildings, two new kids on the block are changing the dynamic in the state of Rajasthan. Opened in October 2015, away from the hectic urban triangle of Jaipur, Jodhpur and Udaipur, both newly built hotels take hospitality within chic, beautifully designed boutique settings to a new level for the area. As a tantalising bonus, they’re located just three hours apart, so you can combine them in one trip. Equidistant from the main cities, Dev Shree at Deogarh is the creation of Shatrunjai and Bhavna, who may be remembered for their warm hospitality at their previous property, Deogarh Mahal. In a tranquil lakeside setting full of colourful bird life, Dev Shree looks like a miniature,

The traditional haveli-style architecture of Dev Shree features deep verandas from which to take in the natural surroundings saffron-coloured palace, with carved stone pillars, marble floors and spacious verandas crafted over two years by locals, in traditional style. But it feels like a home: seven spacious rooms fanning out from a pretty central courtyard, each one furnished by its owners. On the roof terrace or the lawns, there’s yoga at dawn and sundowners at dusk; food is light and authentic, using fresh produce from the gardens and the family dairy next door, and you can eat informally, al fresco, in private or with the family. Just 15 minutes outside Udaipur, in the fresh air of the Aravalli hills with views over Udaipur’s palaces, Bujera Fort has been six years in the making. Choosing to build a boutique hotel in the style of a traditional fortress gave its British owners Trish McFarlane and interior designer Richard Hanlon the scope and scale to be as joyously creative as they liked. Fourteen spacious, artfully decorated rooms are divided between the Fort, the House and the Bungalow, focused around a courtyard pool and peaceful Mughal gardens. Windows and doors are made from salvaged timber, adding to the sense that the dusty pink buildings and cloisters have been there forever. Despite the name, Bujera Fort could not be less military: luxuriously comfortable and run like a private house, it has unobtrusive service, home-cooked Indian and European food and an ox cart to take you exploring in the village. Greaves Travel (020-7487 9111; greavesindia.com) offers bespoke holidays throughout India 컄

From left: The interior of Bujera Fort is decorated with an eclectic mix of antiques and artwork sourced from around the world by its British owners. In the courtyard, a heated pool takes centre stage

House & Garden | May 2016


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Hotels bydesign

F cus n... PUGLIA

From left: The hallway of La Fiermontina is dotted with sitting areas. High, curved stone ceilings add drama in rooms

House & Garden | May 2016

MARIA TERESA FURNARI/FRANCESCA SIMONE

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building as a wreck, and has been turning up noble uglia – the heel of Italy you might overlook in frescoes and artefacts ever since restoration began. your headlong rush to the Lakes or Tuscany A deeply peaceful country retreat surrounded by citrus – is having a moment. Doldrums languishing and olive groves, Trapanà has just nine stylish suites, since the bad-building days of the Seventies, individually designed by Australian Freya Salter, who Puglia has now attracted a handful of visionmakes the masseria’s rustic authenticity luxurious, and ary hoteliers who want to create beautiful places there. brings a breath of fresh air and informality, including Not surprisingly, one of the new hotels is in lovely Lecce, outdoor Balinese-style bathrooms loved by the owner. which anchors the Salento region – its extravagant duomo Guests can lose (or find) themselves among pomegrandwarfing a picturesque centro storico full of architectural ate, cherry and walnut trees in the six secret gardens, treasures, delicious food and wine, and an authentic or by the oversize pool or in the tiny spa. Alternatively, southern welcome. La Fiermontina, opened in June 2015, you can wander into the kitchens for a lesson in cucina has been a 10-year labour of love for Giacomo Fiermonte, povera (peasant cooking), which shows what can be done a Parisian art collector and entrepreneur. His Puglian with simple, local ingredients. There’s access to both the grandmother and her brother, Enzo Fiermonte, a boxer Adriatic and Ionian coastlines for lunch in a beach club turned Hollywood actor who married Lady Astor in the – but once enfolded by Trapanà, it would be hard to Thirties, were his inspiration. imagine wanting to be anywhere else 첸 The boutique hotel is set in a restored seventeenthcentury house in the centro storico, a relaxed refuge of just 16 rooms with curved, vaulted ceilings, pietra di Trani stone floors and tactile Italian furnishings – although Giacomo used a French design firm, Charles-Philippe and Christophe, to achieve the effortlessly chic interiors. He also incorporated his own art nouveau and contemporary furniture, sculpture and art, including pieces by Le Corbusier and Fernand Léger. With a pool, gardens and the promise of gentle yoga and wine tasting, La Fiermontina is styled as an ‘urban resort’, ideally located for exploring. Even closer to the soul of Puglia, just 10 minutes from Lecce, is Masseria Trapanà, This picture: One of the nine suites also the result of a vision – that of Rob at Masseria Trapanà. Right: Its walled Potter-Sanders, a charismatic Australian pool is surrounded by olive groves who bought the sixteenth-century farm


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B R O A D WAY B E L L E A MASTERFUL REFIT FOR T H E C H AT WA L I N N EW YOR K E VO K E S T H E ROMANCE OF Y E S T E RY E A R’ S T R AV E L A N D THE TIMELESS CHIC OF NEW YOR K E M P I R E ART DECO

Stanford White-designed Manhattan institution at the heart of the Theatre District has been reimagined by architect Thierry Despont. It is now The Chatwal, a 76 room-and-suite hotel – the vision of hotelier Sant Chatwal – and joins the Luxury Collection. The redesign has maintained the original facade, and places heritage at its heart, also infusing the new hotel with a contemporary glamour. It is the first hotel for Despont, who made his mark with the Jean Paul Getty Museum, the Frick family mansion and a refurbishment of the Statue of Liberty. This 1905 building was the Art Deco home of America’s cult theatrical society The Lambs Club (named for Victorian London critic and essayist Charles Lamb). Its new look recalls the aesthetic of 1920s Broadway. A grandiose entrance hall has a richly patterned terrazo-style floor, metal-trimmed panels and columns, and desks clad in Deco-style metallic fins. Other features include an original floor-to-ceiling fireplace and elliptical doors. Guestrooms pay homage to the romance of early 20th-century travel with faux-leather cabinets, tinted mirror-clad baths and custom-made furniture by Despont. Organic, handmade Shifman mattresses are topped with Frette linen, Cristina Azario accessories and Down & Co duvets and

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HERITAGE Clockwise from top: an outdoor terrace. Roomy terraces with small gardens in Manhattan are exceedingly rare; The Chatwal’s lobby; the saltwater lap pool; the Lamb’s Club Bar, which turns out feted vintage cocktails

pillows, and bathrooms are stocked with Boca Terry robes. The top rooms are the Chatwal Suite, a one bedroom suite with an outdoor terrace; and the 4500-square-foot Penthouse Floor with two outdoor spaces, four ensuite rooms and two sitting rooms. It is named the Barrymore Suite after actress Drew Barrymore’s grandfather – an original member of the Club. Downstairs, culinary expert Geoffrey Zakarian presides over a modern grill with pannelled walls and red leather banquettes. A final treat is the Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spa, saltwater lap pool and mani-pedi studio. Reservations can be made by calling +1 866 961 3786. For more information visit thechatwalny.com

House & Garden | May 2016


Need to know Ralph Lauren’s linen/cotton ‘Belgrade Batik Floral’, pictured below right, is one of several blue-and-white fabrics that create a marine feel in Hotel Tresanton’s Lamorran suite

Fabric ‘Aegean Stripe’ (pink/green), by Carolina Irving, £192 a metre, from Redloh House Fabrics (redlohhousefabrics.com). As seen at Halcyon House, Australia

Hotels bydesign

Chandelier ‘Botti’, 60 x 90cm diameter, £7,700, from Delightfull (delightfull.eu). As seen at Idol Hotel, Paris

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Wallcovering ‘Scale’ (00), 90cm wide, £110 a metre, from Arte (arte-international. com). As seen at The Hoxton, Amsterdam

OBJECTS OF DESIRE Chair ‘Quiver Klismos’, 80 x 70 x 63.5cm, £7,200, from Soane (soane.co.uk). As seen at Rosewood London

L a u r a H o u l d s wo r th sele cts details from the mo st s tyl i s h h o t e l s , s o yo u c a n recreate the look at home

Chair ‘Floradora Swivel’, 78 x 85cm diameter, £3,120, from Amy Somerville (amysomerville. com). As seen at The Connaught, London

Fabric ‘Vignatella’ (woad), by William Yeoward, £61 a metre, from Designers Guild (designers guild.com). As seen at Halcyon House, Australia

Lantern ‘Large Original Globe’, 64.7 x 54cm diameter, £5,040, from Jamb (jamb.co.uk). As seen at The Kensington, London

Fabric ‘Belgrade Batik Floral’ (indigo), £117 a metre, from Ralph Lauren Home (ralphlauren home.com). As seen at Hotel Tresanton, Cornwall

Lamp ‘Rock Crystal Ball’, 66 x 41cm shade diameter, from £1,620, from Charles Edwards (charlesedwards.com). As seen at The Ritz Paris

Bath ‘Geminus Plinth’, 70 x 181 x 77cm, from £2,308, from Albion Bath Company (albionbathco.com). As seen at Thyme at Southrop Manor, Gloucestershire

Lamp ‘Salperton’, 71.5 x 38.1cm shade diameter, £726, from Porta Romana (portaromana. co.uk). As seen at The Kensington, London 컄

House & Garden | May 2016


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Need to know David Linley decorated 25 art-deco-style suites at Claridge’s, using pieces such as his popular ‘Deco Tub’ chair, seen below in oatmeal linen with a stained beech base

Hotels bydesign

Chair ‘Bug’, by Paola Navone, 73 x 90.5 x 110cm, from £2,605, from Poliform (poliformuk. com). As seen at The Virgin Hotel Chicago

Tile ‘Waverley’, 19.9cm square, £89.70 a square metre, from Fired Earth (firedearth.com). As seen at Macdonald Randolph Hotel, Oxford

Chair ‘Deco Tub’, 79 x 82cm diameter, £3,050, from Linley (davidlinley.com). As seen at Claridge’s, London

Fabric ‘Florentine’ (chocolate/bronze), £159 a metre, from Mulberry Home (gpjbaker.com). As seen at The Kensington, London

Basin ‘Catalano Canova Royal’, 78 x 84 x 44cm, from £998, from C P Hart (cphart. co.uk). As seen at The Laslett, London

Wallpaper ‘Teatro’ (42), 68.5cm wide, £140 a 10-metre roll, from Cole & Son (cole-and-son. com). As seen at Ham Yard Hotel, London

Taps ‘Tradition’, £466, from Aston Matthews (astonmatthews.co.uk). As seen at The Pig on the Beach, Dorset

Rug ‘Papillon’, by Tara Bernerd, from £1,425 a square metre, from The Rug Company (therugcompany.com). As seen at Hotel Bel-Air

Washstand ‘La Parisienne Double’, 116 x 140 x 60cm, £4,500, from Catchpole & Rye (catchpoleandrye.com). As seen at Artist Residence, London

Fabric ‘Patara’ (05), £115 a metre, from Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com). As seen at The Portobello Hotel, London

Light ‘Tom’, 19.3 x 22.1cm shade diameter, £258, from Hector Finch (hectorfinch.com). As seen at Hotel Tresanton, Cornwall

Wallpaper ‘Toile De Nantes’ (rose ancien), £199 a 3.65-metre roll, from Pierre Frey (pierre frey.com). As seen at Relais Christine, Paris 첸

House & Garden | May 2016


BESPOKE PROMOTION

A NEW ROMANCE C E L I N E E S TAT E S A R E A P P LY I N G THEIR INTERIOR D E S I G N AC U M E N TO TURNING M U LT I P L E U N I T S INTO DREAM A PA R T M E N T S

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lassic but thoroughly 21st-century, opulent yet understated, elegant and inviting – this is the aesthetic that defines Celine Estates, the interiors brand that has been taking the finest addresses in London and abroad by storm. Now, the team is taking its finessed interiors to the world of boutique serviced apartments, transforming out-dated multiple units into luxury studio rooms, and transforming large-scale investments into covetable, aspirational spaces. One recent project in the heart of London has created 18 studio flats in a dilapidated building in record time, with the look and feel of a boutique hotel in a serviced apartment building. At the heart of the business is Noor Charchafchi, whose interior design expertise is matched by her pride in providing the highest degree of service, working closely with clients to turn out a bespoke, fully realised, and functional luxury home. Her expertise is often sought out to upgrade property developer stock and tackle private clients’ investment portfolios, where design is filtered through a return-on-investment strategy so that the project may focus on the turning of hostels, two-star hotels and multiple units into aspirational, elegant, luxury apartments, whilst working with planning and budget restraints. The usual interior design brief is set aside and the property

EXPERT Clockwise from top: At Celine Estates, quality finishes, luxuriant soft furnishings and an elegant aesthetic conspire to define a design look and feel that is catching the eye of top property developers

studied in detail with market conditions in mind, so that designs and budgets are based on a full research feasibility strategy. ‘We are unique in that we do not provide one type of luxury finish, we provide luxury design that targets a specific type of buyer or occupier,’ says Noor Charchafchi. Celine Estates thinks out of the box. Celine Estates: 020-7351 3659; celineestates.com

House & Garden | May 2016


BESPOKE PROMOTION

LABOUR OF LOVE WITH INTERIORS BY R E NOW N E D DE S IG N E R A D A M D . T I H A N Y, T H E N E W S E A B O U R N E N C O R E PA I R S C O N T E M P O R A RY S PAC E S W I T H S I X- S TA R S E R V I C E

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hen the 600-guest, all-suite Seabourn Encore launches in December it will crown a trio of ships that is already the most modern and acclaimed in the ultra-luxury segment. Strikingly beautiful and modelled on the existing fleet, Seabourn Encore also marks an evolution in daring design (keep an eye out for the Seabourn Ovation too, which launches in 2018). The vision of master hospitality designer Adam D. Tihany – who counts celebrity chefs such as Daniel Boulud, Paul Bocuse and Heston Blumenthal, the Belmond Cipriani in Venice, The Beverly Hills Hotel and One & Only Cape Town among his international clients – the vessel feels sumptuous and rather like a private residential yacht, complete with highly personalised service and ratios of space and service staff per guest that are among the industry’s highest. Key to Tihany’s ideas was recognising that most guests occupy a ship for at least a week, sleeping, dining and socialising onboard, while discovering wildly desirable destinations ashore (during Seabourn Encore’s inaugural season that includes far-flung

House & Garden | May 2016


BESPOKE PROMOTION

ports from Athens to Arabia, the South Pacific, Australia and New Zealand). Tapping into this appetite for new experiences and the unexpected, he has used soft, elegantly curved lines to create a bespoke aesthetic, with impressive artworks on display throughout and spaces, such as Seabourn Square (the bustling piazza of the ship) that flow naturally from one to the other. There’s also an extra deck with a new speciality restaurant connected by stairs to the Colonnade, which serves up French and American inspired dishes by chef Thomas Keller. Guests will be able to access an inviting club lounge with a dynamic entertainment programme and outside on the terrace, a plunge pool, two whirlpool spas and a fountain that will be elegantly lit up at night. The Verandah and Penthouse suites have also been thoughtfully re-designed. Traditional craftsmanship meets luxury yacht, with subtle nautical references in the blue and white detailed carpet and stitched upholstered headboards. Meanwhile, flexible Penthouse suites (in which a patterned glass door connecting to the living room can be left open to create a larger space for relaxing or entertaining) come with a dining table for two to four people, two flat-screen televisions and a fully stocked mini bar. They also come complete with a spacious bathroom with a bathtub and shower. No detail is overlooked, from the specially tailored mattresses to the exclusive, Molton Brown signature scents in the bathrooms and turn-down gifts every evening including pampering

‘THE VE SSEL FEELS LIKE A PRIVATE RE SIDENTIAL YACHT, WITH ALMOST ONE MEMBER OF STAFF PER GUE ST’ Opposite: Designer Adam Tihany at work. This page, from top: a Penthouse Suite; the pool area; the impressive Atrium, showcasing a glass sculpture by Vistosi; The Restaurant

THE VISION BEHIND THE DESIGN ‘I realised how much of Seabourn’s overall product is dedicated to satisfying their guests’ appetites for surprise, from the planning of itineraries to the cuisine, to their style of service, they are always focused on surpassing expectations and eliciting the sort of delight that results from the unexpected,’ explains Adam Tihany. ‘With that in mind, I have designed a ship that conveys a sense of spontaneity and exhilaration, eliciting the sensation of discovery and novelty that will complement the rest of the guests’ travel experiences.’

lavender eye masks and delicious Belgian chocolates. Whichever suite guests book, one of the main attractions is the private veranda with ever-changing ocean views that are yet another element of surprise on a sublime ship where there’s a new delightful discovery at every turn. Seabourn offers worldwide destinations for 2016 from the Mediterranean, Greek Isles and Baltic Cities through to the Caribbean & Panama Canal, Asia, Australasia and even the white continent of Antarctica. To find out more call 0843 373 2000 or visit seabourn.co.uk

House & Garden | May 2016


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If you thought we only sold stone... think again. We now stock an extensive range of porcelain and decorative tiles alongside our natural stone.

Order online at: mandarinstone.com Or visit one of our inspirational showrooms: Bath Bristol Cambridge Cardif Cheltenham Exeter Marlow Monmouth Weybridge Wilmslow


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Te x t E M M A L O V E

VIEW

FROM

THE

TOP

I N T H E WO R L D ’ S M O S T E N T I C I N G C I T I E S , T H E R I S E O F R O O F T O P H O T E L B A R S A N D R E S TAU R A N T S P R OV E S T H AT T H E O N LY WAY I S U P

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POOLS Clockwise from top: W Amsterdam’s pool overlooks the Royal Palace. The pool at Fasano in Rio faces Corcovado mountain. The infinity pool at The Leela Palace in New Delhi

If you’re Kit Kemp, co-owner and design director of Firmdale Hotels, it’s also the perfect place for a kitchen garden. Her Crosby Street Hotel in New York has a vegetable patch and Tudor-style chicken coop on its twelfth-floor rooftop, while Ham Yard Hotel in London boasts beehives and raised railwaysleeper beds, where fruit and vegetables are grown, to be picked and woven into the restaurant’s menus, along with pots of herbs that create a wild, more natural look. Approaching the gardening theme from a different angle is the vast, all-glass, greenhouse-like Commissary restaurant, run by celebrity chef Roy Choi, at the top of The Line hotel in LA’s Koreatown. Designed by Sean Knibb, it features hanging ivy, fig trees and ferns alongside the communal dining table, with driftwood chandeliers and John Vogel chairs. A garden hose 컄

VICENTE DE PAULO; LUTZ VORDERWUELBECKE

hen the sun is shining, we all hurry to the closest outdoor space: a beach, a leafy park or a rooftop. The latter is the urban hotel’s trump card. Often left unused, a rooftop provides bonus space that can be transformed into a hip restaurant and bar, spa treatment rooms or penthouse terraces, or used to house a pool with a bird’s-eye view of surrounding skyscrapers.

House & Garden | May 2016


Hotels bydesign

dangles from one end of the bar, where wooden crates house yet more greenery. Of course, one of the biggest boons of a rooftop terrace is the magnificent view that usually comes as a standard. At Athenswas (a member of Design Hotels), the Acropolis looms from the sixth-floor bar and restaurant; the white marble infinity pool atop the Fasano by Rio’s Ipanema beach faces Corcovado mountain; and at night, from the Sky Bar and Sirocco restaurant at the Lebua hotel in Bangkok – it’s suspended on a precipice more than 244 metres in the air – the glittering city is lit up below. In Palma, the best rooftop pool is at the Hotel Sant Francesc, a renovated nineteenth-century manor house opposite a beautiful basilica, and in Florence, La Terrazza cocktail bar is perched above a thirteenth-century medieval tower that’s now the Continentale. The bar, redesigned three years ago by local architect Michele Bonan (he used Fifties cinemas as inspiration for the white banquette seating, chrome accents and wooden flooring), offers a front-row seat to the Arno River and its medieval, shopstudded bridge Ponte Vecchio. Interestingly, some of the coolest interpretations of rooftops can be found in the US. The Upstairs cocktail lounge at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles is a real scene with DJs and live bands, designed 컄

EATING Clockwise from top: Commissary at The Line hotel in LA. Cindy’s restaurant at the Chicago Athletic Association hotel. Athenswas provides a tranquil point from which to take in the Acropolis

A R O OF T OP RU N N I NG T R AC K I S I D E A L F O R AV O I D I N G CLOGGED CITY STREETS

RUNNING The running track at Four Seasons in Lisbon House & Garden | May 2016

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Hotels bydesign

T H E S K Y YA R D IN TORONTO IS SET UP FOR ALL SEASONS

BARS From top: The terrace at the Continentale in Florence overlooks the Arno River. Azul on the Rooftop at Hugo Hotel in New York. The suspended Sky Bar at Lebua in Bangkok hangs 244 metres above the city

by local firm Commune (think: cedar stools by sculptor Alma Allen, a Navajolike-print awning by artist Alia Penner and Mexican Equipale chairs in white leather). A concrete pool inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House is also an ideal resting point. In New York, there’s the art deco Ides rooftop bar at the Wythe Hotel and Azul on the Rooftop at Hotel Hugo, which has a vibrant Cuban vibe with vintage posters and graffiti. In Chicago, the only sky-high place to eat is Cindy’s restaurant, set within a vaulted glass and steel atrium across the top of a Gothic-style building that was once a men’s club and is now the Chicago Athletic Association hotel. While rooftops are understandably most popular in times of warm weather, they can function equally well in winter. The Four Seasons in Lisbon has a rooftop gym and outdoor running track (ideal for avoiding pedestrian-clogged streets in a strange city) while the ‘climate defying’ Sky Yard at The Drake Hotel in Toronto is set up for all seasons with cute canvas tents and a fire pit with crackling logs. For those who prefer being indoors, there is also The Tunnel at The Drake, a long enclave kitted out with graphic print cushions on bench seating and a television at one end screening retro cartoons. So it seems that at the most inventive city hotels, where space is often at a premium, the only way to go is up 첸

HIGH LIFE Right: The climate defying Sky Yard at The Drake Hotel in Toronto has cosy canvas tents by heaters and a fire pit to keep warm in winter House & Garden | May 2016

COLIN MILLER; CONNIE TSANG

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Need to know When in Bangkok, trade the crowds at ground level for Lebua’s Sky Bar 63 floors up. Sip on its famous Hangovertini, created for the cast of The Hangover Part II while filming there


BESPOKE PROMOTION

NEW NORDIC LEADING RIVER CRUISE EXPERT VIKING HAS EXTENDED IT S OFFERING TO THE HIGH SEAS WITH I T S F I R S T S H I P V I K I N G S TA R

ith a combination of crisp whites, clean lines and natural wood, the interior of the intimate, 930-guest Viking Star is the epitome of understated elegance. It was built based on feedback from past river cruise guests who expressed a demand for ocean-faring voyages that paired carefully planned, on-point itineraries with a forward-thinking approach to design. The result - an unfussy Scandinavian style - is a real game-changer. Each of the nine decks has the same airy feeling of light and space, from the split-level, observatorylike Explorerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge, full of maritime maps and models, to the Living Room with its connecting atrium and cosy corners for relaxing that have been created from low-level dividing bookcases displaying beautiful glassware and ceramics. Inspired by the cultural heritage of Vikingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nordic roots, the design team has subtly mixed nautical notes (blue tones, metal work, wood panelling) that reference the architectural design of traditional Viking ships with macrame window dressings evoking Norwegian handicrafts. There are chic Eames aluminium chairs in the internet zone, pops of colour in the cushions and woven textiles dotted about the public spaces and a curated collection of artwork that ranges from Nordic

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House & Garden | May 2016

REGAL Clockwise, from top: Viking Star sailing into Venice; the indoor Wintergarden, wood latticework tree structure and large-scale geometric mosaic structure, is a great place for afternoon tea; chic seating in the main pool area with retractable roof


BESPOKE PROMOTION

CHIC Left, from top: the Explorers Lounge, full of maps and books; the Penthouse Veranda Stateroom Clockwise, from right: the Explorer’s Lounge; LivNordic Spa; the pool artefacts to illustrations of scenes from the Bayeux tapestry. Nature too, is a strong underlying theme: an indoor Wintergarden with a retractable roof, wood lattice-work tree structure and a large-scale geometric mosaic of lichens is the perfect spot for afternoon tea, while mini arrangements of dried twigs, pods and birch bark appear as table decorations in Mamsen’s Scandinavian deli, as if freshly gathered from the forest. In the LivNordic spa, created by Swedish company Raison d’Etre, nods to the Nordic way of life continue. Typical bathing rituals which usually involve bursts of hot and cold - a stint in the sauna to soothe muscles, say, followed by a dip in an icy plunge pool that boosts circulation - have been taken to the next level here with the first, boundary-pushing snow grotto at sea (to delve deeper into the benefits of such a routine, sign up for

one of the special sauna evenings). Boasting a temperature of -6C and at no additional charge to use, it’s the star attraction in the swish thermal suite, which also features a heated pool with underwater jets, a fitness area and treatment rooms for pampering, decorated with silvery images of birch forests. It’s not the only onboard innovation either: there’s also a jawdropping glass-walled infinity pool, cantilevered off the stern with mesmerising views out to the horizon, and an inviting hot tub and sun loungers for soaking up some rays nearby. The level of attention to design detail is evident throughout, from the goose-down pillows and luxury linens in the 465 staterooms, which each come with private verandas, to the underfloor heating and heated mirrors (to cleverly prevent them from steaming up) in the bathrooms. And it’s an ethos that looks set to be doubled up later in April when the much-anticipated sister ocean ship Viking Sea sets sail for the first time (look out too, for the launch of Viking Sky, the third in the fleet, in 2017). Let the new look Scandinavian cruise takeover continue.

THE SPARE, NORDIC STYLING – AND THE LEVEL OF ATTENTION TO DETAIL – IS A GAME CHANGER

To find out more or to request a brochure call 0800 652 2469 or visit vikingcruises.co.uk

House & Garden | May 2016


Lifestyle

Hotels bydesign

P h o t o g r a p h s PA U L M A S S E Y

TRADING

PLACES

M A R T I N B R U D N I Z K I I S A M A N I N D E M A N D . H I S TA L E N T F O R C R E AT I N G I N T E R E S T I N G , W E L C O M I N G I N T E R I O R S HAS LED TO NUMEROUS PRESTIGIOUS DESIGN PROJECTS I N T H E U K A N D OV E R S E A S , W I T H S O M E O F T H E B I G G E S T N A M E S I N T H E H O S P I TA L I T Y I N D U S T RY. PA M E L A G O O D M A N TA L K S T O H I M A B O U T T H E S E C R E T S O F H I S S U C C E S S Pictured above: Martin on Brooklyn Bridge in New York House & Garden | May 2016

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Need to know Martin’s design for Scarfes Bar, pictured right, in Rosewood London hotel, retains the original features of the Belle Epoque building and mixes vintage furnishings with custom designs

Hotels bydesign

T LONDON This page anticlockwise from top: A meeting in the Academicians’ Room. In his flat with associate Nick Jeanes. Meeting Fiona McDonald (left) in her shop with design director Pascale Belot. The MBDSdesigned interior of Sexy Fish. Opposite: At Scarfes Bar with his partner Jonathan Brook and Michael Bonsor, the manager of Rosewood London

he Academicians’ Room at the Royal Academy in Piccadilly feels like an appropriate starting point for my day with design maestro Martin Brudnizki. True, the space is not open to the public – that honour is reserved only for Royal Academicians and private members – but it neatly encapsulates so much of Martin’s ethos in creating masterful interiors. The room is one of his most recent achievements, though such is the prolific output of Martin Brudnizki Design Studio (MBDS) that there are always new projects to celebrate. On the subject of transforming the room into the inviting space it is today, Martin says his vision had been to make what felt like an airport lounge into a ‘wonderful drawing room’, where people would feel as comfortable and as welcome as in a private house. This, in fact, is his mantra for all the work he undertakes, believing that interiors should never be austere or intimidating. In characteristic style, he carefully blends colour and texture, vintage and contemporary, with subtle lighting and a clever use of space, always mindful of the history and architectural integrity of a room. The dramatic proportions of the Academicians’ Room, crowned by an expansive skylight, reference another of Martin’s recent projects – the creation of the new Beekman hotel in New York, which opens imminently. Constructed in 1883 by the Irish developer Eugene Kelly, the building that now houses The Beekman is a signature Lower Manhattan landmark defined on the exterior by its brick façade and twin turrets and on the interior by a soaring atrium, which rises nine storeys to a fabulous Renaissance revival glass ceiling. Each level displays elaborate cast-iron arches and filigree balustrades ornamented with decorative flowers, sunbursts and dragons, and it is off these levels that Martin has fashioned a number of the hotel’s 287 rooms. Yet, as much as this has been a restoration project, it has also been a newbuild, for behind the original edifice and seamlessly 컄


House & Garden | May 2016


NEW YORK Clockwise from above: Martin with Eric Bass of GB Lodging, which owns The Beekman, in the hotel’s atrium. In Union Square with Jonathan. Working in the New York studio of MBDS with Karen Cruz (left) and Naeemah Amir. On the roof of The Beekman with Stefan Golangco of PR agency Nadine Johnson, which represents the hotel, and GB Lodging’s Senka Suljic House & Garden | May 2016


Need to know The granite, red Philadelphia brick and tan Dorchester stone building that houses The Beekman was declared an official New York City landmark in 1998

linked to it is the brand new skyscraping Beekman Tower, which houses a further nine storeys of hotel rooms with private residences above. Since the opening of MBDS New York in 2012, Martin has increasingly found himself in the US, the location of about 10 of the 30 or so projects he has on the go at one time. But his home is in London, where he has a flat overlooking the grounds of The Hurlingham Club in Fulham and design headquarters in Chelsea’s Lots Road. It was in the very same building he occupies now that MBDS started out in 2000. ‘I had no ambition to set up my own design practice,’ he tells me, ‘it just worked out that way.’ Selfeffacing though he undoubtedly is, there can be no denying his innate sense of artistic creativity, shaped in part by an upbringing in Sweden in beautiful homes fashioned by his mother, and by his education at the American University in London, where he studied interior design. At first, Martin’s work was split fairly evenly between residential and commercial projects, but over the years he has veered more towards the latter, particularly within the hospitality sector. Restaurants, bars and hotels have become his métier and the list of establishments he has been involved with reads like a roll call of industry superstars: Rocco Forte, Soho House, Thompson, Rosewood and Four Seasons, to name but a few. So what is the secret to his success? First and foremost is his aforementioned modesty, coupled with a strict determination to never let ego get in the way of his designs. He passionately believes that the client is king, that a sense of context is essential and that themes and gimmicks are best avoided. Then comes the design process itself. ‘As simple and as practical as possible to begin with’, he says, overlaid with excellent lighting and colour, and finished with an eclectic mix of furniture, books, decorative accessories and great art to create a characterful, lived-in look. On the whole, his taste is defined by the twentieth century and he loves nothing more than to refurbish or reupholster vintage finds or to commission bespoke pieces based on favourite designs. It comes as no surprise, therefore, to learn that, in recent months, Martin has launched a new online retail arm of MBDS, co-founded with friend and business associate Nick Jeanes, previously design director of MBDS, through which a range of furniture, lighting and decorative accessories are available for general purchase. And Objects, as it is called, is split into two parts: the first concentrates on an in-house product range comprising items such as the lamps used at London’s Sexy Fish restaurant, wall lights from The Ivy and bar stools from 34 Mayfair. The second specialises in product collaborations with leading brands – a bathroom collection in conjunction with Drummonds, for example, or a lighting range with American specialist The Urban Electric Co. As time moves on, the plan is to expand the site to include fabrics, wallpapers, tableware and a wider selection of bespoke furniture, so it won’t be long before we can all have a little bit of Martin Brudnizki at home. Happy days 첸 Martin Brudnizki Design Studio: 020-7376 7555; mbds.com And Objects: 020-7427 6059; andobjects.com

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NEW YORK From top: A view of the neo-Gothic Woolworth Building on Broadway. Martin at ABC Carpet & Home choosing carpets for a London project. Spending time with Jonathan in the city: brunch at Coffee Shop on Union Square and walking along Nassau Street (bottom)


BESPOKE PROMOTION

THE SUITE LIFE F R E S H F R OM A DE S IG N M A K E OV E R , H O L L A N D A M E R I C A L I N E ’ S S PAC I O U S A C C O M M O D AT I O N S A R E L O O K I N G SMARTER THAN EVER

ith a fleet of mid-sized ships each akin to a chic boutique hotel at sea, a high staff-toguest ratio and a selection of excellent onboard restaurants, there’s no doubt that Holland America Line is a serious player in the five-star cruise game - and now it’s raising the stakes even higher. This summer, as ms Eurodam and ms Oosterdam spend four months sailing the Mediterranean, guests will sleep better at night in suites that combine comfort with a fully revamped style focus (the transformation will be gradually rolled out across the company’s other Vista and Signature Class ships too). In addition to the existing floor-to-ceiling glass doors that lead out to a private, teak-lined verandah, a no-host mini-bar and a concierge just a speed dial away who can organise everything from spa appointments to dinner reservations, now there is also new furniture in the living area, contemporary carpet and wallcoverings; a state-of-the-art bathroom with a wall of designer glass tiles that serve as a backdrop to the remodelled dressing area; and just-right lighting (including LED lights for late-night reading by the bed). A new interactive television system with movies on demand, Bose docking stations, fluffy duvets, plush robes and binoculars for use during voyages are the perfect finishing touches. It’s not just the suites that are sweeter this summer. Echoing the spectacular ports of call that feature as part of the leisurely 12-night European itineraries - perhaps wine tasting in the Croatian countryside, seeing the spires of Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia at sunset or tucking into a meze lunch under an olive tree on a tiny Greek Island - Holland America Line has launched several new, landmark cultural partnerships. The first, which celebrates the company’s Dutch heritage, is with the most

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TRANQUIL Clockwise, from top: Cruise to gorgeous Greek islands; a suite life with Holland America Line; spacious suite bathrooms. visited national museum in the Netherlands, the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and sees reproductions of famous art masterpieces showcased on ms Oosterdam as well as guided art classes and in-room programmes about the collections. The second link-up is one for wildlife fans: a series of spellbinding concerts, films and theatre screenings based around the natural world in association with BBC Earth. Holland America Line: thinking creatively and outside the box in so many ways. To find out more call 0843 374 2300 or visit hollandamerica.co.uk

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AT A GLANCE W H AT I N T H E WO R L D I S G O I N G O N W I T H H O T E L S ? B Y PA M E L A G O O D M A N

EUROPE

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PORTUGAL Life in the Douro Valley is principally about two things: the river and wine. Now there’s also the rustic-chic Six Senses to throw into the mix. Set in a nineteenth-century manor house, it has views of rolling vineyards and the silvery ribbon of the Douro; there are walks to be had and indoor and outdoor pools to dip into (above). And don’t forget the spa, where wine and port are key ingredients in many treatments.

STEFANO SCATA

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by the lake or up in the trees, every gorgeous chalet or tree house at the San Luis (left) in the South Tyrolean mountains comes with its own fireplace and sauna. In the heart of Rome, PiazzadiSpagna9 is part hotel (with just six rooms) and part art gallery, owned and run by a furniture designer. FRANCE Jacques Garcia, king of the rich and sumptuous, has turned his hand to Hotel Maison Souquet, a former bordello in Paris’s Pigalle district. The decoration is Moroccan inspired and rooms are named

after the city’s most famous courtesans. Down south, a touch of India is brought to the colourful interiors of Pan Deï Palais in St Tropez. BELGIUM In Bruges, the White Rooms portfolio has expanded to include two new apartments: Katelijne (one bedroom) and Odevaere (two bedrooms). IRELAND Debuting this August, the Belmond Grand Hibernian sleeper – sister train to the Venice SimplonOrient-Express and The Royal Scotsman – will offer itineraries from Dublin through the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. There are 10 carriages, 20 luxury en suite cabins and two dining cars. SWITZERLAND Parquet floors and Scandinavian-style furniture define Zürich’s Marktgasse Hotel, located in the

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Old Town. SPAIN In the Sierra Nevada, Hotel El Lodge has risen from the ashes of a devastating fire; Barcelona’s Casa Bonay is young, edgy and affordable, with a rooftop orchard and a restaurant called Elephant-Crocodile-Monkey. Over in the Balearics, Can Faustino has opened in the beautiful Menorcan town of Ciutadella and Mallorca welcomes the Park Hyatt on the undeveloped east end of the island. UNITED KINGDOM Brilliant budget brand CitizenM will open two hotels in London this year: Tower Hill in June and Shoreditch in the autumn. Out of the city, the Pig group opens The Pig at Combe in Devon and Calcot Collection reopens former Cotswolds88 Hotel in Gloucestershire as The Painswick. 컄


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ASIA & OCEANIA

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AUSTRALIA Who would have thought that a surfing motel on an unfashionable stretch of beach, midway between Byron Bay and the Gold Coast, could be so miraculously transformed into the boutique hotel that everyone’s talking about? Yet Halcyon House (above) on Cabarita Beach is just that – a born again, Sixties creation with stunning interiors by Brisbane designer Anna Spiro. The look is a little bit retro and nostalgic, yet wonderfully eclectic, too, with furniture, wallpapers, art and fabric garnered from around the globe and brilliantly thrown together in a riot of colour and pattern. Also new in Australia is The Old Clare Hotel in Sydney’s emerging suburb of Chippendale; while in Perth, Como Hotels has launched The Treasury.

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CAMBODIA A 20-minute drive from Angkor Wat is the luscious Phum Baitang (above), which has 45 beautifully designed wood and thatch villas, an expansive garden and ayurvedic spa. Off Cambodia’s coast, the tiny island of Koh Krabey opens in June as a wellness retreat – Arovada Private Island by Akaryn – with interiors

by the fashion designer Kenzo Takada. SRI LANKA In the heart of Galle, Fort Bazaar is the new hotspot: 17 rooms, a huge pool and deck, and a buzzing restaurant – the Church Street Social. The wild and wonderful Yala National Park, with the Indian Ocean bang on its doorstep, welcomes Chena Huts, a brand new safari-style lodge with just 14 rustic, palm-fringed cabins. INDIA At last a gorgeous bolthole in Goa – Ahilya by the Sea. More like a home than a hotel, its seven suites range across two seafront Portuguese colonial mansions, bursting to the rafters with art and antiques. THE MALDIVES The wait is over for Soneva in Aqua, an exquisite, two-cabin ‘boat villa’, which sails out of Soneva Fushi in all

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its ultra-luxurious, eco-friendly glory. Hot on the heels of Amilla Fushi, sister resort Finolhu (also in the Baa Atoll) opens this summer. JAPAN First came Aman Tokyo, now there’s Amanemu, a hot spring resort in the Ise Shima National Park overlooking Ago Bay. BALI Down on the beach at Seminyak is Alila; up in the rice paddies near Ubud is Ritz-Carlton Mandapa. Go for a room with a pool on the edge of the river. MALAYSIA On the southern tip of the island of Langkawi, St Regis will throw open its doors any minute now. CHINA Chengdu is China’s new hotspot and The Temple House, which completes the Swire triumvirate of The Upper House (Hong Kong) and The Opposite House (Beijing), is Chengdu’s new style magnet.


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THE AMERICAS

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MEXICO Hotel Esencia (above) on the Riviera Maya has all the right ingredients: good pedigree (it belonged in its private-house days to an Italian duchess), a picture-perfect beach (the best, they say, on Mexico’s Caribbean coast), and a new American owner who has recently lavished a small fortune on the property, updating its 29 rooms and filling its interiors with an exceptional collection of art and antiques. In the historic western Mexican town of Guadalajara, Casa Fayette – a reinvention of a Forties art-deco mansion – is the latest project from brilliant hoteliers Carlos Couturier and Moises Micha of Grupo Habita. House & Garden | May 2016

PERU En route from Cusco to Machu Picchu, make a stop for an adventure in the Sacred Valley at Hacienda Urubamba (above), the latest addition from Peruvian hotel chain Inkaterra. COLOMBIA Four Seasons has been busy in Bogotá. Not only has the company restored and reopened the 62-room Casa Medina (one of the city’s Monuments of Cultural Interest), it is also about to launch Four Seasons Bogotá. COSTA RICA Perfectly timed with British Airways’ new route to San José, Hacienda AltaGracia is now fully up and running. This is the place to saddle up and ride into the lush landscape of Valle del General. THE CARIBBEAN Anguilla, the culinary capital of the Caribbean, has just unveiled Zemi Beach House, the first newbuild on the island in six years, with a prime location on picturesque Shoal Bay. On the remote, unspoilt north coast of the Dominican Republic, sleek and chic Amanera has a spectacular clifftop position overlooking Playa Grande. There’s not just beach and jungle to enjoy, but a golf course, too, (a first for Aman Resorts). Ian Fleming’s famous Jamaican house-turned-hotel GoldenEye has 26 new octagonal, breezy beach huts. In the Bahamas, the One & Only Ocean Club has created a sensational infinity-edged pool. THE US Ian Schrager’s New York Edition in the Flatiron district caused an appropriate design stir in 2015, but 2016’s big arrival will surely be The Beekman (see ‘Trading places’) in Lower Manhattan. Chicago hit the hotel headlines with the launch of the quirky Virgin Hotel (predominant colour red, of course) and the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, where much of the design harks back to the building’s roots as an elite sporting club. In Florida, Thompson Miami Beach cuts a fitting dash of art-deco style – the open-air rooftop spa is a winning feature. Keep watch for Single Thread in Californian wine country – it is a top-notch restaurant with five rooms, all on a working farm. 컄


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AFRICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST

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SOUTH AFRICA Singita, master in safari design, revealed its revamped Ebony Lodge (above) at Sabi Sands in 2015, to be followed this year by a new-look Lebombo Lodge in the Kruger. Last March, Tintswalo Atlantic at Hout Bay was all but destroyed by fire. It’s now rebuilt with 10 five-star beach shacks in splendid isolation (access is via a precipitous track from the clifftop). TANZANIA The globular tented pods

at Asilia’s high-altitude property, The Highlands – just north of the Ngorongoro Crater – set a new benchmark for the remote African safari experience. On the north-east coast of Zanzibar, boutique property Essque Zalu has recently joined the Per Aquum portfolio. ZIMBABWE In the superb game-viewing area of Hwange National Park, Linkwasha provides camping in a slick, contemporary glass and canvas way. KENYA With stunning views to Mount Kenya, Loisaba Tented Camp has just opened on the site of the old Loisaba Lodge. SEYCHELLES On the tiny island of Félicité, Six Senses Zil Pasyon promises 30 pool villas in private island splendour. MAURITIUS Something of an icon on this sunny isle, Le Touessrok has emerged from a six-month

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spruce-up with a new lease of life under the Shangri-La banner of hotels. Nearby Réunion Island, meanwhile, welcomes a new property this year: Lux Sud Sauvage near the Piton de la Fournaise volcano, which will have gardens and villas and adventures galore. ETHIOPIA Could there be a more sublime location than the Simien Mountains, where 14-room eco retreat Limalimo Lodge opens shortly? The views alone will take your breath away. MOROCCO You can always count on Mandarin Oriental to deliver a punch and the new property, set in rose gardens and olive groves, a 15-minute drive from the centre of Marrakech, is a glorious addition to the busy hotel scene there. Drink in views of the Atlas mountains, pound the heated outdoor pool or sink into the spa 첸

MARK WILLIAMS; CECILE & BOYD

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BOTSWANA After an extensive refurbishment, the Belmond Eagle Island Lodge in the heart of the Okavango Delta is all about local materials and subtle colours, exquisitely combined to make the lodge blend seamlessly with its surroundings. Take, for example, the stunning copper headboards in each of the 12 tented suites, which reference Botswana’s mining tradition, or the silvery grey mosquito nets enveloping the vast beds. Outside spaces include a new firepit on the edge of a water channel and a hanging cocoon swinging from an ancient sycamore fig tree, from which to enjoy sublime views of the watery landscape.


BESPOKE PROMOTION

SPA SENSATION B A N YA N T R E E S EYC H E L L E S’ NEW VILLA C AT E G O R Y I S T H E S TA R AT T R A C T I O N F O R S PA AFICIONADOS LOOKING TO UNWIND WITH UNLIMITED M A S SAG E S

ith lush mangroves behind and a sweeping white sand beach in front, Intendance Bay is one of the most stunning, exclusive spots in the Seychelles. It also happens to be the location for the soulful yet stylish Banyan Tree Seychelles. Where actor Peter Sellers and Beatles member George Harrison once had holiday homes now stands a sprinkling of white clapperboard villas with colonial charm. Filled with furniture sourced from indigenous craftsmen and paintings by local artists, these spacious villas come with sprawling terraces and pools and are the most private on the island. Plus, for spa devotees, the new Spa Sanctuary Pool Villa category offers unlimited massages (think the deeply revitalising Lomi Lomi, or Island Dew, specially designed for sensitive skin and tired muscles), a soothing foot bath ritual on arrival and a consultation with a therapist who can advise on the most beneficial treatments to book. Once truly relaxed, guests can take a leisurely stroll on the beach in search of turtles, pick vegetables from the organic kitchen garden for a cooking lesson with the chef or simply sit at a table by the water’s edge tucking into Creole-inspired dishes by candlelight under the stars and gazing out at the magnificent Indian Ocean.

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Abercrombie & Kent (01242 547702; abercrombiekent.co.uk) offers seven nights at Banyan Tree Seychelles from £2,585 per person, B&B, in an Ocean View Pool Villa, including return flights and transfers

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RELAX From Top The view over Intendance Bay. Your very own private pool, perfect for a morning or midnight dip. Spa Sanctuary Pool Villa, right on the beach.


This page: Viewed from Koggala lake, Tri’s wood-clad villas blend seamlessly with the canopy of trees. Opposite: Douglas, the previous owner of Tri’s land, now drives the hotel’s dhoni boat


Hotels bydesign

Te x t PA M E L A G O O D M A N • P h o t o g r a p h s J O S H UA M O N A G H A N

SOUL SANCTUARY

AWAY F R O M S R I L A N K A’ S B U S T L I N G S O U T H C O A S T, T R I H O T E L I S A N OA S I S O F CA L M A N D W E L L N E S S , W H I C H C O M B I N E S S T R I K I N G C O N T E M P O R A RY D E S I G N W I T H T H E N AT U R A L W O N D E R S O F I T S KO G G A L A L A K E S E T T I N G

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eauty comes effortlessly to Sri Lanka’s Koggala lake. First light, heralded by a raucous dawn chorus, reveals a misty expanse of calm water and a scattering of jungle-clad islands. As the sun rises above the palm trees, a breeze ruffles the surface; there are few boats and, aside from the odd, distant fisherman, few signs of human life. And thus the scene remains, changing only with the angle of the sun and the weather. It is mesmerising and peaceful – true food for the soul. Back in 2003, while visiting family, the British photographer Rob Drummond chanced upon an irresistible six-acre lakeside plot on an overgrown peninsula jutting out from the northern shore of the lake. His intentions extended no further than a vague plan to build a house on it, or perhaps some kind of natural retreat. A hotel was not on the cards. But times have changed. Rob has since married acclaimed ‘yogi’ Lara Baumann, had two children and committed himself to a life in Sri Lanka. Furthermore, the intervening years allowed him to explore his love of contemporary architecture and to formulate a plan as to how he might combine this with his small piece of wilderness. The result is Tri, where villas designed to embrace a modern aesthetic with minimal environmental impact are absorbed into their surroundings, each, of course, offering sublime views of the lake. If Rob had the vision, it was Shanghaibased architects A00 who helped bring the project to fruition, combining contemporary materials (concrete, glass and steel) with natural ones (recycled wood and local granite) to great effect. At the highest point of the property, forming the central apex from which pathways and villas spiral gradually outwards and downwards, stands the three-storey water tower, clad in cinnamon branches interwoven with passion-fruit vines. Rob describes this as Tri’s ‘iconic crown’, a building which, half sculptural and half practical – it does indeed contain a substantial water tank and two suites – encapsulates the hotel’s core principle of fusing the natural with the man-made. Looking back at Tri from a kayak or dhoni (a traditional fishing boat) on the lake, the water tower is barely visible,

THE POOL SEEMINGLY STRETCHE S INTO THE LAKE IN A RIBBON OF BLUE

This page both pictures: The 21-metre-long pool is adjoined by a bar area, its cantilevered concrete roof providing shade. Opposite clockwise from top left: The three-storey water tower houses a water tank and two rooms. Food, including locally caught seafood, is simple and healthy. The yoga studio. A seating alcove in the bar House & Garden | May 2016


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blending seamlessly with the canopy of trees. Likewise, the nine stand-alone villas, though defined in shape and size by concrete struts and slabs, are softened by gentle ochre render, panels of cinnamon bark and planted ‘green’ roofs. Vast glass windows create a minimal visual barrier between outside and in and, in keeping with Rob’s less-is-more approach, colour is restrained and furniture – almost all of which was made locally – is pared-back and simple. The main communal bar and pool area stands out, by contrast, in its sheer whiteness – an impressive, cantilevered concrete roof reaching over and above a series of stylish rectangular alcoves to provide welcome shade for small groupings of steel-framed sofas, chairs and tables. And here, too, is Tri’s pièce de résistance, a 21-metre, infinity-edged lap pool seemingly stretching into the lake in a ribbon of blue. Veer off the subject of Tri’s design with Rob and the conversation will turn quite naturally to its ethos. Although not specifically defined as a wellness retreat, you can’t help but feel that this is the direction in which the hotel is headed. Yoga – taught in the beautiful open-sided ‘shala’ (studio) – is already a central theme and the spa and restaurant look set to expand to incorporate ayurvedic treatments and menus. Plans are also afoot for a wooden outdoor gym, a fleet of bicycles and a new jetty with more kayaks for exploring the lake. Perhaps the only drawback is that Koggala is unsafe for swimming – its tepid, shallow waters the salty home to myriad petrol-blue jellyfish and the occasional crocodile. Beyond the lake and within easy reach by car or by tuk-tuk are Galle Fort and the numerous beaches of Sri Lanka’s busy south coast, offering endless opportunities for surfing, swimming, scuba diving and whale watching. But Tri feels pleasantly removed from all that. This is a sanctuary for sinking into nature, for eating healthily and well, for breathing deeply and for letting an awe-inspiring landscape work its magic 첸 Tri: trilanka.com. Rooms start at $248 a night on a half-board basis. Qatar Airways (0333-320 2454; qatarairways.com) flies from London Heathrow to Colombo, with return fares from £678 in economy and £2,939 in business class

This page from top: One of the pared-back, stand-alone villas. A room in the water tower. Opposite clockwise from top: Villas are clad in cinnamon bark, with planted roofs from which vines and grasses trail down. A guest walks by the property’s banyan tree. The library, which is situated underneath the yoga studio House & Garden | May 2016


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This page: Decorated in an eclectic mix of antique and custom-made furnishings, the parlour is a comfortable space in which guests can gather. Opposite clockwise from top left: Room 16 on the first floor. Another area of the parlour has an old public house look. A fire exit sign cheekily covers a painting in the hallway. Barmen Steve Guve (left) and Daniel Sanna with operations manager Gabor Kiszler (middle) at the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entrance

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CABINET OF CURIOSITIES BASED AROUND THE RO GUISH CHARAC TER OF I T S F IC T IONA L OW N E R , T H E Z E T T E R T OW N HO US E I N M A RY L E B O N E C O M B I N E S P L AY F U L E C C E N T R I C I T Y W I T H A G R E AT S E N S E O F S T Y L E Te x t R O S E D A H L S E N â&#x20AC;¢ P h o t o g r a p h s M I C H A E L S I N C L A I R


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Need to know If Russell Sage’s whimsical schemes have you feeling inspired, try an unusual paint colour in your own home, such as Dulux’s ‘Celtic Forest’ as used in the Super Deluxe room

Hotels bydesign

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lone lantern clasped in curled iron spears hangs above the doorway of the eight-month-old Zetter Townhouse on Marylebone’s Seymour Street. One foot through the Georgian doorway and a sense of other-worldliness unfolds: rich red walls are laden with architectural plasterwork; oriental-style porcelain vases, curious antiques and ceramic plates pepper the parlour; and anonymous faces smile out from monochrome photographs. This is the work of The Zetter Group – made up of Mark Sainsbury, Michael Benyan and Jason Catifeoglou – which playfully bases its hotels on fictional characters: Aunt Wilhelmina is the eccentric imaginary owner of the Zetter Townhouse in Clerkenwell, while the latest location in Marylebone has been staged as the home of the roguish gambler, shameless womaniser and intrepid traveller Wicked Uncle Seymour. The magician behind the illusions is interior designer Russell Sage, who designed both settings. Russell and his team ‘created a story for the character and then built a hotel around it. We decided right at the beginning that Wicked Uncle Seymour was a bit of a cad who wouldn’t mind selling the odd antique to pay for something, so there are a few funny gaps around the building,’ says Russell. Taking inspiration from the architectural collections at Sir John Soane’s Museum, decorative casts and plinths fill the walls of the parlour. Elsewhere in the room, surreal elements abound: dainty vases balance atop corbels, swans glide in water on the classical-style painted ceiling, and fish-eye mirrors cast distorted reflections above a sitting nook. Home to Edward Lear from 1812-1888, the six-storey town house comprises 24 bedrooms, including two studio suites and a rooftop apartment. The rooms are dressed in quintessentially English style: wool Witney horse blankets, generous Gainsborough silk curtains, traditional carpets made in the UK by Ulster and handmade Hypnos mattresses as favoured by the Royal family. My Super Duluxe room was painted a delectable olive green, punctuated by ruby-red silk cushions and pink pleated lampshades. Dividing the study and sleeping areas is a marble bathtub with a metallicgold-tiled surround, which Russell describes as ‘a decadent bit of fun’. Outside the room, architectural drawings are lit beneath scallop-shell lampshades along the stairwell. Fire exit signs are painted onto picture frames, while original Punch cartoon pages in the lifts add further charm and whimsy. In a specially commissioned painting above the chimneypiece in the parlour, the omnipresent ‘owner’ feeds a parrot and hand-painted peacocks adorn lift doors. ‘I think it’s so important that you can go to a hotel and not see something that you can buy,’ enthuses Russell. For those passing through, the parlour’s cocktail lounge is a destination spot in its own right. Here, the bar teems with every liquor imaginable: glass bottles glisten under spotlights and herbs stand ready to flavour drinks. As soft jazz murmurs, I sip on a heady gin-based cocktail – supposedly Seymour’s lucky drink at the races – created by mixologist Tony Conigliaro. He masterminded the entire cocktail menu based on Wicked Uncle Seymour’s ‘Grand Tour of Europe’. The food offerings, tasty and light, are devised by chef Bruno Loubet. At the top of the town house is Lear’s Loft. A gold Gainsborough silk canopy and Baroque wall candlelights add drama, while in the bathroom the tub is illuminated by a fiery glow of light, which brings out the veins in the marble, and a map of Great Britain covers the wall behind. For the less inhibited, a free-standing bath on the roof terrace allows for an invigorating dip underneath the chimney pots. ‘We always include elements that surprise people,’ says Russell. ‘It’s all part of the Zetter experience’ 첸

‘WE ALWAYS INCLUDE ELEMENTS THAT SURPRISE PEOPLE. THAT’S ALL PART OF THE ZETTER EXPERIENCE’

The Zetter Townhouse Marylebone: 020-7324 4544; thezettertownhouse.com Studio rooms start at £465 on a room-only basis

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Opposite from top: Lear’s Loft at the top of the town house, which has a rooftop bath (centre). Daniel making a cocktail. This page clockwise from top: The parlour’s cocktail lounge. An English Regency mahogany desk sits in Lear’s Loft. In the Super Deluxe room, the bathtub divides the study and sleeping areas, and creates a focal point with its metallic-gold-tiled surround


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This page: The Pig near Bath is as much about the garden as the interior. At the entrance, formal borders contrast with wilder meadow areas. Opposite: An artichoke flower

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FROM PLOT TO PLATE

C L A R E F O S T E R V I S I T S T H E P I G N E A R B AT H , W H E R E S H E D I S C OV E R S T H AT A P R O D U C T I V E K I T C H E N G A R D E N A N D A WA S T E - N O T H I N G E T H O S A R E AT T H E H E A R T O F A H O T E L G R O U P T H AT E X E M P L I F I E S T H E BEST OF BRITISH FOOD IN AN INFORMAL SETTING P h o t o g r a p h s JA S O N I N G R A M


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Need to know For a true garden experience, book The Hide (£239 midweek, £275 weekend) or the Apple Store (£219 midweek, £239 weekend) – rooms hidden away in the grounds

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he Pig hotels have a simple yet fabulously successful formula: good, local food + relaxed, shabby-chic environment = customer heaven. Owner Robin Hutson, the man behind the Hotel du Vin chain and the Lime Wood hotel in the New Forest, got it exactly right when he opened the first Pig hotel in Brockenhurst in 2011. He has since opened three more: the Pig in the Wall in Southampton, the Pig on the Beach in Studland, Dorset, and the Pig near Bath, with another due to open in Devon in June. All have the same ethos, with kitchen gardens, chickens, bees and, of course, the eponymous pigs right there in the hotel grounds, ensuring that the food delivered into the kitchens is as fresh and as local as possible. What can’t be sourced on site comes from within a strict 25-mile radius. ‘The Brockenhurst hotel already had a kitchen garden, and I started creating a formula in my mind that was driven by the garden and what we could produce,’ explains Robin. ‘Now it really informs everything we do – all the Pig hotels are defined by their kitchen gardens, and if there isn’t one there, we make one.’ Robin’s son Ollie has been instrumental in setting up each of the kitchen gardens, which are all run with military precision to ensure that the widest possible variety of fresh ingredients can be supplied to the chefs. Now head gardener at the Pig near Bath, Ollie helped create the Bath garden from scratch. Two years on, it looks as if it has always been here, with the immaculate rows of vegetables creating a tapestry of colour and texture that makes the garden as attractive to wander around as it is productive. ‘We don’t waste anything,’ says Ollie. ‘We preserve, pickle and smoke, we use edible flowers as garnishes, and we try to use every part of the vegetable, including leaves and stalks. Literally 100 per cent goes into the kitchen.’ From earthy Jerusalem artichokes in winter to the sweet summer bounty of courgettes, purple mizuna and leafy chard, there is never a moment when the garden is dormant. Ollie works daily with the chefs to make sure that whatever is ready to harvest gets onto the menu as

Below: Kale and climbing beans in the kitchen garden. Opposite clockwise from top left: A steel sculpture by Miranda Michels. The entrance to the kitchen garden. Ornamental borders. The eponymous pigs (also centre left). Edible daylilies. A place to sit outside the restaurant. Edible marigolds in the kitchen garden. Deer roam in nearby parkland (centre)

quickly as possible. From plot to plate, the produce from the garden is served up within hours of being picked, which is something that chef director James Golding is passionate about: ‘The flavour of freshly picked vegetables is incomparable to something that’s been sitting on a plane and gas-ripened in transit. It’s a challenge for our chefs to use all this produce imaginatively, but it’s also a hugely rewarding exercise to have everything on the doorstep.’ In the conservatory-style dining room of the Pig near Bath – which is decorated like a potting shed, with stone-slab flooring, seed boxes and pots of herbs – guests will experience the intense, fresh flavours of the ‘Literally Picked This Morning’ menu, with dishes like garden kale and rocket salad with beetroot and shallot dressing or mizuna, garden pickles and chargrilled chicken. And, of course, there is pork galore, from the scrumptious plates of ‘Piggy Bits’ to succulent sausages and bacon from the garden smokery. The hotel has an informal country-house style that makes it as appealing to young urbanites as to an older clientele who perhaps stay mid-week to escape the crowds (weekends at any Pig are always full and have to be booked months in advance). In summer, you can eat outside in the garden, with views of the deer in the parkland beyond. Hammocks are strung between trees, bees buzz in the orchard and friendly pigs snuffle happily in their leafy field – it’s as near to a pastoral paradise as you’ll get in this day and age, and all of us deserve a slice of something like this from time to time 첸 The 29-bedroom Pig near Bath has midweek rooms from £149 a night and weekend rooms from £169 a night (01761-490490; thepighotel.com)

‘ W E D O N ’ T WA S T E A N Y T H I N G . W E P R E S E R V E , PICKLE AND SMOKE, WE USE EDIBLE F L OW E R S A S G A R N I S H E S , A N D W E T RY T O U S E E V E R Y P A R T O F E V E R Y V E G E TA B L E ’

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OH SO SOHO

P o r t r a i t p h o t o g r a p h J O S H UA M O N A G H A N

I N T WO D E CA D E S , S O H O H O U S E H A S G R OW N F R O M A S I N G L E L O N D O N M E M B E R S â&#x20AC;&#x2122; C L U B I N T O A N E M P I R E T H AT S PA N S T H E G L O B E . A L I C E B - B T R A C E S T H E H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D T H AT P U T S C O M F O R T AT T H E H E A R T O F I T S D E S I G N


ENGIN AYDENIZ

Need to know Restored frescoes, marble floors and rosewood doors characterise Soho House Istanbul. Part of it is housed in a nineteenthcentury building once home to the US Embassy

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Opposite: From left, James Waterworth, Vicky Charles and Nick Jones at the newest House, 76 Dean Street. This page: The club bar at Soho House Istanbul House & Garden | May 2016

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Need to know Upcoming projects include a 30-storey skyscraper in Hong Kong, a Tadao Ando project in Tokyo, and The Ned, a 259-room hotel in an Edwin Lutyens building in London

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hen members’ club Soho House opened its Farmhouse in Oxfordshire last summer, it was the biggest thing to happen to the English country-house hotel since, well, since it opened Babington House in Somerset 18 years ago. Though nearly two decades apart, both hotels revolutionised the concept of a country escape. In 1998, Nick Jones, the founder of Soho House – a creatives-only club on Greek Street – wanted to add to his portfolio a country outpost for his members. So Babington House was born, overseen by designer Ilse Crawford, who filled the Georgian manor with Italian furniture, Cole & Son woodland wallpaper and roll-top baths in the bedrooms. It was an instant sensation. Now, once again, the group has hit the sweet spot. Farmhouse, plopped into 100 acres of prime Cotswold countryside, combines the traditional American country club with the new trend for ‘cabin porn’: corrugated cabins, reclaimedboard cladding, outdoor copper bathtubs,

Crittall windows in Cotswold stone barns, and a swimming pool sunk into a lake. Since the first club opened in 1995, the Soho House global empire has grown to 15 Houses (nine with bedrooms), 36 restaurants (including Cecconi’s, Dirty Burger and Pen Yen), and the non-member hotel Dean Street Townhouse. Design is at the heart of each space’s success. Over the years, various designers have been called upon to add their touch to projects. As well as at Babington, Ilse Crawford combined industrial chic with her emotionally driven, flea-market-find aesthetic to create Soho House New York, while Martin Brudnizki referenced vintage Havana at Soho Beach House in Miami. For Shoreditch House in east London, Tom Dixon designed lighting and a range of chairs made by George Smith, and in LA, architect Waldo Fernandez created the appropriately sweeping entrance staircase for Soho House West Hollywood. However, the core of the Soho House look is led by Nick himself. ‘It’s about creating relevant, comfortable places

that people feel good in and that make you want to order a second bottle of wine,’ he explains. With a tower of imminent projects (25 and counting), the in-house design team has also grown. Nick is now f lanked by group design director Vicky Charles, whose first job for him was as a waitress, and European design director James Waterworth, who previously worked for Martin Brudnizki. While a chunk of the Soho House design ethos is to deliver a familiar clubby feel wherever you are, there’s no one-size-fits-all. As the team prepares new Houses in Barcelona, Amsterdam, Malibu and a second space in New York, Vicky explains: ‘The building starts every design process. We spend a lot of time walking the floors, feeling it and photographing all the original finishes. At our new Lower East Side project in New York, which was an old funeral home, we’re keeping the original studded and etched glass doors.’ The city and its culture are also revered. ‘When you’re staying in Istanbul, you want your hotel

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A key design feature of Babington House, the roll-top baths in the bedrooms came about as the Georgian manor’s bathrooms were too small for them

Grit and glamour in the Meatpacking District at Soho House New York: tin ceilings, exposed brick walls and signature George Smith Chesterfield sofas

The design of High Road House in Chiswick is thoughtful rather than overt. The simple panelled rooms have no wardrobes, just Shaker-style pegs

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At Soho House Berlin, furniture is scaled up to cope with the vast rooms. Designer Susie Atkinson chose Dorothy Draper-inspired turquoise for this room

The striped marble floor in Cecconi’s at Soho Beach House, Miami, references its sister restaurant in Mayfair. Hanging jam-jar lights add twinkle at night

Masculine and feminine meet at Soho House Chicago. Open-plan spaces are decorated with pastel-coloured walls and mid-century coffee tables

House & Garden | May 2016


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‘Barwell’ cut crystal glasses

‘Renfrew’ cushion

‘Burleigh’ teacup and saucer

BRING A PIECE OF SOHO HOME

to feel “Istanbullian”,’ says Nick. So alongside the leather club chair and Chesterfield sofa at Soho House Istanbul, there are Turkish tiles, rugs and woodwork. It’s inevitable that, as the scale of the projects develops, so too will the design. ‘I think it’s going to get a bit richer,’ says Vicky. ‘More vibrant, more pattern, more layers, more decorating. The neutrals and the industrial greys are kind of done. But the practical nature of a room comes first. It doesn’t matter how beautiful a chair is, if it’s uncomfortable, it will never work.’ James recently completed work on the newest House, 76 Dean Street – a mid-Georgian townhouse rebuilt and restored by the group after it was ravaged by a fire in 2009. He describes its design as ‘less traditionally English. We’ve mixed it up with mid-century pieces, bespoke designs, white lacquer banquettes and punchy paint finishes’. Predictably, there have been requests to deliver the Soho House look to the homes of its members, including rock stars, comedians and, most recently, George and Amal Clooney. ‘I’m really proud of that one,’ says

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Vicky. ‘Amal has amazing taste.’ Private House – a bespoke interior-design service headed up by Vicky – launches this spring. Hot on its tail is Sohohome.com – a website selling a curated collection of pieces designed by Soho House. So that mohair chair you curled up in at Babington, the bed you slept in at Chicago, the robe you wrapped up in at Farmhouse or the Burleigh teacup you sipped from at High Road House in Chiswick can all be yours. Despite this massive expansion and global success, the design remains grounded. Nick is a humanist, whose company has become a religion to its members, its houses a church for creatives. And there’s no stopping him, because, ‘A, I love it, and B, we’re on a roll. We’ve got the controls and can create different places in different cities and different cultures – not many people in our business can do that’. And C, Nick Jones wants us to keep ordering that second bottle of wine 첸 For details on all of the hotels in the Soho House group, and to apply for membership, visit sohohouse.com

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‘Meard’ leather bin

There’s nothing frou-frou about the rusty metal and leather barstools in the urban rooftop garden at Shoreditch House, built in a Thirties bacon factory

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Reflecting the Georgian building, Dean Street Townhouse has traditional furnishings including pelmets and vintage armchairs to get comfy in the city

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PIXELATE IMAGING; ENGIN AYDENIZ; CHRIS TUBBS

‘Simcoe’ throw

The new Soho Home range of products will be available to purchase from sohohome.com from September 2016. The pieces pictured above are priced from £22 to £95

In the artsy Beyoglu district, Soho House Istanbul is a balancing act between old and new, with rooms in the 1873-built Palazzo Corpi and the new Glass Building House & Garden | May 2016

Influenced by Upstate New York cabin culture, rooms at Farmhouse have reclaimed-wood floors, ticking fabrics and custom-made Stoves cookers


BEAUTY AND THE BEACH A C H A R M I N G N E W H O T E L O N T H E N O RT H C OA S T O F THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC OFFER S THE BE ST OF THE C O U N T R Y ’ S A Z U R E WAT E R S A N D T R O P I C A L J U N G L E I N A R E M O T E S E T T I N G FA R O F F T H E B E AT E N T R A C K Te x t L U C I E Y O U N G • P h o t o g r a p h s N G O C M I N H N G O


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Opposite: Interior designer Celerie Kemble describes the inspiration behind the elaborate fretwork on the Clubhouse as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Puerto Plata Victorianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; architecture. This page: The pool is flanked by two lattice-framed cabanas; this one has tiles designed by Celerie and made locally House & Garden | May 2016

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t is easy to see why the Dominican Republic is the most visited island in the Caribbean. It has hundreds of miles of coastline, an unspoilt charm and vivacity (this is the island that invented the merengue, after all) and a diverse geography (everything from rocky mountains to desert and jungle). And the capital, Santo Domingo, is the oldest continuously populated city in the Americas. Travellers tend to flock to Punta Cana and La Romana along the eastern and southern coasts, but the northern coast from Samana to Puerto Plata is stippled with many favourite local beaches. So when news broke in 2004 that American financier Boykin Curry, his decorator wife Celerie Kemble and a group of investor friends had bought 2,000 acres of land on the north coast, which included the pristine mile-long Playa Grande beach, locals were awash with dread that this small slice of paradise would be ruined by mass development. Contrary to the rumours, Boykin and Celerie had no such intentions. Though keen to build, they were determined to preserve the beauty of the environment and to ensure continued public access to the beach. Groundwork began in 2011 on a private retreat for themselves and their friends, which initially included two communal clubhouse buildings and nine standalone residences varying in size from one to three bedrooms.


Opposite: The pool sits centre stage and overlooks Playa Grande beach. This page all pictures: Every room in all of the nine residences and public areas is different, and each is painted in what Celerie calls, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;faded bathing-suit coloursâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, and layered with art, objects and vintage furnishings. The porches and verandas are designed to feel like outdoor living areas, and every residence has a hammock on its porch (top centre). One of the changing rooms beside the pool (bottom left)

House & Garden | May 2016


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Need to know Owners Boykin Curry and Celerie Kemble invested $2.5 million to create a marketplace for local vendors on the public beach to support business in the area

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Having travelled the world together, they were fed up with geographically nondescript international hotels and decided, therefore, to create a boutique hotel out of their slice of heaven as an antithesis to this. ‘Small scale and true to its context’ is how Celerie describes the Playa Grande Beach Club. It has taken 12 years and an undisclosed fortune to look as though it has always been there. Playa Grande beach, with its honey-coloured sand backed by lush jungle and washed by azure waves, remains more or less unchanged. Near the public entrance to the beach, Celerie has created a marketplace of little wooden kiosks, where locals sell fresh lobster and tropical fruit juice, and where Dominican Republic surf champion Junior Gomez, who grew up practising on this beach, offers two-hour surfing lessons for just $45. The Beach Club sits attractively among a shield of coconut palm, almond trees and sea grape, its white lattice woodwork a delirious riff on the Victorian gingerbread-style vernacular found on the island in Puerto Plata and Santiago. Celerie enlisted the help of fellow American Elric Endersby, who has a holiday home nearby, to source authentic Dominican architectural details, including corrugated zinc roofs and hand-hewn tabla de palma (royal palm wood) used to clad the exterior walls.

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t the heart of the hotel are two Clubhouse buildings. In the main one is a long, high-ceilinged Great Room, which doubles as a bar and restaurant. Three sides of this space have folding doors, which open onto a wraparound veranda overlooking the pool and its decorative cabanas. Inside, elaborate fretwork adorns the walls, while the floors are made of ornate hand-pigmented concrete tiles. Swinging tipsily overhead is an array of giant, spidery wrought-iron lights and scattered throughout are vintage wicker, shell and bamboo furniture, which create a languorous, easy-going atmosphere. The second Clubhouse building is a small, two-storey house with a semi-open-air library on the ground floor and an evening bar above. This treehouse-like hideout is the perfect place to watch the sky bleed to rose pink at sunset, while sipping on a glass of Mama Juana (a local drink made by allowing rum, red wine and honey to soak in a bottle with tree bark and herbs). Fanning out to the left and right along stepping-stone paths in the lush garden planted liberally with orchids, ginger flowers and elephant’s ears are nine stand-alone houses – six one-bedroom bungalows and the rest three-bedroom houses. Many come with gazebos and porches, which can be totally closed off with louvred doors or thrown open to the elements. There is a seductive largesse and dreaminess to the furnishings: huge copper baths are big enough to put all the family in at once and in some bedrooms there are curling wrought-iron vine beds with tendrils that reach the ceiling, inspired by Celerie’s own childhood bed made by her mother, the interior designer Mimi McMakin. Further developments are planned along Playa Grande beach and an additional four miles of coastline, but everything is intended to be as minimally invasive as possible. Already, with Celerie and Boykin’s blessing, the Aman Group has opened a low-slung property, Amanera, on a cliff overlooking Playa Grande beach. And Celerie is at work on five more villas located in the rainforest behind the main Clubhouse 첸 Playa Grande Beach Club: playagrandebeachclub.com One-bedroom bungalows starts at $800 per night, breakfast included

This page from top: The children’s bedroom in Casa Guava, one of the houses for rent, which is Celerie and Boykin’s own beach house. All the bathrooms are fitted with oversize copper baths. Casa Guava is full of quirky touches, such as the garden furniture used in the dining area. Opposite: The Great Room in the main Clubhouse

House & Garden | May 2016


MANDARIN ORIENTAL, MILAN The striking monochrome bar at the Mandarin Oriental in Milan, with its geometric marble floor and walls, is the brainchild of contemporary Italian designers Antonio Citterio and Patricia Viel. At the heart of the four cleverly redeveloped, eighteenthcentury buildings that make up the hotel, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find Mandarinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bar manager, the award-winning mixologist Mattia Pastori, presiding over new and exciting concoctions at the bar. mandarinoriental.com/milan


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MAKING A STATEMENT THE LOF TY HEIGHTS, SCENIC LANDSCAPE S A N D F U T U R I S T I C D E S I G N S AT T H E S E F O U R H O T E L S W I L L TA K E Y O U T O A N O T H E R W O R L D

Te x t C H A R L O T T E T O T T E N H A M

DOOK PHOTO

ANGAMA MARA, KENYA Steve and Nicky Fitzgerald, developers of safari lodges throughout Africa, came out of retirement to create Angama Mara, with the help of architects Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens. As you scour the Maasai Mara for Kenya’s big five from the lofty heights of the Oloololo Escarpment, it comes as no surprise to learn that the hotel’s name in Swahili means ‘suspended in mid-air’. The deck, with its sunken fire pit and bold, red cushions, is a dreamy spot for Out of Africa reveries. angama.com

House & Garden | May 2016


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Need to know Thai firm Architect Space has fashioned four concepts for Keemala’s rooms. Besides the Bird’s Nest Villas, there are cottages, tents and tree houses, each with their own pool

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Keemala in Phuket draws design inspiration from Thai mythology, its 38 villas creating a fantasy land of weird and wonderful structures set in the abundant woodland not far from the village and beach of Kamala. There are eight elaborately interwoven Bird’s Nest Pool Villas, each with a main bedroom, terrace and pool from which to absorb the peace and serenity of trees, streams and waterfalls. keemala.com

House & Garden | May 2016

BRENT MADISON; ERIC PIASECKI

KEEMALA, PHUKET


VINA VIK, CHILE Perched on a hilltop in the midst of an 11,000-acre estate, Viña Vik in Chile is the cutting-edge, James Bond-esque design masterpiece of Alexander Vik and his wife, Carrie, along with architect Marcelo Daglio. Hovering in your carbon fibre, hammock-style ‘vessel’ bathtub in the Vik Suite, you can gaze out across the hotel’s own private vineyard, over the rolling foothills of the Millahue Valley and out towards the snow-capped peaks of the Andes. vikhotels.com 첸


Now online! HOUSE & GARDEN has launched The List – an indispensable online directory for anyone wanting work done to their home VISIT IT NOW

Do you provide a brilliant design service? Not yet registered? Promote your business to the 944,000 monthly unique users of the website HOUSE and 5 million Facebook followers. Membership starts at £120 a year and includes a year’s subscription to HOUSE & GARDEN. Register online at:


Need to know The staircase at Il Sereno (4) is by architect and designer Patricia Urquiola. Her cuttingedge design in natural materials is a break from the Renaissance revival style popular in Lake Como

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DE SIGN INSPIRATION

COMPILED BY CHARLOTTE TOTTENHAM. PHOTOGRAPHS: TODD EBERLE; SIMON BROWN; ANDREW MONTGOMERY; NIKOLAS KOENIG; RICHARD POWERS; MARK PARREN TAYLOR

C A P T I VAT I N G I M A G E S F R O M H O T E L S A R O U N D T H E W O R L D O F S T R I K I N G S TA I R C A S E S , T E N T S , B E D S A N D P O O L S

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1 Hotel Josef, Prague 2 St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London 3 The Mark, New York 4 Il Sereno, Lake Como 5 The New York Edition 6 Coworth Park, Ascot 7 Four Seasons, St Petersburg 8 The Temple House, Chengdu 9 CitizenM, Rotterdam ì»&#x201E;

House & Garden | May 2016


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1 Mahali Mzuri, Narok County, Kenya 2 Aurora Safari Camp, Swedish Lapland 3 Jawai Leopard Camp, Rajasthan 4 Four Seasons Tented Camp, Chiang Rai, Thailand 5 Highlands Camp Ngorongoro, Tanzania 6 Al Maha, Dubai 7 Longitude 131, Uluru, Australia 8 Mustang Monument, Nevada 9 Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp, Namibia

House & Garden | May 2016

KRISTI JOHNSON; DAVID HANCOCK; MANUEL ZUBLENA; DANA ALLEN; GERRY Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LEARY; JACK BROCKWAY

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Need to know The futuristic pods in Tanzania (5), which look like they have descended from space, are actually tents with wood-burning stoves and views of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area


Need to know The handcrafted gate bed in The Loft room of Artist Residence (2) is from Anthropologie. There are just 10 rooms in this bohemian hideaway in the middle of London

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SIMON BROWN; DESIGN HOTELS; TRISTAN SHU; ANTONIO CUELLAR

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1 Ballyfin, Leinster, Ireland 2 Artist Residence, London 3 Relais Christine, Paris 4 Domaine de la Baume, Provence 5 Hôtel Americano, New York 6 Batty Langley’s, London 7 Casa Fayette, Guadalajara 8 Blakes Hotel, London 9 Charlotte Street Hotel, London 컄

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Need to know The Gold Energy Pool at The St Regis Lhasa Resort (2) is otherworldly; the tiles are plated with gold leaf set in place with crystals and it is constantly heated to 32 degrees Celsius

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1 Alavya, Alacati, Turkey 2 The St Regis Lhasa Resort, Tibet 3 Luna2, Seminyak, Bali 4 Lakshman Sagar, Rajasthan 5 Holiday Inn, Shanghai 6 The Library, Koh Samui 7 Laucala Island, Fiji 8 Cuixmala, Jalisco, Mexico 9 Amangiri, Utah 첸

House & Garden | May 2016

DESIGN HOTELS; MICHAEL GILBREATH; JASON BUSCH; RALF TOOTEN

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condenastjohansens.com The Grove, England


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Qand A Interior designer TA R A B E R N E R D d i s c u s s e s h e r s tyl e fo r m u l a , c u r r e n t hotel projects and dream commissions w i th Lyd i a B e l l Q_How would you describe your company’s style? A_It’s a little bit edgy and industrial. The work is bold, unfussy, strong and characterful.

Q_What are some projects in the pipeline? A_We are currently monopolised by Hotel Russell in Bloomsbury – a massive presence, all Grade II-listed marble and velvetcocooned areas. The rooms all differ in height, shape and size, and each has demanded careful consideration, in particular the incredible Palm Court, which we are rebuilding. We’re also working on a big project in Fort Lauderdale with Four Seasons. Q_What is the trickiest part of hotel design? A_When the client wants to open in record time or the budget gets reshaped. The greatest challenge is to ensure that magic and atmosphere are in line with financial constraints and timings. Q_What is your favourite hotel? A_For me, hotels ultimately win on atmosphere, staff, the music in the lobby, uniforms and smell. There’s something twinkly about stepping into Claridge’s (pictured left is a Claridge’s doorman). At the same time, I could be swept away by Hotel Raya in the Aeolian Islands. Q_Who do you love working with? A_Jason Pomeranc, the originator of Thompson Hotels, is brilliant. I recently finished Sixty SoHo in New York for him. Plus, the Four Seasons.

Q_Where are your go-tos for furniture? A_I love the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair as there are always new greats to discover. I mix up styles a lot and don’t have particular brand loyalty, but I do like Carl Hansen & Son (its ‘CH27’ chair is pictured above right), B&B Italia and 1stdibs. Q_Which hotel designers or brands do you admire? A_André Balazs has a magic touch and Nick Jones of Soho House is up there for me, too. I haven’t visited the new J K Place Roma, but I admire the group’s work from afar. Q_Who is on your wish list of companies or people to work with? A_Rosewood – I think they’ve got integrity and choose great sites. More Sixty projects, I hope. And perhaps André Balazs and I might come up with something one day. Q_Has hotel design fundamentally changed in the past decade? A_There will always be a desire for the big and glitzy, but boutiquehotel design has influenced the industry giants. The big brands are waking up to the fact that guests want something understated, edgier and more chic, with bigger rooms and huge bathrooms. Q_What kind of brain fosters interior-design excellence? A_Being able to think outside the box and dispense with rules. I learnt this years ago when working for Philippe Starck. I have always been able to visualise what a project will look like in the end and, if you use this muscle, you get better at it 첸 Tara Bernerd & Partners: 020-7245 1658; tarabernerd.com

House & Garden | May 2016

GRACIELA CATTAROSSI

Q_What’s the first thing to consider with a hotel project? A_It’s a formula. First, it’s about the interior architecture: the layouts and function. Many hotels are today’s lifestyle palaces – the only places that retain great entrances, the grand salon, the sense of arrival. From there, we question the design DNA of a project. Where are we? Is it boiling hot or freezing cold? Who are our guests and how do they like to live? Once we’ve got the answers, we pull together a palette and design scheme.


Rush The Team Members of LUX* help people to celebrate life with the most simple, fresh and sensory hospitality in the world.

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