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creates and the artificial world that the powerful can form around themselves. That bubble, that mirror-filled space of power, is both where she lives and the cause of her fall. David himself has escaped, in almost miraculous fashion, the pitfalls of contemporary stardom. His refusal to be pigeonholed, his insistence on challenging himself, his excitement about learning: all have made him the most generous of collaborators, and the least egotistical of stars. I came to see his fascination with Imelda as a counter to his own example, a warning of what awaits down the road of celebrity he has so resolutely refused to tread. Clearly, if we were going to make a piece of theater from this delightful collection of songs, we should set it in a discotheque. Why would we not continue the metaphor theatrically? But we also wanted to tell a story, a story

with characters we could connect to, a narrative we could invest in, ideas which we could debate. So the challenge was before us: to create an environmental, audience-interactive theater piece which also wove a powerful dramatic fable. We wanted the audience to dance, but also to feel and think. Alex Timbers was our natural choice for director. His fantastic theatrical ability was matched by his fresh and bold thinking; the Public had just produced his remarkable Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, and he had become a close comrade. Over the three years we worked developing Here Lies Love, that choice was validated time and again. He is one of the great talents of his generation, and along with Annie-B Parson, our brilliant choreographer, and a design team headed by set designer David Korins, he created a show, an experience, that was both

thrilling and unique. In June of 2012, we staged a weekend workshop at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, with the able collaboration of Jenny Gersten and the Williamstown Theatre Festival. That workshop was the final stop before Here Lies Love opened at the Public Theater in April of 2013, to a roar of critical and public acclaim. Here Lies Love recognizes that the star system, the narcissistic reflection of ego, is inimical to the democratic spirit. The anonymous voices that David drew from documentary sources to make up the lyrics of “God Draws Straight” tell us more about the Philippines than all of Imelda’s self-aggrandizement. The Filipino cast members of Here Lies Love, those indispensable collaborators in making the show, have told us how much this story, their story, means to them. The People Power

Revolution became, in many ways, the prototype for a wave of uprisings in the following quarter-century—the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, the Velvet Revolution, the Arab Spring—all the moments where it became clear that the people are the real source of legitimacy, and power, in any nation. We may begin Here Lies Love thinking we are in Imelda’s disco—indeed, the show asks us to feel complicit in her rise to power. But by the end, we realize that Imelda just tried to take over the club for a while, and failed. This is the Filipino people’s party, and always has been.

OSKAR EUSTIS ART IST IC DIRECTOR AT T HE P UBL IC T HEAT ER


HERE LIES LOVE: THE STORY First of all, as of this writing, Imelda Marcos, the main subject of this project, is still alive; in fact she’s been back in politics in Manila for a while. Her husband, Ferdinand, passed away while the couple were in exile in Hawaii. His body, or something that looks like it, is embalmed and preserved and can be seen in Batac City, a small town in the province of Ilocos Norte, where he was born. I visited this “shrine” and saw “him,” but Madame Marcos had the flu when I

was visiting Manila for research, so no, I didn’t meet her. Does she know about this project? Yes, she does, but she hasn’t seen the earlier production at the Public Theater here in NYC. I think she’d like the music, the festive vibe, and the attention, but other aspects have led Marcos loyalists to angrily walk out of the show. Though there was almost none of the

usual theatrical dialogue in this project, the inventive staging by Alex Timbers, the video projections by Peter Nigrini, and the incredible costumes by (Filipino) Clint Ramos helped tell the story visually, by complementing the songs. Without those aids while listening to the songs on this record, it might be a little hard to follow the whole story. Here, then, is a summary of the period and personalities that Here Lies Love covers.

AMERICAN TROGLODYTE In 1898, the U.S. colonized the Philippines, having “liberated” the country from the Spanish. The Philippine-American War ensued, with over one million dead. Filipinos were swamped by U.S. pop culture and values.

HERE LIES LOVE IMELDA MARCOS LISTENING TO THE EARLIER ALL-STAR VERSION OF

HERE LIES LOVE PHOTO: JES AZNAR

In 1929, Imelda Romualdez was born in Manila, though her family was from the

southern province of Leyte. Her family was (and still is) powerful and influential in that province, especially in the largest town there, Tacloban, which was breakyour-heart devastated by the recent typhoon. Alfred Romualdez is the current mayor of Tacloban, if that gives you an idea of the continuity we’re talking about. Anyway, Imelda’s father was not one of the more successful members of that family—at times, she, her brother and sister, and their maid, Estrella Cumpas, who was also Imelda’s best friend, were forced to live in the garage behind the main house, where the children from dad’s first marriage lived. They slept on planks and boxes and shared the garage with a car. Neighbors passed them food. Imelda sometimes visited her more well-to-do relatives and served them teacakes and such, so she saw what she was missing. It must have been humiliating and painful.


R O S E O F TA C L O B A N

O P P O S I T E S AT T R A C T

Imelda, who is tall for a Filipina, blossomed into a great beauty—she won a beauty contest in Leyte, going on to be crowned Miss Leyte and eventually Muse of Manila. She was known locally as the Rose of Tacloban. For a relatively poor girl, she was finding a way out.

It seems the relationship was quite serious, but Ninoy eventually left Imelda, claiming she was too tall (see earlier note). He soon married Corazón “Cory” Cojuangco, a girl from another influential family. Hurt but undaunted, Imelda entered and won more beauty contests and invariably moved up the social ladder.

CHILD OF THE PHILIPPINES Another influential family from another province are the Aquinos (the current president of the Philippines is the son of our character and national hero Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino). Young Ninoy Aquino was a newspaper reporter who became disillusioned with the pervasive corruption in politics he saw all around him, so he eventually decided to run for office as a reformer. When the young Imelda moved to Manila to live with relatives and work in a piano store, he began to date her.

A PERFECT HAND In 1954, while having a soda at the senate cafeteria, Imelda attracted the attention of Ferdinand Marcos, an ambitious young senator from the northern region of Ilocos. Marcos’s father was also a politician, and young Ferdinand had been jailed for killing his father’s rival. The rival was shot through a window while brushing his teeth. Young Marcos was smart—he studied law in jail and got himself acquitted. He immediately saw in Imelda

a perfect political wife: beautiful, and with connections to the Romualdez clan in the south, an area where he had no strong connections.

E L E V E N DAYS Their “courtship” was legendary—he didn’t see her the whole time (which amounted to 11 days); instead he sent her notes and roses. At the end of the 11 days, he and a publicist took her for a ride in the country, where he presented her with marriage papers—which she signed. One can only imagine that she liked the idea of marrying him, too.

WHEN SHE PASSED BY They married in a small civic ceremony, but threw themselves quite the elaborate wedding reception held on the grounds of the Malacañang Palace. Estrella, Imelda’s old friend who had more or less raised her, wasn’t invited,

PHOTO: LICHFIELD ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES but she was thrilled for her former friend and charge.

SUGARTIME BABY It was a picture-perfect union, and at first the couple seemed completely blissful.

WALK LIKE A WOMAN Marcos, however, soon set out to remake Imelda into the political wife he felt she should be: he weighed her food, showed her how to enter a room, and


told her what to wear. It was a Pygmalion moment, and Imelda tried her best, but eventually she couldn’t take it anymore. She banged her head on the wall, became listless, and it was obvious she was having a nervous breakdown. Under intense pressure, she was rescued by her brother and flown to what’s now NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, where she was told that she had a decision to make: leave her husband or commit to a life in politics. With the help of some prescription pills and some self-help motivation, she returned, a changed woman, and began to help her husband on his presidential campaign. There was no looking back.

towns and campaign stops. Her energy was prodigious (the pills helped too). Marcos promised schools and roads and public projects, which made them both incredibly popular. When Marcos easily won the election, the whole world took notice—this glamorous young couple was welcomed internationally as the

Asian Kennedys. The U.S. had a big air base near Manila, and the Philippines was a former U.S. colony, so a kind of special relationship developed, or rather was strengthened.

DON’T YOU AGREE In 1965, Ferdinand Marcos ran for president. Imelda was invaluable to the campaign—she’d sing and remember the names of the families in the various

PHOTO: BORIS CHALIAPIN/TIME PHOTO: LOPEZ MUSEUM COLLECTION

PRETTY FACE Marcos was a genius at marketing and publicity—way ahead of his time. He knew how to work a photo op and even had two feature films made in which actors played him (and Imelda), one highlighting his WWII exploits (later largely discredited) and the other focusing on the whirlwind romance of Imelda. Both Marcos and Imelda adopted aspects of Philippine traditional garb, which triggered nationalistic pride—she wearing long dresses with butterfly sleeves and he wearing barong shirts rather than Western-style suits. Internationally it had the effect of making them look more elegant than ever. Marcos did in fact keep many of his campaign promises—building those roads and schools—so the couple continued to be incredibly popular, as previous presidents never seemed


BENIGNO “NINOY” AQUINO PHOTO: BERNARD GOTFRYD/ PREMIUM ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES

PHOTO: OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT

PHOTO: RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES 06 DEC 1976 “THE GLORY OF RUSSIAN COSTUME” EXHIBIT OPENING

PHOTO: RUBBERBALL/JOHN WANG/GETTY IMAGES


She had saved the Polaroids they’d taken of each other, the packets of pubic hair they’d exchanged, and she recorded some of their love play with a recorder hidden under the bed at her house. So, when Marcos told her to leave and that she’d never see the promised money, she headed for the safety of the U.S. Embassy and released the tape, which was (reportedly) delivered to a university radio station by Ninoy Aquino. Then all hell broke loose in the Marcos household. PHOTO: THROUGH THE COURTESY OF HERMIE ROTEA, AUTHOR OF THE BOOK “MARCOS’ LOVEY DOVIE”

MEN WILL DO ANYTHING Always a ladies man, Marcos began an affair with Beams; he bought her a house and promised she would never want for anything. However, he eventually tired of her and told her it was time to go. Dovie, no fool, had retained some insurance.

POOR ME By this point a recurring illness that Marcos had been suffering from had gotten more serious (it turned out to be lupus), and he was bedridden and on dialysis some of the time. Imelda, in response to his public infidelity, demanded not a divorce but power and financial independence. Marcos was in no position to argue, so he gave her a whole host of ‘projects’ to run along with a new geopolitical entity called Metro Manila, which was like NYC if it included all the suburbs in New Jersey and Connecticut.

with a group of society ladies in tow). She met U.S. presidents, naturally (she sang at a dinner LBJ hosted, which kind of surprised everyone, though singing—and later karaoke—was just what you did in the Philippines); Gaddafi was ‘seduced’ to help quell an Islamic uprising on a southern Philippine island; Chairman Mao, Kissinger, President Ford… the list goes on.

S TA R A N D S L AV E While Imelda might have known about Marcos’s many flings, she put up with them as long as the façade of their marriage was maintained—but this airing of the pubes in public was more than she could take.

PLEASE DON’T Imelda, with her new sense of power and independence, began a campaign of what she called ‘handbag diplomacy’ — she claimed she could leave at a moment’s notice when duty called— with just a handbag for luggage. She lobbied for Philippine interests (often

PHOTO: COURTESY GERALD R. FORD PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY


SOLANO AVENUE Estrella, meanwhile, was interviewed by a journalist about her shared childhood with Imelda. When it came out that Imelda’s childhood was less than glorious, Imelda was infuriated, and had Estrella brought to the palace. Imelda offered her former friend and nanny a stipend and a home and placed her under house arrest.

chaos, Marcos declared martial law in 1972—the famous Order 1081—which allowed him to summarily jail opponents (Aquino among them) and muzzle the press. Democracy in the Philippines was now over. The chaos that had been everywhere “miraculously” evaporated. The U.S., the special friend, did nothing. Martial law lasted for nine years.

ORDER 1081 Marcos’s term-limited time in office was about to run out, but before he stepped down he and his team fomented strife in the streets and staged fake assassinations—all were blamed on Communist insurgents, which guaranteed the support of the U.S. A bomb went off in Plaza Miranda during a rally of Marcos’s political opponents, killing most of them but sparing Ninoy Aquino, who had arrived late. To deal with all this manufactured

PHOTO: BBC MOTION GALLERY An unbelievable amount of money (and gold) was spirited out of the country, and corruption flourished.

SEVEN YEARS

G AT E 3 7

After almost seven years in jail, Aquino went on a hunger strike that became lifethreatening due to a weak heart. When news got out, human rights organizations and even Jimmy Carter began to speak out about the Aquino situation. The Marcoses realized they had a public relations situation on their hands, and in a brilliant stroke Imelda went to the prison to set Aquino free—sort of. She would do the humanitarian thing, getting him out of jail and into a heart hospital (one she had built), then eventually to one in the U.S., where conveniently he would be exiled. The pesky opposition and former boyfriend would be gone forever. She told him then, and later at a meeting at the Waldorf in NYC, that he shouldn’t even think of returning… that there were people who would like to see him dead. Not me personally, she might have said, but, you know…

Aquino, now in Boston and recovered from his heart operation, realized he was the only opposition member who could mount a serious threat to the Marcos dictatorship (which is what it now was), and he eventually decided to not take her advice. On August 13, 1983, he said goodbye to Cory and his children at Logan Airport and, via a circuitous route, headed back to Manila. He almost certainly knew they’d be gunning for him, but he figured if he could get through the airport alive he’d stand a chance of being influential. The plane was filled with supporters, reporters, and well-wishers, but upon landing, Aquino was weirdly ushered off the plane by security forces, led down onto the tarmac where no one could see them—and the next moment everyone on the plane heard shots. Aquino lay dead on the ground before his body


PHOTO: AP/WIDE WORLD PHOTOS

PHOTO: STEVE MCCURRY/MAGNUM PHOTOS


Our story ends here. The famous shoes were not discovered until a couple of hours later, when folks entered the palace and discovered them and other signs of the decadent lives that had been hidden from public view. The People Power Revolution, as it came to be called, was prescient; its form— bloodless, popular, and massive—was replicated in the revolutions that ended the Soviet regimes across Eastern Europe and then later in what became known as the Arab Spring. What followed in all these cases was not always the governments or leadership that might have been wished for, but sometimes real and lasting changes did occur. What the Philippine people did was incredible, brave, and beautiful, and if our little show helps it to not be relegated to the back pages of history, then I am very, very happy.

HERE LIES LOVE DAVID BYRNE

PHOTO: KIM KOMENICH, COURTESY OF THE BANCROFT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY


HERE LIES LOVE: THE ROAD TO THE STAGE HOW DID WE GET HERE? About six years ago I had all but given up on this project ever being realized in a theatrical version when I heard that Oskar Eustis at the Public Theater in NYC might be interested. We met and he made it clear that there would be no guarantee, but that we’d take it step by step. (It helped that there was already a recording of many of the songs

interpreted by great singers). He gave the green light to at least do the first of a series of workshops. There would be three of these in this process—the first two being the most critical, as they were in effect tests to see if the concept even worked. The concept being that there would be almost no dialogue and that the setting would be a virtual dance club, of the type that Imelda Marcos used to frequent. Though it could have been killed off at any point, I was encouraged because I sensed that Oskar had no ambition to turn it into something other than what it wanted to be… and if it didn’t seem to work in that form, then at least it wasn’t because it had been compromised. I was game. I had always envisioned the piece taking place in a simulated club setting (Imelda liked discos; she installed a mirror ball in her NYC apartment), so when we met I made that clear—it

shouldn’t, in my opinion, be presented as a proscenium piece. In my mind this concept referenced the “track act” shows I’d seen years ago in large discos—people like Grace Jones or Frieda Payne performing on small stages in dance clubs, singing along live to backing tracks of their hit recordings. There was no band and their shows were short—maybe twenty minutes long. This was all antithetical to the rock aesthetic, though both music scenes were evolving in parallel, sometimes in the same neighborhoods. Some of these acts, like Jones, added theatrical elements to these performances, while others simply gyrated and sang their one or two hits. I envisioned this piece being physically similar—there would be a few small stages around the perimeter of a dance floor, with performers on them backed by video screens. On these stages the various singers would

appear, in character, and sing the songs that would—with the help of the video, costumes and staging—convey the narrative. All while the audience could simultaneously dance and soak up the ambience in which much of the story took place. It would eventually go way beyond these ideas I had initially imagined, thanks to the various collaborators who became integral parts of this project. That process is what I’m going to write about here. Oskar and Jenny Gersten, then the Artistic Director at Williamstown Theatre Festival, suggested I meet with a few directors—I didn’t presume that I might direct it myself; I welcomed the skills others would bring and especially their fresh perspective. One of these was Alex Timbers—and though Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, a pop musical about the U.S. president, was yet to open at


the time, I had seen and loved some other pieces he’d done—Hell House and A Very Merry Scientology Christmas Pageant. In both of those pieces, Alex worked with ‘found’ material, which was, for the most part, left completely intact—something I found very attractive, as many of the song lyrics I used had their origins in found texts: interviews, quotes, speeches, and statements made by historical figures in the Philippines during that era. (Hell House was a faithful recreation of an existing fundamentalist Christian Halloween house, and Christmas Pageant was also what it says, with almost no changes made.) Alex understood immediately that this piece shouldn’t be a conventional musical, which typically has dialogue scenes (book is the term that refers to dialog in the theater world) interspersed with characters intermittently breaking into

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: ALEX, DB, VIDEO DESIGNER PETER NIGRINI, AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR ANDREW SCOVILLE PHOTO: DEBRALEE DACO song. He knew it therefore had to tell the story through other means—the staging, the songs (of course), the video elements, and the costumes—plus, it needed to have the energy typical of a music club.

Oskar suggested that the workshops would determine if that concept would actually work and would help us discover the tone of the piece. These workshops would be done with very little in the way of a sound system (no mics for the singers at first), almost no costumes, lights, sets, or props. In the first workshop we decided to try the first third of the piece rather than attacking the whole thing—and when we were ready we invited only Public Theater staff and a few friends to view the result. The public (lower case) was definitely not invited. During this process we immediately made some changes to my original song lineup. We decided to move “American Troglodyte” to the front slot as a way of both establishing the festive clubby vibe, and letting the audience know something about Filipinos’ inundation and fascination with U.S. pop culture…

and by implication, the U.S. influence over Philippine politics. Opening with “Troglodyte” established right off the bat that you were going to be immersed in this world and also have a lot of fun… but that information, and even history, would still be slipped in—without being didactic. I had an existing collection of politican masks (Kennedy, Nixon, Reagan, etc.) that I had used for an art piece, and Alex suggested that some of the cast use these to visualize the handshake agreements between the U.S. government and that of the Philippines, all while keeping the party vibe going. Then, in the next song, we’d flash back to Imelda’s childhood and begin to establish our characters. This kind of visual storytelling is something Alex does instinctively, and it allowed us to not have lots of expository text in the videos as well as eliminating those pesky dialogue scenes.


This first section (Act I) would take us from the relative poverty of Imelda’s childhood up until her marriage to then senator Ferdinand Marcos. I knew before we even started this process that some of the songs I’d previously written would inevitably get cut—as some were narrative asides, or they didn’t advance the story, or they were repeating some information we already had—so right away “Women in Blue” and “How Are You?” went out the window. It also became apparent that Benigno Aquino would have a larger role than I had previously imagined, so we needed to figure out how to introduce him in Act I. We would need to know a little more about him before he evolved to become the principal Marcos adversary, an adversary who was ultimately assassinated in a national tragedy that eventually triggered the revolution that ousted the Marcoses.

If we were expecting the audience to care when he gets killed later—which would be essential to the story and to us identifying with the feelings of the people—then we needed to know who he was and what he stood for. Though I knew from my research that Aquino and Imelda had dated as adolescents—which was a strange and wonderful bit of information on its own—I didn’t know more than that at the time. So we introduced him not principally and exclusively as a boyfriend of Imelda (not yet anyway) but as a young man on the rise, disillusioned by both his experiences as a journalist in the Korean War and as someone who witnessed his father fall suddenly and completely out of political favor. I came up with a song called “Grew Up Too Soon,” which incorporated quotes from Aquino on these formative experiences and his reaction to them—in his own

words he ‘grew up too soon.’ I imagined him as a firebrand—a charismatic and passionate public speaker who could move people, and so I gave these new songs of his a sort of gospel feel, with Aquino employing the passionate cadences and repetitions of a preacher. Though the real Aquino was certainly a gadfly and employed repetition as a device in his most famous speeches, he was no gospel preacher—so this was taking liberties, a little bit. “Grew Up Too Soon” didn’t work. This kind of unfortunate discovery was what the workshop process was about—trial by fire. The idea of him as a passionate quasi-gospel preacher remained valid—that idea maybe wasn’t totally misguided—but the song itself wasn’t clear enough. I tried tweaking it a couple of times, to see if it could be made to work, but it didn’t quite sell why he felt driven to go into political life, or

the extent that he prioritized politics over his personal life (or at least over his relationship with the young Imelda). We didn’t actually drop the song until a future workshop—but we knew it was an area that needed fixing. Other songs would get the axe too. The song that established the fact that Imelda grew up in relative poverty, as well as the bond between her and her maid Estrella (“Every Drop of Rain”) had beautiful choreography, but eventually it and the song that followed (“You’ll Be Taken

RUTHIE AS IMELDA AND MELODY AS ESTRELLA DOING THE ACT I VERSION OF “HERE LIES LOVE” PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS


Care Of”)—in which Imelda’s mother promised on her deathbed that Estrella would be compensated for her years without pay—would get cut as well. As much as I liked those songs, I had to admit they got the piece off to a bit of a mopey start. Some of the information they conveyed—the bond, the shame, the poverty—was, in my opinion, still essential to convey. Those latter two issues especially became driving forces for the adult Imelda. Her lack of acceptance by the ‘better’ sides of her own extended family would be a ‘problem’ she would deal with again and again. So, much later, I would tweak other songs to get this information across by altering some lyrics or writing and inserting new sections that conveyed some of this information. Most of all, this first workshop, which took place in a dark, stuffy room loaned by NYU, allowed us

(especially Alex) to discover how to tell the story through visual means and how to find an appropriate tone. In my opinion, Alex got the storytelling issue solved almost immediately. He often accomplished that through innovative staging techniques rather than having a character tell you something in words. This, combined with Annie-B Parson’s choreography, was bringing the whole thing to life. Adding lots of dialogue would have made my heart sink. For example, in this act we are introduced

PETER NIGRINI AT WORK PHOTO: JUSTIN LEVINE

to young Senator Marcos via simulated live TV coverage of his senate campaign. This innovative use of video, suggested by Peter Nigrini, told us instantly that he was a charismatic and aggressive up-and-coming politician. No one had to say it—you saw it right in front of you. Jose, the actor who originated the role, even looks a little like the young Marcos, which is a bit ironic as his parents were very much active in the opposition to the Marcos regime. In Alex’s staging you immediately got who Marcos was and what he was doing. The song was now freed to function as more than exposition; one believes this is what the character would naturally be saying at that point. The lyrics are a mixture of actual Marcos campaign quotes and self-improvement rhetoric. In my opinion (and besides having songs that didn’t quite work), we didn’t completely find the right tone for Act I—

that would emerge more successfully in the second workshop about four months later. It was, however, successful enough that Oskar gave us the thumbs up to go ahead with that second workshop. Act II would focus on Imelda’s years of power and glamour, and that would set the stage for the Marcoses’ eventual downfall in Act III. We had a meeting and discussed what Act II would need to accomplish. In advance of this next workshop, which would be held at an unused stage at P.S. 122, I was given an assignment to write more songs and adjust some existing tunes. Alex suggested combining “Pretty Face” and “Don’t You Agree?” into one song, and I agreed to give it a try. (I learned that in theater the writer— that’s me—is boss, so being generous and flexible about trying someone else’s suggestions and new ideas isn’t a total risk.) One of the above songs was


about the Marcoses’ campaigning for president, and the other is about the good works they would do after elected: the hospitals, roads, and schools they promised, and actually did build when they first came to power. Alex had the actors treat us in the audience as if we were the Philippine public—as if they were trying to convince us to elect them—and it worked. By the end of the scene, when Ferdinand Marcos is elected, the audience cheers, and therefore becomes completely complicit in their rise to power. The Aquino story thread was important in this act too, and another song for him, “The Fabulous One,” also written in a preaching, gospel style, was lyrically based on a famous speech he gave to the Philippine Senate called “A Pantheon for Imelda.” Imelda was, by the time of this speech, already First Lady. Aquino attacked her for spending

state funds on a grand cultural center, when people living almost next to it were squatting in shanties with sewage running down the streets. President Marcos didn’t take kindly to Senator Aquino attacking his wife’s projects— that seemed like dirty fighting to Marcos—and Aquino would pay for this insolence later. But now we had established him as a kind of ‘voice of the people,’ who could make known the issues and doubts people were having with the policies of the Marcoses and with their extravagant behavior. I remember later on, when the complete piece was being rehearsed, Oskar suggested that Aquino might also react specifically to Imelda’s visits to New York discos and to the homes of socialites—something we’d just seen and heard in the previous song, “Dancing Together.” I tweaked the first line of the song “The Fabulous One” to reflect this,

CONRAD RICAMORA AS NINOY AQUINO PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS and though it sounded a little clunky lyrically at first, it really helped with the narrative—you had just seen what he was reacting to. I myself wouldn’t have thought of doing that. The songs were becoming less discrete episodes and more continuous points along a narrative that spoke to one another. Alex

also had Ruthie Ann Miles (Imelda) come out on a runway dressed in fur with a glass of champagne at the same time that Aquino is rallying his supporters in response to her decadent ways. A little later in the story, we needed to make clear Imelda’s decision to emotionally distance herself from Marcos and dedicate her love instead to the Philippine people—the song “Star and Slave” was written to do that. The words, as usual, were taken from an anecdote that Imelda conveyed—in this case about recovering from an assassination attempt. I repurposed this weird ‘dream,’ with its ‘Egyptian Queen’ story and the ‘crowd of people praying for me,’ to her recovering from her husband’s infidelity. It worked perfectly, and the title was a quote from her too, though I think I’ve heard that phrase elsewhere. I modeled the song on Tammy Wynette’s “Stand by Your Man,”


not for the subject matter, but on the narrative and emotional arc of the song. Pop songs are usually a snapshot of an emotional moment. In a typical pop song, the singer has the same feeling at the beginning as they do at the end—no change occurs: they’re pissed off, jealous, gloating, sexy, bragging, melancholy, ecstatic. Most pop songs are distilled expressions of a single emotional moment. In musicals, as it was explained to me, each scene is about a decision that a character makes that then pushes the narrative along. Part of the challenge of this whole piece was to NOT do typical musical theater (MT) songs, but to see if songs that were closer to the pop mold could actually convey a story. (The reception this piece got when finally presented proves that it can—with the right staging and other elements.) “Star and Slave” would be one of a

few exceptions to the pop song rule— there had to be change and character development within the song itself. Imelda had to be devastated at the beginning of the song and triumphant at the end. Pretty weird for a pop song—although the disco anthem “I Will Survive” does that (another example I could have emulated). One peculiar aspect of “Stand by Your Man” is that the chorus doesn’t appear until the end—there isn’t another verse and then a second iteration of the chorus. That gave me confidence that this method could work. I’d do a sort of prologue in the song where Imelda is recalling the dream involving the ‘Egyptian Queen,’ and then I’d write verses with her repurposing and redirecting her love for Marcos toward ‘the people,’ and the final chorus would be a total triumphant declaration of independence. It was as close as I would comfortably get

to MT territory. I was thrilled with the result—I’d been gently nudged by my collaborators to write in a way that I’d never tried before. Alex had Imelda rise from her bed, where she had just been sobbing, and then, as she repurposes her love, walk amongst the audience—just like when the Pope mixes with the public in St. Peter’s square on Wednesdays. At the end she ascends to another platform stage, now independent and triumphant. Alex then suggested we needed to go further—he and Oskar both felt we needed to make it clearer that not only was Imelda declaring her independence, but she was also partly declaring that it was she who was in charge now. So, they suggested, we might need yet another song to make that point—that with a sick husband it was Imelda who was running things (well, she and the generals). In response

I repurposed the music from an earlier song, “Walk Like a Woman,” and once again dug into my research and found some quotes from Imelda where she mockingly complained, ‘Now I have to do everything!’ to the cabinet. I also found some quotes from the press department making excuses for the lack of public appearances from the now very sick President Marcos. ‘He’s writing a book, it’s just a small cold, he’s

IMELDA AT THE BEGINNING OF “STAR AND SLAVE” PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS


so overworked’—all were actual press statements given at the time. Maybe, I reasoned, using the music from “Walk Like a Woman” in this new song, “Poor Me,” would be a sonic reminder of the time when Imelda was ready and willing to be made over into a political wife by her then new husband. The leitmotif and the echo of this earlier material was something one could do in this theatrical form. When and if it worked, it might actually add depth to the material. The layering and reminder made you remember the earlier event, and possibly realize how the earlier feeling was now getting twisted and perverted as it played out down the line. By the time we finished the second workshop, we had sketched out rough staging up through this ‘transfer of power,’ as Oskar liked to call it. We’d accomplished a lot. More important for me than telling the story was the fact

that when we finished Act II, I felt the tone had been established and it was a comfortable fit—the concept was, for me, now totally working. We had a LOT of technical stuff to work out—not to mention how to do all of Act III—and a paying audience still hadn’t seen any of this, so who knew if it was really working for anyone outside the project, but proof of concept was settled, in my mind at least. I was overjoyed. I was wary at first of emphasizing Aquino and his relationship with Imelda as much as we were doing—in the literature their dating is mentioned, but just barely. It was all too perfect: the story of a spurned woman exacting revenge and a man who made a decision he later possibly regrets (dumping Imelda). It’s not impossible that these could have been real political motives, even if they were unconscious, as similar psychological motivations are

at work in any country in the world, but it seemed maybe risky—a little too neat. It risked simplifying historical events and reducing a complicated situation to a love triangle. But then, as often happened on this project, I got confirmation from a friend of his that not only was their relationship indeed quite serious, but also that when he boarded the flights that took him back to Manila he almost certainly knew he’d be martyred. Wow—some heavy stuff. That latter bit of information became the source for the song “Gate 37”— him saying goodbye to his family, and his assassination. The workshop that would include Act III (and Acts I and II) took place at the Hunter Center at MASS MoCA, and once again there would be some big changes from the material I had previously written. Back to face the problems with the first Aquino song in Act I, I now wrote

a new one during rehearsals called “Child of the Philippines,” in which Aquino lays out some of his political ambitions. I did a rough demo and Justin Levine added some great keyboard and brass samples. We tried it with a third verse in which Imelda joins him and he then blows her off, but it only sort of worked. We later realized we hadn’t quite solved all of the problems. I had been timid about dealing with what I knew would be the ending of

CAST AND CREW AT MASS MOCA WHEN A FIRE ALARM FORCED US TO TAKE A BREAK PHOTO: EVAN D’ANGELES


our story, the People Power Revolution, but in the eight-month gap between workshops two and three, I knew I had to find a way to tell this part of the story. I wanted to avoid dealing with the revolution by writing a rousing anthem—that seemed both a cliché and maybe something beyond my songwriting skills. To begin the writing process I decided to divide the revolution into two parts: Aquino’s funeral after he is assassinated (which was in some ways the trigger—the precursor—to the People Power Revolution that would follow two and a half years later), and the People Power Revolution itself, which was a manifestation by the Philippine people that resulted in the peaceful ousting of the Marcoses after just four days. To write these songs I needed to jump back into research mode, and I found a treasure trove in the book People

Power: An Eyewitness History, by Monina Allarey Mercado—an oral history of the People Power Revolution that happened to include quotes from Aurora Aquino, Benigno’s mom, about her son as a child and the impact of the massive turnout for his funeral. She said it all. The metaphor she used of her young son as an aspiring drummer was perfect—personal, sentimental, and inspiring. That book had beautiful and moving testimonies from all sorts of people from all walks of life. People who were personally involved in those days realized they were witnessing history and at the same time making it themselves. I was knocked out. What struck me was how utterly banal many of the details were: people mentioned joggers passing by, the TVs in a shop window, the participation of guys from the neighborhood and girls from the office. These everyday references,

combined with what turned out to be a momentous and historical event, was a potent combination. I thought to myself, ‘I can make a song out of this material—the revolution from the point of view of an ordinary person.’ My answer was not to make a rousing anthem, but to zoom into the lives of anonymous participants—the ones who actually made this thing happen. One of those quoted summed up the result by saying, ‘God draws straight, but with crooked lines,’ and I thought, ‘There’s my song title.’ Alex heard my demo and immediately suggested we do it as an acoustic interlude, the way U2 or the Stones might do at one of their stadium shows. Although it was originally not slated to go last (we originally thought it would come before Imelda gets airlifted out of Manila), we eventually realized that nothing could follow “God Draws

Straight” except the curtain call. Though “Why Don’t You Love Me?” sort of takes place during the revolution, it would now have to come before this new song, as the acoustic version would make a perfect and very moving ending. “God Draws Straight” was sung from the point of view of looking back at those events, after all. Not only did we agree that it should be staged like the acoustic interlude in a concert, Alex and lighting director Justin Townsend emphasized that change by killing all the theatrical lighting entirely. We were visually out of the decadent disco and instead all together in a room—performer and audience member alike—like those people in the streets of Manila. Ideally, the theatricality we’d been immersed in for the last eightysome minutes would evaporate and we’d suddenly wake up and find ourselves in the real world, listening to someone tell us what had just happened to them.


public—though MASS MoCA is quite a drive from NY. It was still done on the cheap—thrift store costumes and such (thank you, Andrea)—but we were finally seeing and hearing the whole show, complete with the platforms that served as little stages all positioned around the audience. Alex and production designer David Korins had developed ideas on how to mount this production that went way beyond what I had initially imagined. They proposed that some of those platform/stages might move! This

SET DESIGNER DAVID KORINS AND MUSIC SUPERVISOR KIM GRIGSBY PHOTO: JUSTIN LEVINE

A TEMP VERSION OF THE SET BEING CONSTRUCTED AT MASS MOCA meant that the performing area could be continually reconfigured: sometimes the cast could parade down a runway in the middle of the audience, and sometimes the entire area was cleared so the audience could dance. The audience would be encouraged to not only look at one scene on their right and then the next on their left, but also be urged to move to different parts of the floor as the platform/stages moved. The biggest idea along these lines was

what we referred to as the flotilla: a whole stage, with actors singing on it, would move from one end of the room to the other. Just prior to this the audience would have switched places with the actors—the audience members would move up to a stage and the actors would end up mostly down on the floor where the audience was previously standing. This worked as a perfect metaphor as well, as the revolution moved into high gear. After the workshop at MASS MoCA, I was ecstatic. I felt the piece worked beautifully and was anxious to get it mounted in NY, but there were still more songs to write. As we began rehearsing upstairs in the former Astor Library space, we had the opportunity to take a new look at Act I. I wrote some new parts for the first Imelda song that I hoped made her relationship with Estrella and her relative poverty more clear, and began

work on a song that would make the Imelda/Aquino breakup make more sense, in the hopes that “Child of the Philippines” didn’t have to carry that dual burden anymore. I did a kind of electro-style song called “Opposites Attract” not knowing there had been a Paula Abdul song by the same name. Oops. Luckily, titles can’t be copyrighted, so I stuck with that theme—that he’s saying they are just too different as people to be a couple and she says that love will heal all their differences. But my music wasn’t quite cutting it. I knew this would be the last song (fingers crossed) I wrote for this show, so looking back to the beginnings of the whole project I dug into the archive of Fatboy Slim beats that Norm had sent my way when this thing was getting started. I found some beats and riffs I’d overlooked, and rewrote the song as


“Opposite Attraction” for both Aquino and Imelda to sing. Alex staged it like a second boy-band number after “Child of the Philippines” and had the young Cory Aquino symbolically appear in an incredible Filipino flag dress that Clint Ramos whipped up. It worked. Now the real sound team was involved in the show and we had speakers everywhere. We tried localizing the vocals—having them come from the left, for example, if that’s where the actor was—and it was nice when it directed your attention to the actor who might not be in your current line of sight. But sometimes it also made for some weird balance issues, so we had to be careful. There was no live band—there was never a live band with those ‘track acts’ that played in dance clubs, so that localizing had a certain logic to it. Annie-B Parson had been choreographing this thing from the

beginning, and had stoically dealt with having to restage and rechoreograph songs and scenes many times over, to say nothing of dealing with the new songs I kept bringing in. I love the way her work fit into this piece—someone else would have turned it into a discovoguing-soul-train cliché. She brings her own movement vocabulary, which is just odd enough to not be all vernacular dance quotes and familiar moves, while remaining fun and accessible. Like me, she doesn’t come from the MT world,

ANNIE B PARSON AND HER ASSISTANT LIZZIE DEMENT PHOTO: JUSTIN LEVINE

so we were similarly challenged and sometimes fish out of water. Clint brought in the real costumes little by little during these rehearsals. There were lots of breakaway outfits so that actors could pop out of costume right on stage. Imelda’s wedding dress was modeled on her real one, and the various butterfly sleeve outfits typical of the era were made in the Philippines. These all actually helped tell the story; they weren’t just a parade of extravagance (though there was that too). Kim Grigsby coached the actors in singing together, harmonizing, and how to make these songs sound ‘pop,’ as opposed to MT. I watched more or less in awe, as she could articulate how to make a vowel sound match and how to vocally form a note in ways I hadn’t often been aware of and certainly didn’t know how to put into words. When we were finally ready we had

BREAKAWAY DRESSES WORN DURING “ROSE OF TACLOBAN” PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS a few weeks of previews before the actual opening. One is allowed to make changes during the preview period, which are performed in front of a live audience, and the critics know to stay away. They know that if they review a show while it is in previews they’d be shunned by the theater community, and besides, the show may not end up exactly like the version they review if significant changes are made. Most of us in the creative team would


join the audience during these previews, notepads in hand. I would take my notes, but if my comment concerned staging or acting I’d whisper it to Alex, and defer to him. Similarly if it were about a vocal performance I’d go to Kim and let her decide if it warranted a comment or fix or not. As is typical in the theater, Alex would similarly defer to me, the author, if he felt some lyric, text, or arrangement could be improved. Matt Stein did a lot of musical mix improvements at this point—adding dance-remix-type sections and working the dynamic of the song recordings. The flotilla became an issue for me. It is such a brilliant idea, but moving this whole piece of stage and then moving the audience up onto another stage—well I honestly wondered if it wasn’t taking the audience out of the show too much. It eventually became a priority to get that bit of business working. There was some

set adjusting and fixing, but mostly it came down to practice—the amazing stagehands and audience wranglers on this show were essential to its success. They make the audience feel secure and didn’t interfere with the attention that needed to be focused on the stages. When they move the platforms (and the flotilla) they learned to do so with musical timing, as if they too were all choreographed. We opened to very favorable reviews, but I really think it was the word of mouth that helped the piece sell out for pretty much the entire first run. I myself would dance, laugh, and, yes, cry almost every time I sat in as a member of the audience. And I knew it backward and forward! I think it’s something about the skillful way my collaborators and the actors helped pull this together, but, just as much, I think my emotional reaction had a lot to do with the fact that these events actually happened.

Every time I saw it I had thoughts that would break my heart—I’d empathize with Imelda, and her neediness, her need to be loved, her self-delusions and public delusions. I’d see Aquino, not a perfect man, but a man who became the man he could be—a man who stepped forward when the time came. And the Philippine people, who similarly got willingly seduced by this glamorous couple, as the audience does, and then, finding themselves pushed and abused beyond endurance, react not with revenge or with violence, but with a calm and peaceful unity that gives us a glimpse of what human beings are capable of at their very best. I can’t take any credit for any of that and how deeply moving and inspiring it is—it actually happened.

DAV ID BY RNE

DEC 11 2013


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project has been emerging for a long time. Lots of people were involved in it at various points along the way. Their contributions and suggestions are not always apparent in this present version of the piece, but without them it wouldn’t have gotten to where it is. Years ago, Marc Geiger at William Morris casually suggested that Fatboy Slim might be a good person for me to work with, though he had no idea it would turn out like this. In thinking through the theatrical possibilities, Marianne Weems was incredibly helpful and supportive. Kim Whitener helped with an early live version and Jim Taylor had suggestions that only a great screenwriter would think of. Jim Findlay

and Steve Luber helped us as well. That version didn’t happen, but it was part of the process. Oskar Eustis and Jenny Gersten took an interest and the development began in earnest. Thanks to all the staff at the Public who were involved with this, and to the creative team—Alex Timbers (Director), Kim Grigsby (MD), Clint Ramos and Andrea Hood (Costumes), Alaina Taylor (SM), Matt Stine and Justin Levine (Music), Peter Nigrini (Video), Annie-B Parson (Choreography), David Korins (Sets), Justin Townsend (Lighting), and the incredible cast and crew. In the Philippines, Butch Perez, Jessica Zafra, Joel Torre, and Krip Yuson were invaluable, and the path to them was opened by Mario Ontal via John Sayles. Thanks to Ms. Lia Sweet, Nan Lanigan & Ilene Bashinsky at RZO; Frank,LeeAnn & Jasper at Todomundo!; David Whitehead at Maine Road, and everyone at Nonesuch.

HERE LIES LOVE CAST AND CREW PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS Special thanks to all of my family and friends who offered support, criticism, and suggestions: Cindy Sherman, Ford Wheeler, Sally Singer, and many others.

And most of all, thanks to the Philippine people, whose story this is, who set an example for the whole world to follow.


DISC 1 01. AMERICAN TROGLODYTE M A L E EN S:

I could be a dancer, maybe, I could be a judge
 Used to sing that karaoke… but I, I don’t do it much Democracy in action, 
 there is nothin’ up my sleeve
 A watermelon postcard, I am 
plantin’ all my seeds

Americans are livin’ the simple life Americans are dancin’ on Friday night Americans are goin’ to Broadway shows Americans believe in the Holy Ghost Americans are wearin’ that lingerie Americans are throwin’ that shit away Americans are watchin’ reality Americans are goin’ from A to Z Americans are dancin’ in discothèques Americans are payin’ their income tax Americans are workin’ from 9 to 5 Americans are livin’ like troglodytes

ALL (w/o I MEL DA):

Americans are goin’ to outer space
 Americans are buyin’ that real estate
 Americans are wearing those sexy jeans Americans can be what they wanna be Americans are buyin’ that modern art
 Americans are drivin’ gigantic cars
 Americans are doin’ that exercise
 Americans are livin’ like troglodytes Americans are playin’ that basketball Americans are doin’ that rock and roll

02. HERE LIES LOVE IMELDA:

Though I’m just a young girl from Leyte Whose dresses are all hand-me-downs and scraps I’d see the people smile, when I would sing for them How happy they all seem when I would dance

The ladies passing by— The most important things are love and beauty It doesn’t matter if you’re rich or poor To prosper and to fly, a basic human right The feeling in your heart that you’re secure Is it a sin to love too much? Is it a sin to care? I do it all for you—how can it be unfair? I know that when my number’s up When I am called by God above Don’t have my name inscribed into the stone… Just say: Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love ESTRE LLA : We live a stone’s throw from the palace

I M E LDA :

A simple country girl who has a dream ESTRE LLA / FE M A LE E N S :

IME L DA / F E M A L E E N S :

A better class than I How much it means to me to be like these EST R E LL A / F E M A L E E N S :

At least we have each other The neighbors pass us food IME L DA / F E M A L E E N S :

No clothes, no bed, no jewelry Sometimes I had no shoes A LL :

Is it a sin to love too much? Is it a sin to care? I do it all for you—how can it be unfair? I know that when my number’s up When I am called by God above Don’t have my name inscribed into the stone… Just say Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love… Just say


03. CHILD OF THE PHILIPPINES AQ U I NO :

This song right here is going out To all my Filipinos going through the struggle You may feel like nobody sees you But Aquino’s got your back… Now listen up: Once upon a time, I was a little prince Anything I wanted, anything I wished But money can burn you, and it won’t set you free Though my friends stuck around— I knew that I had to leave All around our land I see hatred and fear Where is the kindness? Where now, my dear? Can our country be healed? Can it change and be strong? Will the answers come soon? We have waited so long

Now listen up: I am a child of the Philippines From Calayan to Lake Sebu And I—I’m a young man, a young man in a hurry But you—you know that those miracles They might… Come true

AQU I NO:

Now when you walked in the room, I just had to say, “Ahh” And with you by my side, uh, I know we’ll go far

They might… Come true AQ U IN O :

I see you, Imelda!

Anything you want—ev’rything you do Love is gonna change the bad into good

I think they can come true We can educate our children! And we can unionize our workers! We can give our people a break Come on, let’s give our people a break! You say—

IMELDA:

AQU I NO:

A LL :

Hey, Aquino!

But we have waited so long, now a change will come soon And if you put me in charge, hey, well that’s what I’d do Help me out, fellas:

Give our people a break!

A LL:

A LL :

I am a child of the Philippines From Calayan to Lake Sebu And this—this is our land— a land that’s in a hurry But you—you know that those miracles

Give our people a break!

AQU INO:

Girl, you better bring that pretty face over here ’Cause… You make me wanna, you make me wanna Dream a little dream, with a girl just like you IMELDA:

It’s not a dream, and you know that it’s good

I M E LDA :

AQ U IN O :

Come on, let’s give our people a break! Lemme hear it—

AQ U IN O :

Lemme hear it! Give our people a break! You say—


ALL :

Give our people a break! AQ U I NO :

Just give ’em a break! Yeah!

0 4 . O P P O S I T E AT T R A C T I O N I M E L DA:

Come on, boys I say—ev’ryone needs love, and to love in return But you say—you’ve got to change the world, well that’s alright ’Cause I say—no one lives by bread, by bread alone But you say—people got to have a home, that’s what you say But I say… Opposite attraction Like magnetism, or the pieces of a puzzle It’s a natural reaction

Now baby it’s sick, and I think that I’m in trouble Now we’re diff’rent as we can be And the fit is pretty good it seems We’re so tight it wanna make you scream But that’s why opposites attract for real Yeah, opposites attract for real AQU INO:

You know me—I got to speak my mind No matter what the cost—and you say… IMELDA:

Boy, don’t you leave me behind AQU INO:

AQU I NO:

But I say, ooh girl We’re living in a world—a world so real Opposite attraction Though we keep tryin’ there’s an awful lot of distance An emotional reaction Now I’m taking my shot and I need to make a diff’rence Now we’re diff’rent as we can be And politics puts you to sleep I understand the pain you feel Now it’s sad the way this has to end So baby can we still be friends? And I know someday you will understand

That’s what you say… You say

0 5 . T H E R O S E O F TA C L O B A N IMELDA:

I M E LDA :

I say that love is all—it’s all we need

I wrote inside my yearbook “To try is to succeed Fried chicken and the rumba

The colors pink and cream” Ninoy was my first love But he said I was too tall A rich girl stole the sweetheart Of the Rose of Tacloban The heart grows slightly colder Necessary to survive And money makes it easy In many people’s lives The sky above protects us Don’t know what I will become Or what lies beyond tomorrow For the Rose of Tacloban Elegant women on a magazine page Elegant women, like a paper parade I don’t go out dancing, I just stay at home Cutting out their faces, and replacing them with my own Cutting out their faces, and replacing


The sky above protects us Don’t know what I will become Or what lies beyond tomorrow For the Rose of Tacloban What lies beyond tomorrow For the Rose… Of Tacloban

06. A PERFECT HAND M A R C OS:

They occupied our country We were almost overrun I knew if I did not react They’d kill us, ev’ryone I promised to my mother She meant so much to me That for ev’ry single tear she shed There’d be a victory That for ev’ry single tear she shed There’d be a victory Who’s holding aces? And who’s gonna fold?

And who’s got a secret? And who’s feeling bold? It’s a winning combination If a lady understands That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand So know what you are holding But be prepared to bluff There are many ways to win a game But skill is not enough There are many ways to win a game But skill is not enough Who’s holding aces? And who’s gonna fold? And who’s got a secret? And who’s feeling bold? It’s a winning combination

If a lady understands That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand

If a lady understands That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand That the king and the queen of hearts Could be a perfect hand

In the senate or in business But most of all in love You ladies all know how things work You know how to get things done And if you open the door for a lady You open the door for yourself And a stranger’s only someone That you have yet to help

0 7. E L E V E N D A Y S

M A RC OS/ E NS:

Who’s holding aces? And who’s gonna fold? And who’s got a secret? And who’s feeling bold? It’s a winning combination

IME L DA :

He’s so fast, tell me what’s his name? It was only a moment, but I don’t feel the same He gave me—two roses He gave me—two roses One is open One is closed One is the future And one is my love— Eleven days—since the moment we met Eleven days—I will never forget Eleven diamonds—on the ring that he gave I haven’t seen him—in eleven days


What am I doin’? Must be out of my mind He just pulled out the paper and I signed on the line He gave me—two roses He gave me—two roses One is open One is closed One is the future And one is my love—

Two important families A glorious occasion A foretold destiny I followed in the morning papers How exciting it has been The courtship and the whirlwind romance For the sweetest of beauty queens

EST R ELL A:

He’s crazy for you Who wouldn’t be, I’m sure And nothing matters more than that And you’ll never be poor no more— How she looked when she passed by How she looked when she passed by I feel like I’m watching history Living before my eyes

I heard that you were getting married I always knew that you’d do well You’re a legendary beauty From our small provincial town Ilocos joined to Leyte

And many years from now We’ll recall just how How she looked when she passed by I know that you are in there somewhere

Eleven days—since the moment we met Eleven days—I will never forget Eleven diamonds—on the ring that he gave I haven’t seen him—in eleven days

08. WHEN SHE PASSED BY

Letters get misplaced in the mail I guess that there was some confusion Amidst those throngs and swells Did you see me outside? Did you see me wave? When you passed in your car Ah well, that’s okay— How she looked when she passed by How she looked when she passed by I feel like I’m watching history Living before my eyes And many years from now We’ll recall just how How she looked when she passed by

09. SUGARTIME BABY I M E LDA :

People ask me how we started I tell them it’s true I was just a simple salesgirl

When I ran into you MARCOS:

I took one look at you Sitting there with your friends Had I seen you before? Now my whole life has changed IME L DA / MA R C O S :

Now I’m walking on air Through these tropical streets We’re from different worlds Love has power to heal Sugartime baby honeymoon Lucky for me, crazy for you Puffy white clouds both near and far Flowers exploding in my heart You never know where love is found God only knows where we are bound P R ES S AT TAC H É :

What a picture they make


I’m so proud of us all And the whole world can see They’re our Jackie and John Now the man from the north And the Tacloban rose Make a beautiful dream And how far they will go I M E L DA/MAR CO S:

Sugartime baby honeymoon Lucky for me, crazy for you Puffy white clouds both near and far Flowers exploding in my heart You never know where love is found God only knows where we are bound

10. WALK LIKE A WOMAN I M E L DA/FEMAL E EN S:

He taught me—how to do it He taught me—lightly He taught me—you’ll get through it

He taught me—nightly IMELDA:

bright yellow pills he gave me Remind yourself what you’re doing it for It’s for love—it’s for love It’s for love—in your head, there’s nothing wrong with your heart

And to be married to such a man I can’t believe how lucky I am I am so lucky, so lucky to be Never poor no more, I have all that I need

1 1 . D O N ’ T Y O U A G R E E ? | P R E T T Y FA C E

IMELDA/F EMALE E NS:

FE M A LE SOLO:

I’m going to learn how to walk like a woman I’m going to learn how to dress, how to dance I’m going to learn how to make an impression Do anything for the love of this man

With my heart and with my skin From town to town and back again With my skin and with my soul How each one cries when he’s alone

IMELDA:

And if he loved me on the day we met Then why must I be someone else? The girl he married—now is that still me? “Who am I now?” I ask myself And if I bang my head on the wall for hours Then I won’t feel the confusion no more The New York doctor—

And here we are, convention center Traveled so far, crossed many rivers No time to rest, no time to sleep Keep movin’ on my tired feet Sometimes you need a hero Can’t make it on your own Sometimes we need a strongman When things out of control Don’t you agree—agree with me?

Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree—agree with me? Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree? MARCOS:

Will you reach into your pockets To show us that you care For the orphans and the farmers Ev’ryone gives their share IME L DA :

I feel so guilty when I’m resting Though I rise at early dawn For ev’ry hour that passes I could have helped someone IME L DA / MA R C O S :

And we’ll show the world What a country girl can change We’ll show the whole wide world That we have a pretty face F E MA L E E N S :

Pretty face, pretty face,


IM E L DA:

pretty face have we

A thousand miles of concrete Schools and dams and parks Two thousand day care centers And a center for the arts

ALL:

Don’t you agree—agree with me? Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree—agree with me? Don’t you agree? Don’t you agree?

M AR C OS:

There will always be poor people Got to teach them how to care If a hospital is needed Ev’ry business gives its share IM E L DA/MAR CO S:

And we’ll show the world What a country girl can change We’ll show the whole wide world That we have a pretty face F E M AL E EN S:

Pretty face, pretty face, pretty face have we Pretty face, pretty face,

Ali Hassan, Margot Fonteyn Christina Onassis and the Queen of Spain Beautiful women in beautiful homes Just out of reach if your skin’s colored brown I M E LDA /A LL:

12. DANCING TOGETHER IMELDA:

Went to the house of Mary Lasker Saw Matisse, Picassos, Renoirs and Gauguins Golf course and flowers, statues and stables I met a Whitney, Rockefeller and Brown! IMELDA/ALL:

And they were dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—so beautifully Dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—oh, as if in a dream IMELDA:

And they were dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—so beautifully Dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—oh, as if in a dream I M E LDA :

Charles Jourdan, Oleg Cassini There was Andy Warhol and Hannae Mori Beautiful products all over the table Fills my heart up with thoughts of my people I M E LDA / FE M A LE E N S :

He taught me—how to do it He taught me—lightly He taught me—you’ll get through it

He taught me—nightly F E MA L E S O LO :

Breakfast with George, disco with George It must be us who truly serve! IME L DA /A LL :

And they were dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—so beautifully Dancin’—dancing together Dancin’—oh, as if in a dream Dancin’!


13. THE FABULOUS ONE ALL :

I’ma rise up, I’ma rise up AQ U I NO :

Out ev’ry night in New York and Paris Champagne and dancing, while back here at home People barely surviving, they’re living in shanties Our country’s in trouble, but her party goes on! Now I have risen—at the risk of her ire And I have risen—at the risk of her scorn And I have risen—at the risk of her fury While that monument rises, for the— The fabulous one, the fabulous one You know who I’m talking about— the fabulous one Out on her yacht—bacchanalian feasts On the palace roof, they party till dawn Now a cultural center for Callas and

Bernstein That monument rises for the fabulous one Now, now I have risen—at the risk of her ire And I have risen—at the risk of her scorn And I have risen—at the risk of her fury While that monument rises, for the— The fabulous one, she’s so… Fabulous A ghetto sprawls and I am revolted Houses of cardboard, no medical care Misuse of money and a monument rises The stench of the toilets, but it’ll stand there Come on, let me hear you say, “Rise up!” ALL:

I’ma rise up! I’ma rise up!

14. MEN WILL DO ANYTHING

FEMALE SOLO:

You play around with that woman Didn’t you know I cared?

Walking ’round, ev’ryone can see A sleazy cheap affair What’s the matter with me, baby? Am I not good enough for you? If you prefer that slut—OK I’ll tell you what we’ll do FE M A LE SOLO/ E N S :

Men will do anything For a little peace of mind Men will do anything That’s how you keep them in line Men will do anything For some sweet tranquility And men—will do anything And there’s nothing you can do to me

Like a poor little mangy puppy With his tail between his legs If you catch them fooling around Outside the mosquito net F E M A L E S O LO/ E N S :

Men will do anything

DISC 2 0 1 . S TA R A N D S L AV E IM E L DA :

FE M A LE SOLO:

Last night I had a dream that I was back in Leyte I dreamed I was barely alive, but I could still see Then a woman in white approached my bed This Egyptian queen, she could raise the dead

Do anything that you want them to If you leave them on their own They’ll sign here on the dotted line If you ignore what they have done

And a crowd of people, they were praying in there for me And this crowd of people, they were


singing their songs for me And I can feel it now, their faith and affection Feel that I, I’m their Pygmalion Now, I sit up—in the dream I rise —and I, I come back To the river of life, now I rejoin the river of life Now my personal life— that old life is over And I’ll serve my country for the rest of my days And I, oh I thank God— we know how to make money Now I, I am the people’s star— star and slave Now it’s because of you that happiness lives here And I’ll give you my love, now it’s my turn to say

That if, if it is true, that you shall enslave me Well it’s because of you, nothing can stand in my way Let me be your star and slave And my personal life— well let them take it away I can’t be hurt anymore, by those things that they say Let it come, let it come, let it come what may Let me be… Your star—star and slave

02. POOR ME MARCOS:

Oh Imelda, light of my world My queen of hearts, for all of these years Come back to me, don’t leave me alone For there is darkness, when you are not here

I M E LDA :

Putang ina mo! You deserve to be sick! In public no less—what you did to me! How can a titi mo run the country? It takes a woman to do a man’s job M A RC OS:

I’ll be up and about In a matter of days She, she meant nothing to me I’ll never do it again

Poor me—I learned to walk like a woman Now I’m strong— nothing can stand in my way P R ES S AT TAC H ÉS / E N S :

Our President’s fine—how to do it He’s doing OK—lightly Our President’s fine—you’ll get through it I saw him today—nightly P R ES S AT TAC H ÉS / IM E L DA :

The President’s fine—it’s a slight allergy Well he’s doing OK—you know he’s writing a book Our President’s fine—it’s just a small cold Now, our President’s fine—you know he’s so overworked

Our President’s fine— now I have to do ev’rything He’s doing OK— I’m their star and their slave Our President’s fine— I learned to walk like a woman I saw him today— nothing can stand in my way

I M E LDA / FE M A LE E N S :

M A R C O S / F E MA L E E N S :

Poor me—now I have to do ev’rything Poor me—I’m their star and their slave

Oh Imelda, light of my world— poor me, how to do it

P RESS AT TAC H ÉS:


Come back to me, don’t leave me alone—poor me, you’ll get through it Now I’m strong—nightly IM E L DA:

Let me be your star and slave

03. PLEASE DON’T

IM E L DA:

The world—they want—to criticize us Greed, injustice and dominance A woman—a woman knows—knows relationships That’s why, why I make, make my little trips

Please don’t! Like they used to do to me Ronald Reagan, Mao Zedong— they’re all the same Kissinger, Anwar Sadat—let me explain First we talk a bit, a little dance— champagne on ice An hour or two, relationship—we’re friends for life! Please don’t! Don’t let them look down on us Please don’t! Like they used to do to me

So if there’s a problem We do the Filipino way No we don’t need the President I’ll get my little bag and say:

Nixon, Castro, Zhou Enlai Qaddafi is easy, and I’ll tell you why A woman knows, just how to do— only rub his leg He understood my point of view, so I don’t have to beg!

Please don’t! Don’t let them look down on us

Please don’t! Don’t let them look down on us

Please don’t! Like they used to do to me Please don’t! Don’t let them look down on us Please don’t! Like they used to do to me

EST R E LL A :

So take back all your money Although I need it more than you Just acknowledge that you knew me On Solano Avenue

04 . SOLANO AVENUE ESTRE LLA :

What did I do to make you mad? I swear I only told the truth And none of this could hurt you now And it’s no insult to be poor So take back all your money Although I need it more than you Just acknowledge that you knew me On Solano Avenue

When they teased you on the street When they hurt you deep inside To me it was that you came running And I held you when you cried So take back all your money Although I need it more than you Just acknowledge that you knew me On Solano Avenue

05. RIOTS AND BOMBS I M E LDA :

I used to think that we were friends It’s not my fault that you are poor These things you want won’t make you happy I’ll help you feel that you’re secure

06. ORDER 1081 WO MA N 1:

A bomb went off this morning— raining bodies on TV They are blaming the insurgents,


they are blocking off the streets And the smoke is rising slowly, from the barrel of a gun The solution to disruption—Order 1081 WO M AN 2: Now the sunsets are incredible across Manila Bay You can hear the bombers landing at the U.S. Air Force base And somewhere in the distance, far beyond the setting sun They will sign a proclamation— Order 1081 WO M AN 3:

Now we live down by the water in a shack that’s made of wood And the bankers need to huddle—so they need some extra room We will find us somewhere better, there’s enough for everyone Got a perfect explanation—Order 1081

WOMAN 4 : I thought I ordered buko, but they gave me 7Up Got to clear away these shanties and these ugly nipa huts So the seeds of our great future, they can grow here when we’re done And it’s clearly all because of Order 1081 WOMAN 1:

For thirty days the rain fell, we were nearly washed away The radio fell silent, nothing left to do but pray And the President, he told us the guerrillas are on the run And the reason they are hiding?— Order 1081

can’t hear what he says Now it’s safe to walk the streets at night—a new world has begun Ev’rybody’s sleeping soundly thanks to 1081

IME L DA / F E M A L E E N S :

0 7. S E V E N Y E A R S

IME L DA :

I M E LDA :

Ninoy, you were my first love But you said I was too tall The heart gets stronger and grows colder For the Rose of Tacloban But Ninoy now, now I’m asking you To take back all those things you said You’ll be safer in America And there are those who’d see you dead

For seven years you’ve been in here Seven years down in the hole—they said “Your watch, your glasses and your wedding ring You won’t need them anymore” AQU I NO:

What brings you here, amongst us criminals Have you not done enough to me?

WOMAN 2 :

I M E LDA :

They are planting plastic flowers on the seaside esplanade The Pope is speaking Spanish, but we

I heard a voice say, “Go and help him now” So I have come to set you free

Santo Niño, Santo Niño Take good care of him Santo Niño, Santo Niño Take good care of him

AQ U IN O :

It’s my country that I’m leaving I’ll keep it with me, it’s never far You must know that I’m not guilty You must know it in your heart


to be saying goodbye? Do you know what it means that this might be forever? I might be seeing you now for the very last time

I might be seeing you now for the very last time

I M E L DA/FEMAL E EN S:

AQU INO:

09. JUST ASK THE FLOWERS

Santo Niño, Santo Niño Take good care of him

I can hear the announcement, as they call China Airlines This bulletproof vest, it’s the best we can do But the chances are slim, and if the truth it be told ’Cause if they aim for my head, then it won’t do me much good

AQU I NO’S M OTH E R :

I M E L DA:

Ninoy, remember a long time ago You used to walk me to my home Ninoy, don’t be a hero Promise me you won’t come back

0 8 . G AT E 3 7 AQ U I NO :

So hold me now, Cory and Benny You know this thing, it’s bigger than me I’ve got to do this alone, so it’ll draw less attention But it hurts me so much, now it’s time I must leave AQ U I NO/MAL E EN S:

Now you’re all gathered here, here at gate 37 Do you know what it means

AQU INO/MALE ENS :

Now you’re all gathered here, here at gate 37 Do you know what it means to be saying goodbye? Do you know what it means that this might be forever?

Now you’re all gathered here, here at gate 37

When I asked my son what do you want to be I was a little surprised, when he said to me: I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together Now I watch the procession,

as his body goes by Half the country is here, but they won’t see me cry Ten thousand or more and they’ve waited for hours When I asked, “Why are you here?” They said, “Just ask the flowers” They said, “Just ask the flowers” Yeah, just ask the flowers, “Tama na, sobra na” We put up with so much, but this is going too far— I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together


And my son was a drummer, this I now understand That day something was born in those afternoon showers And the reason they’re here— you need just ask the flowers Just ask the flowers Yeah, just ask the flowers, “Tama na, sobra na” We put up with so much, but this is going too far— I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together I wanna be a drummer, Mom— I wanna be a drummer I got to call the people, Mom— and get ’em all together ALL :

Oh yeah!

10. WHY DON’T YOU LOVE ME?

ESTRE LLA :

M A R C O S / F E MA L E S O LO :

IMELDA:

How can you say this? And when did you change? You used to love me Was it just pretend? Why don’t you love me? Why don’t you love me?

When I did ev’rything—

Why don’t you love me? I gave you my life I gave you my time What more could I do? I’m broken inside Why don’t you love me? What’s a woman to do? Why don’t you love me? Do I mean so little to you? It’s been—so long—our lives— What’s wrong—what’s right? I did ev’rything Ev’rything was for you Why don’t you love me? Why don’t you love me?

M A RC OS:

Just look at Nixon They tore him apart How could you be so hard? I gave you my heart FE M A LE SOLO:

Does it add up to nothing The years that we’ve been through ESTRE LLA :

And how can you say this to me

EST R E LL A :

Ev’rything was for you A LL :

Why don’t you love me? Why don’t you love me? Why? IME L DA :

Remind yourself what you did it all for It’s for love


11. GOD DRAWS STRAIGHT M A L E SO LO :

As I left my house, as I walked out today Thought I’d walked out my marriage— thought I’d walked out on grace As the dawn it was breaking, at the end of the street I didn’t know what would happen— didn’t know what I’d see I saw two transit buses block the road on our side Saw a couple of joggers who chanced to run by Saw some soldiers come out and they mixed with the crowd Tears came to my eyes, we’re just walking around Well there’s so many people— ev’rybody is here I saw the girls from the office— I saw those guys from the street

You might think you are lost, but then you will find That God draws straight, but with crooked lines I saw a matron in white, her face lifted to heaven I saw nuns on their knees, and some who were weeping Saw a middle-aged man, and a government clerk An Afro Mestizo held his rosary up I saw nobody leave— I didn’t feel fear or terror It felt like a movie, like the end of an era Nobody got hurt, and nobody died I’ll remember this day— I’ll remember this time And there’s so many people— ev’rybody is here

I saw the girls from the office— I saw those guys from the street You might think you are lost, but then you will find That God draws straight, but with crooked lines As I turned on my Walkman and all I could hear Ev’ry station was Marcos— he’s on ev’ry TV An appliance store window— he fills ev’ry screen Then the TVs went blank and his face disappeared Then the darkness it thickened, there was no time for choices Half blind I ran, I was guided by voices When the choppers took off leaving Malacañang We knew it was over, knew it was the end

And there’s so many people— ev’rybody is here I saw the girls from the office— the whole country it seems You might think you are lost, but then you will find That God draws straight, but with crooked lines Yeah God draws straight, but with crooked lines

1 2 . H E R E L I E S L O V E ( C U R TA I N C A L L ) IME L DA :

When I was a young girl in Leyte My dresses were all hand-me-downs and scraps I’d see the people smile, when I would sing for them How happy they all seemed when I would dance Is it a sin to love too much? Is it a sin to care?


I do it all for you—how can it be unfair? IM E L DA/EN S:

I know that when my number’s up When I am called by God above Don’t have my name inscribed into the stone… Just say Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love… Just say Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love I know that when my number’s up When I am called by God above Don’t have my name inscribed into the stone… Just say Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love… Just say Here lies love, here lies love, here lies love

CAST ALBUM CREDITS Most DB guitars and programming recorded at South Hell Studio, NYC and Malu’s Motel Vocal recording: Patrick Dillett at his studio Additional engineering by David Groener, Simon Akkermans and Jonathan Altschuler Vocal Supervisor: Kimberly Grigsby Music Associate (vocal scores): Scotty Arnold Orchestra Contractor: Garo Yellin Mixed by Patrick Dillett at his studio Mastered by Greg Calbi at Sterling Sound, NYC Production Management: Frank Hendler, Jasper Berg, Rebecca Sherman, Steven Showalter, Brian Hultgren Design: Doyle Partners Art Supervision: LeeAnn Rossi Press: Sacks & Co. Artist Management: David Whitehead at Maine Road (DB) and Garry Blackburn at Anglo Plugging (FBS) Cover Photograph: Slim Aarons/Hulton Archive/Getty Images Production Photography by Joan Marcus Marcos Family Portrait by Ralph Cowan David Byrne is published by Moldy Fig Music, Inc. (BMI). Fatboy Slim and Cagedbaby are published by ASongs Publishing (ASCAP). Los Amigos Invisibles is published by Universal Music Publishing (ASCAP).


Here Lies Love was originally produced and presented by The Public Theater, April – July 2013 Concept and Lyrics: David Byrne Music: David Byrne and Fatboy Slim Additional Music: Tom Gandey, J Pardo Direction: Alex Timbers Choreography: Annie-B Parson Set Design: David Korins Costume Design: Clint Ramos Lighting Design: Justin Townsend Sound Design: M.L. Dogg and Cody Spencer Projections: Peter Nigrini Music Supervisor: Kimberly Grigsby Collaborating Music Producer: Justin Levine Music Editor: Matt Stine Fight Director: Jacob Grigolia-Rosenbaum Production Stage Manager: Alaina Taylor Associate Artists Director: Mandy Hackett Associate Producer: Maria Goyanes General Manager: Steven Showalter Production Executive: Ruth E. Sternberg Artistic Director: Oskar Eustis Executive Director: Patrick Willingham

WITH: Melody Butiu (Estrella), Jose Llana (Marcos), Kelvin

Moon Loh (D. J.), Ruthie Ann Miles (Imelda), Conrad Ricamora (Aquino), and Renée Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez (Ensemble)

DISC 1 01. AMERICAN TROGLODYTE (D. Byrne, N. Cook, J. Pardo) Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario,

Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Jeigh Madjus, Ruthie Ann Miles, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Rhodes Piano: Armando Figueredo Synth: Cagedbaby Guitar: David Byrne Guitar: José Luis (Cheo) Pardo Bass: José Rafael Torres Sequencer, Programming: Fatboy Slim Music produced by: Los Amigos Invisibles, Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, and Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Los Amigos Invisibles at Gozadera Studios, NYC, Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, and Patrick Dillett at his studio 02. HERE LIES LOVE (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Melody Butiu Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez,

Debralee Daco, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez

Keyboards: Cagedbaby Guitar: David Byrne Programming, Synth Bass: Fatboy Slim Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Viola: David Gold Cello: Garo Yellin Trumpet: CJ Camerieri French Horn: Greg Smith Trombone: Michael Seltzer Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: Rick Heckman Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Avatar Studios, NYC 03. CHILD OF THE PHILIPPINES (D. Byrne) Lead Vocals: Conrad Ricamora, Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals: Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Jeigh Madjus, Trevor Salter Drum Programming: David Byrne Piano, Bass: Justin Levine Trumpets: Josh Frank, Sycil Mathai Alto Saxophone: Jack Bashjow Tenor Saxophone: Alex Foster Baritone Saxophone: Stan Harrison Trombone: Mike Seltzer Horn arrangement: Tony Finno and Justin Levine Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio 0 4 . O P P O S I T E AT T R A C T I O N (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Conrad Ricamora, Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu,

Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Maria-Christina Oliveras Programming, Synths: Fatboy Slim Additional Synths, Guitar: David Byrne Additional Programming: Matt Stine Music

produced by: Fatboy Slim and David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio 0 5 . T H E R O S E O F TA C L O B A N (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Upright Bass Loop: Cagedbaby Toy Piano: Mark degli Antoni Woodblock, Udu, Shakers, Rods and Bells: Mauro Refosco Rhodes Piano: Tony Finno Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Violas: David Gold, Cyrus Beroukhim Cellos: Arthur Cook, Garo Yellin Trumpets: Kenneth de Carlo, John Sheppard French Horns: Chad Yarbrough, Theodore Primis Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: David Young Euphonium: Kenneth Finn Orchestra arrangement: Gil Goldstein and Tony Finno Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio, Kampo Studios, NYC, and Avatar Studios, NYC 06. A PERFECT HAND (D. Byrne) Lead Vocals: Jose Llana Backing Vocals: Renee

Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Guitar: David Byrne Drums: Graham Hawthorne Bass: Paul Frazier


Piano: Thomas Bartlett Additional Drum Programming: Matt Stine Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Kampo Studios, NYC 0 7. E L E V E N D A Y S (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez,

Debralee Daco, Maria Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Synth, Guitar, Wah Guitar: David Byrne Keyboard Bass: Fatboy Slim Wurlitzer: Thomas Bartlett Additional Drum Programming: Matt Stine Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Kampo Studios, NYC 08. WHEN SHE PASSED BY (D. Byrne, T. Gandey) Lead Vocal: Melody Butiu Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Maria Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Keys, Drum Programming: Cagedbaby 12-String and Electric Guitars: David Byrne Bass: Paul Frazier Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio and Kampo Studios, NYC

09. SUGARTIME BABY (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Jose

Llana, Jeigh Madjus Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Janelle Velasquez Cavaquinho, Programming: David Byrne Bass: Paul Sandrone Keyboard: Thomas Bartlett Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne and Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Kampo Studios, NYC 10. WALK LIKE A WOMAN (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Janelle Velasquez Keys, Synth and Bass Programming: Cagedbaby Piano, Clavinet, Guitar, Trumpet Loop: David Byrne Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio

by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton and Patrick Dillett at his studio 12. DANCING TOGETHER (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, MariaChristina Oliveras Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody

Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Jeigh Madjus, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Guitars: David Byrne Drum, Bass and Brass Loops: Fatboy Slim Organ: Mark degli Antoni Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Kampo Studios, NYC 13. THE FABULOUS ONE (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Conrad Ricamora Backing Vocals:

11. DON’T YOU AGREE? / PRETTY FACE (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Jose Llana, Maria-Christina Oliveras Backing Vocals: Renee

Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Piano, Bass, Guitar, Synths, Programming: David Byrne Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio

Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Wurlitzer, Pad: Cagedbaby Backing Vocal, Organ, and Guitars : David Byrne Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded

14. MEN WILL DO ANYTHING (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocal: Maria-Christina Oliveras Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Ruthie Ann Miles, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Guitar: David Byrne Organ: Fatboy Slim

Tambourine: Mauro Refosco Bass: Paul Frazier Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton and Patrick Dillett at his studio

DISC 2 0 1 . S TA R A N D S L AV E (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Guitar, Keys, Programming: David Byrne Violins: Hiroko Taguchi, Rob Moose, Amy Kimball, Una Tone Violas: David Gold, Artie Dibble Cellos: Arthur Cook, Garo Yellin Trumpets: Josh Frank, Mike Gurfield Trombone: Brian Mahany French Horns: Chris Komer, Eric Davis, Jacquelyn Adams English Horn: Erin Gustafson Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio and Patrick Dillett and Sean Kelly Caster at Water Music Studios, NJ 02. POOR ME (D. Byrne) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Jose Llana Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua

Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Keys, Synth and Bass Programming:


Cagedbaby Piano, Clavinet, Guitar, Trumpet Loop: David Byrne Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio 03. PLEASE DON’T (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Jose Llana, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Conrad Ricamora, Janelle Velasquez Synths, Percussion Programming: David Byrne Shakers, Congas: Mauro Refosco Wurlitzer, Clavichord, Organ Bass: Thomas Bartlett Additional Programming: Matt Stine Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Kampo Studios, NYC 04 . SOLANO AVENUE (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Melody Butiu Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez,

Debralee Daco, Maria Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Guitars: David Byrne Loops, Bass, Keyboards: Fatboy Slim Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Viola: David Gold Cello: Garo Yellin Trumpet: CJ Camerieri French Horn: Greg Smith Trombone: Michael Seltzer Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: Rick Heckman Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by:

Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, and Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Avatar Studios, NYC 05. RIOTS AND BOMBS (D. Byrne) Synths, Guitar, Programming: David Byrne Additional Programming: Matt Stine Music produced by:

David Byrne 06. ORDER 1081 (D. Byrne) Lead Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez, Maria-Christina Oliveras Backing Vocals:

Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Backing Vocals, Rhythm Guitar: David Byrne Backing Vocals: Ganda Suthivarakom Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Viola: David Gold Cello: Garo Yellin Trumpet: CJ Camerieri French Horn: Greg Smith Trombone: Michael Seltzer Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: Rick Heckman Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Avatar Studios, NYC 0 7. S E V E N Y E A R S (D. Byrne) Lead Vocals: Ruthie Ann Miles, Conrad Ricamora Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie

Cortez, Debralee Daco, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Arpeggio Guitar: David Byrne Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Violas: David Gold, Cyrus Beroukhim Cellos: Arthur Cook, Garo Yellin Trumpets: Kenneth de Carlo, John Sheppard French Horns: Chad Yarbrough, Theodore Primis Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: David Young Euphonium: Kenneth Finn Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio and Avatar Studios, NYC 0 8 . G AT E 3 7 (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Conrad Ricamora Backing Vocals: Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Trevor Salter Guitar, Keys, Programming: David Byrne Violins: Hiroko Taguchi, Rob Moose, Amy Kimball, Una Tone Violas: David Gold, Artie Dibble Cellos: Arthur Cook, Garo Yellin Trumpets: Josh Frank, Mike Gurfield Trombone: Brian Mahany French Horns: Chris Komer, Eric Davis, Jacquelyn Adams English Horn: Erin Gustafson Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio and Patrick Dillett and Sean Kelly Caster at Water Music Studios, NJ

09. JUST ASK THE FLOWERS (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal: Natalie Cortez Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Guitar, Bass, Programming: David Byrne Piano: Justin Levine Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio 10. WHY DON’T YOU LOVE ME? (D. Byrne, T. Gandey) Lead Vocals: Melody Butiu, Jose Llana, Ruthie Ann Miles, Maria-Christina Oliveras Backing Vocals:

Renee Albulario, Natalie Cortez, Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jeigh Madjus, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Guitars: David Byrne Bass: Paul Sandrone Rhodes Piano: Tony Finno Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Violas: David Gold, Cyrus Beroukhim Cellos: Arthur Cook, Garo Yellin Trumpets: Kenneth de Carlo, John Sheppard French Horns: Chad Yarbrough, Theodore Primis Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: David Young Euphonium: Kenneth Finn Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: Cagedbaby, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, Kampo Studios, NYC, and Avatar Studios, NYC


11. GOD DRAWS STRAIGHT (D. Byrne) Lead Vocal, Guitar: Kelvin Moon Loh Backing Vocal, Surdo: Renee Albulario Backing Vocal, Snare Drum: Joshua Dela Cruz Music produced by: David Byrne Music recorded by: Patrick Dillett at his studio 1 2 . H E R E L I E S L O V E ( C U R TA I N C A L L ) (D. Byrne, N. Cook) Lead Vocal: Ruthie Ann Miles Backing Vocals: Renee Albulario, Melody Butiu, Natalie Cortez,

Debralee Daco, Joshua Dela Cruz, Jose Llana, Kelvin Moon Loh, Jeigh Madjus, Maria-Christina Oliveras, Conrad Ricamora, Trevor Salter, Janelle Velasquez Keyboards: Cagedbaby Guitar: David Byrne Programming, Synth Bass: Fatboy Slim Additional Programming: Matt Stine Violins: Amy Kimball, Galina Zhdanova, Hiroko Taguchi, Pauline Kim Viola: David Gold Cello: Garo Yellin Trumpet: CJ Camerieri French Horn: Greg Smith Trombone: Michael Seltzer Clarinet: Jay Hassler Flute, Oboe: Rick Heckman Orchestra arrangement: Tony Finno Music produced by: Fatboy Slim, David Byrne, Patrick Dillett Music recorded by: Simon Thornton at HMS House, Brighton, Patrick Dillett at his studio, and Avatar Studios, NYC

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David Byrne & Fatboy Slim - Here Lies Love Original Cast Recording_BookletDavid Byrne and Fatboy Sli