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Biology Senior Capstone Experience (2 credits) Fourth Year BIO 4250. Journal Club: Advanced Topics in Neuroscience (2)*** ***Taught on a rotating basis by biology faculty. This is a capstone course with a flexible topic, dependent upon the expertise and interest of the professor. The course will include both written and oral presentation components, as well as discussion and critical analysis of primary literature. Requirements for the Minor in Biology (20 credits) BIO 1399. BIO 2000.

Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature I: Cellular and Molecular Processes (4) Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature II: Evolutionary and Ecological Processes (4)

Two courses selected from the following: BIO/PHS 2060. Human Physiology (4) BIO/ANA 2070. Human Anatomy (4) BIO 2110. Organismal Biology I: Prokaryotes, Protists, Fungi & Plants (4) BIO 2120. Organismal Biology II: Zoology (4) One additional BIO course at the 3000-level or higher (4)

Course Descriptions BIO 1100. Biology: A Human Perspective. A study of biological principles, with emphasis on their application to the human organism. This course will introduce the student to the process of scientific inquiry along with cell level processes, continuance of the human species and maintenance of the human body. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week, and is recommended for students who are seeking a singlesemester course. Course fee is $25. Four credits. [N] BIO 1120. The Human Body and Exercise. This course is designed to present the physiological and musculoskeletal systems as they relate to the biomechanics of exercise. Skeletal, muscular, pulmonary and cardiovascular system structure and function will be emphasized. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Course fee is $25. Four credits. [N] BIO 1399. Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature I: Cellular and Molecular Processes. This course is a study of the general principles of living systems with a focus on chemical, cellular, and metabolic levels of

biological organization, emphasizing the role of genetics and evolution. The acquisition of primary literature via electronic data retrieval systems will be emphasized. Students will learn to read and interpret research and review papers, write summaries, and present scientific information orally. Three 60-minute lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Course fee is $25. Four credits. [N] BIO 2000. Introduction to Biological Principles and Literature II: Evolutionary and Ecological Processes. This course focuses on basic concepts and applications of evolutionary biology and ecology. Emphasis is given to the mechanisms of evolution, processes that lead to the formation of new species, and methods used to infer evolutionary relationships. Principles of population, community, and ecosystem ecology are also emphasized. Three 60-minute lecture periods and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BIO 1399 or permission of the instructor. Four credits. BIO/PHS 2060. Human Physiology. A study of the physical and chemical mechanisms by which human systems function. The focus of the course is on homeostasis, a dynamic equilibrium regulated locally and by neural and endocrine systems. Some pathologies are covered as a means for appreciating normal function. Students will participate in a number of non-invasive activities. Computerassisted data acquisition is used for some exercises, including reaction times, muscle function, EKGs, spirometry, and breathing rates. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Four credits. [N] BIO/ANA 2070. Human Anatomy. A study of the anatomy of the major systems of the human body. All of the systems and their various parts will be covered. Laboratory will consist of models, interactive electronic programs, and where possible, dissection of a representative animal. Course consists of three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Four credits. [N] BIO 2110. Organismal Biology I: Prokaryotes, Protists, Fungi & Plants. A survey of the diversity of bacteria, algae, fungal protistans, fungi and plants. Reproductive cycles, morphology, economic/ecological importance, phylogeny, and the anatomy and developmental and physiological processes in seed plants will be emphasized. Methods of diversity will be stressed in the laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 1399. Course consists of three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Four credits. BIO 2120. Organismal Biology II: Zoology. A survey of the diversity, systematics, and ecology of protozoa and select

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Undergraduate Bulletin 2016 2017  
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