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Activities Pre-performance 1. Working in groups of 3 or 4, try coming up with an original fable. First, discuss what the moral will be. Then, decide what kind of person needs to learn that moral. If that person was an animal, what kind of animal would it be? Who is the main character? Who will the main character come in contact with? How will the story be resolved (how will your animal learn its lesson?) Share your story with the class. 2. One of Aesop’s most popular fables is The Tortoise and the Hare. The moral of the story is, of course, “Slow and steady wins the race.” But what if the moral was “Winning isn’t everything?” In what ways would the characters and plot of the story need to change? Would they even have to change? As a class, re-write the story of The Tortoise and the Hare to illustrate this new moral. 3. Thousands of years ago when Aesop was believed to have lived, talking face to face was the most common way to communicate. How do we communicate today? Make a list on the board of all the different ways to communicate. Which way do you use the most? Why? With all these ways to communicate, do you think face-toface communication is still important? Why? Have a discussion with your class. Post-performance 1. In the performance, you saw many different Fables. Which was your favorite? Why? Write a letter to one of the characters describing why their story is your favorite. Include a picture. 2. In the beginning of the performance, the actors used a rap to introduce Aesop. In groups of 4, make up a rap about something you have learned recently in class (this could be from Math, English, Social Studies, Art, Physical Education, etc.) Once you have made up your “teaching” rap, use objects found around the room to create a beat (be creative!) Share what you have done with the class. 3. In our performance, the actors talked about their favorite animals. What of these animals do you like best: Lion, Fox, Hare, Mouse, Crow, Wolf or Dog? Research Aesop’s Fables written about the animal you picked and make a list of all the lessons the animal learned or helped to teach. Then, create a collage of all the lessons your animal learns (or teaches) and the other characters your animal meets.

For more information on this production, including a downloadable Activity Page, please visit our website: www.merry-go-round.com

Teacher Comments

“The actors were outstanding. The boys and girls enjoyed the show. It fit perfectly with our curriculum on Fables, just at the right time. The Merry-Go-Round Playhouse players always do an outstanding job and it is crucial for students to see a live performance with all the work that is involved. A very worthwhile program — as always. Looking forward to the next!” – S. Goodfriend, Ohio Street School, Watertown CSD “The production was very age appropriate. It was nice that there were so many fables and parables presented. My students each knew at least 1 or 2 of them. Great job by everyone!” – D. Chelini and A. Kent, Ontario Primary, Wayne CSD “The actor in my classroom kept the 2nd grader’s attention and presented the pre-performance lesson informatively and in an engaging way. Aesop’s Fables on Stage, superbly written and performed, motivated my students to read timeless fables and write about them.” – E. Gaston, Herman Avenue Elementary, Auburn CSD

Production Guide created by Amy Simolo & Designed by Lauren Chyle

Aesop’s Fables on Stage

By Vivian & Larry Snipes Originally produced by Lexington Children’s Theatre, Lexington, KY

Merry-Go-Round Playhouse Ed Sayles, Producing Director Carole Estabrook, Educational Theatre Coordinator 17 William St. • 2nd Floor Auburn, New York 13021 Phone: (315) 255-1305 Fax (315) 252-3815 Email: youthmgr@merry-go-round.com www.merry-go-round.com

Production Guide 2nd Grade


Summary

Glossary

NYS Learning Standards

Aesop’s famous fables come to life in this upbeat performance. Tidbits of Aesop’s life and the traditions of Greek Theatre sneak in between such well known tales as The Milkmaid and Her Pail, The Lion and the Mouse and, of course, The Tortoise and the Hare. Our actors use rap, rhyme and masks to give these famous fables a modern twist. Students will be entertained as they learn the moral for each tale; morals such as “Don’t count your chickens before they hatch,” “Honesty is the best policy” and as the wise tortoise says; That’s one small step for “Torty”, one giant leap for tortoise kind” (better known as “Slow and steady wins the race.”)

Errant: behaving wrongfully, moving about without purpose. “He heard the tale of the errant ax that went splash.”

Here is a list of Aesop’s Fables you will see in the performance: The Woodcutter and His Axe The Milkmaid and Her Pail The Goose and the Golden Eggs The Lion and the Mouse The Fox and the Grapes The Fox and the Crow The Dog and the Shadow The Ant and the Grasshopper The Tortoise and the Hare

Weary: worn out, no energy. “Weary from the day, the lion fell asleep.”

Preparatory Workshop ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE ARTS 4: Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts - THEATRE ELA 1.1: Language for Information and Understanding – Listening and Reading ELA 1.2: Language for Information and Understanding – Speaking and Writing ELA 2.2: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Speaking and Writing ELA 3.2: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation – Speaking and Writing ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking SS 2.1: World History - Understanding of social and cultural values, beliefs and traditions.

Plight: a bad condition or state. “This poor man’s plight is very familiar, I think.” Quiver: to move with a slight shaking motion. “How my poor heart does quiver.”

Ghoulish: acting like an evil being. “I did not think the Fox so ghoulish.” Tedious: tiring, dull. “Leave your tedious gathering of peas.” Convey: to communicate. “A simple thought I’d like to convey…” Lunacy: extremely foolish. “To race with me is lunacy!”

FABLE FACTS •Fables are stories that include a moral. •A person who writes fables is called a “fabulist.”

Additional Resources Websites coe.nevada.edu/jbanales/webquest — Aesop’s Fables Web Quest for Grades 1-2 www.childclassics.com — Aesop’s Fables in mp3 format www.aesopsfables.com — Hundreds of Aesop’s Fables in one place.

•Fables often have animals as their central characters, although some give personalities to the wind, sun, trees or other inanimate objects. •The word “fabulous” literally means “pertaining to fables” but its meaning has been changed over the years to mean “incredible,” “beyond belief,” or “marvelous.”

Books Aesop. Aesop: Five Centuries of Illustrated Fables selected by John H. McKendry. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1964. Aesop. Belling the Cat and Other Aesop’s Fables Retold in Verse. New York: Morrow Junior Books, 1990. Kheridan, David. Feathers and Tails: Animal Fables from around the world retold by David Kheridan. New York: Philomel Books, 1992. Video/DVD: Bill Cosby: Aesop’s Fables. Warner Studios, 1997. *available at amazon.com The Golden Age of Cartoons: Aesop’s Fables. Van Beuren Studios, 2006.

Performance ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE ARTS 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources – MUSIC ARTS 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources - THEATRE ARTS 4: Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts – THEATRE ELA 2.1: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Listening and Reading ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking Production Guide ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE ARTS 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources – MUSIC & THEATRE ARTS 3: Responding to and Analyzing Works of Art – THEATRE ARTS 4: Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts – THEATRE ELA 1.1: Language for Information and Understanding– Listening and Reading ELA 1.2: Language for Information and Understanding – Speaking and Writing ELA 2.2: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Speaking and Writing ELA 3.1: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation – Listening and Reading ELA 3.2: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation – Speaking and Writing ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking ELA 4.2: Language for Social Interaction – Reading and Writing MST 1.1: Analysis, Inquiry and Design – Scientific Inquiry SS 2: Understanding of social and cultural values, beliefs and traditions.


Glossary

Iroqouis: name given to the Haudenosaunee people by the French, based on the Algonquin word for “fierce fighters.”

For more information on this production, including a downloadable Activity Page, please visit our website: www.merry-go-round.com

Haudenosaunee: “People of the Longhouse,” a name used by the Iroquois for themselves in reference to the characteristic structures used for shelter.

Activities Pre-performance 1. In our country, we participate in a democratic government in which the majority rules. The Haudenosaunee made decisions by reaching a consensus. Everyone had to agree to a course of action. Divide into small groups. Each group should be given a problem they must solve by consensus within a specified time period. For example, they must select the game to be played at free time or how they will spend $10.00. After the decision making process has been completed, discuss what it was like to have to make decisions by consensus versus a traditional democracy. 2. Routines play a significant role in the daily life of all cultures. Each culture has their own particular methods of accomplishing the tasks associated with preparing food, making clothing, recreation and education. How does routine help these processes? In what ways does having a specific method make a task easier? Can routines make things harder than they need to be? Discuss with your class ways in which routine affects your life at home, school and in your community. Post-performance 1. Pretend time travel is possible and you have been hired by a museum to travel back in time and interview an actual member of one of the Haudenosaunee nations. What nation would you choose to visit and why? We know that every individual served some specific purpose that benefited their village i.e. chiefs, warriors, hunters and story tellers. What role would you choose to investigate? Write a short paragraph explaining your choice, including a short list of the questions you intend to ask. Exchange your list with a member of your class and assume the role of the individual selected. Research the individual and provide short and accurate answers to the questions. For a fun challenge, present your work to the class by acting out your interview. 2. Native Americans passed on their traditions through oral history and symbols placed on their pottery, baskets, clothing, etc. Try your hand at these methods of communication. Your challenge is to convey a series of events without using written words. Draw symbols upon a strip of paper, similar to a wampum belt. Share your completed belt with the class. See if anyone can guess the story you were trying to convey.

Teacher Comments

“I’m extremely pleased with the presentation and performance. This tied in well and enhanced our unit on Native Americans. My students really enjoyed the suggested activities (making symbols, story telling) Great work!” - Mr. Worden, Glen Park Elem “As always, a wonderful and effective program for my 4th grade students. It provides authentic learning and reinforces the lessons taught in the classroom. My students were enthused and excited about the program. Bravo!” - Cathy Walseman, Glenfield/South Lewis “As always, it was excellent! They learned a lot and it \got them excited about the coming unit on Native Americans. Thank you!” - Karlie Both, Candor Elementary

Students will have the opportunity to explore the interactive longhouse set.

“I’m always impressed with the high caliber of presentations given by the Merry-Go-Round.” - Wendy Holcomb, J.E. Lanigan School, Fulton

Production Guide created by Tim Fox & Designed by Lauren Chyle

There Once Was a Longhouse By Rick Balian

Merry-Go-Round Playhouse Ed Sayles, Producing Director Carole Estabrook, Educational Theatre Coordinator 17 William St. • 2nd Floor Auburn, New York 13021 Phone: (315) 255-1305 Fax (315) 252-3815 Email: youthmgr@merry-go-round.com www.merry-go-round.com

Production Guide 4th Grade


Summary

Resources

NYS Learning Standards Preparatory Classroom Workshop

This production has been designed to allow your students to actively participate in a simulation of life in an Iroquois village. The production elements have been designed to look and feel as authentic as possible. The set is a scale replica of an actual longhouse. The actors’ costumes were created to look as if they were made by genuine methods.

Websites www.peace4turtleisland.org — a fascinating site that gives information regarding each of the six nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, their traditions and culture; includes artwork and basic facts about each nation including descriptions of characteristic clothing and practices.

Storytelling has always played a key role in the Native American tradition. The strength of the stories lies in their ability to instruct, entertain and empower. We honor this tradition through our presentation of There Once was a Longhouse. The goal of this experience is to allow students a unique glimpse into the life of the Haudenosaunee.

Our story takes place in front of a longhouse in a Haudenosaunee village. The three actors will greet the students and lead them through the longhouse to one of five campfires where they will assume the identity of a member of one of the five original nations of the Haudenosaunee: Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida and Mohawk. Through active participation, students will learn some of the ways of the Haudenosaunee, “The People of the Longhouse.” The students will choose chiefs and send their representative to a Council of Nations, participate in a festival of thanksgiving, play a hunting game and listen to a story of old.

Characters

Skanawati: Onondaga man whose name means “Beyond the Rapids.” Odankot: Seneca woman whose name means “Light from the Sun.” Tanawadeh: Mohawk warrior whose name means “Swift Water.”

The Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy were the Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida and the Mohawk. Remember the five nations spell SCOOM. For more facts and a downloadable activity sheet visit our website, www.merry-go-round.com

www.goodminds.com — web site maintained by the Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in Ontario; educational resource page for Native American studies; references to materials in all formats for educational use; materials able to be purchased through site. Books for Teachers Bruchac, Joseph & Michael Caduto. Keepers of the Earth. Golden, CO: Fulcrum, Inc., 1988. • Study guide also available. Cornell, Joseph. Sharing Nature with Children. Ananda Publications, 1979. Gabor, R. Costumes of the Iroquois. Ontario, Canada: Irografts, ltd., 1988. Orlick, Terry. The Cooperative Sports & Game Book. NY: Panteon Books, 1978. Parker, Arthur C. The Indian How Book. Dover Publications, 1927. Books for Students Kalman, Bobbie. Life in a Longhouse Village. Crabtree Pub., 2001. Levine, Ellen. If You Lived with the Iroquois. Scholastic, 1999. Sneve, Virginia Driving Hawk. The Iroquois (A First Americans Book). Holiday House, 1995. Shenandoah, Joanne and Douglas. M. George. Skywoman: Legends of the Iroquois. Clear Light Publishing Company, 1998. Tehanetorens, Ray Fadden. Wampum Belts of the Iroquois. Book Publishing Company, 1999. CD ROM The Great Peace...The Gathering of Good Minds. Brantford, Ont.: Working World Training Center Inc., 1998. • multimedia presentation of information regarding the history, culture and beliefs of the six nations of the Haudenosaunee; more info available at www.greatpeace.org.

ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE ARTS 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources – THEATRE ARTS 4: Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts THEATRE ELA 1.1: Language for Information and Under- standing – Listening and Reading ELA 1.2: Language for Information and Under- standing – Speaking and Writing ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking SS 1.1: History of the United States and New York: Development of American Culture and its diversity and multicultural context. SS 1.2: History of the United States and New York: Connections and interactions of people and events across time. SS 1.3: History of the United States and New York: Roles and contributions of indi- viduals and groups to social, political, economic, cultural and religious activities SS 1.4: History of the United States and New York: Understanding changing and com- peting interpretations of historical developments

Performance

ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE & MUSIC ARTS 2: Knowing and Using Arts Materials and Resources – THEATRE & MUSIC ELA 1.1: Language for Information and Under- standing – Listening and Reading ELA 2.1: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Listening and Reading ELA 3.2: Language for Critical Evaluation and Analysis – Speaking and Writing ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking SS 1.2: History of the United States and New York: Connections and interactions of people and events across time. SS 1.4: History of the United States and New York: Understanding changing and com- peting interpretations of historical developments SS 5.1: Civics, Citizenship and Government: Learning about political systems, the purposes of governments and civic life and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place.

Production Guide

ARTS 1: Creating, Performing and Participating in the Arts – THEATRE ARTS 3: Responding to and Analyzing Works of Art – THEATRE ARTS 4: Understanding the Cultural Dimensions and Contributions of the Arts THEATRE ELA 1.1: Language for Information and Understanding – Listening and Reading ELA 1.2: Language for Information and Understanding – Speaking and Writing ELA 2.1: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Listening and Reading ELA 2.2: Language for Literary Response and Expression – Speaking and Writing ELA 3.1: Language for Critical Evaluation and Analysis – Listening and Reading ELA 3.2: Language for Critical Evaluation and Analysis – Speaking and Writing ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction – Listening and Speaking SS 1.1: History of the United States and New York: Development of American Culture and its diversity and multicultural context. SS 1.2: History of the United States and New York: Connections and interactions of people and events across time. SS 1.3: History of the United States and New York: Roles and contributions of individuals and groups to social, political, economic, cultural and religious activities SS 1.4: History of the United States and New York: Understanding changing and competing interpretations of historical developments SS 3.1: Geography: Displaying information in a spatial format with maps and charts SS 5.1: Civics, Citizenship and Government: Learning about political systems, the purposes of governments and civic life and the differing assumptions held by people across time and place SS 5.4: Civics, Citizenship and Government: Probing ideas and assumptions to develop and refine participatory skills


Glossary

Acrobats:

are circus stars who perform on the trampoline, trapeze, tight wire or tumbling mats.

For more information on this production, including a downloadable Activity Page, please visit our website: www.merry-go-round.com

The Big Top: is a large tent where the early circus was and sometimes still is performed! Clowns:

have exaggerated facial features, and colorful make-up. These performers usually make us laugh!

Jugglers:

performers who toss three or more objects into the air, which requires skill of hand and eye.

Teacher Comments

Ringmaster: is the person who announces the circus acts.

Activities Pre-Performance Activities 1. Ask the class if anyone has ever been to the circus. You may want to print out images of different circus acts (trapeze, clowns, lion tamers, etc) and ask the children if they have ever seen these performances, and if they know what actions are being performed in each picture. 2. Ask the children to draw a picture of their favorite jungle animal. Ask which of these animals may be found in the circus. 3. To trademark a clown face, a clown sends a photo of his/her face into the Clown Registry. The face is then painted on a goose egg and kept in the registry. Create your own Clown Registry by letting the children draw themselves as clowns, then hang the self-portraits around the room! Post-Performance Activities 1. Let the children draw a picture of their favorite part of The Happy Circus. They may draw their favorite animal (lions or ponies), or their favorite act (tight rope or clowns). You can show how everyone’s picture is different because everyone’s imaginations are different! 2. Read descriptions of various circus animals or performers from The Happy Circus, and let the students guess who you are describing. Examples: “I wear a long, red cape and a big, white hat. I carry a baton.” (Bandleader) “I am an instrument that clashes!” (Cymbals) 3. Ask for volunteers to stand in front of the class and pantomime a circus act. See how quickly the class can guess which act the student is portraying!

“The Happy Circus is a wonderful interactive performance which gives the students a chance to use their imaginations! It is definitely age appropriate and we need to give our young students more opportunities like this!” – Ms. Helen Gray, Smith Road Elementary “The program was fantastic and really reinforced the use of one’s imagination, which is important in this computer and technology age. Thanks for a great afternoon!” – Ms. Beki Button, Jasper Troupsburg Elementary “I loved how the circus actively engaged ALL of the students. It didn’t require them to simply sit quietly and observe a performance. Well done!” – Susan Hayes, Jasper Troupsburg Elementary “Very interactive and age appropriate- delightful!” – Judi Haskins, F.E. Smith Elementary

Merry-Go-Round Playhouse Ed Sayles, Producing Director • Lisa Myers, Associate Producer • Lzay Whalen, Educational Theatre Coordinator 17 William St. • 2nd Floor Auburn, New York 13021 Phone: (315) 255-1305 Fax (315) 252-3815 Email: youthmgr@merry-go-round.com www.merry-go-round.com

The Happy Circus By Ed Sayles & Lisa Myers

Production Guide Kindergarten


Summary

Student Learning Objectives-Happy Circus

During the preparatory lesson, a “circus entertainer” will enter the classroom to talk to the children about the different parts of the circus, and the work that goes into the “Greatest Show on Earth.” He or she will talk about all of the musical instruments that are used in a circus parade. The children will be invited to play pretend instruments, making different musical sounds. The entertainer will conduct the children as they choose different instruments and play in a make-believe band.

30-minute classroom prep, 45-minute performance In conjunction with the instructional shifts called by for the Common Core Standards, Merry-Go-Round has created a list of Student Learning Objectives for each component of our programming. We have distilled what we believe to be the essence of what students should retain after a Merry-Go-Round visit. For the complete listing of the Student Learning Objectives and for the Core Standards and NYS Learning Standards in the Arts that our programming supports, please visit www.merry-go-round.com. ELA 4.1: Language for Social Interaction - Listening and Speaking

The entertainer will also talk about the different animals of the circus, allowing the students to mimic the sounds of their favorite circus animals. After the lesson, the entertainer will lead the children in a parade, ending under the big top!

Additional Resources

During the performance, the children will assume roles such as elephants, ponies, jugglers, and clowns as they put on a make-believe circus. The entertainers will join the students, taking on the various roles of circus performers. Our actors, in addition to portraying their roles, will lead the students and facilitate the “circus.” Through the exercises carried out in The Happy Circus, the children will learn about following directions, working as a group, and creatively using their imaginations as we teach them about musical instruments and animals.

Did you know? The Disney®™ classic Dumbo was inspired by the popularity of Jumbo, the most famous elephant in history! Born in Africa, Jumbo came to the Barnum & Bailey Circus in 1882 to become a part of the “Greatest Show on Earth.” Jumbo’s name is a combination of two Swahili words: jambo (which means “hello”) and jumbe (which means “chief”). Jumbo the elephant stood 11 feet tall and weighed over 10,000 lbs. The giant elephant’s name has since spawned the expression “jumbo” meaning very large in size; like a “jumbo hot dog” or a “jumbo jet.”

STRIKE UP THE BAND Every good circus has music, and our circus will be no exception! Students will hear wonderful big top classics like John Philip Sousa’s Stars and Stripes Forever and the iconic circus theme Entry Of The Gladiators by Julius Fucik. In addition during the performance the students will create the Bingley Brother’s marching band. The greatest of all circus bands performed over 100 years ago and your students will join the ranks by marching and pantomiming playing one of the following instruments:

-Clarinet (Woodwind) -Cymbals (Percussion) -Drums (Percussion) -Flute (Woodwind) -Tuba (Brass) -Trombone (Brass) During the pre-performance preparatory workshop, the actor in the classroom will show the students a picture of the instrument they will be playing in the band, show them how it is held and what sound it makes. When all the classes join together for the circus, they will make beautiful music together under the big blue Bingley Brother’s circus tent!

Books Downs, Mike. You See a Circus, I see…Watertown: Charlesbridge, 2005. Falconer, Ian. Olivia Saves the Circus. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2001. Rey, H.A. See the Circus (Lift the Flap Edition). Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. Joseph Slate, Ashley Wolff (Illustrator). Miss Bindrgarten Plans a Circus with Kindergarten. USA: Penguin, Dutton Juvenile, 2002. Websites www.yesnet.yk.ca/schools/wes/webquests_themes/circus_ sharon/games.html — Ecole Whitehorse Elementary School—features activities, student projects, and many links for teacher resources. www.circusweb.com/circuswebFrames.html — CircusWeb: Circuses of the Past and Present atv.disney.go.com/playhouse/jojoscircus/games/games.html — Jo Jo’s Circus Games, online, interactive games from Disney www.ringling.com — Official site for Ringling Brothers Circus

MGR Youth Theatre Production Guides  

Concept and Art Direction: Hilary Ford Content: Carole Estabrook and Hilary Ford Design: Lauren Chyle

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