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Models of ODR and Court Integration

According to participants in the ODR 2016 conference, full integration would empower the users, allowing them to have control over the dispute. Parties themselves are invited to log in, see the information, negotiate and can evaluate if the agreement is fair. In that way, the degree of informed consent can be increased. The fairness of outcomes can also be ensured by a reviewer assessing the agreements. Full integration would also reduce the procedural barriers between the negotiation phases and adjudication. As a consequence, the user experience would be more seamless, and a judge can place more targeted and timely interventions. This can lead to cost savings and/or more effective delivery of justice to more citizens needing it. An informal vote during the ODR 2016 conference revealed that full integration is the preferred option of most participants. Full integration is not possible

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without the involvement of policy makers, however. New forms of cooperation are needed. Sharing data (with adequate protection of privacy) with charities and other government organisations whose aim is to support people, could be a next step and foster full integration.

HiiL Trend Report IV ODR and the Courts: The Promise of 100% Access to Justice?  

As innovators within the ODR world, through our Rechtwijzer platform, we were delighted to host this years annual Online Dispute Resolution...

HiiL Trend Report IV ODR and the Courts: The Promise of 100% Access to Justice?  

As innovators within the ODR world, through our Rechtwijzer platform, we were delighted to host this years annual Online Dispute Resolution...

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