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Continental Mari-Times A Subsidiary of Huntington Ingalls Industries

January 2017

Welcome to 2017! Before we look forward to the New Year, we wanted to look back on the year past. Here is a quick snapshot of 2016 CMSD happenings, as seen from the last 12 Newsletters. For a history of Continental Mari-Times publications, visit: https://issuu.com/hiicmsd.

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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Happy New Year!

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Department of the Month

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Employee of the Month

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Spotlight Employee

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Ornament Decorating Contest

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2017 Holiday Calendar

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Retaliation - Zero Tolerance

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News from the Nurse

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News from Security

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News from I.T.

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Compliance Corner

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HII/CMSD Ethics & Business Conduct

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VPP & ISO

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Announcements

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Word Search Puzzle

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Job Openings

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Dates to Remember

In This Issue 01/01 New Year’s Day (CMSD Observed 01/02) 01/13 Friday the 13th 01/16 Martin Luther King Jr. Day (CMSD Observed) 01/28 Chinese New Years (It’s the Year 4715)

CONTINENTAL MARI-TIMES: Contributions were made by the following departments: EH&S, IT, Security, HR, QA, Programs, Contracts, Production, and the Bay Front Clinic. Newsletter design, articles and photography by Allison Pittam except as otherwise noted. Editor: Liz Rigney. Send comments, questions, or story ideas to: CMSDNEWS@continentalmaritime.com

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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Department of the Month - Boiler “A ‘Can-Do’ spirit, pride in their work, and comradery are the top three attributes of the Boiler Department,” says Superintendent, Sam Nichols!

Boiler Department from L-R: Francisco Goularte, Marcial Cardenas, David Valdeolivar, Ed Gearing, Ed Fernandez, Fernando Barron, Earl Pheal, Fermin Solorio, Frank Patch, Willie Smith, Sammy Gurrola, James Poulson, Ted Roberts, Doug Werner and Sam Nichols.

The Boiler Department handles both hot and cold systems including naval boilers, distilling units, condensers, coolers, valves and associated equipment involving the transfer of heating and chilling. Sam tells us he likes to recognize his team with Spot Awards, department lunches and items from the CMSD Apparel Shop. While the Boiler Shop is always busy and challenged, Sam says that a shifting of responsibility created a need for his Senior Journeymen, Tradesmen and Journeymen to take on more leadership responsibilities. “Which they have done commendably,” he added. In closing, Sam says he and his team are, “A united, hardworking crew, and just like family.” “Thank you for the superior work you do and Congratulations Boiler Department!”

Superior Results through Teamwork Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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Employee of the Month

Congratulations to Fermin Solorio, our first Employee of the Month for 2017! Fermin lives in San Diego but says he is originally from Tijuana, Mexico. He started working here in 2003, after graduating from High School. He was hired as a Pipefitter Helper 1. Today, he is a Boilermaker Journeyman. Among his accomplishments since working with CMSD is graduating from our Weld School in July of last year. Fermin was also recognized as the star student for earning eight qualifications. He says he feels really good about graduating, but adds, “It’s only the first step. Now I need to get experience on the ships, and I know I will get better every time I weld.”

Job well done to Fermin Solorio, CMSD’s Employee of the Month for January 2017

According to Sam Nichols, Boiler Department Superintendent, Fermin attended CMSD’s Weld School on his own time and took on this difficult task to increase his value as an employee. “Fermin is diligent, hardworking and highly qualified,” says Sam. “By completing Weld School, Fermin is now recognized as a Journeyman Boilermaker, Journeyman Pipe Welder and also as a Bricklayer.” Our EOM for January 2017 tells us he likes working in his trade as a Boilermaker and everything that comes with it. “CMSD is a good company, and I like the department I work in. I would like to work for CMSD until I retire,” he added. Fermin says his mentors are his Dad, who always led by example, and all the Journeymen who helped him when he first started working here. “With any job he is working on, Fermin always strives to succeed and always produces quality work,” Sam said. “He is always willing to teach new employees requirements of the trade and also assists as on-sight Foreman during repairs to USS ESSEX where he oversees working crews.”

When not out on the ships or in our shipyard learning everything he can, Fermin tells us he loves camping with his wife and seven year old daughter and watching his favorite sports team, the New York Yankees. We say, Great Job and Way to ‘knock it out of the park’ Fermin!

Be The Best Partner In The Port Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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W

Spotlight Employee e are pleased to recognize

Mark Gutierrez as this month’s

Spotlight Employee.

Mark first started working for CMSD in 2007 as a Boilermaker Helper and tells us what he likes most is the people he works with. He says before CMSD, he also worked as a sandblaster. Boiler Department Superintendent, Sam Nichols, says Performance is Mark’s strongest attribute.

“Mark is always asking for new challenges and jobs to constantly improve his skills . He is hardworking, tireless and always does quality work, Sam explained. For Mark, he says that learning more about his trade and working to be a Boilermaker Journeyman are top goals. The best advice he would give his peers is, “Work hard and learn all you can about your trade.” “Working diligently to accomplish all tasks given to him, taking on extra duties installing tubes for USS Essex, as Congratulations to Mark Gutierrez, well as completing and demonstrating qualifications to CMSD’s Spotlight Employee of the become a Boilermaker Journeyman earns Mark Month for January 2017. recognition as Spotlight Employee,” explained Sam. Sam tells us that Mark has also shown leadership qualities, and added that, “He has taken newer employees under his wing to teach them different aspects of the trade and answer their questions.” When not sharing his knowledge with his teammates, Mark says he likes to spend time with his wife and five kids. He added that he enjoys watching the Dodgers on TV and playing pool and is also a volunteer at Shelters of Mexico, in Tijuana.

Bravo Zulu, Mark and Job well done! Our Priorities Safety, Quality, Cost and Schedule Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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Ornament Decorating Contest Congratulations to the Winners of CMSD’s Ornament Decorating Contest: 1st Place Yolly Flores Tabletop Reindeer

2nd Place

3rd Place

Noe Flores 2Globe Glitter Snowman

Chris Frelke Snowman on the Beach

Thank you to all who participated in this year’s contest. Pictured below (in no specific order), are all other ornaments we received. By Deborah Moore

By Marvin Banegas By April McGinley By Vanessa Contreras

By Mike DeOssie By Ralph Ferrer By Carlos Seamanduras

By Liz Rigney

By Hector Fimbres

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

By Jesse Solis

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Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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CMSD NEWSLETTER LOCATIONS: Hard Copies available at: Main Gate, Outside of H.R., Production Gate, North Gate. Printable Electronic Copies available at:  www.continentalmaritime.com/news-media/  CMSD Intranet. On the top right of the Enterprise Homepage, under ‘Useful Links’ click on the top link, ‘Newsletter’. This will take you to a PDF version that you can read, print or save.

Enjoy!

To place an ad please email: CMSDNews@ContinentalMaritime.com Ad needs to include a picture of the item, price of item and any specifications that will help you sell your item as well as contact information. If received by the 25th of the month; your ad will run in the next month’s newsletter. Before submitting your information, please double-check for accuracy. Incomplete information will not be published.

Superior Results through Teamwork Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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TONE at the TOP - Retaliation By Joe Baszak, Director of Material Support

H

appy New Year to you all! I hope you celebrated the start of 2017 in good spirits with family and friends. Now that we’re a few days into the New Year, it’s a good idea to spend a moment to reflect back on last year and then ask yourself, “How can I be better this year?” So here is a thought: What are the guidelines of our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct handbook? As you look through the handbook, think about how you can apply to your work. By taking this step we are building better trust, respect, and integrity with our customers, competitors and coworkers. When you or your customers and competitors observe or suspect something that contradicts our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct, we encourage you or them to speak up and report it without fear of retaliation!

CMSD’s Retaliation Policy reinforces our safe reporting philosophy. Anyone that engages in retaliatory behavior is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. So what does retaliation look like? It can come from all levels within the company and in many forms. But whatever the form, retaliatory behavior is subject to disciplinary action. Here are some examples:

Employee to Employee Retaliation Maria observes an ethics violation by a coworker and reports it to her Supervisor. Her Supervisor initiates an investigation by interviewing everyone in the department. Meanwhile, Maria begins receiving derogatory emails from her coworkers blaming her for “upsetting” the department and not being a “team player”. So, they were retaliating against her.

Supervisor Retaliation Ralph observes an ethics violation by a coworker and reports it to his Supervisor. A few weeks later, Ralph is transferred to another department. No reason is provided to Ralph as to why he is being transferred. This could be considered retaliation if the investigation finds that the Supervisor transferred Ralph without cause. Remember though, sometimes you may think there is wrongdoing or an ethics violation when there is none. Here is an example: Bob was hired on as an Outside Sales Representative. Six months into his employment, his Supervisor called him into the office to discuss his lack of performance. Bob agreed to a 90-day Performance Improvement Plan. Two months later, Bob discovered and reported to his Supervisor that a coworker had been cheating on his expense report. After investigating Bob’s allegations, the coworker was terminated. A few weeks later, Bob and his Supervisor met to review his 90-day Performance plan. It was clear that Bob was not performing to the plan and was subsequently let go for performance reasons and not because he reported the sales person’s wrongdoing. Bob’s termination is not considered retaliation! In closing, if you suspect or observe an ethics violation, I encourage you to speak up and report it to your Supervisor because to “Be the Best Partner in the Port” means earning the respect of our customers, competitors and co-workers on the merits of our ethics and how we do business. My very best wishes to you and your family for a prosperous 2017!

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NEWS FROM THE NURSE Happy New Year! Now that the Holiday Season is over, the Clinic has a few ideas for starting 2017 on a healthy note. If you are thinking you may want to put a little lean in your life; here are a few ideas for a Fit Figure: Adjust your mindset when it comes to losing weight! The key to weight loss…plain and simple…EAT LESS! This solution however has more to do with adjusting your mindset so healthy choices and portion control feels right and doesn’t feel like deprivation, or punishment. We all have the ability to change our mindsets not by drifting away or hitting the brakes but by simply drifting into a new lane of thinking. These 6 switches will help you start:

First, Love Yourself Unconditionally When you’re overweight or obese, you may think you don’t deserve love and attention. But that’s the point of unconditional love, it isn’t something you can earn. Instead, it’s given away freely. And when you decide to give it to yourself by exercising and eating well, amazing things can happen. And unconditional love for yourself is very important. Accept and love who you are and move on.

Second, Get To The Root Of It Like other addictions, food can sometimes be a way to temporarily soothe the pain of a past trauma or certain voids in your life. Maybe you feel unfulfilled in certain areas of your life, perhaps you feel you are not truly fulfilling your purpose in life, maybe you are not happy in your relationship or other deeper psychological reasons such a depression or past traumatic incidents (death, rape, or abuse). Figure out if there are deeper inner voids that are subconsciously trying to be filled with food.

Third, (REMEMBER THIS ALWAYS!) Realize That Self-Care Will Empower You To Help Others More Air travelers have all heard this one before: “Put on your own oxygen mask first, before assisting others.” Sometimes people who prioritize others’ needs before their own get so worn down that they end up helping no one. But if you put your health first, there’s no telling what you can accomplish for your loved ones. Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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NEWS FROM THE NURSE Fourth, Overcome Your Anxiety Being overweight can fill you with a million different reasons to hide from the world, but these people found out that in order to shed the weight, they had to shed their fears first. In the weight-loss world, fear is almost as bad a word as pudding. We fear the scale. We fear the doctor. We fear shopping for clothes. We fear the camera. We fear being embarrassed. The more we fear, the more we retreat—and the harder it is to climb out of whatever destructive habits we have. Realize this is a normal feeling but get a handle on it and steer your mindset in the right direction.

Fifth, Find New Friends Surround yourself with people who are kind, supportive and inspiring, but TOUGH when it comes to losing weight. Friends come in all kinds these days, virtual communities like Facebook, meetup, or chat groups. You can even meet new weight loss friends at church, work, or at local hospitals who have weight loss programs.

Last but not least, Quit Your Magical Thinking It takes several years for a person to get obese, the weight will NOT come off magically. It will take hard work, dedication and the change in mindset to lose 50 or more pounds. Sometimes people try some pretty crazy quick fixes, but the reality is you need dedication and hard work. There is so much temptation out there everywhere we go, new restaurants, fast and easy convenient foods, large cheap portions, more butter, more sugar, more advertisements. When will it stop? It stops with your new mindset, everyone needs to practice a very under rated personal character called WILL POWER. Our body is magical but our mind needs to treat it with more RESPECT.

I hope 2017 will be a great year for all of you, let’s stay healthy together. If you have any more questions on losing weight, please stop by the clinic.

Be The Best Partner In The Port Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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NEWS FROM SECURITY

Source: https://www.infragard.org/

CMSD Security is here to: assist, support, and educate regarding all security matters. Please stop by or call if you have any questions or concerns, we’re here to help. Trevor Jones, CMSD Security Manager

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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NEWS FROM I.T.

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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COMPLIANCE CORNER do business in Israel. • Agreeing to discriminate, or actually discriminating, against other persons based on race, religion, sex, national origin or nationality. • Agreeing to furnish, or actually furnishing, information about business relationships with or in Israel or with companies organized to do business in Israel. • Agreeing to furnish, or actually furnishing, information about the race, religion, sex, or national origin of another person.

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ork Compliance Plans were

implemented to ensure periodic reviews and compliance with Huntington Ingalls Industries (Corporate) business practices, policies and internal controls. The WCP’s provide reasonable steps to communicate the Company’s standards and procedures in a practical manner. Each work plan outlines the responsibilities, and includes a risk assessment and communication plan to facilitate timely discovery of improper conduct. There are a total of 38 Core Elements of the Work Compliance Plans available to read on the CMSD Intranet. In the upcoming newsletters two Core Elements will be featured each month. A summary and list of the procedures that comply with each of the required core element will be shared with all employees.

ANTI-BOYCOTT Summary: It is the policy of CMSD to comply fully with the anti-boycott laws of the United States. These laws prohibit U.S. companies from participating in or supporting boycotts that are not sanctioned by the United States. While the anti-boycott laws primarily are aimed at countering the Arab boycott of Israel, the anti-boycott laws apply to all foreign government boycotts that are not sanctioned by the United States. CMSD is restricted from engaging in any of the following boycott activities: • Agreeing to refuse, or actually refusing, to do business with or in Israel or companies organized to

Anti-boycott laws also require CMSD to report: • Requests received to take certain actions to comply with, further, or support an unsanctioned foreign boycott. • Business operations in, with, or related to a boycotting country or its nationals. The current boycotting countries are: Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. Employees shall immediately report to the International Compliance Office or the Law Department: • Any request they receive to participate in any of the boycott activities outlined above; and • When they will be performing any type of business operations in or with a company organized to do business in the boycotting countries. Employees must report even if CMSD refuses to engage in the boycotting activity. Penalties. Unlawful participation in or failure to report an unsanctioned boycott activity could subject CMSD and its employees to criminal prosecution, fines, imprisonment (for individuals), civil penalties, loss of certain tax benefits, and loss of export privileges. Penalties can include, per violation, civil fines up to $250,000 or twice the value of the transaction, and criminal fines up to $1 million or imprisonment up to 20 years. Implementing Corporate Policy / Procedure: CP A8, Business and Trade Practices CP X1, Export/Import Compliance CO F503, Federal Income Tax Return Preparation Process Documentation CO X101, International Compliance – Export/ Temporary Import Controls CO X108, International Trade Practices Division Supplements: None

Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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COMPLIANCE CORNER ANTI-CORRUPTION Summary: It is CMSD’s policy to comply with the anti-corruption laws of both the United States and any country in which it is doing business. Most of these laws make it illegal to bribe Government officials to get work or obtain some other favorable treatment. Some like the UK Bribery Act extend to the private sector and prohibit commercial bribery as well. To ensure the company’s compliance with the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), no CMSD employee will: • give, offer or promise to give; • anything of value; • to an employee or elected official of a foreign Government, political candidate or party, or the employee of a company owned by a foreign government (“Foreign Official”); • for the purpose of improperly influencing the recipient; • to obtain or retain business. If any CMSD employee makes a payment to a Foreign Official for any reason, he or she will ensure that the payment is recorded accurately and fairly in the company’s books and records. Requests to provide anything of value to a Foreign Official or a UK Business Associate must be submitted to the Law Department for pre-approval using Form C-591, Request for Law Department Approval of Business Expenditures for Foreign Official (s) and U.K. Business Associates. Employees should notify supervisors or assigned legal counsel if there are any concerns regarding compliance with the FCPA or any other countries’ anti-corruption laws. Penalties. For violations of the FCPA, CMSD may be fined up to $2,000,000 and its officers, directors, employees, and agents may be fined up to $250,000 and could be imprisoned for up to 10 years. In addition, under the alternative fines provision, CMSD may be fined up to twice the gross gain or twice the gross loss caused by any activity that violates the FCPA. A person or firm found violating the FCPA may also be barred from doing business with the Federal government. Indictment alone can lead to suspension of the right to do business with the government. Finally, violators could lose their export privileges. Any company officer or employee who makes, authorizes, or directs a payment in violation of the FCPA, UK Bribery Act or applicable company procedures will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination. All questions regarding the scope, specific elements, and/or related issues of the FCPA and the UK Bribery Act should be addressed promptly to assigned legal counsel. Implementing Corporate Policy / Procedure: CO A312, Anti-Corruption Procedure Division Supplements: None

C

ompliance is each employee’s responsibility.

In order for all employees to understand their responsibilities to our Compliance Plan, CMSD has made a link to the 2016 Annual Compliance Plan. It is now available on the CMSD Intranet under Featured Items. Compliance awareness is distributed via newsletter, gang box, and official training. Additionally, employees are encouraged to review the Annual Compliance Plan to become more familiar with how their role and day-to-day activities contribute to meeting CMSD’s compliance obligations. If you do not have computer access, you may request to review the compliance plan through your department manager.

Our Priorities Safety, Quality, Cost and Schedule Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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CODE OF ETHICS AND BUSINESS CONDUCT Retaliation HII / CMSD strictly prohibits and has zero tolerance for retaliation of any kind against any employee for reporting potential wrongdoing or overpayments or for cooperating in the conduct of an investigation. What if: You witness a Code of Ethics violation or are asked to engage in conduct that violates the Code of Ethics and Business Conduct, what should you do? You should report it. It is not only your right to express your concerns, it is your responsibility. The company will treat your information as confidential and you may remain anonymous if you desire. In any case, company policy prohibits direct or indirect retaliation on anyone reporting a violation of the Code of Ethics and Business Conduct. What if: You do not feel comfortable reporting suspected violations to the OpenLine. Your co-workers have warned you that if you report something, you will be retaliated against. Calls and letters to the OpenLine are kept confidential and may be made anonymously. In either event, the identity of the caller will not be given to anyone except as required by law or as needed for investigation purposes. Any employee who retaliates against another employee, customer, or supplier for submitting a question or report of a suspected violation will face disciplinary actions. Retaliation is strictly prohibited against any person who, in good faith, reports a concern. If you feel that you were retaliated against, please talk to your manager, Human Resources, your BCO/Mary Ann Davis, or call the OpenLine. Retaliation is strictly prohibited against any person who, in good faith, reports a concern. You may voice any concerns or report violations by: Contacting your/any manager, HR, Compliance Manager; using the HII Open-line: 1-877-631-0020, or: https://hii-openline.alertline.com/ gcs/welcome. The success of our program relies on every individual’s ability to communicate openly about ethical issues without fear of retaliation.

Superior Results through Teamwork Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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VPP and ISO 14001 What is VPP? The VPP recognize employers and workers in the private industry and federal agencies who have implemented effective safety and health management systems and maintain injury and illness rates below national Bureau of Labor

Statistics averages for their respective industries. In VPP, management, labor, and OSHA work cooperatively and proactively to prevent fatalities, injuries, and illnesses through a system focused on: hazard prevention and control; worksite analysis; training; and management commitment and worker involvement. To participate, employers must submit an application to OSHA and undergo a rigorous onsite evaluation by a team of safety and health professionals. Union support is required for applicants represented by a bargaining unit. VPP participants are re-evaluated every three to five years to remain in the programs. VPP participants are exempt from OSHA programmed inspections while they maintain their VPP status. Goal: Achieve (Retain) Star Status The Star Program is designed for exemplary worksites with comprehensive, successful safety and health management systems. Companies in the Star Program have achieved injury and illness rates at or below the national average of their respective industries. These sites are selfsufficient in their ability to control workplace hazards. Star participants are reevaluated every three to five years, although incident rates are reviewed annually.

What is ISO 14001:2004? ISO 14001:2004 ISO 14001:2004 sets out the criteria for an environmental management system and can be certified too. It does not state requirements for environmental performance, but maps out a framework that a company or organization can follow to set up an effective environmental management system. It can be used by any organization regardless of its activity or sector. Using ISO 14001:2004 can provide assurance to company management and employees as well as external stakeholders that environmental impact is being measured and improved. The benefits of using ISO 14001:2004 can include:

Reduced cost of waste management Savings in consumption of energy and materials Lower distribution costs Improved corporate image among regulators, customers and the public.

Be The Best Partner In The Port

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ANNOUNCEMENTS PROMOTIONS Brian Schulz: Facilities Maintenance Technician 11 Anthony Reyes: Facilities Maintenance Technician 10 Fernando Barron: Boilermaker Helper 3 David Barnett: Electrician Tradesman 2 Fabio Garcia: Shipfitter Tradesman 2

CARPOOL WINNERS Maria Sanchez Larry Frelke

NEW HIRES SAFETY INCENTIVE WINNERS

Amanda Petrie: Accounts Payable Clerk

Michael Chandler: Contracts Administrator 2 Ruth Howard: Contracts Assistant Roberto Cruz: Electrician Tradesman 4 Rodger Moore: Electrician Journeyman

Ruben Juarez Rito Del Villar Hector Becerra Rogelio Castro Alexander Brown

BIRTHDAYS Abraham Cuevas

Fabio Garcia

Kevin Anglin

Robert Lamarche

Alejandro Garcia

Fidel Becerra

Lisa Thiringer

Blaine Jasmund

Gerald Peoples

Maria Reyes

Ruben Juarez

Camille Murray

Hector Fimbres

Mark Lindsey

Rudy Benavidez

Carlos Seamanduras

Jaboris Jackson

Marlon Famber

Sandra Ortega

Christian Calderon

James Reed

Martin Carrillo

Tim Olson

Christopher Frelke

Jesse Guzman

Michael Luczak

Timoteo Aguirre

Daniel Olivas

Jesus Morales

Nicholas Sanchez

William McMillan

David Lopez

John Kendrick

Norman Triggs

Willie Smith

David Nowak

John Tackel

Raquel Sherman

Zachary Werner

Edgar Llanes

Jonathan Coronado

Reginal Williams

Enrique Vizcarra

Jose Padilla

Ricardo Garcia

Eriq Zabala

Keith Garrett

Robert Jasieniecki

Roberto Perez

Our Priorities Safety, Quality, Cost and Schedule Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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Word Search Puzzle

Happy New Year

Anti Boycott

Boiler Department

Martin Luther King Jr Day

Carnation

Winter

Zero Tolerance

Anti Corruption

Twenty Seventeen

Friday the Thirteenth

Compliance Corner

Chinese New Years

Ethics

Garnet

Capricorn

Business Conduct

Ornament Contest

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JOB OPENINGS

For updated JOB OPENINGS check: www.continentalmaritime.com

BOILERMAKER HELPER 16-056 Requires a minimum of 12 months’ experience in repair of naval marine boilers. Must be physically able to conduct all repairs onboard U.S. Navy ships and pass respirator fit test. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. BOILERMAKER JOURNEYMAN 16-054 Requires a minimum of 7 years’ experience in repair of naval marine boilers. Capable of completing Boilermaker Journeyman testing requirements. Must be physically able to conduct all repairs onboard U.S. Navy ships and pass respirator fit test. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. BOILERMAKER TRADESMAN 16-055 Requires a minimum of 3 years’ experience in repair of naval marine boilers. Capable of completing Boilermaker Tradesman testing requirements. Must be physically able to conduct all repairs onboard U.S. Navy ships and pass respirator fit test. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required CONTRACTS ADMINISTRATOR 16-071 The Contracts Administrator is responsible for the full range of contract administration functions and negotiations and has signatory authority for Government and Commercial contracts. Duties include contract modifications, schedule changes, and subcontractor performance management. Ensures compliance with contractual obligations including Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR)/Defense Acquisition regulations and relevant regulatory requirements. Estimates and negotiates changes to contracts, interprets and provides advice to Production on contractual issues, issues purchase orders to subcontractors, and is directly responsible for contract close-out. Minimum of 5 years of experience in Contract Administration. Bachelor's Degree in Business and/or Certification in Prof. Contract Mgmt. preferred. Experience in ship repair, production trades, Government Contracts preferred but not required. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. ELECTRICAL JOURNEYMAN 16-069 5-7 years’ experience at the Journeyman level. Must have an overall general knowledge of electrical requirements onboard Naval Ships, be able to read schematics and blueprints, accomplish ship alterations with minimal supervision, and troubleshoot/repair various electrical systems on Naval Ships. Maintaining and installing various electrical temp services onboard ships is a plus. Motor repair and weld machine maintenance/ repair is also a plus. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. ELECTRICAL TRADESMAN 16-052 3-5 years’ experience and must have an overall general knowledge of electrical requirements onboard Naval Ships. Maintaining and installing various electrical temp services onboard ships is a plus. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. OUTSIDE MACHINIST HELPER 16-068 Requires 2 years’ experience. Job duties include general shipboard and shop knowledge of rebuilding various seawater, fresh water, and steam valves, rotating machinery (saltwater and freshwater pumps). Able to use blueprint drawings, identify materials, and comply with shipyard safety and quality processes. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required.

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JOB OPENINGS

For updated JOB OPENINGS check: www.continentalmaritime.com

OUTSIDE MACHINIST JOURNEYMAN 16-066 Requires 10 years’ experience. Job duties include shipboard working on valves, rotating machinery, turbines, hydraulics, elevators, and other mechanical systems. Must be familiar with NAVSEA standard items and proficient with use of drawings, identification of material, shipyard safety, and quality processes. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. OUTSIDE MACHINIST TRADESMAN 16-067 Requires 3 years’ experience. Job duties include shipboard work on valves, rotating machinery, turbines, hydraulics, elevators, and other mechanical systems. Must be proficient with use of drawings, identification of material, shipyard safety, and quality processes. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. PRODUCTION WELDER JOURNEYMAN Minimum 5 years’ experience. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required.

16-062

RIGGER TRADESMAN 16-058 Minimum 3 years of shipboard and shipyard rigging experience. Military with shipyard rigging experience equivalent acceptable. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. SHIPFITTER HELPER 16-065 Minimum 1 – 2 years of experience. Mechanical ability preferred. Ability to work at heights and in confined spaces and to access and move around ship safely is required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required. SHIPFITTER TRADESMAN 16-064 Minimum 2 years of on the job experience including tacking and fitting of bulkheads, railings, foundations, deck plating, and other structural members, and demonstrated knowledge of blueprint reading, ship terminology and different metals. Good burning, welding and craftsmanship skills. Mechanical ability preferred. Welding certification to tack/weld steel. Ability to work at heights and in confined spaces and to access and move around ship safely is also required. ◙ U.S citizenship required. ► The ability to acquire a RAPIDGate credential is required.

Excellent company-paid benefits and savings plan ◙ U.S. Citizenship Required for Some Positions Apply in person to: Continental Maritime of San Diego A Subsidiary of Huntington Ingalls Industries 1995 Bay Front Street San Diego, CA 92113 Equal Opportunity Employer – Veterans/Disabled Welcome

Superior Results through Teamwork Continental Mari-Times January 2017

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