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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH & CREATIVITY SYMPOSIUM

HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY NOVEMBER 14TH, 2015


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SNCURCS 2015 Table of Contents Welcome Letter…………………………………………………………………………………………...1 SNCURCS Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………….3 George T. Barthalmus Undergraduate Research Grants……………………………………………...…..4 NCICU Undergraduate Research Grants………………………………………………………………....5 Recruiters’ Fair……………………………………….…………………………………………………..6 Oral Presentations List…………………………………………...……………………………………….7 Poster Presentations List…………………………………………………………………………………20 Performance Presentations List………………………………………………………………………….35 Exhibit Presentations List………………………………………………………………………………..36 Abstract Listing (Alphabetical by Student)……………………………………………………………...37 Student Presenter Index………………………………………………………………………………...172 SNCURCS 2015 Statistics……………………………………………………………………………...215 SNCURCS 2015 Sponsors……………………………………………………………………………...217 High Point University Campus Map…………………………………………………………................218

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SNCURCS 2015 Agenda: Saturday, November 14, 2015, High Point University 8:00 - 11:00 AM

Check-in

Slane Student Center (2nd floor)

8:00 - 10:00 AM

Light Continental Breakfast

Slane Student Center

Vendor Check-in and Set Up 9:00 - 9:20 AM

Opening Remarks

Phillips School of Business 120

9:30 - 10:30 AM

Oral Presentations: Session 1

Phillips School of Business

9:30 -10:45 AM

Poster Presentations: Session 1

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

Exhibits: Session 1 10:00 - 3:00 PM

Recruiters' Fair

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

10:30 - 11:30 AM

Performances: Session 1

Phillips School of Business 120

10:45 - 11:45 AM

Oral Presentations: Session 2

Phillips School of Business

11:00 - 12:15 PM

Poster Presentations: Session 2

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

Exhibits: Session 2 11:00 - 2:00 PM

Floating Lunch (vouchers)

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

12:00 - 1:00 PM

SNCURCS Faculty Meeting

Slane Student Center Faculty Club (3rd floor)

1:00 - 2:15 PM

Poster Presentations: Session 3

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

Exhibits: Session 3 1:30 - 2:30 PM

Oral Presentations: Session 3

Phillips School of Business

Performances: Session 2 2:30 - 3:45 PM

Poster Presentations: Session 4

Slane Student Center (1st floor)

Exhibits: Session 4 2:45 - 3:45 PM

Oral Presentations: Session 4

Phillips School of Business

4:00 - 4:30 PM

Closing Remarks

Phillips School of Business 120

Presentation of 2015 Grant Winners

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George T. Barthalmus Undergraduate Research Grants Dr. George T. Barthalmus (1942-2011) was the driving force behind the creation of the State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium. He had a passion for encouraging undergraduates to pursue their interests through the process of research, be it in the sciences, humanities, or through artistic expression. He was an advocate for early involvement of students in the research process as a way to engage and retain students in academics. He was an advocate for early involvement of students in the research process as a way to engage and retain students in academics. To this end, the George Barthalmus Undergraduate Research Awards have been developed to promote early involvement in the research process through support of sophomores in a research project of their design. These awards are designed to assist students with development and engagement in undergraduate research and creative works. Students from all disciplines are invited to apply for the awards. The winners of the grant will present their research at SNCURCS 2016. The following students received a George Barthalmus Undergraduate Research Grant in 2015: 

Noah Coates, High Point University, English/Health Sciences, “Psychological Benefits of Narrative Medicine on Older Adults”

Michael T. Dong, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, Chemistry, “Regioselective AntiMarkovnikov Addition to Monoalkyl and 1,1-Dialkyl Olefins with a Xanthylium Catalyst System”

Maya Drzewicki, University of North Carolina - Wilmington, Marine Biology, “The role of mechanosensitivity in regulating predator evasion behaviors of Favella sp.”

Taylor Felton, University of North Carolina - Pembroke, Chemistry, “HPLC Determination of Amoxicillin from African Drug Samples”

Ismael Gomez, Nash Community College, Biology, “A Comparison of Mitochondrial and Nuclear Gene Trees of the Seepage Salamander (Desmognathus aeneus)

Qeashaunda Johnson, Chowan University, Literature, “Rhetoric of the Horrifying in Slave Narratives”

Minnie Lane, Elon University, Dance and Creative Writing, “Parallels in Dance and Creative Writing: A New Friendship”

John Lu, Duke University, Biochemistry, “Determining the unique binding sites on RBPJ for EBNA 2, 3, and Notch”

Luis Felipe Roldan, North Carolina State University, Chemical Engineering, “Developing nongrowth conditions Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20ZR to be used in a trickle-bed reactor”

Natalie Suchy, University of North Carolina - Greensboro, Psychology/Education, “Differences Between Tablet Learning and Traditional Learning in Elementary School Children”

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North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Research Grants The North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (NCICU) Undergraduate Research Program provides funding for undergraduate research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The program was created to encourage students to pursue careers or advanced degrees in these fields and to promote greater diversity by making it possible for students who are often underrepresented (new American, low-income, first generation, and/or minority college students) to participate in undergraduate research opportunities. The awards are funded by the NCICU Undergraduate Research Endowment. The endowment was established through a gift from the North Carolina GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and other corporate and foundation entities. The following students received North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities NCICU Undergraduate Research Grants in 2015:        

Alexandra Barbour, Guilford College Jenifer Castanon, St. Andrews University David Creasman, Campbell University Zoe Flowers, Meredith College Crystal Gunther, Meredith College Amber Hancock, St. Andrews Zachary Riley, Wake Forest University Kyung-Min Yoo, Wake Forest University

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Thank you to our 2015 Recuiters! Slane Student Center Gym 10:30 am - 3:00 pm The Recruiters' Fair provides an opportunity for symposium attendees to meet representatives from graduate school programs, recruiters, exhibitors, and corporate vendors from in and around North Carolina and beyond.

Geography Graduate Program at Appalachian State University Binghamton University East Carolina University Graduate Office Admissions East Carolina University Biology Graduate Studies Gardner-Webb University High Point University Norcross Graduate School Liberty University North Carolina A&T State University/JSNN North Carolina Central University School of Graduate Studies RTI International University of Idaho, College of Graduate Studies Wake Forest University Bioethics Graduate Program Wingate University-Ballantyne

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS LISTED BY SESSION AND ROOM ~ Oral Session 1 (9:30 – 10:30) ~ Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 113 9:30 - 9:45

Sociology

Andrew Haldeman Appalachian State University

Human Nature

9:45 - 10:00

Sociology

Lauren Irby Methodist University

Moral Hazards Associated with Marrying in the Military

10:00 - 10:15

Psychology

Melody Allison Richard Kurr Mariah Wright David Cleveringa Methodist University

Brief Academic Trauma Intervention

10:15 - 10:30

Sociology

Rachel Ryding Melissa Roberts University of North Carolina Greensboro

Identifying Opportunities: Geospatial Analysis as a Tool for Targeted Redevelopment

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 114 9:30 - 9:45

Political Science

Natalia Soto Appalachian State University

9:45 - 10:00

Political Science

Emily Turner Appalachian State University

10:00 - 10:15

Political Science

Fionna Walsh Appalachian State University

10:15 - 10:30

Political Science

Caroline Webb Appalachian State University

Co-Housing Immigration Solution: Invest in Opportunity Immigration: The True Cost for Opportunity in America Europe vs. America on Illegal Immigration Interactions Between Immigrants and United States Law Enforcement

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 215 9:30 - 9:45

9:45 - 10:00

10:00 - 10:15

10:15 - 10:30

Biological Sciences Anatomy & Physiology Biological Sciences Genetics

Johnathon Boles Catawba College

Common Oat: A Potential Wound Healing Promoter

Kristen Rogers NC School of Science and Mathematics

RNAi of DCR-1 Gene to Inhibit Overactive Ras Protein Pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans

Biological Sciences - Nadine Brockmann Microbiology Virginia Merida Catawba College Biological Sciences - Alexandra Barbour Microbiology Jessica Tutterow Kelsey Lindeman Guilford College

Exploring Bacterial Diversity in Student Athletes: Implications for Skin and Organismal Health The Influence of Bluebird Fecal Sac Microbiota on Nest Sanitation Behaviors

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Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 216 9:30 - 9:45

Chemistry Analytical

Lindsay Preston Appalachian State University

Elemental Analysis of Raw and Refined Samples of Vegetable Oil and Biodiesel Using Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectroscopy Determination of the Rate of Ethanol Production by Yeast in Wine

9:45 - 10:00

Chemistry Analytical

Brandon Skinner Barton College

10:00 - 10:15

Chemistry Biochemistry

Marc Muraski Guilford College

Cloning and Characterization of tRNA(Ile) Lysidine Synthetase in Burkholderia cenocepacia

10:15 - 10:30

Chemistry Biochemistry

Matthew McHenry University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Cofactor Engineering of HemeBinding Enzymes for the Catalysis of Non-Natural Reactions

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 217 9:30 - 9:45

Communication

Evan Atkinson Appalachian State University

What the Dead Say About the Living: An Exploration of Zombie Film as a Barometer for Social Anxiety #CopLife: A Study of Panopticism in American Police Culture

9:45 - 10:00

Communication

Asia Anderson Kenneth Campbell Darryl Bazemore North Carolina Central University

10:00 - 10:15

Communication

Sheila Welborn Dianna Hawkins Appalachian State University

Integrated Media Marketing Campaign

10:15 - 10:30

Psychology

Tyler Foster Pfeiffer University

Friends and Self Esteem

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 218 9:30 - 9:45

Economics

Kayla White Appalachian State University

Economic Benefits of Immigration

10:00 - 10:15

Economics

Emily Rutledge Salem College

10:15 - 10:30

Economics

Monique Robinson Jocelyn Elliott North Carolina A&T State University

Playing to Win: Market Economies in Multiplayer Online Video Games The Rising Popularity of the Natural Hair Trend and Its Effects on the Hair Industry as Relaxer Sales are Declining

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Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 220 9:30 - 9:45

English

Allanah Hund Appalachian State University

The Effects of Intelligence on the Good Life

9:45 - 10:00

English

Amber Jones Appalachian State University

10:00 - 10:15

English

Andrea Medina Appalachian State University

10:15 - 10:30

English

Michael Murphy Appalachian State University

Analyzing Destructive Relationships in Gilda Effects of Mass Media Communications on the Perceptual Concept of a Good Life How to Correctly Watch a Movie

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 221 9:30 - 9:45

Environmental Sciences

9:45 - 10:00

Sociology

10:00 - 10:15 10:15 - 10:30

Adrianna Allred Guilford College Cierra Vickers Appalachian State University

English (Literature) Jessica Chaplain Appalachian State University Liberal Studies Sarah Bartholomew Appalachian State University

Nature as Mother: Perceptions of Women in Science and the Natural World Gender Roles: The Transition of Coming to America and the Benefits for Women Class and Hierarchy in My Fair Lady The Power of Feminism: The Educated, the Employed, and the Liberal

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 222 9:30 - 9:45

Psychology

Hannah Gillespie Appalachian State University

9:45 - 10:00

Psychology

Jaiza Wesley Bennett College

10:00 - 10:15

Psychology

Emma Plyler South Iredell High School

10:15 - 10:30

Psychology

Jonathan Raby Appalachian State University

Wilderness Therapy's Impact on Young Adults Does the Gender/Sexual Orientation of the Perpetrator and the Type of Retaliation Affect African American Female College Students Perceptions of Domestic Violence? Communication is Key: The Relationship Between Verbal Ability and the Detection of Word Defining Altruism as the Key to the ‘Good Life’

Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) - Phillips 223 9:30 - 9:45

Mathematics

Marah Hild-Ladebauche Queens University of Charlotte

Labs in Physics Education

10:00 - 10:15

Statistics

Claire Brown Appalachian State University

Statistics

Taylor Harbold Michelle Page Courtney Rasmussen University of North Carolina Wilmington

An Optimal Strategy for Deal or No Deal Zip Codes and Neural Networks: Machine Learning for Handwritten Number Recognition

10:15 - 10:30

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~ Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) ~ Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 113 10:45 - 11:00

Sociology

Anastasia Shymanovich Zechariah Etheridge University of North Carolina Greensboro

The Center for Housing and Community Studies of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Citizen Perceptions of Police, Police Perceptions of Citizens: An Analysis and Explanation of Conflicting Perspectives

11:00 - 11:15

Sociology

Christian Roberts University of North Carolina Wilmington

11:15 - 11:30

Undecided

Katherine Pate Appalachian State University

Examining the Good Life Through Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

11:30 - 11:45

Sociology

Regina Nasrallah Appalachian State University

Life is Death; Anyone Who Says Differently is Selling Something

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 114 10:45 - 11:00

Philosophy

Marisa Fernandez Appalachian State University

11:00 - 11:15

Political Science

Adam Williams Appalachian State University

11:30 - 11:45

Philosophy

Lauren Garretson Elon University

The Good, the Bad, and the Unethical: The Ethics of Propaganda Unintended Consequences of AntiImmigration Laws Memory Destruction in the Creation of Post-Genocide Rwanda's "Walking Dead"

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 215 10:45 - 11:00

Biological Sciences - Gabrielle Hayes Microbiology High Point University

11:00 - 11:15

Biological Sciences Microbiology Biological Sciences Microbiology

11:15 - 11:30

11:30 - 11:45

Biology

Victoria McQuade North Carolina State University

Synergy Between Manuka Honey and Linezolid Against Staphylococcus aureus Delftia acidovorans: Life in the Sink

Elizabeth Gerdes University of North Carolina Pembroke

Photorhabdus luminescens: Virulent Properties and Agricultural Applications

Joseph Henry East Carolina University

Impacts of Two Synthesized Indenopyridine Compounds on Spermatogenesis and Gene Expression

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Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 216 10:45 - 11:00

Chemistry

Calla Telzrow High Point University

Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis and Antimicrobial Assessment of a Plant-Derived Cyclic Peptide New Thione and Selone Complexes of Mercury and Copper

11:00 - 11:15

Chemistry Inorganic

Margaret Kocherga University of North Carolina Charlotte

11:15 - 11:30

Chemistry Nanoscience

Austin Lowry Carissa Tai North Carolina Central University

Detection of Melamine in Milk with Raman Scattering

11:30 - 11:45

Chemistry

Nicole Tipton Appalachian State University

Assigning Acetol: Simulated IR Spectra Using High Level Ab-Intio Methods

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 217 10:45 - 11:00

Computer Science

Tyler Borden Appalachian State University

11:00 - 11:15

Computer Science

Aleksander Ratzloff Appalachian State University

11:15 - 11:30

Computer Science

Jordan Stack Appalachian State University

11:30 - 11:45

Computer Science

Connor Criscoe University of North Carolina Charlotte

How Leadership Has Shaped Watauga Residential College Spark as a Cluster Computing Platform Hierarchical Storage and Spectrographic Visualization of Beehive Audio in Python A Computational Exploration of nBody Dynamics vis-Ă -vis the Moons of Jupiter

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 218 10:45 - 11:00

Exercise Science

Kelsey Butler Appalachian State University

11:00 - 11:15

Pre-Medicine

Caitlyn Lowry Appalachian State University

11:15 - 11:30

Pre-Medicine

Julia Draper Guilford College

11:30 - 11:45

Public Health

Anika Hannan University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

The Science of Exercise and Happiness: Exercising Your Way To Happiness The Changing Face of Immigration Past as Prologue: The Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Health Outcomes in Emerging Adults The Association Between Women Empowerment and Child Nutrition in Bangladesh

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Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 220 10:45 - 11:00

English

Alice Brower Appalachian State University

Undocumented Immigrants and the Right to Banking Services

11:00 - 11:15

English

Madison Carr Appalachian State University

The Straddling of Society In Gilda

11:15 - 11:30

English

Megan Hall Appalachian State University

Martin Scorsese’s Director’s Message in Taxi Driver

11:30 - 11:45

English

Sydney Huff Appalachian State University

The Good Life Across the Ages

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 221 10:45 - 11:00

Environmental Sciences

Ruici Ong Duke University

Smallholder Coffee Farmer Perceptions of Climate Change in Espírito Santo, Brazil Trailheads as Vectors of Invasive Plant Species in Charlotte, NC

11:00 - 11:15

Environmental Sciences

Theodore Hartsook Queens University of Charlotte

11:15 - 11:30

Engineering Biological & Agricultural

Kristin Garner Joshua Axhoj Benjamin Goodes Derek Urquhart Douglas Royalty North Carolina State University

Lagoon Sludge Transformation

11:30 - 11:45

Undecided

Aaron Wells Appalachian State University

Natural and Urban Environments Effects on Health

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 222 10:45 - 11:00

Psychology

Talha Salman Appalachian State University

Parallel Journeys: A Comparison on European and American Immigration

11:00 - 11:15

Psychology

Amanda Baeten University of North Carolina Greensboro

How Rumination Affects Emotions

11:15 - 11:30

Psychology

Anna Warner University of North Carolina Greensboro

Prisoners of Progressivism: Huxley's Attempt to Preserve Our Human

11:30 - 11:45

Psychology

Alleya Williams Appalachian State University

Expanding Experiential Learning in Higher Education

Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) - Phillips 223 10:45 - 11:00

Physics Astrophysics

Ibrahim Abdeally East Carolina University

11:00 - 11:15

Physics Astrophysics Physics

Alan Vasquez Soto High Point University

11:15 - 11:30

Christopher Pawlyszyn Appalachian State University

Using Light Magnitude Data and Transit Photometry to Model Exoplanet HD 189733 b There and Back Again: The Disappearing Pulsations of CS 1246 Background Southeast United States Aerosol Optical Properties and Their Dependence Upon Meteorology

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~ Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) ~ Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 113 1:30 - 1:45

Political Science

Lela Ali North Carolina State University

The Circle of Hell

1:45 - 2:00

Political Science

Sean Norton University of North Carolina Greensboro

2:00 - 2:15

Political Science

Mankaprr Conteh Wake Forest University

2:15 - 2:30

Mathematical Economics

Caught Between: Transnistria's Separatist Conflict in the Regional Context The Progress and Politics of Social and Emotional Learning in the US An External View Into European Economics

Tabin Dharanikota Arnav Goswami University of North Carolina Charlotte

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 114 1:30 - 1:45

Arts - Visual

Jose Silva Cantu Appalachian State University

1:45 - 2:00

Arts - Visual

Mary Pruitt Taylor Daniel High Point University

2:00 - 2:15

Arts - Visual

Amber Kalu North Carolina Central University

2:15 - 2:30

Graphic Design and Monica Galletto Digital Imaging North Carolina State University

Indoor Confinement Among Our Children: Addressing Concerns of Nature Deficit Disorder From Beginner to Innovator: A Beekeeper's Journey A 21st Century Creative Reading of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Contemporary Artists in Florence

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 116 1:30 - 1:45

Computer Science

Edward Shuffler Devin Sink Ahmar Gordon Christopher Smith Appalachian State University

Aquarium Monitoring and Control Using Embedded Systems

1:45 - 2:00

Computer Science

Ahmar Gordon Edward Shuffler Appalachian State University

Automated Beehive Surveillance Using Raspberry Pi

2:00 - 2:15

Computer Science

Tim Ransom Scott Shuffler James Corsi Appalachian State University

Web Automated Grading System (WAGS)

2:15 - 2:30

Computer Science

Dakota Murray Appalachian State University

Evaluation of Source Separation Algorithms Applied to Beehive Audio

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Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 215 1:30 - 1:45

1:45 - 2:00

2:00 - 2:15

2:15 - 2:30

Biological Sciences - Mena Issa Microbiology Elizabeth Gerdes Neveen Issa University of North Carolina Pembroke Biological Sciences - Ashley Darr Toxicology University of North Carolina Charlotte Biological Sciences - Nicole Wright Microbiology High Point University

Heterorhabditis Bacteriophora: Ecofriendly Biological Control Agent

Biological Sciences - Jesse O'Campo Microbiology University of North Carolina Pembroke

Effect of Environmental Factors on Growth Kinetics of Photorhabdus luminescens Phase-I cells using a 2 L Sartorius Stedim Biostat® A+ Fermentation System

The Reproductive Effects of Atrazine on Drosophila Melanogaster Combinatorial Effects of Antibiotics and Manuka Honey on Escherichia coli

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 216 1:30 - 1:45

Chemistry Nanoscience

1:45 - 2:00

Chemistry

2:00 - 2:15

Chemistry Nanoscience

Chauncey McNeill University of North Carolina Charlotte

2:15 - 2:30

Chemistry Nanoscience

Emily Schmidt University of North Carolina Charlotte

Tim Eldred University of North Carolina Charlotte Maria Gurski Catawba College

Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanostructures for Water Purification How HuR and CP1 are Affected By KRas and Stressors in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Binding of Novel Earth Abundant Metal Coordination Complexes as Molecular Spacers to Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes AER- NanoResin for the Removal of DPBs During Water Purification

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 217 1:30 - 1:45

Communication

Macon Atkinson Appalachian State University

How We Tell War Stories

1:45 - 2:00

Communication

Kenneth Campbell North Carolina Central University

2:00 - 2:15

Communication

Jay Rubin University of North Carolina Asheville

American Thug: The New Nigger By Proxy, An Exploratory Taxonomy of Black Masculinity in the 21st Century Hopi Prophecy and Myth

2:15 - 2:30

Undecided

Clare Howerton East Carolina University

Understanding the Community Facilitator Role in the ¡Cuídate! Pilot Project

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Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 218 1:30 - 1:45

History

Michael Helms North Carolina State University

The Role of Firearms in America's Technological Revolution

1:45 - 2:00

History

Kako Lavendier North Carolina State University

2:00 - 2:15

History

Phillip Cox University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

2:15 - 2:30

History

Madeline Coffey Wake Forest University

The Production of Fine Ceramic Table Ware from Roman Cyprus: Continuity or Discontinuity? Questions of Representation in Hercules and Antaeus (after Raphael) Voices of Southern Women: A Digital Initiative

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 220 1:30 - 1:45

English (Writing)

Marc Augenreich Appalachian State University

Controversies of Immigration

1:45 - 2:00

English (Writing)

Molly Kucmierz Christina Donovan Lex Scott Appalachian State University

Women and the Good Life

2:00 - 2:15

English (Writing)

Monica Hassett Appalachian State University

2:15 - 2:30

English (Writing)

Jessica Feldman Appalachian State University

Watauga Residential College: The Successful Alternate General Education Program Cultural Abandonment Due to Assimilation

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 221 1:30 - 1:45

English

Jessie Drew High Point University

1:45 - 2:00

English

Anna Cox University of North Carolina Greensboro

2:00 - 2:15

English (Writing)

Christiane Kamariza Methodist University

The Effects of Narrative Medicine on Anxiety Implications of the Purity Myth

An Analysis of Facebook’s Negative Effects on Users

Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 222 1:30 - 1:45 1:45 - 2:00 2:00 - 2:15

International Relations Business

Ryan Beverley Appalachian State University

Cultural Enclaves Impede Success

Julie Dixon High Point University

International Relations

Caroline Puckett Appalachian State University

The Impact of Internal and External Factors on Service Firm Productivity Refugee Status

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Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) - Phillips 223 1:30 - 1:45

Liberal Studies

Mackenzie Briggs Appalachian State University

How and Why Universities Need to Invest in a Holistic Experience

1:45 - 2:00

Liberal Studies

Hannah Clark Appalachian State University

2:00 - 2:15

Liberal Studies

Shelby Spencer Appalachian State University

Filling the Cracks in the Foundation of Success Replacing Your "Real" Family: The Residential College Effect

2:15 - 2:30

Liberal Studies

Raven Walker Appalachian State University

Do Selective Programs in Universities Brainwash Students?

~ Oral Session 4 (2:45- 3:45) ~ Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 113 2:45 - 3:00 3:00 - 3:15

3:15 - 3:30

Biology

Mary Clare McGinn High Point University

Biological Sciences - James Rager Anatomy & High Point University Physiology Marine Sciences Samantha Peart North Carolina State University

Effects of Various Algal Food Sources on Cyclopoida Effects of 17-Beta-Estradiol on Bone Development and Ossification in Danio rerio Error and Precision of Photogrammetric Methods in the Deep-sea

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 114 2:45 - 3:00

Anthropology

3:00 - 3:15

Human Relations

3:15 - 3:30

3:30 - 3:45

Cambray Smith North Carolina State University

Michael Antin Appalachian State University

Individualized Major Karen Sieber Program University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Women's and Gender Alaina Monts Studies University of North Carolina Greensboro

Hope for Health: Exploring Healing Methods and Perceptions of Medical Affliction in the Evangelical Community of Santiago Atitlán The Language Barrier Mapping the Mill Village: Digitally Recreating Gastonia's Loray Mill in 1920 “Take You to Paradise” : Meshell Ndegeocello, Liminality, and Radical Black Sexualities

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Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 116 2:45 - 3:00

Undecided

Anthony Fish Olivia Bundy Thomas Edwards Ronnie Hatfield Donnie Fann Kartik Sharma Methodist University

Determining Support for a TobaccoFree Campus

3:00 - 3:15

Special Education

Logan Beyer Duke University

Multimodality, Learning Disabilities, and the Writing Center

3:15 - 3:30

Undecided

Autumn Grinstead Appalachian State University

Watauga Residential College Curriculum

3:30 - 3:45

Education

Zane Gray Appalachian State University

Effects of Inquiry Based Learning in Watauga Residential College

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 215 2:45 - 3:00

Biology

Gabriella Villalon East Carolina University

A Pedigree Approach Tracing the Inheritance of White Egg Coloration in Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)

3:00 - 3:15

Biology

Madison Peregoy Greensboro College

A Review of Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

3:15 - 3:30

Biology

Kaitlyn Jackson University of North Carolina Wilmington

Experiencing Transformative Education through Applied Learning (ETEAL): Development of a Free STI Test for College Students

3:30 - 3:45

Biology

Hannah Shaheen High Point University

DOC Effects on Daphnia magna

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 216 2:45 - 3:00

Education

Amelia Bass Appalachian State University

Faculty Means Family

3:00 - 3:15

Education

Jessica Hatcher North Carolina State University

3:15 - 3:30

Education

Jessica Gada Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

Computer Science

Grayson Fenwick Appalachian State University

Regional Differences in Pre-Service Teachers' Discussions of Dialect Perks of Being a Wataugan: The Difference a Residential College Can Make Finch Robots and Education

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Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 217 2:45 - 3:00

Education

Raimie Neibaur Appalachian State University

3:00 - 3:15

Education

Cyrus Shea Appalachian State University

3:15 - 3:30

Education

Siesa Shuman Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

Education

Amy Walker Appalachian State University

How Anecdotes and Misconceptions Affect Perceptions of Residential College Program What is Watauga and Why Should You Care? Stay True or Stay Alive Why Education Is Destined For Failure (And How to Stop It)

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 218 2:45 - 3:00

Economics

Terrel Ferguson Quesion Bennett North Carolina A&T State University

How Likely Are People to Help Others?

3:00 - 3:15

Economics

Ariel Lewis North Carolina A&T State University

Fertility and Depression: What is the Connection?

3:15 - 3:30

Economics

Matthew Drake Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

Economics

Daniel Gore Methodist University

Economic Impact of the 2015 High Country Beer Fest How Weaponized Interaction Theory Works

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 220 2:45 - 3:00 3:00 - 3:15 3:15 - 3:30

3:30 - 3:45

English (Literature) Warren Powers Chowan University English (Literature) Michael Heslink High Point University English (Literature) Shanon Murray University of North Carolina Charlotte

English (Literature) Mollie McKinley High Point University

The Legacy of Slavery on American Productions of Othello The Third Turn of the Screw The Anatomy of Racism: A Dissection of Racial Oppression and Social Injustices in the Work of Contemporary African American Poet Wanda Coleman Mary Wroth's Pamphilia to Amphilanthus and the Limits of the Self

18


Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 221 2:45 - 3:00

English

Jessica Pierce Appalachian State University

Gilda: Female Oppression in Film

3:00 - 3:15

English

Chloe Prunet Appalachian State University

Factors Affecting the Good Life

3:15 - 3:30

English

Loryn Rader Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

English

Abigail Sullivan Appalachian State University

The Methodology and Effectiveness of Teaching a Respect for Nature at Watauga Residential College Jaws: Fear of Water, Fear of Life

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 222 2:45 - 3:00

Political Science

Samuel Fritz Appalachian State University

Increased Funding to Crime Prevention Programs as a Border Security Supplement

3:15 - 3:30

Political Science

Clare Milburn Appalachian State University

3:15 - 3:30

Political Science

Isabel Pernia Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

Political Science

Jacqueline Cafasso High Point University

Granting Amnesty in the United States Effects of Language on Intergenerational Relationships Among Immigrants Shift in Ideology and Public Policy Effects

Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) - Phillips 223 2:45 - 3:00

Political Science

Darius Floyd Appalachian State University

3:00 - 3:15

Foreign Languages & Trenee Little Literature Katria Farmer Campbell University

3:15 - 3:30

Foreign Languages & Dylan Powell Literature Appalachian State University Education June Garver Appalachian State University

3:30 - 3:45

Adolescent Immigrant Aid Globalization in 20th Century Mexico Shown Through Mariana of Las Batallas en el Desierto by Mexican Writer JosĂŠ Emilio Pacheco Reading in Between Both Lines with Bilingual Newspapers English Language Learner Program Reform in United States School Systems

19


POSTER PRESENTATIONS LISTED BY SESSION Discipline

Poster

Presenter(s)/Institution

Title

Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45) Biology

1

Jasmine Robinson Fayetteville State University

Hemp Seed Formulations’ Effect on Feeding in Red Four Beetles (Tribolium Castaneum)

Chemistry Biochemistry

2

Hannah Seddon North Carolina State University

Psychology

3

Kathleen Burris Catawba College

Biological Sciences Anatomy & Physiology

4

Lauren Mantikas High Point University

Glutathione Depletion Impacts MMS and H2O2 Sensitivity of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Media Influences on Beliefs about Fitness and Exercise Concurrent Validity of Maximal Jump Height Measurements of Clinical, Wearable, and Research-grade Instrumentation

Arts Performing Chemistry Materials

5

Samantha Salvato University of North Carolina - Charlotte

6

Sarah Colbert High Point University

Physics Astrophysics Exercise Science

7

Faith Montgomery Appalachian State University

8

Hannah Watson Pfeiffer University

Biological Sciences Microbiology

9

Kelsey Brown North Carolina State University David Tart Appalachian State University

Exercise Science Chemistry Biochemistry Biological Sciences Neurobiology Anthropology

10 Megan Avery Campbell University 11 Matthew Beck High Point University 12 Kelly Thompson North Carolina State University

13 Kathryn Scruggs North Carolina State University Food, Nutrition, 14 Illa Jones & Meredith College Bioprocessing Sciences Psychology 15 Kiana Perez-Jimenez University of North Carolina - Pembroke

Dance Reconstruction: American Modern Dance Choreographer: Paul Taylor Novel Patterning Techniques of VaporDeposited Au Thin Films onto Polymeric Substrates Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Visual Back and Camera Upgrade Project The Effect of Different Rest Intervals on the Exercise Volume Completed During Bench Press Lifts Microbial Warfare Among Bacteria and Fungi Isolates of Plantago major and Trifolium repens Assessment of Breakfast and Physical Activity Habits in College Students Role of Rac1 on Cell Migration in ATM Deficient Cells Isotocin Expression in Thalassoma bifasciatum Brains Maize: Tradition, Change, and Womanhood Surveying the Food Climate of Meredith College: A Qualitative Study

Inside the Mind of a Terrorist

20


Marine Sciences

16 Joyah Watkins University of North Carolina - Charlotte

Environmental Sciences

17 Lauren Andersen Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences Genetics

18 Hui Yi Grace Lim Duke University

Identification and Characterization of Novel Regulators of Anchor Cell Invasion in Caenorhabditis elegans

Physics Nuclear, Particle, Atomic, & Molecular Exercise Science

19 Colton Bradley North Carolina State University

Pion Loop Contribution to the Nucleon Self-Energy Interpolated between the Instant Form and the Front Form of Relativistic Dynamics

Chemistry Analytical Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Chemistry Physical

Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences Genetics Biomedical Sciences Psychology Environmental Sciences Chemistry Biochemistry Mathematics Computer Science

Characterizing Symbiodinium Communities in Coral Reefs Across Different Species and Thermal Regimes Building Vegetation Spectral Libraries Local to the Southern Appalachians with an Emphasis on Carolina Hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana)

20 Patrick Saracino Effects of Static Stretching vs. Dynamic University of North Carolina - Wilmington Warm-Up on Jump Performance of High School Aged Football Players 21 Mathew Kelley Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Pigments in the Appalachian State University Peel and Flesh of North Carolina Varieties of Apples 22 Ashle Page Investigation of Polystyrene Latex North Carolina State University Microsphere Adhesion to Wind Tunnel Surfaces 23 Stella Sommer Comparison of Quantitative Vapor-phased Appalachian State University Infrared Intensities with Density Functional Theory Calculations for Vibrational Modes of Oxygen Groups in Alcohols and Aldehydes 24 Claire Basista Determining the Source of a Pipe Discharge from NC State's Gym Using Non-Targeted Krystal Carter North Carolina State University Screening for Organic Contaminants 25 Anna Paschall Purification and Quantification of North Carolina State University Mitochondrial Genomes Using Exonuclease V for the Detection of Heteroplasmy 26 Jasmine Hughes The Effects of Overexpression and KnockEast Carolina University Down of SH3PX1 on Escort Cells 27 Julia Geaney-Moore Community is What You Make It: Sense of Guilford College Community at Guilford College 28 Hannah Shapiro Which Species to Conserve: Evaluating Children's Species-Based Conservation Kenneth Erickson North Carolina State University Priorities 29 Rebecca Ulrich Probing the Structure-Activity Relationship High Point University of Escherichia Coli Extracellular Death Factor 30 Michael Diez Modeling Love Dynamics Fayetteville State University 31 Christopher Smith Analysis of Frequencies in Beehive Audio Appalachian State University Recordings

21


Environmental Sciences

32 Joshua Lemli Appalachian State University

Chemistry

33 Riccardo De Cataldo Kaitlyn Griffith High Point University 34 Brandon Buchanan Appalachian State University 35 Matthew Carnaghi High Point University 36 Chaarushi Ahuja Joseph Levy Parth Chodavadia Komal Kinger Duke University 37 Brianna Morris Dayton Bell Elizabeth City State University 38 Stephanie deGuzman North Carolina State University

Physics Physics Public Health

Chemistry Biochemistry Public Health

Chemistry Analytical

39 Emily Oshita Fayetteville State University

Psychology

40 Allison Price University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill 41 Ismael Gomez Nash Community College

Biological Sciences Genetics International Relations Biology

English Chemistry

42 Rachel Benton North Carolina State University 43 Kenya Joseph University of North Carolina - Charlotte 44 Catherine Bakewell High Point University 45 Michael Vidmar University of North Carolina - Asheville

Biology

46 Julia Horiates East Carolina University

Exercise Science Chemistry

47 Johanna Schoenecker Queens University of Charlotte 48 Fernando Guerrero Nava Catawba College

Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular

49 Mounir Zerrad North Carolina State University

Mapping the Blitesphere: An Extensible Approach to Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Solid, Liberated, Anthropogenic Rubbish 3-Dimensional Modeling and Printing of Electron Orbitals Raman spectroscopy – an introduction Synthesis of Nickel Tubes for use in Biomimetic Cilia Arrays Gender Differences In Mental Health Outcomes For An OSC Population In New Delhi

Title: Effect of Novel Rhenium Compounds on Different Cancer Cell Lines The Development of the Self-Efficacy in Teaching Nutrition in the Community (SET-NC) Survey Evaluation of Lead Contamination in Southeastern North Carolina Water Sources by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Highly restrictive goals turn temptations into multifinal means A Comparison of Mitochondrial and Nuclear Gene Trees of the Seepage Salamander (Desmognathus aeneus) Iceland’s Crash and Boom: Impact of Tourism on Iceland’s Economic Recovery Cellular Uptake of siRNA Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery in Whole Blood and Lymphocytes Purcell's Dido and Aeneas: A Turning Point in English Drama Mossbauer elucidation of zero valence iron and iron oxide components of an engineered solid solution of nanoparticles Conservation Genetics of the Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis Cross Education Effect in Activities Requiring Accurate Muscle Activation Investigating the Mechanism of Hemeactivated Artemisinin Metabolites through a Lipid-Based in vitro Assay High-Throughput Biosensors for Polyketide Synthetic Biology

22


Biology

50 Samia Ladner High Point University

Biology

51 Ben Groelke Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences Zoology

Excess Power Index: A Sexual Dimorphic Trait in Bees

Progress towards temperature measurements via power spectrum analysis of Brownian motion of an optically trapped microsphere 52 Avery Dominguez Developing a Test Model System for University of North Carolina - Wilmington Hatching Crustacean Zooplankton

Physics Biophysics Engineering Industrial & Systems

53 Sam Migirditch Appalachian State University 54 Amelia Hardee North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences Microbiology Environmental Sciences Sociology

55 Layth Awartani Guilford College

Biological Sciences Microbiology Chemistry Biochemistry

58 Tyler Moore University of North Carolina - Pembroke

Mathematical model of transcription factorDNA binding dynamics

59 KyungMin Yoo Wake Forest University

Biological Sciences Botany Atmospheric Sciences

60 Meredith Hemphill North Carolina State University

Development of enhanced tissue adhesives by chemically modifying hyaluronic acid with a catechol amine Mapping the membrane topology of cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins in live cells Measurements of fluorescent particle concentration in and around west coast storms using impinger collectors and fluorescence microscopy

56 Nicholas McCauslin Queens University of Charlotte 57 Andrea Becker Wake Forest University

61 Rachel Wilkinson North Carolina State University

Lorenz-Mie Scattering Models of Gold Nanoshells in Optical Tweezers Evaluating silver-titanium orthopedic implants activated by low intensity direct current for infection control (Co-author: Zhuo (George) Tan) A Survey of the Bacterial Microflora Present in the Feces of Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) Nestlings Relationship between hydraulic fracturing and seismic activity in the Marcellus Shale The Jewish Return to Berlin—A Look at Collective Memory Through the Prism of Modern Berlin

23


Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) Does China’s Hunt for Energy mean Neocolonialism in Sudan? Name Letter Matching After Cognitive Depletion The Effects of ATM-mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation on Cell Migration Probing the Early Universe with Microhalo Substructure An Evaluation of Water Filters in Rural Guatemala Analysis of Phosphorylation Using Cofactor Mimics Compared Analysis of Muscle Activation During Piston Resistance Training and FreeWeight Training Longitudinal Alignment and Optical Characterization of Gold Nanostars in Electrospun Polymer Fibers

Political Science

1

Adonia Williams Fayetteville State University

Psychology

2

Erich Guebert Catawba College

Chemistry Biochemistry

3

Ryan Casey High Point University

Physics Astrophysics Public Health

4

Lucas deHart University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

5

Corrie Hansen East Carolina University

Chemistry Biochemistry Exercise Science

6

Maria Ramirez Perez Salem College

7

Nicole Hernandez Madison Sanderford Campbell University

Engineering Materials

8

Vamsi Varanasi North Carolina State University

Anthropology

9

Cheyenne Wagi University of North Carolina - Wilmington

Biological Sciences Neurobiology Biological Sciences Genetics Biological Sciences Genetics

10 Natalie Belcher Gaston Early College High School

Tie the Knot, Grow a Baby: The Effects of Marital Status on Neonate Growth in American Samoa Hair Color in Relation to Pain Perception – Red Heads Are More Sensitive to Pain

11 Chelsea Gustafson University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Analyzing Genetic Variants to be Included in Newborn Screening

12 Morgan Packer Breann Zeches Clayton Brown Campbell University 13 Jennifer Marshall High Point University 14 Bryanna Sierra University of North Carolina - Charlotte

Binding Interactions Between a MafA Pdx-1 Fusion Protein and the Insulin Promoter

15 Hunter Alford North Carolina State University 16 Calvin Macemore Appalachian State University 17 Adam Bell Appalachian State University

Dehaloperoxidase’s Relationship Between Folding Stability and Enzymatic Activity Examining the Effects of Urbanization on Boone Creek Exploring the Stability Dependence of the Critical Bulk Richardson Number in Computing the Planetary Boundary Layer Height over Boone, North Carolina

Chemistry Biology

Chemistry Biochemistry Chemistry Analytical Environmental Sciences

Functionality of the Osteocalcin Disulfide Bond Periostin and Transforming Growth Factor Beta Induced Expression and Breast Cancer Progression

24


Special Education

18 Christina Honeycutt High Point University

Psychology

19 Helen Barker Ariel Hodges High Point University Food, Nutrition, 20 Imani Grimes & Bioprocessing North Carolina A&T State University Sciences Psychology Biological Sciences Genetics Biological Sciences Microbiology Chemistry Environmental Sciences Biology Engineering Biomedical

How Do Commonly Measured Reading Related Constructs Correlate in a Sample of Struggling Readers? Studying Executive Function in a Lemur

Interaction Between Bifidobacteria and Medical Drugs

21 Samantha Tracy University of North Carolina - Charlotte 22 D-Jon-Nique Devone Fayetteville State University

Emotional and Cognitive Mechanisms in Social Networking Behaviors Degradation of DNA from Whole Blood by UV Radiation and Exposure Time

23 Heather Hill Alisha Palekar North Carolina State University 24 Nicholas Hall Appalachian State University 25 Mitchel Modlin Appalachian State University 26 Cailyn Scanlan High Point University 27 Zhan Wu Duke University

Social Hierarchy Among Selectively Bred Zebrafish

Marine Sciences 28 Samantha Farquhar University of North Carolina - Wilmington

Radiative Forcing of Aerosols in Boone North Carolina A Viability Study of Moso Bamboo Cultivation in North Carolina A Study into the Effects of Resveratrol on Bone Development in Danio rerio Role of Small GTPase Rab7 on the Electrotransfection Efficiency in Mammalian Cells Age and growth of the invasive lionfish: North Carolina, USA vs Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean

Biological Sciences Toxicology

29 Lori Saunders Fayetteville State University

Hemp Seed Formulation Increases Mortality and Disrupts Nervous System of Ants

Biological Sciences Microbiology Chemistry

30 Lori Roberts Guilford College

Antimicrobial activity of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) against opportunistic, potentially pathogenic bacteria Asymmetric Synthesis of Enantioenriched Lactams Investigating the Interactions of SR-A, TLR3, and TLR4 Receptors and the Impact on Cytokine Production Impact of a Pre-Service-Learning Training on Students' Skills Needed to Deliver a PrePackaged Educational Curricula in the Community Effectiveness of TENS Unit on Quadriceps Muscular Endurance During Weight Bearing Exercise

Biology

31 Eni Minerali University of North Carolina - Greensboro 32 David Creasman Campbell University

Food, Nutrition, 33 Anne Pursifull & Bioprocessing North Carolina State University Sciences Exercise Science

34 Grace Candler-Miller University of North Carolina - Wilmington

25


Biological Sciences Botany

35 Allison Baucom Catawba College

Mathematics

36 Brandon Macer Fayetteville State University 37 Eugene Filik High Point University 38 Nicole Clark High Point University 39 Frederick Liu Wake Forest University

Physics Biology Chemistry

Raspberries: Harvest to Health; Comparison of soluble sugar content, pH, anthocyanin, and phenolic content in red, yellow, and black raspberries Machine Learning Accuracy Analysis Using Support Vector Machine Model A Pulsar with a Long Orbit- The 12th Double Neutron Star System The Investigation of the Transcription Regulator GerE in Clostridium Species Title: Importance of Phosphine ligand Design in the Elucidation of Homogeneous Gold (I) Mechanisms Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Chemiluminescent Esters Using Acyl Chlorides and Phenols

Chemistry

40 Colleen Lasar Appalachian State University

Computer Science

41 James Inscoe Fayetteville State University

Developing systematic process for dealing with robot failures in robotics research

Pre-Medicine

42 John Lu Nona Kiknadze Phil Reinhart Duke University 43 Jennifer Zou North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Schistosomiasis Prevalence around Lake Victoria, Tanzania and Efficacy of a Previous Mass Drug Administration Campaign

Physics

44 Russell Chamberlain Appalachian State University

Connecting Analysis and Data

Engineering Civil, Construction & Environmental Biological Sciences Genetics

45 Sarah Wu North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoparticle Concentrations in Wastewater Treatment and Biosolid Application for Environmental Risk Assessment Mimicry In Two Genera Of Salamander

Chemistry Materials

Exercise Science

46 Jesus Rios Alyssa King Jaired Mobley Indersen MIrchandani Nash Community College 47 William Stutts Winston-Salem State University

Environmental Sciences

48 Andrew Bennett North Carolina State University

Physics

49 Nykesha Fyffe Appalachian State University 50 Benjamin Migirditch Appalachian State University 51 Moira O'Neill Guilford College

Physics Biophysics Social Work

Heat-Reflecting Window Coatings: Improved Design with Novel Materials

Facilitators and Barriers in Experiential Learning: The Case of Motorsports Management Majors in HBCU Determining The Source of A Pipe Discharge From NC State’s Gym Using Targeted Screening for PPCPs Maintaining Constant Pressure and Concentration Within A Fluidic Device Automation of spatial filter tilt in confocal Raman spectroscopy Developing Partnerships to Address Food Hardship in Greensboro, NC

26


International Relations

52 Lindsay Roth North Carolina State University

Pharmacy

53 Emma Hughes Appalachian State University 54 Luis Roldan North Carolina State University

Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular Health and Physical Education

55 Sydney Hendricks East Carolina University

Psychology

56 Megan Shannahan University of North Carolina - Wilmington 57 Samuel Barker Pfeiffer University 58 Bethany Hagopian Pfeiffer University 59 John Watters NC School of Science and Mathematics

Economics Psychology Chemistry Analytical

Running of the Bulls: Stimulating youth in Spain to run ahead of unemployment, mental health disorders, and the “discouragement” effect High-throughput Drug Organic Anion Transporters in Caenorhabditis elegans Developing non-growth conditions for Methylomicrobium alcalaphilum 20ZR to be used in a trickle-bed-reactor Assessing Eastern North Carolina Latino Community’s Readiness for Health Prevention through the Community Readiness Model Temporal changes in LPS-induced microglial cell activation in adult and aged mice Input Output Analysis In the School System Music Genre Preference and Machiavellianism Fabrication and Characterization of the Micro-Impedance Detector for Enumeration of Circulating Tumor Cells

27


Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15) Engineering Biomedical

1

Brinnae Bent North Carolina State University

Biology

2

Martina Azoro Fayetteville State University

Criminal Justice

3

Karnella Fobbs Fayetteville State University

Chemistry Biochemistry Psychology

4

Katherine Albanese Wake Forest University

5

Grace Tworek Catawba College

Biological Sciences Microbiology

6

Brian Masters North Carolina State University Hannah Klemmer Research Triangle High School

Exercise Science

7

Nathan Norris Campbell University

Biology

8

Maria Trujillo High Point University

The Impact of Altered Visual Input and Auditory Stimulations on Balance and Postural Stability Mapping the Sorting Signals of the Cytoplasmic Domain of Atg27

Chemistry

9

Crystal Gunther Meredith College

Natural Sources Used as Light Harvesters in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

Engineering 10 Kaitlyn Barbour Mechanical & North Carolina State University Aerospace Marine Sciences 11 Stephanie Perez University of North Carolina - Wilmington Health and 12 Courtney Stewart Physical Rachel Pearce Education Keerthana Velappan Caroline Abashian East Carolina University Chemistry 13 Jamie Schnuck Biochemistry High Point University

Environmental Sciences

14 Kimberly Bowman Appalachian State University

Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular

15 Piyanka Saha North Carolina State University

Miniaturizing Photoplethysmography for use in a Multifunctional Health Monitoring Device with Applications in Asthma Analysis Degradation of Male Haploid Extracted DNA by UV Radiations at Various Wavelengths and Exposure Time Identifying the Accuracy of Criminal (Criminal Justice Myths) & Forensic Junk Science Antimicrobial Properties of Gallium Against Bacillus subtilis Active vs. Passive Language Use in APAStyle Writing Effect of Different Nitrogen Sources on the Growth of Four Species of Dunaliella

Stress-Relaxation Behaviors of Diseased Heart Valve Tissues Silicon Requirements in Coccolithophores with STIL Channels Enforcement Official Perceptions of Underage Alcohol Consumption in a College Town

Characterization of the Metabolic Effect of Beta–Alanine on Markers of Oxidative Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Skeletal Muscle Hefty or Wimpy? A Biomechanical Hypothesis for Plant-Pollinator Species Associations Investigation of Novel Cellulose-Binding Tapirin Proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor Species

28


Chemistry Analytical Biological Sciences Microbiology Textiles Engineering, Chemistry & Science

16 Weston Petroski Brooke Wilson Appalachian State University 17 Vinay Giri Duke University

Quantification of Pentacyclic Triterpenoids in 2014 Season North Carolina Apple Peels

18 LaTasha Nicholson North Carolina State University

Identification of Transcription Factors Required for the Survival of C. Neoformans in the Central Nervous System Dissolution Temperature of Lignin and Poly(vinyl alcohol) Gel Fibers

Chemistry

19 Howard Willett Appalachian State University

Comparison of Photochemical Reactions for Waste Water Purification

Biological Sciences Genetics Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences Biological Sciences Zoology Business Administration

20 Arinton Davis NC School of Science and Mathematics

RNAi of ERK Substrates in the RAS-RAFERK Pathway of C. elegans

21 Kayla Harris North Carolina A&T State University

Viability of Probiotic Cultures in Greek Yogurt During Refrigerated Storage

22 Lucas Piedrahita Appalachian State University

Foot Preference Related to Lateralization in Coquerel’s Sifaka Lemurs (Propithecus coquereli) Technology in the Adolescent Mind

Chemistry Materials

24 Chaeyeong Jang Salem College Matthew Cottam Wake Forest University 25 Viktor Stromberg Appalachian State University 26 Austin Harrell Appalachian State University 27 Nigel Bethel Joshua Williams Elizabeth City State University 28 Aaron Frazier University of North Carolina - Greensboro

Environmental Sciences Chemistry Biological Sciences Botany Psychology

23 Michael Konrad Appalachian State University

Novel Processing of Porous Ceramic Nanocomposites for Fuel Cell Electrodes

Methane Emissions Associated with Unconventional Natural Gas Well Production Measuring The Energy of Fermentation Comparing Transformation Efficiencies of Four Different Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Cultivars Using Agrobacterium Tumefaciens Analysis of self-reference word usage of individuals with depression pre- versus posttreatment Cross-species Comparison of Auditory Template Function in Songbirds

Biological Sciences Neurobiology International Relations

29 Kunal Lodaya NC School of Science and Mathematics 30 Alexandra Tabor North Carolina State University

Women Factory Workers in Bangladesh

Chemistry Biochemistry

31 George Tabor Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences Genetics

32 Matthew Jordan-Steele Catawba College

Exploring the Possible Roles of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides in Invadopodia Function Phenomenal Phenolics: An Association Study of Avenanthramide and Tocopherol in Avena sativa

29


Biology

33 James Jenkins Davidson College

The effect of Alzheimer's disease gene APP/apl-1 on neuron development

Biological Sciences Genetics

34 Chelsey King Erin Spurrier Madison Staves Gaston College 35 Hunter D'Abundo High Point University 36 James Lohr Catawba College

Study of the intrusion of non-native invasive earthworm species in north carolina

Psychology Biological Sciences Botany Biology

37 David Billups University of North Carolina - Wilmington

Relationships Between Personality and Perfectionism Preparation Methods on the Differential Accumulation of Metabolites in Brassica Oleracea subsp. italica The Effects of Environmental Stress and Mutualisms on Relationships Between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in Dune Plant Communities Enhancement of Anaerobic Digestion with Electrically Conductive Particles

Engineering Civil, Construction & Environmental

38 Conner Murray North Carolina State University

Physics

39 Alexander Mandarino Appalachian State University 40 Logan Butler North Carolina State University

External force measurement methods in optical tweezers Inhibition of the Anti-Apoptotic Interaction between Caspase-3 and Calbindin-D28k through Computationally Designed Cyclic Peptides

Public Health

41 Hallie Hartley North Carolina State University

Can Designer and Illicit Drugs Determine the Source of Effluent Discharge at NC State Gym?

Biology

42 Richard Gregory Kelly Knutson High Point University 43 Lauren Musa Fayetteville State University 44 Maria Valverde High Point University

Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance: An Ongoing Battle

Chemistry Biochemistry

Mathematics Biological Sciences Microbiology Physics

Computer Science

Education History Psychology

45 Thomas Benton Natalie Kamitsuka Corey Aiken University of North Carolina - Asheville 46 Joshua Pinos James Fisher Joshua Cutolo Fayetteville State University 47 Megan Delamer Queens University of Charlotte 48 Haley Vartanian North Carolina State University 49 John Tunnell Pfeiffer University

Finding Face Outlines Using the DRLSE and Geometric Properties of the Face In Vitro Analysis of Transcription Repression by GerE during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis Optimization, Pointing Model Calibration, and Deep-Sky Imaging at Lookout Observatory Autonomous Real Time Tracking of Humans Using A Ground Based Multi-Camera System

Student Perceptions and their Impact on Grades The Myth of the Peddler: A re-examining of early Lebanese-American roles in the US Increasing Free-throw Percentage Using the Visualization Technique

30


Environmental Sciences

50 Kevin Fowler North Carolina State University

Physics

51 Maxwell Maurer High Point University 52 Ravikumar Patel Appalachian State University 53 Zachary Riley Wake Forest University

Physics Biophysics Pre-Medicine

Physics

54 Sarah Harvey Appalachian State University

Political Science 55 Brian Hart Wake Forest University Psychology 56 Juliette LaFargue Wake Forest University Environmental 57 Shay Bahl Sciences Queens University of Charlotte Exercise 58 Alexander Pearson-Moyers Science Brett Pinnix University of North Carolina - Wilmington Pharmacy

59 Jeffrey Ramsey Appalachian State University

Public Health

60 Nhung Budam Jalisa Horne Abigail Budam Branda Mlo University of North Carolina at Greensboro H'Lois Mlo Tasmia Zafar Guilford College 61 Terrance Shelton Nykeera Cockrane Winston Salem State University 62 Caroline Bertoni Wake Forest University

Chemistry

Anthropology

Determining The Source of a Pipe Discharge from NC State’s Gym Using Negative Mode LC-TOF MS Screening for Organic Contaminants Agarose as a Mucus Simulant For Use In a Biomimetic Cilia System Optimization of imaging in an optical tweezers system using a tunable field lens Digital Imaging for Objective Airway Assessments Shows High Inter-rater Reliability Amongst Anesthesiology Researchers Analyzing CO Isotopologues Toward Young Stellar Binaries and Isolated YSOs using High-Resolution Spectroscopy China Dream Propaganda Art: Creating the Cult of Xi Jinping Parents’ Beliefs, Emotions, and Behaviors in Response to “Typical” Adolescent Behavior A Proposed Study Of Alpha & Beta Acid Concentrations of Hops Grown in Cecil Soils Effectiveness of North Carolina Basic Law Enforcement Physical Fitness Training on Police Recruits: Expected Improvement Guidelines for Police Instructors Impact of Natural Products on HighThroughput Fluorescence Assay for DrugDrug Interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans Tailoring a Biological Risk Factor Survey for use in Hypertension Assessment with Montagnard Refugees

Development of rhodium catalyzed conjugate addition reactions of arylzinc and application to the synthesis of bisteppogenin Clay Sourcing, Ceramic Production and Prehistoric Exchange along the Yadkin River

31


Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45) Biology

1

Charity Baldwin Fayetteville State University

Criminal Justice

2

Whitney Watson Fayetteville State University

Biological Sciences Microbiology

3

Tyler Wilson High Point University

Chemistry Nanoscience

4

Daniela Fontecha North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences Microbiology Biological Sciences Genetics Biology

5

Hannah Klemmer Research Triangle High School

6

Kimberline Chew Duke University

7

Hillary Wilson High Point University

Biological Sciences Neurobiology

8

Zachary Johnson North Carolina State University

Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular

9

George Harper North Carolina State University

Chemistry Biochemistry

10 William Shaw High Point University

Importance of Specific Amino Acids on the E. coli MazEF Toxin-antitoxin System

Psychology

11 Daphne Hill University of North Carolina - Greensboro 12 Samantha Dove University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill 13 Erin Monahan High Point University 14 Natasha Morales Castellanos Salem College

Negativity of Intrusions for Dysphoric Individuals The Effect of Stress on HRV and Habitual vs. Goal-Directed Behavior Relationships Between Childhood Trauma, Disordered Eating, and Self-Esteem Deciphering the Hierarchy of Stroma in Breast Cancer Utilizing Multispectral Analysis

15 Sarah Martin North Carolina State University

Hair Coat Phenotype’s Effect on Thermoregulation of Heifers Infected with Fescue Toxicosis Quantifying Bisphenol - A Concentration in Canned Craft Beer

Psychology Psychology Chemistry

Biological Sciences Zoology Chemistry

Chemistry

16 Lauren Rogers Appalachian State University Philip Ashmore Appalachian State University 17 Shivaliben Patel Fayetteville State University

Testing Cannamix as a Pesticide to Inhibit Feeding Habits in the Tribolium castaneum and the Tenebrio Insect Reporting Sexual Assaults to Campus Police: Comparisons Between HBCUs and PWIs Synergistic Effects of Amoxapine and Betalactam Antibiotics Against MRSA Investigation of Optical Properties of PbSe/CdSe core/shell Quantum Dots Over Time Cloning and Over-expression of Beta-type Carbonic Anhydrases from Photobacterium profundum Quantitative Measurement of Centromere Strength and Function in Human Dicentric Chromosomes Exploring Methods in Art-Driven Science Outreach Training Tomorrow's Neuroscientists

Biomass Degradation by Multi-domain Catalytic Surface-Layer Proteins in the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis

Voltammetric Studies of the Interactions of DJ-1/Park 7 Gene with Quercetin

32


Engineering Chemical & Biomolecular

18 John Wright North Carolina State University

Food, Nutrition, 19 Nadia Idris & Bioprocessing North Carolina A&T State University Sciences

Implementation of a High Temperature Kanamycin Resistance Selectable Marker in the Hyperthermophilic Biomass Degrading Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii Effect of Gums and Proteins on Acid Whey Retention from Greek yogurt

Environmental Sciences

20 Bethany Kautz North Carolina State University

Correlation Between Water Quality and Turtle Abundance

Environmental Sciences Chemistry Analytical

21 Seren Homer Guilford College 22 Natalie Smith William Sink Nicholas Hall Alex Merwin Appalachian State University 23 Kendall Fallon High Point University

Guilford College Sustainable Food Systems Program: Guilford Farm An Investigation of the Chemical and Optical Properties of Aerosols in the Southeastern U.S.

Biological Sciences Microbiology Biology

24 Ryan Booth Gaston College

Antibiotic Resistance in Human Wastewater

25 Edem Dzotefe High Point University

The Interactions of Antimicrobial Therapeutics with Disulfiram, a Commonly Prescribed Medication

Exercise Science Chemistry Inorganic

26 Melissa Savas High Point University 27 Hannah Woolard East Carolina University

Biology

28 Sana Bharde East Carolina University 29 Alexander Schomo University of North Carolina - Wilmington

The Relationship Between Xbox Gaming Performance and Physical Function Regiospecific acylation of cycloplatinated complexes. Scope, limitation, and mechanism. The role of microRNAs in nicotine-induced early and late-onset diseases in C. elegans g. Nautilus: Improving Brain Assessment Accessibility

Biological Sciences Genetics

Biological Sciences Neurobiology Chemistry Psychology Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences Microbiology Atmospheric Sciences Biological Sciences Botany

30 Marina Leonidas Appalachian State University 31 Nicole Salonia East Carolina University 32 Chris Kolischak Appalachian State University 33 Jaimi Boston Brooke Roberts Elizabeth City State University 34 Bryce Carter Appalachian State University 35 Jennie Forsythe North Carolina State University

Identifying Dog Breeds

Iron(II) Tris(bipyridine) Crosslinked Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Networks Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms and Family Functioning in Children With Food Allergies The effects of road salt application on trace metal mobility, a case study of an urbanized headwaters stream. Evaluating Bacterial Buildup of Cosmetics

Variation in Surface Irradiance and Aerosol Optical Depth Identification of putative glucan interacting residues in Arabidopsis cellulose synthases

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Physics

36 Hallie Stidham Jacob Brooks High Point University 37 Samuel Weeks Izzy Pinheiro Nakisa Sadeghi University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

HPU's Chip 'n' Ship and NASA Micro-g NExT Program Experience

Earth Science

38 Harrison Bolton University of North Carolina - Greensboro

Ground Penetrating Radar Investigations of Surface Collapses due to Mining Operations in Gold Hill, North Carolina

Physics

39 Daniel Gallimore University of North Carolina - Asheville

Reevaluating the Acceleration of a Wheeled Cart on an Inclined Plane

Physics Condensed Matter Biology

40 Dylan Cromer University of North Carolina - Asheville

First Steps in Comparing Analytical Surface Enhancement Models with Experimental Results Finding Synergistic Interactions between Tacrine and Antibiotics Comparison of Support Vector Regression Models of Transcription Factors E2F1 and E2F4’s Binding Specificities to DNA Sequences The Role of Force Feedback in Retinal Microsurgery: A Human Interaction Perspective, a Meta-Analysis Determining the Halving Thickness of Materials During Phase Changes

Individualized Major Program

Biological Sciences Genetics Engineering Industrial & Systems Physics

Physics Biophysics Chemistry Biochemistry Physics Exercise Science Health and Physical Education Chemistry Biochemistry International Relations Environmental Sciences Engineering Mechanical & Aerospace

41 Josiah Howard High Point University 42 Sunwoo Yim NC School of Science and Mathematics

43 Julia Griffin North Carolina State University 44 Corey Aiken Thomas Benton University of North Carolina - Asheville 45 Evyn Lee Appalachian State University 46 Ariel Pinkham East Carolina University 47 Michael Paolino Appalachian State University 48 Brett Pinnix Alex Pearson-Moyers University of North Carolina Wilmington 49 Caroline Brailer Wake Forest University 50 Christina Tingle Wake Forest University 51 Annalisa Kristoffersen North Carolina State University 52 Victoria Brown Queens University of Charlotte 53 Andrew Cox North Carolina State University

Experiencing Music in the Waiting Room Environment

Raman Mapping: The Automation of Pinhole Alignment and Stage Scanning in Confocal Raman Spectroscopy Investigating the effects of disaccharides on bacteria Calibration of a Custom Built Fluorescence Anisotropy Instrument New NC Police Physical Fitness Assessment Tables: Are the current tables used by North Carolina Police Academies still relevant? Vitamin A Levels and Exercise Time in COPD Patients Following Nitrate Consumption Is Older Really Wiser? Age-Based Changes in Synaptic Structures in the Brain of the Honey Bee Climate Change Refugees: Warming Up to New Policy The Impacts of Soil Quality on Biodiversity An Investigation into an Automated Fiber Placement Process

34


Anthropology

54 Robert Sakaguchi Wake Forest University

The Construction of Identity in the Fa’atama Community of Samoa

Communication

55 Alexa Erb Wake Forest University 56 Jose Pagan North Carolina State University

Intersectionality, Intimate Partner Violence, and Representation in Theatre and Film Structural characterization of ERECTA family of receptor kinases(ERfs)

Chemistry Biochemistry

PERFORMANCE PRESENTATIONS Phillips 120 Time

Discipline

Presenter(s)/Institution

Performance Session 1 (10:30 - 11:30) Phillips 120 10:45 Earth Science Ian Lins 11:00 Michael Huneycutt David Hackney Pfeiffer University

Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:15) Phillips 120 1:30 - 1:45 English Brianna Horton East Carolina University 1:45 - 2:00 English Ashley Everidge (Literature) Catawba College 2:00 - 2:15 English (Writing) Jennifer Deane Appalachian State University

Title

Primitive Survival

East Carolina University Cather's Indefinite Decision Spoken Word Poetry

35


Exhibit Presentations Slane Student Center Time

Discipline

Presenter(s)/Institution

Title

Exhibit Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45) Slane Student Center 9:30 9:45 9:30 10:45

Arts - Visual

Addie Jones Appalachian State University

The Ethics of Ecoart

Arts - Visual

Baylen Burleson Appalachian State University

Understanding Poseidon

Exhibit Session 2 (11:00 – 12:15) Slane Student Center 11:00 12:15 11:00 12:15

Arts - Visual

Engineering - Electrical & Computer

Victoria Howerton Appalachian State University

Eco-Feminism in Art and Social Issues

Richard Ketchum East Carolina University David Moore East Carolina University

Cyber Attacks From the Internet

Exhibit Session 3 (1:00 – 2:15) Slane Student Center 1:00 2:15 1:00 2:15

Arts - Visual

India Moffett Appalachian State University

Education

Lyndee Weaver Appalachian State University

Gaia in Green: Honoring the Goddess in Contemporary Ecofeminist Art What Exactly is Watauga? (and Why Everyone Should Care)

Exhibit Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45) Slane Student Center 2:30 3:45

Anthropology

Cory Henderson University of North Carolina - Greensboro

The Application of 3-D Imaging as an Instructional Tool

2:30 3:45

Arts - Visual

Abby Johnston Appalachian State University

Trash in Perspective

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ABSTRACT LISTING ALPHABETICAL BY LEAD STUDENT AUTHOR ___________________________________________________________ Student Author(s): Ibrahim Abdeally, Freshman, High School, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Astrophysics, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Using Light Magnitude Data and Transit Photometry to Model Exoplanet HD 189733 b I attempted to extrapolate the properties of the exoplanet HD 189733b using light flux measurements. I first compiled data of the star’s visual magnitude during a time where it underwent a transit using the TRESCA database. After plotting this data, I accounted for outside interference before using that data to model the data. I then derived my own set of equations to describe the motion of the planet relative to its star in order to effectively model the data. I then compared my results to already established values in order to determine my error and I found that it is possible to determine the exoplanet’s basic characteristics through modeling. This process can hopefully show anyone how to predict properties of an exoplanet, and maybe even allow them to discover their own. Student Author(s): Chaarushi Ahuja, Senior, Biology and Global Health, Duke University Joseph Levy, Junior, Psychology and Global Health, Duke University Parth Chodavadia, Senior, Neuroscience and Global Health, Duke University Komal Kinger, Senior, Chemistry and Global Health, Duke University Mentor(s): Sumedha Gupta Ariely, Duke University Presentation: Public Health, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 36 Gender Differences In Mental Health Outcomes For An OSC Population In New Delhi Orphaned and separated children (OSC) tend to have worse mental health status compared to other children. In particular, females in OSC populations, on average, often exhibit low levels of self-concept, low levels of egoresiliency, and greater trauma symptoms. However, there is still limited research on gender differences in mental health in institutionalized children. The purpose of our longitudinal study is to explore the relationship between gender and common mental health issues including self-concept, peer and guardian attachment, ego-resiliency, and trauma symptoms within a population of OSC children of a residential care program in New Delhi, India. Seventyfive children randomly selected across eleven different group homes were interviewed in 2014 and 2015. Our results indicate that on average, males in 2014 and in 2015 tended to exhibit better mental health, showing higher guardian attachment (p = 0.045 in 2014) and peer attachment (p = 0.013 in 2015), lower trauma symptom scores (p = 0.053 in 2014), higher self-concept scores (p = 0.048 in 2015) than females. There was not a significant difference between ego-resiliency in males and females. The associations and patterns we explore shed light on gender differences in mental health status and how various mental health indicators across time might differ based on gender. Further research on these relationships could lead to better understanding of gender dynamics in institutional settings and potential gender-based interventions to improve mental health outcomes in OSC populations. Student Author(s): Corey Aiken, Senior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Thomas Benton, Senior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): James Perkins, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 44 Determining the Halving Thickness of Materials During Phase Changes The halving thicknesses of tin, gallium, and indium are investigated as the materials go through the solid-liquid phase change in order to see if their gamma ray shielding properties are functions of either temperature or phase. As radiation passes through a material it can be partially absorbed and lose some intensity. The ability of a material to absorb gamma rays is determined by its density and mass attenuation coefficient, i.e. its halving thickness. An experimental platform is constructed to measure the halving thickness of solid or liquid materials over a broad

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range of temperatures (-200 to 300 degrees Celsius). This platform uses a Cesium-137 gamma ray source, a commercially available dosimeter, and materials that can withstand the broad range of temperatures required. For each metal, which all have near room temperature melting points, the halving thickness can be measured for several temperatures above and below the melting point. Careful determination of halving thickness is important for materials used in many applications such as nuclear power generation, shielding for astronauts and high-altitude pilots, and fallout shelters. Student Author(s): Katherine Albanese, Senior, Chemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Patricia Dos Santos, Wake Forest University George Donati, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 4 Antimicrobial Properties of Gallium Against Bacillus subtilis New targets are needed for the development of new antibiotics to combat bacterial resistance. Iron (Fe) and Fe-S metabolism are vulnerable to stresses faced by bacteria during infection. Fe is required for growth, enzyme function, and oxidative stress defense. Gallium (Ga) has been proposed as an antimicrobial agent due to its similarities in atomic structure with iron, but its mechanism is not fully understood. We hypothesized that Ga causes growth inhibition by disrupting Fe-S clusters and thiol-redox homeostasis. The possible mechanisms of gallium’s antimicrobial efficiency were investigated through growth curves, Fe-S enzyme activity assays, WCAES and ICP-OES analysis, and by a redox sensitive roGPF in Bacillus subtilis. Growth inhibition was caused by micromolar concentrations of Ga and led to lower activity of the Fe-S enzymes aconitase and glutamate synthase. B. subtilis strains lacking the low molecular weight thiol bacillithiol are more sensitive to Ga. Preliminary analysis using roGFP suggests that lack of bacillithiol does not affect redox homeostasis, but impairs Fe-S enzyme activity, potentially through participation of Fe mobilization to the biogenesis and/or repair of Fe-S clusters. Spectroscopic analysis shows that low concentrations of Ga causes uneven cellular localization and alters the content and distribution of Fe and other metals. Student Author(s): Hunter Alford, Senior, Biochemistry and Chemistry, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Stefan Franzen, North Carolina State University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 15 Dehaloperoxidase’s Relationship Between Folding Stability and Enzymatic Activity The change in the kinetics of redox reactions involving 2,5-dihchlorohydroquinone induced by dehaloperoxidasehemoglobin (DHP) binding of substrate and inhibitor was investigated via Michealis-Menten Kinetic Analysis. Kinetic data was collected via time based UV/Vis assays with differing concentrations of inhibitors and substrates and reproduced in triplicate. All assays were performed on degassed solution as to prevent side reactions caused by the introduction of oxygen, and subsequent reduction of oxygen to water. The absorbance wavelengths of the fivecoordinated heme (ranging from 406 nm for ferric to 434 nm for ferrous) were monitored and utilized to create reproducible kinetics curves in Igor. A clear shift in the effects of the hydroquinones was seen after inhibitor and substrate were added. As conformation of amino acid residues is known to have significant effects on the reactions of enzymatic compounds, the change induced by substrate or inhibitor clearly alters the redox reactions involving the heme’s oxygen and 2,5-dichlorohydroquinone. Both the inhibitor and substrate bind in the internal (distal) pocket of the protein, it is likely they either block the heme Fe (inhibitor) or stabilize the binding of molecules to the heme Fe (substrate). Student Author(s): Lela Ali, Senior, International Political Science, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Jodi Khater, North Carolina State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 3, (1:30-2:30) The Circle of Hell The purpose of this paper is to explain gender dynamics and sexual violence in Egypt by examining patterns of gender exploitation that have pervaded Egyptian society since the post-colonial period. Sexual violence and misogyny do not hold provenance in the nature or culture of Egyptian society, but are phenomena of a neocolonial governing system that ensures its sustenance through judicial and economic violence, and through the division of society over issues of gender, culture, and religion. This paper will analyze tactics used to intimidate women, particularly during public revolt, in order to show how misogyny has been perpetuated by a system that exercises power through violence. It will aim to highlight state policies regarding gender, which are ambiguous and fail to

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sufficiently address the delineating social circumstances that women have been attempting to challenge. This paper will also trace political accounts in Egyptian history that depict the government being pressured into accepting and maintaining “customary” patterns of foreign dependency initiated under colonialism, which have disadvantaged women from asserting their rights. These approaches will serve to portray sexual violence in Egypt as a manifestation of how a neocolonial governing system sustains and exercises its power. Student Author(s): Melody Allison, Senior, Psychology, Methodist University Richard Kurr, Senior, Psychology, Methodist University Mariah Wright, Senior, Psychology, Methodist University David Cleveringa, Senior, Psychology, Methodist University Mentor(s): Mark Kline, Methodist University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Brief Academic Trauma Intervention While successful treatment interventions have been developed for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in recent years, a lack of trained clinicians and limited access continue to be barriers to treatment for many. Our study looked at whether non-clinical interventions helped with academics in students who deal with any academic difficulties they may encounter as a result of their trauma. Our study consisted of three small peer-led groups that met for a total of 5 sessions. Participants’ were taught cognitive-behavioral methods for coping with trauma as well as stressreduction techniques. The data collected consisted of the participants’ GPA after their mid-term and final exams, and an assessment of academic performance given to both the participants and a supervising faculty member before and after the intervention. While the BATI participants showed no significant changes in GPA, there was a statistically significant decrease in self-reported academic problems, and a strong trend towards significance for improved teacher ratings of academic performance. Given the small sample size and preliminary nature of this study, these promising findings suggest the BATI is an effective academic intervention for college students who have experienced trauma. Student Author(s): Adrianna Allred, Senior, Environmental Studies and Geology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Holly Peterson, Guilford College Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Nature as Mother: Perceptions of Women in Science and the Natural World For centuries in Western culture, poets, philosophers, and artists have personified nature as a beautiful, virgin, female figure—a mother that embodies the soul of the earth. Richard Looker, a Renaissance writer, considered nature to be a machine that carries out God’s will: “God being the Author…her voice is but his instrument.” But with growth in technology, population, and use of natural resources, nature has shifted from a nurturing mother to a disorder—something to be harvested and dominated. These two attitudes have not only drastically changed the way we perceive how we treat our earth, but also how we understand differences in gender. Women have been historically considered anatomically and intellectually inferior to men—passive, ductile, and only valued if untouched, the same characteristics men have valued in the development of land. This presentation explores how changes in the philosophy, language, and imagery surrounding nature are parallel to perceptions of women in Western society and how women interact with the natural world. By investigating women’s contributions to science, the popularization of Newtonianism, and the writings that have shaped the scientific process, we can evaluate how gender and nature intertwine throughout the history of scientific inquiry. Student Author(s): Lauren Andersen, Junior, Geography, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jessica Mitchell, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 17 Building Vegetation Spectral Libraries Local to the Southern Appalachians with an Emphasis on Carolina Hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) The future of hemlocks in the United States is threatened by the insect pest hemlock wooly adelgid. The purpose of this research project was to gather locations of hemlock and compile spectral libraries that can be used to inform land cover classifications and support exploration of hemlock spectral variability within canopies, across species, and with varying health levels. GPS locations and foliar samples of Carolina hemlock (Tsuga carolinana), Eastern

39


hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), and other dominant local species were collected. A FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer was used to collect spectral reflectance measurements at the needle/leaf scale. The collected measurements were compiled into spectral libraries and hemlock spectral variability was analyzed. The upper and lower canopy samples exhibited similar spectral characteristics. The live hemlock canopy exhibited higher reflectance than samples extracted from the field and measured in the lab. Results also indicate the potential to spectrally discriminate between Carolina and Eastern hemlock species. To our knowledge, the spectroscopy information collected in this study established the first collection of vegetative and geologic spectral libraries specific to the Southern Appalachians. The spectral libraries can be used to archive compositional information and generate new and potentially more accurate land cover maps from hyperspectral and multispectral imagery. Student Author(s): Asia Anderson, Junior, Mass Communications, North Carolina Central University Kenneth Campbell, Junior, Mass Communications, North Carolina Central University Darryl Bazemore, Junior, Mass Communications, North Carolina Central University Mentor(s): William Robinson, North Carolina Central University Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) #CopLife: A Study of Panopticism in American Police Culture Recent high profile incidents of police brutality, of which African Americans were the victims of said brutality, have generated public policy demand for heightened law enforcement accountability across the United States. Among the items up for consideration, is the use of body cameras. According to a position statement from the American Civil Liberties Union, the use of body cameras would represent a dual solution: 1) protecting against police abuses of power, and 2) the protection for police against false allegations of misconduct. This panel presentation will offer a critical race theory/anthropological investigation using the concept of panopticism to study the Durham Police Department as they consider the implementation of body cameras for its officers. Gleaned from this hybrid study will be a combination of video interviews with leaders within the Durham community (i.e. residents, police officers, attorneys, legislators, judges); a budding historical documentation regarding the effectiveness of body camera use by law enforcement; as well as any possible changes in the policing of African American communities. Student Author(s): Michael Antin, Freshman, Exercise Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Human Relations, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Language Barrier The rise in undocumented immigrants coming to the United States has brought to the forefront the question of what is to become of the children of these families. Many of the issues that they face can be attributed to the language barrier between immigrants and documented citizens. Avoidance often becomes key in not being reported to the authorities. This tends to lead to entire neighborhoods being comprised of Hispanic immigrants so that they can speak their native language in everyday life without a fear of being alienated because of it. To alleviate the issues presented by this language barrier it will take major policy reforms including legislation that allows undocumented students to receive in state tuition when applying to colleges, an increased standard for the quality of who can be hired as a ELL teachers and ways to encourage the different ethnic groups within a community to intermingle more. Hopefully people can realize that undocumented immigrants are much more than “illegal aliens”, that they are largely intelligent, hardworking and caring people. Until these changes come into effect, linguistic differences will continue to serve as social and educational barriers for members of the Hispanic immigrant community in the United States. Student Author(s): Evan Atkinson, Freshman, Journalism, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Andrea Roller, Appalachian State University Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) What the Dead Say About the Living: An Exploration of Zombie Film as a Barometer for Social Anxiety This film exploration was conducted for the purpose of determining “to what extent are zombie movies indicators of larger social trends at the time in which they were made?” In order to develop a reasonable answer to this question, select films throughout the history of the zombie in media were viewed and analyzed for their

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metaphorical qualities. As well as this, research on the subject of social criticisms in zombie films was consulted along with scholarly articles on the history of the zombie in film to provide background information on the topic. The resulting evidence of social commentary was determined to be directly linked to the fears of the viewing public and was thus placed into four categories: racial themes, political concerns, social concerns, and global fears. Having determined these categories, their instances were expounded upon with greater detail to link their importance to the thesis. After the completion of all research it was found that zombie films do serve as a vessel for the fears and or concerns of the public and this has in some part contributed to the longevity of monster. Student Author(s): Macon Atkinson, Freshman, Journalism, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Andrea Roller, Appalachian State University Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) How We Tell War Stories I will be discussing how American creatives use film and literature to tell our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s war stories of the past and present. I am using library and community based research: information from academic journals and books along with interviews from local community members. Results will address the accuracy and glamorization of war in Hollywood movies, the process of recording war stories from a firsthand or secondhand point of view, and how depicted violence in films and literature affects both civilians and veterans. I plan to explore how the process of telling war stories helps us heal and commemorate both as a free nation and as humans. Student Author(s): Marc Augenreich, Freshman, Exercise Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Writing), Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Controversies of Immigration Since the beginning of man, migration has been one of the most prevalent forms of adaptation. Migration still continues today and for the United States, one of the most popular destination points for those attempting to escape the trials of Central America, this natural process is extremely prevalent. On migrants travelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, they are forced to endure extreme physical hardships such as riding along the tops of fast-moving trains, trekking through the desert and other daunting tasks. Additionally, migrants are forced to suffer psychological hardships including, but not limited to, post-traumatic stress disorder and separation anxiety. Sanctuary clinics are not different from any other clinic with the exception that a check of papers to ensure legality is not required and that all physical and psychological traumas can be treated in that one facility. Due to the aforementioned perilous trials that migrantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face, and the resulting psychological and physical trauma that the trials cause, the United States should adopt sanctuary clinics in which those who are suffering in silence - without a document proving true legality - could seek the medical help they require without the fear of being caught or even deported. Student Author(s): Megan Avery, Senior, Exercise Science, Campbell University Mentor(s): Jennifer Bunn, Campbell University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 10 Assessment of Breakfast and Physical Activity Habits in College Students Purpose: To assess relationships between breakfast habits, body composition, and physical activity in undergraduate college students at a rural private university. Methods: 197 undergraduate college students (male: 90, female: 107) with an average age of 20.1 +- 2.49 years completed an 11 question survey regarding breakfast and physical activity habits, and completed body composition and body mass index (BMI) assessments. A chisquare analysis was used to determine the relationships between survey responses, body composition, and BMI. Results: The analysis revealed a significant relationship between the number of days of physical activity participation the breakfast consumption (p < .001), athletes consume breakfast more frequently than non-athletes (p = .01), and on-campus students consume breakfast less frequently than off-campus students (p = .026).Conclusion: Some recognized themes from the data suggest that undergraduate students who consumed breakfast consistently chose healthier breakfast foods, off-campus students had better access to breakfast foods compared to on-campus students, and athletes consumed breakfast more frequently due to greater energy needs. The current study suggests that college students who participate in at least one healthy lifestyle habit are likely to participate in more, and these healthy habits established in young adulthood can translate into lifelong health.

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Student Author(s): Layth Awartani, Senior, Biology & Health Sciences, Guilford College Mentor(s): Melanie Lee-Brown, Guilford College Christine Stracey, Guilford College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 55 A Survey of the Bacterial Microflora Present in the Feces of Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) Nestlings There are few studies on non-domesticated avian gut flora and even less research on the microbial populations of nestling fecal sacs. Of the few studies, most focus on zoonotic bacteria or the health of agriculturally important domestic avian species. This study examined the culturable gut microbes from the fecal sacs of 9 and 11 day-old Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) nestlings. Loggerhead Shrikes are strictly omnivorous migratory passerines (perching birds) and top-level predators. Their populations have fallen sharply over the past half-century and they are now classified as a Tier I, at-risk species in the U.S. and critically endangered in Canada. Nestling fecal sacs were collected over a four-month period in Antelope Island State Park Salt Lake, Utah summer 2014. I hypothesized that fecal sac microflora composition, species richness, and overall abundance should increase with nestling age. After screening 98 isolates from 23 fecal sac samples, we identified the presence of 13 culturable Gram-Positive bacterial species. The isolation of only Gram-Positive bacteria is consistent with published reports documenting the normal gut flora of omnivorous passerine species. As expected, the species richness and abundance of culturable gut microbes increased with nestling age. Student Author(s): Martina Azoro, Senior, Biology, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Khalid Lodhi, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 2 Degradation of Male Haploid Extracted DNA by UV Radiations at Various Wavelengths and Exposure Time Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) degrades rapidly when exposed to the environmental factors like free radicals, high temperature, relative humidity, and various types of radiations, etc. These studies were conducted to investigate the trend of DNA degradation when known amounts of human whole spermatozoa cells as well as human semen extracted DNA samples were exposed to UVA, UVB, and UVC radiations for different times of exposure. Forensic techniques utilized included DNA extraction from human male sperm cells through organic methods, human male DNA quantitation using Quantifiler®Duo kit on ABI 7500 Real-Time PCR. Human male DNA was amplified by using AmpFlSTR®Identifiler® kit as per manufacturer recommended protocol. Amplified products were separated by the ABI PRISM® 310 Genetic Analyzer through capillary electrophoresis. GeneMapper® ID v3.2.1 was used to analyze data with a peak height detection threshold of 100 relative fluorescence units. Genetic analysis of human male included monitoring the level of DNA degradation for 15 Short Tandem Repeats (STR) plus the amelogenin marker. The data collected from the samples exposed to natural radiation showed that exposure after 120 minutes resulted in low peak heights of the DNA at various markers. The data from UVA (365 nm) exposure indicated no notable damage of DNA up to 120 minutes. However, the human semen samples exposed to UVB (302 nm) and UVC (254 nm) radiations appeared to be inconclusive. This study can be helpful to establish the limitations of human identification utilizing STR markers in forensic sexual assault investigations. Student Author(s): Amanda Baeten, Junior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Blair Wisco, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) How Rumination Affects Emotions The purpose of our study was to examine multiple emotions in one rumination episode. Rumination is when one continually thinks about their depression; like their symptoms and origins of depression. Rumination has been shown to increase sadness and prolongs depressive symptoms. We predicted that dysphorics who ruminated would have increased sadness, anger and anxiety and have a decreased positive mood. We recruited 99 participants, who were classified as either dysphoric or non-dysphoric. Participants were randomly assigned to either ruminate or distract themselves. Before and after the induction they completed 9-point Likert scales assessing their mood. We conducted planned contrasts to examine if the dysphorics who ruminated were significantly different. Depressed mood was marginally different, while positive mood and angry mood were significantly different from the other groups. Follow-up paired t-tests revealed that depressed mood was marginally increased from pre to post for the dysphroics who ruminated, and angry mood was significantly decreased for dysphorics who distracted. For positive mood, the dysphorics who ruminated showed a significant decrease while the dysphorics who distracted showed a

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marginal increase. These findings can be used to improve the assessment and treatment of depression by examining individuals’ anger and positive mood. Student Author(s): Shay Bahl, Senior, Environmental Studies, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Reed Perkins, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 57 A Proposed Study Of Alpha & Beta Acid Concentrations of Hops Grown in Cecil Soils Craft brewing has quickly become a growing industry in the southeast. This has created a market for local hop growers; however the majority of data on hops production in the U.S is developed by or for the Pacific Northwest. This poster describes a proposed methodology to examine the concentrations of alpha and beta acids of four varieties of hops when grown in slightly acidic Cecil soils and slightly alkaline Cecil soils in the southern piedmont of North Carolina. This study will also examine the effects of different levels of soil drainage in respect to alpha and beta acids. Methods of analysis will utilize gas chromatography mass spectrometry to identify acid concentrations in dry cone mass. The study will utilize T-tests to determine if there are any significant differences of acids of hops grown in different soil acidity. Results will also be compared to other hop growers in the state. Student Author(s): Catherine Bakewell, Sophomore, Spanish, High Point University Mentor(s): Laura Alexander, High Point University Presentation: English, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 44 Purcell's Dido and Aeneas: A Turning Point in English Drama During a century where opera reached great heights in Italy and in France, Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas (1687) was one of the first and only English operas during the late seventeenth century. My objective in my research was to learn how this opera came to be despite being born in a country that loathed the art form. I read analyses of the libretto, debates about the historical context of the work, and explanations of seventeenth century English and politics to further broaden my understanding of the world into which Henry Purcell and librettist Nahum Tate brought their opera. The libretto itself eased audiences into this new art form by incorporating characteristics of the popular genre of the Heroic Drama. Furthermore, this work displays ideals of English nationalism by being in English and by including allusions to contemporary politics concerning the much-maligned king, James II, who was unabashedly Catholic while ruling a protestant nation. I argue that this opera’s existence is largely due to the support from a king who, having spent time in France, would support those arts which may have be considered foreign to the average Englishman. Student Author(s): Charity Baldwin, Senior, Biology, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Shirley Chao, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 1 Testing Cannamix as a Pesticide to Inhibit Feeding Habits in the Tribolium castaneum and the Tenebrio Insect Many pesticides are used to control pests such as Tribolium castaneum and Tenebrio species. These chemicals are often toxic to humans and are ineffective due to their increased resistance to chemicals. One potential promising pesticide, a newly developed, patent pending formulation made from hemp seed called Cannamix was tested. The repellency or attractive nature of this hemp seed formulation was determined by a choice test. The following hypothesis was tested: Cannamix repels insects, such as Tribolium castaneum and Tenebrio larvae. Insects were given two choices: Whole-wheat flour (control), and Cannamix (hemp seed formulations). Our findings indicate that hempseed treatments serve as a good repellent that prevents the beetles feeding behaviors in the T. castaneum but an attractant for the Tenebrio larvae.

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Student Author(s): Kaitlyn Barbour, Senior, Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Hsiao-Ying Shadow Huang, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Mechanical & Aerospace, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 10 Stress-Relaxation Behaviors of Diseased Heart Valve Tissues It is a widely acknowledged health concern that heart valve diseases lead to defective structures and improper function of heart valves. Studies have indicated that heart valve diseases are caused by disrupted tissue homeostasis under a variety of pathological conditions, resulting in alterations in their microstructures and mechanical properties. Severe collagen depletion is one example of disordered tissue remodeling caused by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that pathologically induces matrix destruction and changes the viscoelastic property of the heart valve tissue. Strain on collagen fibers may effectively enhance or block proteolytic sites and could potentially accelerate or resist degradation of fibers, leaving them selectively susceptible to collagenases and MMPs. With application of collagenase to the tissues to simulate collagen degradation by MMPs, this project will focus on characterizing stress-relaxation behaviors of fresh porcine heart valve tissues and collagenase-treated ones under different stretching conditions. The results will reveal the sensitivity of collagen fibers to proteolytic degradation. We hypothesize that a decrease in stress on the leaflet is associated with the strain and collagenase concentration induced on the heart valve tissue. Conceptually, this project could potentially explain how collagen fibers are selectively susceptible to degradation and help develop strategies to reduce heart valve diseases. Student Author(s): Alexandra Barbour, Senior, Biology, Guilford College Jessica Tutterow, Senior, Biology, Guilford College Kelsey Lindeman, Senior, Biology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Melanie Lee-Brown, Guilford College Christine Stracey, Guilford College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) The Influence of Bluebird Fecal Sac Microbiota on Nest Sanitation Behaviors Cross-discipline collaborations at Guilford College between Microbiologists and Ornithologists have recently investigated whether microbial communities can influence animal behavior. Like many songbird species, nestling Eastern bluebirds (Sialia silais) produce mucous membrane enclosed fecal sacs. Two different behaviors have been observed for nest sanitation; the parents carry the fecal sac away from the nest or the parents ingest the fecal sac. Many published reports hypothesize the benefits of ingesting fecal sacs, and why this behavior may change from ingestion to removal as the nestling ages. This study is novel in that it explores the microbiota of the nestling fecal sacs to help explain the switch in nest sanitation behavior. We hypothesize that the nutritional value and decreased predator detection benefit of ingesting the fecal sacs, is outweighed by the cost of ingesting dangerous microbes as the nestling ages. Utilizing dilution plating, 16S rDNA analysis and Illumina sequencing, we can determine the relative abundance and diversity of microbes within fecal sacs from nestlings across a variety of ages, and nest locations. The long-range focus of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between parental nest sanitation behaviors and changes in the microbial populations of nestling fecal sacs. Student Author(s): Samuel Barker, Sophomore, Mathematics, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Vinson Sutlive, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Economics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 57 Input Output Analysis In the School System This research will be dedicated to making an input and output analysis of the school system in NC, or perhaps more broadly the United States. It will focus in on the Public School system in order to eliminate any unnecessary variables added in by the private schools as well as to reveal government efficiency in the school system. Input will be measured in terms of money. Care will be taken to consider where the money is dedicated to in this analysis. For instance, a newly built school will require a much larger sum of money to get started than a developed school will need to simply sustain itself. However, the input will be largely unfiltered into categories of academia, curricula, facilities and so on, because the argument will be entertained that facilities and other seemingly nonacademic areas make a difference in the academic performance of the students. This proposal is of course unproven and will be a topic of inquiry in this research. In measuring the output, a large variety of outcome indicators, such as average GPA, test scores, and graduation rates will be considered. These will be weighted together and perhaps addressed individually as outcomes.

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Student Author(s): Helen Barker, Sophomore, Biology, High Point University Ariel Hodges, Junior, Psychology, High Point University Mentor(s): Joanne Altman, High Point University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 19 Studying Executive Function in a Lemur What makes humans uniquely different from other animals? For decades, researchers have investigated cognitive tasks that at one time seemed uniquely human (e.g. tool use, language, self-awareness, theory of mind) but the literature shows that these are all evident in at least some non-human species. To date, there is no evidence of a cognitive ability unique to humans. This research is part of an investigation to find evidence of executive function, one of our most complicated cognitive tasks (organized in the pre-frontal cortex), in a non-human primate. Executive function involves planning and decision-making and is not fully developed in humans until early adulthood. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) is a definitive test of executive function (Heaton, 1981; Jodzio et al., 2015). The test is a matching game, which uses three different rules that continuously change. The player must understand the rules and determine which rule to use as the game continues. This poster reflects the initial training of a lemur to match cards on a tablet, with the intent to ultimately shape its ability to complete the WCST. The poster focuses on the lemurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress. Student Author(s): Sarah Bartholomew, Freshman, Music Therapy, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Liberal Studies, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) The Power of Feminism: The Educated, the Employed, and the Liberal Watauga Residential College was founded during the height of the feminism movement in the 1970s. As feminism was reaching past gender boundaries, Watauga, along with proponents of feminism, followed and strived to surpass those limits. Watauga faculty and students have and still continue to embrace a liberal, open-minded viewpoint, including on topics regarding womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issues and feminism. In this research project, I will be focusing on the specific roles that women played in Watauga, how Watauga has battled sexism in the field of education and employment, and how Watauga Residential College compares to other departments at Appalachian State University, as well as previous experimental schools such Black Mountain College. I will be using resources varying from course descriptions to personal interviews from women who have been a part of Watauga. The resources will show how Watauga Residential College has impacted not only the Appalachian State University community and its students, but also the impact that the students within Watauga created within their own communities. Student Author(s): Claire Basista, Senior, Environmental Technology and Management, North Carolina State University Krystal Carter, Senior, Environmental Technology and Management, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Elizabeth Nichols, North Carolina State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 24 Determining the Source of a Pipe Discharge from NC State's Gym Using Non-Targeted Screening for Organic Contaminants South of Carmichael Gymnasium at North Carolina State University is Rocky Branch Creek, a local water body that flows into the Falls River Basin, in which the city of Raleigh obtains its drinking water. The Carmichael Gymnasium pool at is used every day for university courses and recreation, and there is reason to believe that Carmichael Gymnasium is outsourcing into the creek. Through continual human use, chemical compounds leach from humans into the pool. The objective of the study was to determine if Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) are entering Rocky Branch Creek by the Carmichael Gymnasium pool alone, or if other sources within the gymnasium are contributing. We sampled Rocky Branch Creek at the pipe, upstream and downstream. We also took tap and pool water samples for comparison. Samples were concentrated by the Agilent 610 Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer and analyzed by the Agilent 1100 LPC separation system. Our results showed that Pesticides were the highest detected chemical class, followed by Equine and Veterinary drugs. There were correlations between chemical compound classes detected in pipe and pool samples. Further study must be exhibited to verify the objective.

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Student Author(s): Amelia Bass, Freshman, English, Secondary Education, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Faculty Means Family The purpose of faculty and staff in Universities is to impact the future of their students’ lives and to account for the student’s intended success for the future. However, students' internal development is usually not a factor for faculty success, except for in a program at Appalachian State University: Watauga Residential College. Watauga is an experiential residential program based on interdisciplinary learning and is Centered on the idea of the faculty and students as a well-knit, thought provoking, and internally liberating community. Faculty are known to impact lives of the students within Watauga, both academically and in terms of self-awareness which is an experience hard to find in the institutionalized collegiate level. Using memorandums recorded during the early years of Watauga, the Margaret McFadden papers to delve into the curriculum taught during those times, and utilizing sources including Virginia Foxx’s dissertation and interviews I will provide the basis for residential colleges, what they strive to achieve, and Watauga’s progress through the years. Throughout these sources, I will show the unique and effective teaching styles of the professors from around the time the residential college was founded, the impact they have on students today and how they’ve created this thriving community. Student Author(s): Allison Baucom, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Constance Rogers-Lowery, Catawba College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Botany, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 35 Raspberries: Harvest to Health; Comparison of soluble sugar content, pH, anthocyanin, and phenolic content in red, yellow, and black raspberries Red raspberries (Rubus ideaus), yellow raspberries (Rubus ideaus), and black raspberries (Rubus occidentalis) are potentially a high value crop, but are difficult to grow in North Carolina. These fresh fruits are rich sources of vitamins, antioxidants, trace minerals, phenolic compounds, and anthocyanins. Various health benefits come from anthocyanins and phenolic compounds including disease prevention, reduced hypertension, and enhanced antioxidant production. It was discovered that at day 0 the black raspberry had the largest anthocyanin value, red raspberries had the intermediate value, and the yellow raspberries had the least amount of anthocyanin content. Total phenolic content followed the same trend: black raspberries contained the most, red raspberries were intermediate, and yellow raspberries had the least amount. After storage black raspberry anthocyanin value decreased while red and yellow increased. Student Author(s): Matthew Beck, Senior, Biochemistry, High Point University Mentor(s): Melissa Srougi, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 11 Role of Rac1 on Cell Migration in ATM Deficient Cells Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a genetic condition associated with a lack of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, which is crucial in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs). A-T patients have a predisposition to metastatic cancer. The Rho-family of small GTPases including Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 also play key roles in tumorigenesis by controlling cellular migration and adhesion. Work in our lab has shown that loss of ATM results in an increase in ROS that directly activates Rac1, rather than solely by the traditional guanine nucleotide exchange factor-mediated pathway. We therefore hypothesize that an increase in activated Rac1 causes greater cell motility in cells lacking ATM kinase activity. To test this hypothesis, siRNA was used to knockdown Rac1 in ATM inhibited HeLa cells. A dose-time response with siRNA specific to Rac1 (siRac1) was performed and its effects on Rac1 protein levels determined. We found that a 25 nM treatment of siRac1 for 72 hours was optimal for Rac1 protein knockdown. We are currently using similar conditions to test for the role of Rac1 in ATM-mediated cell migration using chemotaxis-based assays. The finding from our studies will contribute to the mechanism-based understanding of A-T associated tumorigenesis.

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Student Author(s): Andrea Becker, Senior, Sociology & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Amanda Gengler, Wake Forest University Joseph Soares, Wake Forest University Presentation: Sociology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 57 The Jewish Return to Berlin—A Look at Collective Memory Through the Prism of Modern Berlin This project examines the identity politics of being a Jew in modern Berlin two generations after the liberation of Auschwitz. Since the fall of the Nazi Reich, the Jewish community in Berlin has experienced three primary revivals—the end of World War II, the fall of The Wall, and the turn of the 21st Century—and is now in international spotlight as the new up-and-coming destination for both Israelis and Diaspora Jews. This research seeks to identify patterns pertaining to where Jews are immigrating from, what aspects of Berlin are appealing, and what role the German state had in this unexpected influx. Using the tenants of ethnographic, inductive sociological research, I attended Jewish meeting groups as a participant observer and conducted 18 intensive, semi-structured interviews with a diverse group of Jewish adults in Berlin in order to collect personal narratives. To complement the individual accounts, I assessed overarching thematic elements using content analyses of Jewish sites—including the Jewish Museum, The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, and the “Stumbling Stones” scattered around the city. The data from both of these methods revealed three overarching themes: the appropriation of the Holocaust by the German state, the utilization of Israel as the new anti-Semitic scapegoat, and the tension between state-sanctioned and grass-root support for the Jewish community. Through an in-depth examination of the Jewish community in Berlin, this research explored the broader questions of collective memory, the politics of regret, and the politics of martyrdom. Student Author(s): Natalie Belcher, Freshman, Biology, Gaston Early College Mentor(s): Hisayo Tokura-Gallo, Gaston College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Neurobiology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 10 Hair Color in Relation to Pain Perception – Red Heads Are More Sensitive to Pain People with red hair are often said to have low pain tolerance. This research tested whether or not this belief is a myth. Melanocortin-1 Receptor (MC1R) partly controls pain perception and bonds with specific proteins to create different pigmentation in hair and skin color. In addition, MC1R interacts with various neurotransmitters, including endogenous opioid neuropeptides and endorphins. Mutated MC1R leads to the combination of red hair and light, freckled skin. This mutation leads to K-opioid receptor alterations, which is involved in pain perception. To test this, 50 subjects of various hair colors were tested on their sensitivity to the pain by keeping their hand in a bucket of ice water. The results showed that how long the subjects kept their hands in the ice water was related to their hair color. These results may have some implications for administration of pain medication. Student Author(s): Adam Bell, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Christopher Thaxton, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 17 Exploring the Stability Dependence of the Critical Bulk Richardson Number in Computing the Planetary Boundary Layer Height over Boone, North Carolina The Critical Bulk Richardson Number (Ribc) is a parameter frequently used to determine the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The convention has been to treat Ribc as a pseudo constant, which covers all stability regimes, and many efforts have been made to find a universal value. Experimental data from seventy-six upper-air radiosonde launches conducted at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, during the summer of 2013 were used to explore the stability dependence of Ribc and to compute site specific characteristics of the boundary layer for this area. First, the PBL height at the time of each launch was determined as the steepest vertical gradient in optical backscatter from on-site micro-pulsed LiDAR (MPL) data. The radiosonde launches were then binned according to Pasquill-Gifford stability class, and an algorithm was used to compute the Bulk Richardson values at the MPL-derived boundary layer height. Using linear fitting and statistical error minimization, we attempt to define the optimal Ribc range for each stability class. We expect to see an increase in the optimal Ribc as thermally stratified instability increases. Obukhov length (L) was also determined and used to further characterize the bulk stability of the PBL for Boone, North Carolina.

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Student Author(s): Andrew Bennett, Senior, Environmental Technology and Management, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Elizabeth Nichols, North Carolina State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 48 Determining The Source of A Pipe Discharge From NC State’s Gym Using Targeted Screening for PPCPs This study quantified pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the Carmichael Gymnasium Pool and several locations at Rocky Branch Creek near Carmichael Gymnasium in order to determine if there is a connection between discharge from a pipe outlet at the creek and pool water at the gym. Prior research detected similarities in conductivity between the discharge from the pipe outlet at Rocky Branch Creek and the pool water from Carmichael Gymnasium, making the pool a likely source of the discharge. Grab samples were taken from both the pool, the pipe outlet, as well as upstream and downstream from the pipe. Samples were extracted using solid phase extraction cartridges and were later analyzed using a LC-MS/MS at the UNC-Chapel Hill Biomarker Mass Spectrometry Facility. The analysis showed no significant similarities between the pharmaceuticals in the creek and in the gym’s pool. Many of the same compounds were identified at both locations, but the quantities were different enough to indicate that the pool is not the source of the discharge. Further research is needed to identify the source of the discharge. Student Author(s): Brinnae Bent, Senior, Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Alper Bozkurt, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Biomedical, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 1 Miniaturizing Photoplethysmography for use in a Multifunctional Health Monitoring Device with Applications in Asthma Analysis Current treatment plans for chronic respiratory diseases are limited to single point measurements, obtained in the regulated environment of a clinic. The development of a continual health and environmental monitoring system will allow for a better understanding of how external factors are affecting the patient’s respiratory condition and can shift healthcare into a preventative system rather than treating the symptoms. In addition to the integrated electrocardiogram (ECG), ozone detection, three-axis accelerometer, and microphone, photoplethysmography (PPG) allows for a more complete physiological understanding of chronic respiratory conditions. Dual wavelength PPG allows for the measurement of respiratory rate, heart rate and arterial oxygenation (SpO2), and can be used in unison with ECG to provide an estimation of blood pressure via pulse transit time (PTT). Flexible conformation to the tissue, time multiplexing of the differing wavelengths, protective polymer coating, and the overall power consumption are some of the main concerns in our design of the probe. The PPG probe is miniaturized and manufactured to increase accuracy while maintaining a flexible, lightweight, and energy efficient device component. With the ability to monitor both heart rate and respiratory rate, it greatly improves the versatility and accuracy of the overall multifunctional health-monitoring device. Student Author(s): Rachel Benton, Senior, International Studies, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Shea McManus, North Carolina State University Presentation: International Relations, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 42 Iceland’s Crash and Boom: Impact of Tourism on Iceland’s Economic Recovery Following Iceland’s major economic crash of 2008, the eruption of Eyjafjallajokull brought a swarm of tourists to the small island nation, providing much needed financial assistance. This influx has resulted in negative environmental consequences including the desecration of Iceland’s pristine wilderness. Many worry that these environmental issues could lead to declines in tourism, considering that many come to Iceland primarily to experience nature. Drawing from statistical data, interviews with Icelanders, and scholarly literature, this study examines how tourism has impacted economic recovery and the environment in Iceland. It shows that tourism has diversified Iceland’s industry and has significantly contributed to economic growth since the crash. Contrastingly, the research demonstrates that increasing numbers of visitors has required Iceland to quickly expand its infrastructure and, as tourism has grown, the amount of pristine wilderness has declined. This research argues that tourism is essential to the economic recovery of Iceland, but its impacts on the environment could ultimately result in tourism decline, thereby requiring new policies to limit the amount of tourists and thus limit the environmental consequences that they bring. Adjusting public policy to ensure future financial stability holds significant relevance to the everyday lives of Icelanders and to Iceland’s economic prospects.

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Student Author(s): Thomas Benton, Senior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Natalie Kamitsuka, Senior, Physics, University of North Carolina Asheville Corey Aiken, Senior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): Judy Beck, University of North Carolina - Asheville Brian Dennison, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 45 Optimization, Pointing Model Calibration, and Deep-Sky Imaging at Lookout Observatory In the summer of 2015, a series of projects were conducted in order to enhance the functionality of UNC Asheville’s Lookout Observatory. The goals of these projects included: 1) Assess the integral components of operating the observatory in order to improve efficiency, 2) improve the accuracy of the telescope’s pointing and tracking using TPoint software, and 3) create an image catalog of deep-sky objects using a CCD camera mounted to the telescope. The first objective was accomplished by taking an inventory of the facility, determining what was needed, and organizing the equipment. The calibration of the pointing and tracking of the telescope was obtained through the use of the pointing model software TPoint, which required the slewing of the telescope to the locations of approximately 100 known stars, and manually Centering each star. The result was an improvement in the sky root mean square pointing value from approximately 44 arcseconds to 14.9 arcseconds. Finally, images of various deep-sky objects were taken and processed using the imaging software ImageJ. Students and faculty of UNC Asheville, as well as members of the larger community, will ultimately benefit from the advancements made to Lookout Observatory through the successful completion of these projects. Student Author(s): Caroline Bertoni, Senior, Anthropology and History, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Paul Thacker, Wake Forest University Presentation: Anthropology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 62 Clay Sourcing, Ceramic Production and Prehistoric Exchange along the Yadkin River My research project investigates the late prehistoric Native American production and exchange of pottery vessels along the Yadkin River using multiple laboratory methods to determine the mineral composition of regional clay deposits and archaeological artifacts. For the past forty years, archaeologists working at Late Woodland sites in the North Carolina Piedmont have debated the amount and nature of interaction between diverse Native American ethnic groups that lived in the region. Prehistoric ceramic vessels hold important clues about past behavior including container function, status signaling, and cultural aesthetics. My research systematically located and characterized the geochemistry of 53 clay deposits located within a five-kilometer catchment area of the large late Woodland Donnaha village archaeological site (31YD9). After an initial series of tests to determine workability, the raw clays and fired test tiles were analyzed using multiple laboratory methods, including macroscopic and x-ray fluorescence analysis. My results indicate that a majority of the ceramic vessels were produced locally, and that overall levels of pottery exchange were low. I was able to identify a few distinctive pieces made using clays not found within the surrounding area, signifying these pieces were most likely traded from more distant areas. Student Author(s): Nigel Bethel, Senior, Biology, Elizabeth City State University Joshua Williams, Sophomore, Biology, Elizabeth City State University Mentor(s): Margaret Young, Elizabeth City State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Botany, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 27 Comparing Transformation Efficiencies of Four Different Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Cultivars Using Agrobacterium Tumefaciens Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is a model plant that is widely used in plant transformation experiments. However, there is limited data when the most common cultivars are compared for transformation efficiency. Leaf explants of four tobacco cultivars (Samsun, TN90, K326, and Hicks) were used in plant transformation to determine the most successful transformed cultivar. Plasmids containing the gus gene with or without an intron, were mated into two different strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A.t.; GV3850 and EHA105). The plasmids also had the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene. The leaf explants were inoculated for 5 minutes with A.t. and plated on medium containing kanamycin. Controls were also plated on media with or without kanamycin. Results show that Samsun had the highest percentage of explant survival (96 – 100%) for both A.t. strains and plasmids. Additional data such as number of explants with meristemoids and shoots will be presented. Future plans are to conduct GUS histochemical analyses, PCR and Southern Blots, on transgenic plants recovered.

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Student Author(s): Ryan Beverley, Freshman, Art Management, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: International Relations, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Cultural Enclaves Impede Success Cultural Enclaves are places of familiarity and sanctuary for new immigrants as they migrate to a new country, in this case, the United States. While immigrants may feel more safe and comfortable inside the enclave, living and working there actually impedes their success in America. “…gross returns of enclave participation for all groups among Chinese immigrants are lower than their counterparts in the mainstream economy.” Most immigrants, if joining the mainstream economy, are settled in the secondary labor market because their lack of previous work experience forcing them to take low wage jobs. In order to help immigrants assimilate into American society, programs need to be put in place to help them regain some of the human capital that was lost upon their arrival. These programs should include educational opportunities, civics and economics classes, and vocational classes. We also need to teach American citizens to be more welcoming and open minded towards immigrants, as it is a principle of our American society. With the help of these classes and a change of attitude in natives, immigrants will assimilate into society with much more ease. Student Author(s): Logan Beyer, Junior, Child Development, Duke University Mentor(s): Margaret Swezey, Duke University Presentation: Special Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Multimodality, Learning Disabilities, and the Writing Center Learning disabilities (LD) often go unnoticed on college campuses. Diagnoses of ADHD, ADD, and LD are subtle, and the fear of stigmatization powerfully incentivizes students with LD to adopt a “silent struggle approach” to complex assignments, especially those involving writing. The goal of this project was, first, to investigate the strategies that writing Centers can employ to help LD students navigate these challenges; and second, to compile all available resources into a single, easily accessible location. The project began with research in relevant scholarship. It quickly became apparent that an environment with a universal design for learning, enriched with a variety of multimodal tools, holds the most promise to make the writing Center a more inclusive campus resource. Based on this premise, a website was created as an online tool for writing Center staff, administrators in campus disability access offices, as well as for individual students working independently on projects and assignments. Through a colorful, multimodal design that incorporates several different learning styles preferred by students with ADHD, ADD, and LD, the website aims to equip LD writers with the tools they need to succeed on even the most daunting assignments. Student Author(s): Sana Bharde, Senior, Biology, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Baohong Zhang, East Carolina University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 28 The role of microRNAs in nicotine-induced early and late-onset diseases in C. elegans MicroRNAs fine-tune the expression of target genes needed for homeostasis. Our pilot study showed that nicotine altered 17% miRNAs in C. elegans larvae. Here, we plan to investigate the role of microRNAs in mediating nicotine-induced adolescent and adult-onset phenotypes: larval pharyngeal pumping, adult germ line apoptosis, and survival. Worms were treated with nicotine during the postembryonic stages with either 20µM and 20mM. For the pharyngeal pumping assay, videos were recorded for at least 15 worms/group to compute average pumps/sec. For adult apoptosis and lifespan assays, worms were washed off treatment before gametogenesis and allowed to grow till adulthood on nicotine-free media. Day 1 adults were stained with SYTO12 or acridine orange and apoptotic cells were counted for at least 50 gonads per treatment group. The remaining 200 worms were counted and transferred every 1-2 days until all worms died. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the survival curves across treatment groups. Our data suggests that post-embryonic nicotine exposure inhibited pharyngeal pumping, decreased lifespan and increased germ cell apoptosis in WT, but not mutant worms. Due to the conservation of those signaling pathways, our results provide insights for miRNA-based treatment strategies for nicotine disorders in early and late stages.

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Student Author(s): David Billups, Senior, Marine Biology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Zachary Long, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 37 The Effects of Environmental Stress and Mutualisms on Relationships Between Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in Dune Plant Communities Biodiversity can affect ecosystem functioning through niche complementarity or positive interactions among species and by more diverse cultures including species with particular traits. Here, we tested whether the mechanism by which diversity influences functioning and the importance of mutualisms change with environmental stress. We planted monocultures of three dune grasses (Uniola paniculata, Spartina patens, and Panicum amarum) and the complete mixture in a factorial design that resulted in four treatments consisting of both the presence and absence of mycorrhizae and fertilizer. We found that, aboveground, diversity increased biomass production in treatments with fertilizer and mycorrhizae by increasing the biomass of the largest plant species. This suggests that fertilizer collapsed niche space aboveground and the best competitor for light dominated. Belowground, however, complementarity among species increased overall root mass in fertilized treatments and no species dominated. Our results suggest that the environment and context of interspecific competition can determine how biodiversity influences ecosystem functioning. Student Author(s): Johnathon Boles, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Constance Rogers-Lowery, Catawba College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Anatomy & Physiology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Common Oat: A Potential Wound Healing Promoter Oat is used in many topical applicants to reduce pain, burning, inflammation, and irritation on the surface of the skin. Common oat has been identified to contain phenolic compounds, such as avenanthramides that have antioxidative properties associated with promotion of wound healing. Through our in-vitro study we tested crude oat samples verses defatted extract samples on human dermal fibroblast in both double distilled water and DMSO. To execute the experiment, we used an insert assay that created a scratch across the petri dish once lifted. Once the insert was removed, the initial injury space was recorded and then it was recorded again at 24 hours. The initial value was subtracted from the time 24-hour value to obtain the closure value. No significance was found between crude and phenolic extract. However, there was a significance difference between dilution vehicles that were used within the phenolic extractions. Student Author(s): Harrison Bolton, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Roy Stine, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Preston Phillips, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Earth Science, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 38 Ground Penetrating Radar Investigations of Surface Collapses due to Mining Operations in Gold Hill, North Carolina In February of 2014, a deep sinkhole developed in a high traffic area of the Gold Hill Historic Park, Gold Hill, NC. Efforts to fill the opening were thwarted by subsequent collapse, which highlighted risks to people and property within this historic mining district. A GSSI SIR速 3000 ground penetrating radar (GPR) system fitted with a 200 MHz antenna was employed during the summer of 2015 to survey near-surface risks and disturbances in two locations where recent subsidence has occurred. In these locations, GPR revealed subsurface features to a maximum depth of approximately 4 meters. This investigation includes a series of single transects that produced 2dimensional data and one grid that produced a 3-dimensional data set. All data were processed using GSSI Radan 7 software. GPR surveys indicate these areas were backfilled after mining operations ceased. Fill consists of rocks mixed with clayey soil. Shaft and stopped area margins are discernable within the GPR profiles. Sinkholes appear to be associated with collapsed backfill over deep shafts.

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Student Author(s): Ryan Booth, Freshman, Biotechnology, Gaston College Mentor(s): Ashley Hagler, Gaston College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 24 Antibiotic Resistance in Human Wastewater Antimicrobial compounds frequently enter the environment through wastewater treatment facilities. The wastewater treatment facilities in Gaston County, North Carolina currently do not test for, or practice the removal of any known antibiotic compounds in wastewater effluent. This study focused on an area wastewater treatment plant found in North Carolina. We hypothesized the following: If antibiotic compounds pass through the wastewater treatment process, and are discharged into the local streams, then there will be an increase in antibiotic resistance within environmental bacteria near the effluent discharge site. We compared the level of antibiotic bacteria between the primary and secondary levels of treatment inside the treatment plant while maintaining duplicates, measuring the pH, temperature, and DO. Water samples were taken from each level and were plated on LB agar plates treated with cycloheximide. Master spread patch plates were created for all water samples. The 16s region of Ribosomal DNA was extracted using Amplitaq gold enzymes, then 1492R and 27F primers were added and samples were amplified using PCR. All samples were sent to Yale Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DNA analysis facility for Sanger sequencing. Identified samples were then streaked onto plates containing the following antibacterial discs: Ciprofloxacin, Streptomycin, Erythromycin, Tetracycline, and Ampicillin. Student Author(s): Tyler Borden, Freshman, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) How Leadership Has Shaped Watauga Residential College In my research I will be looking at the different forms of leadership present in Watauga Residential College and how the different directors have contributed to the programs overall idea and how it is today. Watauga College is a residential college at Appalachian State University that was formed in 1972 with the goal to combine living and learning together in order to form a close community. I will conduct my research by looking at documents from Wataugaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, listen to interviews of previous directors, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll look at a dissertation that talks a lot about Watauga. This research is significant because it allows the students and future directors a way to see how Watauga became what it is now. This gives a basic outline into how the past directors operated and lets future directors see what needs work and what they can continue on. My conclusion is that although the directors have different styles of leading they keep the overall objective in their mind and make sure that is highest priority. Student Author(s): Jaimi Boston, Senior, Chemistry, Elizabeth City State University Brooke Roberts, Senior, Chemistry, Elizabeth City State University Mentor(s): Shirin Siddiqui, Elizabeth City State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 33 Evaluating Bacterial Buildup of Cosmetics Cosmetics have been dated back to 4000 BCE in Ancient Egypt. During this time period, women used kohl sticks and copper to create their desired looks. There are three skin irritants that may occur when dealing with makeup: irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and acne cosmetica. Many women are not knowledgeable of the preliminary steps to applying cosmetics. Before applying cosmetics, women are to wash their faces with a gentle cleanser and gently pat dry. Next, a moisturizer or sunscreen is applied, following the application of makeup. If cosmetics are applied to skin without preparation, the skin is pre-exposed to bacteria. This experiment was to determine the amount of bacterial build up present in different cosmetics. The aim of this study is to evaluate the amount and types of bacteria present within cosmetics. Small amounts of cosmetics were obtained and mixed with nutrient broth into a microfuge tube. The mixture was then applied to the nutrient agar to go into the incubator. The petri dishes were observed every three days. On day ten, gram staining was conducted in order to determine the type and amount of bacteria formed.

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Student Author(s): Kimberly Bowman, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Geib, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 14 Hefty or Wimpy? A Biomechanical Hypothesis for Plant-Pollinator Species Associations The observed association between pollinator tongue length and flower corolla length is thought to mediate plantpollinator species associations by expediting nectar collection, yet these traits often co-vary with others that could mediate the association. We address this problem using a long-tongued bumble bee, Bombus balteatus, and two cooccurring clovers, Trifolium dasyphyllum and T. parryi, which differ in B. balteatus visitation, corolla tube length, and the correlated traits, stem and pedicel strength. We experimentally altered stem and pedicel strength of the short tubed, weaker T. dasyphyllum to test whether handling time or handling effort differences arising from floral trait variation explain B. balteatus preference for long-tubed T. parryi. We assessed impacts of manipulations on foraging time and mechanics (Experiment 1) and bees’ preferences while foraging on the clovers (Experiment 2). Flower handling time was equivalent among the clovers; instead, scape and pedicel strength differences impacted handling effort. Strengthening T. dasyphyllum altered bees’ foraging effort to mimic that while on unmanipulated T. parryi and increased B. balteatus preference for T. dasyphyllum. Results suggest that biomechanical aspects of fit have consequences for foraging energetics, and should be added to the repertoire of factors driving pollinators’ niche partitioning among floral species. Student Author(s): Colton Bradley, Junior, Physics and Applied Mathematics, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Chueng Ji, North Carolina State University Presentation: Physics - Nuclear, Particle, Atomic, & Molecular, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 19 Pion Loop Contribution to the Nucleon Self-Energy Interpolated between the Instant Form and the Front Form of Relativistic Dynamics The equivalence of the light-front, equal-time and covariant formulations in meson-baryon interactions has been previously demonstrated. In particular, the self-energy of a nucleon dressed by pion loops with the pseudovector πNN coupling has been discussed to show the universality of the leading nonanalytic behavior of the chiral dynamics consistent with QCD. In this poster, we present the link between the instant form dynamics and the lightfront dynamics by interpolating them together with an interpolation variable. We confirm the universality of the leading nonanalytic behavior of the chiral dynamics by verifying the independence of this behavior from the interpolation variable. Student Author(s): Caroline Brailer, Senior, Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Michael Berry, Wake Forest University Presentation: Health and Physical Education, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 49 Vitamin A Levels and Exercise Time in COPD Patients Following Nitrate Consumption Research has shown that dietary nitrate supplementation can increase submaximal constant work rate (CWR) exercise in patients with COPD. Additionally, ingestion of antioxidants has also been shown to improve exercise performance in COPD patients. The purpose of this research was to determine whether antioxidant levels following supplementation with dietary nitrates were associated with CWR exercise time. Twelve COPD patients completed two CWR exercise tests following ingestion of either a high or a low nitrate beverage. Dietary analysis for determination of vitamin A, C and E levels was performed. Associations between CWR exercise time and vitamin levels were determined for each of the nitrate conditions using Pearson product moment correlations. Following ingestion of the nitrate rich beverage, CWR exercise times were positively and significantly correlated with dietary levels of vitamin A (r = 0.593, p = 0.021). Interestingly, following ingestion of the low nitrate beverage, CWR exercise times were negatively and significantly correlated with dietary levels of vitamin A r = -0.574, p = 0.025). Levels of vitamin C and E were not shown to be associated with exercise time under either of the nitrate conditions. These data suggest that exercise time is positively associated with dietary ingestion of vitamin A when high levels of nitrate are also ingested. Further studies with supplementation of both vitamin A and nitrate may be the next step in determining whether higher levels of vitamin A in addition to supplemental dietary nitrate can further increase exercise performance in patients with COPD.

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Student Author(s): Mackenzie Briggs, Freshman, Global Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Liberal Studies, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) How and Why Universities Need to Invest in a Holistic Experience This research presentation aims to explicate the benefits that undergraduate students can reap from partaking in residential colleges. These positive consequences will be supported through intensive investigation of Watauga Residential College at Appalachian State University, various interviews, inquiry into other residential colleges nationwide, photos and student work, as well as other various forms of research. Culture today is defining college as the conventional next step after a high school education, making the college experience more desirable. In order to best prepare the coming generations to whole-heartedly serve our society, an exemplary and impactful college experience is necessary. A residential college is a learning environment in which students live and take classes alongside one another, with a heavy emphasis on faculty involvement. Residential colleges provide unique environments with a diverse population of students so that through both living and learning experiences, students will understand and develop themselves as an individual. Through my extensive research I have found that in this context students will undoubtedly thrive and develop a well-rounded character, thereby suggesting that implementing residential colleges within undergraduate schools would prove beneficial for an ever-changing society. Student Author(s): Nadine Brockmann, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Virginia Merida, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Carmony Hartwig, Catawba College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Exploring Bacterial Diversity in Student Athletes: Implications for Skin and Organismal Health Continually we learn about how the bacteria that constitute individual microbiomes affect our general health in numerous ways, such as how we break down our food, how we heal, and how we manage infections. Recent research suggests that the overall health of our skin and wound-healing capabilities are associated with an increase in bacterial diversity and abundance. As a society we often consider one major aspect of human health and wellness to be not only regular exercise, but time spent in the outside environment. We therefore sought to investigate differences in skin bacterial diversity and abundance from human populations that have distinct levels of regular exercise in varied environments. The most protected environment on the human skin is the belly button, and prior research has demonstrated the abundance and variety of bacterial species that thrive there. We hypothesized that student athletes, particularly those that exercise regularly in an outside environment, will have more skin-associated bacterial species diversity and abundance as evidenced by navel cavity swabs than individuals who do not exercise on a regular basis. Here we present our collective findings and discuss the implications of exercise on microbiome composition as it relates to skin and organismal health. Student Author(s): Alice Brower, Freshman, Economics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Undocumented Immigrants and the Right to Banking Services Before the Grameen Bank, banking for the poor was laughed at because many assumed the poor lived hand to mouth. Since then, microfinance loans have been extended throughout the developing world. The premise of banking for the poor is simple- the poor make informed financial decisions through whatever means they have and given financial tools, these decisions about saving and spending amplify their ability to make their own lives better. In the United States, many below the poverty line are illegal immigrants. In 2004, it was estimated that 75 percent of undocumented immigrants in the USA did not have a bank account. This means that there is a population of poor people within our own boarders who, like the developing world before 1976, often do not have access to financial tools to assist them in carrying out the financial decisions they are already making. This has a direct impact on American people because money not vetted through official systems is not taxed or managed through means that make all of America better off. Barriers to banking for illegal immigrants profoundly impacts their ability to make sound financial decisions, increase their living standards, and positively contribute to American society

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Student Author(s): Kelsey Brown, Senior, Human Biology, North Carolina State University David Tart, Junior, Cell-Molecular Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Julia Stevens, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 9 Microbial Warfare Among Bacteria and Fungi Isolates of Plantago major and Trifolium repens This paper explores the symbiotic bacteria and fungi of the common North Carolina weeds Plantago major and Trifolium repens for the purpose of proving the effectiveness of those symbiotic microbes against one another and Escherichia coli, verifying their role in creating competitiveness for the weed in new environments. Cell cultures and isolations were taken from the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, and endosphere of each weed sample to explore microbial variation. Competition assays between isolates were performed and a final set of disc diffusion assays was conducted to test effectiveness against E. coli. The Trifolium repens produced the highest degree of inhibition against E. coli with 33.3% of its symbiotic bacteria and fungi displaying inhibition. No microbes from Plantago major were able to inhibit E. coli. When competing Trifolium repens and Plantago major microbe isolates against one another, 60.38% participated in microbial warfare. These microbes could serve as the basis for future explorations into anti-pathogenic usage of common weed microbes. Student Author(s): Claire Brown, Freshman, High School, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Statistics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) An Optimal Strategy for Deal or No Deal In this paper, I examined the popular U.S. game show Deal or No Deal in order to discover the best strategy to maximize the contestant’s winnings. A computer program was built replicating the default format of the game, using pre-existing literature theorizing a formula for the banker’s offer. I then ran 100,000 simulations and recorded the banker’s offers at the end of each round. Using this data, I recorded the mean of the banker’s offer at the end of each round, the median offer per round, and the probability that a contest would be presented with an offer greater than the mean of the all of the cases. Based off of that data, I suggested that accepting the banker’s offer at the end of Round 8 is the optimal strategy for a contestant to walk away with the largest amount of money considering the random aspects of the game. Student Author(s): Victoria Brown, Junior, Environmental Studies, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Reed Perkins, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 52 The Impacts of Soil Quality on Biodiversity Agriculture, species distribution, and even industrial success are dependent on the quality and type of soil in a given geographic area. However, climate change and land development have altered the soil quality in many areas of Earth resulting in the displacement of local organisms and the consequent strain on ecosystem health. The impacts of biodiversity loss on the planet’s food web have been an area of concern for science. This literaturebased study examines the effect of soil quality on biodiversity. The research looks at how soil connects to the geographic cycles that determine the distribution of various organisms. Literature shows that preserving soil protects the wildlife that is naturally adapted to that area. Student Author(s): Brandon Buchanan, Senior, Physics Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Burris, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 34 Raman spectroscopy – an introduction Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique that utilizes the inelastic scattering of light. When light is incident on a material, the majority of light is scattered elastically with no change in energy in the interaction. However a small fraction of the incident light is scattered inelastically, which leads to a shift in the energy of the scattered light. This is called Raman scattering. Raman scattering is unique for every material and by comparing these shifts in energy, the sample can be characterized. Various techniques of Raman spectroscopy were explored, and preliminary data will be presented as a part of this presentation.

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Student Author(s): Nhung Budam, Junior, Public Health Education, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Jalisa Horne, Senior, Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Greensboro H'Lois Mlo, Sophomore, Guilford College Tasmia Zafar, Junior, Health Sciences and Biology, Guilford College Abigail Budam, Junior, Nutrition and Wellness, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Branda Mlo, Senior, Public Health Education, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Mentor(s): Sharon Morrison, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Public Health, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 60 Tailoring a Biological Risk Factor Survey for use in Hypertension Assessment with Montagnard Refugees Formative research indicates hypertension is a key concern among the Montagnards, a S.E. Asian refugee community in Greensboro, N.C. To investigate hypertension risk among this population, literature reviews were first conducted to determine both biological and behavioral measures of hypertension risk and find validated survey questions previously used with S.E. Asian populations. In this presentation we focus on how we tailored the biological risk factor survey for this group. The variables for this survey included age, gender, prehypertensive status, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, chronic stress measures (saliva and scalp hair cortisol), medication use and pre-existing health conditions. Survey questions on medication use inquire on prescribed medication in the U.S. and plant-based traditional medicines. Through a collaborative work process between university faculty mentors, Montagnard student researchers and community health workers, the final biological survey content was discussed, adapted and refined. An additional strategy in tailoring the survey included the production of a supplementary visual flipbook to facilitate administration with limited English speakers and those with low literacy. These efforts produced a culturally appropriate and validated survey for use in data collection with Montagnard households and possibly other S.E. Asian groups. Student Author(s): Baylen Burleson, Freshman, Business, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45) Understanding Poseidon Water is, without a doubt, the most important resource on Earth. This photo gallery is a source that brings together a plethora of aquatic artwork attempting to answer the question "How can water as a physical and metaphorical element influence the balance between strength and tranquility?". Scholarly research examined diverse art, mythology, and essays about the role of water in human welfare. These photographs showcase the many characteristics of water ranging from peaceful and calming to roaring and violent. Geographically diverse photographs have been collected. Waves at the beach, rapids in a river, and a simple puddle in the forest appear. The researched sights included locations such as Roan Mountain in Tennessee and Myrtle Beach in South Carolina in search of illuminating qualities the water might hold. Known to show it's teeth throughout history and legend, water also has some benevolent qualities. Water appears as both sacred and profane dependent on velocity. Pictures are an effort to portray the versatility and virtues of water. Poseidon has been attempting to teach humanity for centuries, and it's humanity's turn to listen. Student Author(s): Kathleen Burris, Senior, Psychology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Sheila Brownlow, Catawba College Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 3 Media Influences on Beliefs about Fitness and Exercise I examined how different content of blog-style media served as a prime for views of fitness and exercise. Men and women participants read a fitness blog (or one about the benefits of pets, as a control), completed personality scales, and indicated their attitudes toward diet, exercise, and ideal body physique. Preference for extreme slimness in women was decreased for both men and women participants when the blog advocated moderate fitness beliefs, and any type of health-related priming (including that toward hyperfitness) increased self-reported selfesteem. Blog content did not influence perfectionism and preference for muscular physiques in men. The results suggest that even short exposure to media promoting reasonable views of fitness can have positive effects on both men and women.

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Student Author(s): Logan Butler, Senior, Biochemistry, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Benjamin Bobay, North Carolina State University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 40 Inhibition of the Anti-Apoptotic Interaction between Caspase-3 and Calbindin-D28k through Computationally Designed Cyclic Peptides A potential anti-apoptotic and cancer forming interaction has been observed between the proteins calbindin-D28k, a calmodulin family calcium sensor protein, and caspase-3, a pro-apoptotic protein. The interaction between these two proteins has been characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry and a protein docking program. This protein:protein interaction is thought to occur between the active site loops of caspase-3 and the EF-hands 1 and 2 of calbindin-D28k in a calcium dependent manner. Attempting to disrupt this interaction and thereby allowing for caspase-3 to resume the cell death cascade, a total of 160,000 potential cyclic peptide inhibitors were computationally screened against calbindin-D28k and scored to validate the inhibitory ability. A general consensus sequence of the cyclic peptides was found to contain positive electrostatic characteristics with at least one aromatic amino acid. Further experimentation to validate these computational inhibitors is being conducted. The first step is to use PCR to sub-clone only EF-hands 1 and 2 of calbindin-D28k. These truncated proteins can then be tested for their interaction with caspase-3. If found still to interact, cyclic peptide inhibitors identified in the computational screen will then be synthesized and characterized for their ability to disrupt or prevent the protein:protein interaction by binding to calbindin-D28k. Student Author(s): Kelsey Butler, Sophomore, Exercise Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Exercise Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Science of Exercise and Happiness: Exercising Your Way To Happiness Happiness is not a fitness goal, it is a byproduct of taking care of yourself". Exercise increases positive emotions otherwise known as happiness. Even though little research has been conducted on happiness affecting the body due to exercise, the field is growing. Emotions are chemically caused by external stimuli telling the brain to produce certain neurotransmitters. Each emotion has its own chemical make-up. To break down happiness into three main emotions affected by exercise, the options include pleasure, excitement, and confidence. The neurotransmitters, dopamine, endorphin, and serotonin coincide with a particular emotion and physical aspect of exercise. Nerves sense the contracting of muscles, production of pain, and demand of energy when exercising. Every sensation picked up by the body, correlates to the production of an individual neurotransmitter. These chemicals released when feeling happy can block negative emotions thus changing the emotion. Neurotransmitter deficiency causes stress and depression and are relieved or even cured by exercise. Exercise generates more dopamine, endorphin, and serotonin, which induce aspects of happiness. Feelings of happiness are felt in the moment and help in the future. Student Author(s): Jacqueline Cafasso, Senior, English Writing and Political Science, High Point University Mentor(s): Martin Kifer, High Point University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Shift in Ideology and Public Policy Effects Over the past ten years, researchers have discovered strong evidence suggesting that there has been a shift in voters’ political ideology. Today, scholars recognize this shift as a realignment of ideologies – conservative and liberal – to their original partisanship bases. Recent scholars have suggested that the 2008 Tea Party Movement and political elites can be to blame for this ideological realignment. This study focuses on measuring the change in how individuals have voted for public policy issues, such as immigration, healthcare, and abortion, over a period of three years. Using Pew Research Center’s 2011 and 2014 dataset on Political Typology, I hypothesize that there will be an overall increase in consistency between ideological labels and issue positions. The study concluded that both conservatives and liberals have become more ideologically consistent, with stronger effects among former than the latter.

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Student Author(s): Kenneth Campbell, Junior, Mass Communications, North Carolina Central University Mentor(s): William Robinson, North Carolina Central University Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) American Thug: The New Nigger By Proxy, An Exploratory Taxonomy of Black Masculinity in the 21st Century The 2015 Baltimore Uprising represented yet another in the latest of racial epiCenters demanding justice in response to alleged instances of police brutality. As with Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, and countless others, public outcry against the killing of Freddie Gray in police custody morphed from acts of civil disobedience, into mainstream media images of property destruction throughout the city. Prominent social critics branded many of these young protesters as “thugs". For media practitioners, the term seemed natural. However, other media professionals expressed criticism; most noted, former CNN host Soledad O’Brien: “Thug is a proxy, a word we use instead of the ‘N-word.” The researchers seek to address the following ontological questions: conceptually and operationally, what is a thug; how is this term distributed along the dyad of race and class in our popular culture, and what is the hegemonic power associated with labeling the thug persona? The focus of this expletory concept analysis seeks to address those questions by means of establishing a postmodern taxonomy of the term “thug” and its use in the controlling, politicizing, and criminalization of the Black male body politic. Student Author(s): Grace Candler-Miller, Senior, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Wayland Tseh, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 34 Effectiveness of TENS Unit on Quadriceps Muscular Endurance During Weight Bearing Exercise PURPOSE: To examine the effectiveness of TENS use on quadriceps muscular endurance during weight bearing exercise for healthy populations. METHODS: Fifteen male and fifteen female volunteers provided informed consent prior to participation. In Session 1, participant’s height, body mass, and one repetition maximum (1-RM) for non-dominant quadriceps were assessed using a knee extension machine. In Session 2, participant’s baseline maximum repetition of non-dominant knee extensions at 40% of 1-RM was attained. Participants were randomly selected into experimental (activated TENS), placebo (non-activated TENS), and control (no TENS) groups. Session 3: Experimental, placebo, and control participants performed maximum repetitions at 40% of 1-RM on the leg extension machine. RESULTS: The mixed-model ANOVA revealed no overall difference in mean repetitions amongst groups. However, a one-way ANOVA did reveal significant increases in mean repetitions between Session 1 and Session 2 for the experimental group. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, TENS significantly improved mean repetitions between Session 1 and Session 2, but the overall improvement was not significantly above the mean repetitions attained by the control and placebo groups. Testing with additional samples is needed to clarify if the improvement can lead to significant differences between groups. Student Author(s): Matthew Carnaghi, Senior, Physics and Computer Science, High Point University Mentor(s): Briana Fiser, High Point University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 35 Synthesis of Nickel Tubes for use in Biomimetic Cilia Arrays Fluid flow in the lung is driven by cilia that beat in metachronal waves to displace mucus, expelling pathogens to prevent illness. To further investigate this biological system, we are creating biomimetic cilia arrays capable of propelling fluid in a similar manner. These biomimetic cilia are made by electrodepositing nickel tubes in a porous polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membrane and filling the membrane with a flexible polymer. The polymer is then cured and the membrane is dissolved, resulting in an array of flexible polymer rods capped with nickel tubes. These rods can be actuated with a changing magnetic field, and when placed in fluids, the rods can displace the surrounding liquid. To fabricate Ni tubes, a three-electrode electrodeposition cell was constructed using parts created with a 3-D printer. Applying a voltage across the PCTE membrane within a Ni ion solution creates a current through the membrane pores. Ions then accumulate inside the pores and over time grow into tubes. For a particular potential and current, the tube length can be determined by deposition time. This allows the responsiveness of the rods to be tuned to the specific need of the array. Results on Ni tube fabrication and characterization will be discussed.

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Student Author(s): Madison Carr, Sophomore, English Secondary Education, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Straddling of Society In Gilda This research paper looks at the film noir, Gilda, directed by Charles Vidor in 1946, and the female lead Gilda. The goal is to explore and explain the use of lighting and character placement in the film, and how these elements help to determine how Gilda is viewed by society, and Johnny as the personification of society, versus who she actually is, and how she is treated respectively. By examining the use of lighting and character placement that helps to define Gilda. She oscillates between the housewife and modern woman archetypes, and is seen as an immoral and unfaithful woman because society only sees this side. She moves between the left and right of the screen, which deviates from traditional character placement within film. Gilda is a character that does not conform to the norm in any respect, including elements of the mise-en-scene. Student Author(s): Bryce Carter, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): James Sherman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Atmospheric Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 34 Variation in Surface Irradiance and Aerosol Optical Depth The purpose of this initial study is to analyze variability in surface-received solar irradiance and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over 3.5 years and 5 years to study a possible relationship between the two. Solar irradiance is measured at ~1 minute intervals throughout the day by a Kipp&Zonen pyranometer as part of the NASA Solar Radiation Network (SolRadNet). AOD is measured every ~15 min when the sun is unobstructed, using NASA aerosol equipment. All instrumentation used for this study is found at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research facility (AppalAir) on the campus of Appalachian State University. This facility is the only co-located NOAA and NASA aerosol station in the Eastern United States. Recorded data was used to map daily, weekly, seasonal and inter-annual variability in irradiance and AOD. Further work to this study might include the effect of different aerosols measured at AppalAir on cloud cover and irradiance. Student Author(s): Ryan Casey, Sophomore, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Melissa Srougi, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 3 The Effects of ATM-mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation on Cell Migration Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) patients cannot produce the protein ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is crucial in the response to double-stranded DNA breaks. Previous data has shown a connection between ATM and the Rho family of small GTPases. Rho proteins are involved in a multitude of cellular responses. Work from our lab has shown that loss of ATM increases reactive oxygen species (ROS), which directly activates Rac1. We therefore hypothesize that elevated ROS present in ATM inhibited cells activates Rac1 to increase cellular migration. To test this, we used HeLa cells and inhibited ATM kinase activity using the selective inhibitor Ku55933. Using an immunoprecipitation-based assay, inhibition of ATM resulted in elevated Rac1-GTP levels compared to control cells. ATM inhibition led to a delay in wound healing as compared to control cells without a significant change in cell proliferation. These data may suggest that increases in activated Rac1 may strengthen cell-cell adhesions and thus decrease cell migration. Ongoing work will determine the effects of ROS on cellular migration in ATM inhibited cells following treatment with the scavenging agent N-acetyl cysteine. This work is an important step in understanding the etiology of A-T and provides the foundation for future therapies to ameliorate the disease.

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Student Author(s): Russell Chamberlain, Junior, Math/Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): James Sherman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 44 Connecting Analysis and Data The marriage between computerized data collection and the scientist that interpret the results has not always been a happy one. The necessity of interacting with a complex computer system can limit access to data and force accomplished scientists to spend more time manipulating data via computers than attempting to understand the results. At the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR), more data is collected than can be analyzed and, until recently, accessing the data required more experience with computer science than most undergraduate researchers have. To increase access to the multiple extensive datasets the AppalAIR equipment produces across more disciplines and individuals, I created a Graphic User Interface. This program accelerates the process of extracting datasets from the native equipment formatting and converting them into files compatible with analysis software. This project reduces many minutes of command-line and scripting in Matlab® to less than a minute of navigating a Graphical application. Student Author(s): Jessica Chaplain, Sophomore, Film Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Literature), Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Class and Hierarchy in My Fair Lady Classism, which defines social roles and behaviors, is prevalent in the musical My Fair Lady (1964) directed by George Cukor. In this musical Eliza Doolittle--a member of the lower class--meets Henry Higgins, a wealthy man who believes speech is the key to social hierarchy not money. He assesses Eliza’s cockney dialect to be the reason she could never become a lady (a woman of respectable social standing during that time). Throughout the musical Eliza struggles to find her place in a society that respects proper English and formality, not colloquialisms. Higgins mentors Eliza and teaches her the proper speech and behavior of the upper class so that she may be financially independent. My paper examines the way Eliza’s conflict with society was introduced, developed, and solved with the help of mise en scene. The use of camera movement, lighting, musical motifs, costuming, and setting all establish the developing conflict of class divisions. In this paper I interpret these film elements and how they lead to a resolution for Eliza as she develops into a lady. This musical challenged previous notions on class and represents the expectations that cause these social differences. Student Author(s): Kimberline Chew, Junior, Biology, Duke University Mentor(s): Beth Sullivan, Duke University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 6 Quantitative Measurement of Centromere Strength and Function in Human Dicentric Chromosomes Genome rearrangement produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentric) that historically have been associated with instability during cell division. Dicentrics in humans are unusually stable, due to the inactivation of one of the two centromeres. However, several studies have revealed that some dicentric human chromosomes retain two active centromeres. How these functionally dicentric chromosomes remain stable is unknown. The goal of my research is to test if the centromeres on functionally dicentric chromosomes are quantitatively functionally equivalent and to mechanistically understand stability of functionally dicentric chromosomes. I have focused on dicentric isochromosomes of the X long arm (dicX) that occur in 15% of Turner’s syndrome patients. I have used immunofluorescence-FISH, a combination of protein immunostaining and DNA probe hybridization, to investigate if the two active centromeres contain equal amounts of centromere/kinetochore proteins CENP-A and CENP-E. Centromere proteins are quantitated using a custom, interactive macro that measures the intensity/integrated density of fluorescent signals. Our results suggest an unexpected spectrum of functional states of centromeres on dicentric chromosomes. These studies will deepen our understanding of centromere function and the unique stability of dicentric human chromosomes.

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Student Author(s): Nicole Clark, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Dinene Crater, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 38 The Investigation of the Transcription Regulator GerE in Clostridium Species Organisms of the Firmicutes Phyla including Bacillus and Clostridium are able to undergo a process called sporulation during a time distress. Sporulation involves a lengthy process in which the bacterium undergoes asymmetric cell division resulting in a mother cell and forespore. The mother cell engulfs the forespore and eventually lyses (after eight protective layers surround the forespore) leaving a spore that is almost indestructible. Sporulation in Bacillus cannot occur without the help of the transcription regulator GerE, a DNA-binding protein that controls gene transcription in the late stages of sporulation. Clostridium, however, is ancestral in comparison to Bacillus and sporulation is somewhat different. The transcription regulator SpoIIID is required for sporulation, but we believe that there must be more than one transcription regulator in Clostridium. We hypothesize that Clostridium species have a GerE-like transcription regulator. GerE from Bacillus subtilis binds to DNA, so we used that knowledge to identify homologous proteins in Clostridium. We used Bacillus subtilis as a control to study four different Clostridium species (C. acetobutylicum, C.tetani, C. butyricum, and C. sporogenes).We used a bioinformatics approach to conduct a genomic database search and found similar gene sequences amongst different Clostridium species. We then designed degenerative primers that were compatible to gerE; however, our PCR analysis using those primers was unsuccessful. Future directions will be to 1) acquire Clostridium ultunense for research and 2) use iChIP to identify unknown proteins that bind to our genomic regions of interest. Student Author(s): Hannah Clark, Freshman, Exercise Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Liberal Studies, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Filling the Cracks in the Foundation of Success In this paper, I will explore Appalachian State University’s best kept secret that aims to build stronger foundations for the educational and occupational success of college students everywhere. While it is not a well-known feature of campus, Watauga Residential College provides the most unconventional and effective means of general education through its practice of interdisciplinary studies. The Watauga Residential College’s divergent approach to general education begs the question: how does an interdisciplinary general education curriculum impact the quality of its students’ success? Through reading founding documents of America’s first universities, analyzing dissertations on interdisciplinary studies and the Watauga Residential College, digging through the archives of Appalachian State University, and conducting interviews with faculty within the Watauga Residential College and interdisciplinary studies experts, it can be concluded that the foundation of success in one’s college and career is best established through an interdisciplinary approach to general education because it makes general education applicable to everyday life. Student Author(s): Madeline Coffey, Junior, History, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Lisa Blee, Wake Forest University Chelcie Rowell, Wake Forest University Presentation: History, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Voices of Southern Women: A Digital Initiative Oral history can explain the personal impacts of historical events on individuals, yet those who are interested in exploring the past often find it difficult to access recorded personal experiences. Furthermore, oral history collections of social movements often focus on the activists, who typically share education, class, and racial backgrounds. I wanted to learn about how regular women of various backgrounds in the South experienced and reacted to the Women’s Liberation Movement (1955-1975). I conducted interviews and created an online platform to make these rare voices accessible to researchers and general audiences. With the guidance and expertise of Digital Initiative Librarian Chelcie Rowell, the interviews are now presented on a WordPress site using Sound Cloud to play full length interviews and short segments. The platform allows for a display of the audio interviews, photos of participants, and transcriptions in one space. This platform breaks down oral history interviews into small and easily navigable topic-subjects, such as “Family Influences” or “Women in the Church.” These elements help to make this type of public scholarship increasingly accessible to the general public; by placing these women’s experiences on such a platform, viewers will be able to identify with the ways in which ordinary women were

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affected by the Women’s Liberation Movement, even if they did not appreciate it or participate in it at the time. Furthermore, this project hopefully serves as a model for other students to show how to make oral histories with ordinary peoples accessible in free platforms for the benefit of others. Student Author(s): Sarah Colbert, Sophomore, Psychology, High Point University Mentor(s): Brian Augustine, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Materials, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 6 Novel Patterning Techniques of Vapor-Deposited Au Thin Films onto Polymeric Substrates This project examines vapor-deposited Au thin film adhesion to thin films of PMMA dissolved in chloroform and spun-cast as well as bulk PMMA samples. Films were spun-cast from solutions prepared with varying concentrations and molecular weights of 996000, 550000, 120000, and 15000 g/mol. Films were prepared with PMMA dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene for comparison. These films were then characterized with FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, single wavelength ellipsometry, and AFM. Enhanced gold adhesion was observed in solutions prepared with chloroform, THF, and toluene using a standard tape test. This could be explained by nanoporous surface features in films prepared with chloroform and THF; however, further investigation is necessary to understand the interactions between the films and gold. The enhanced adhesion of gold to PMMA by chloroform treatment was also spatially manipulated to develop a gold patterning technique using Inkjet Printing. Chloroform was deposited into patterns on bulk PMMA via inkjet printing. After gold deposition onto the PMMA, the excess gold was physically wiped away, leaving an array of gold dots where the chloroform was deposited. Further research will be conducted to develop arbitrary patterns and to determine the minimum feature size attainable using this technique. Student Author(s): Mankaprr Conteh, Junior, Politics and International Affairs, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): R. David Coates, Wake Forest University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Progress and Politics of Social and Emotional Learning in the US Education is often idealized as the best tool to break the cycle of poverty that an over-representative portion of minorities find themselves in, but this research explores the reality of American educational efforts to ensure its students—especially vulnerable students of color—have the socioemotional skill set necessary to be strong learners and citizens. It provides a detailed definition of social and emotional learning (SEL) and character education (CE), address the socioemotional disadvantages young poor people of color face in depth, profiles advocates for legislation supporting SEL and CE in schools, and finally the successes and setbacks those advocates have faced in defending and perfecting SEL and CE. Student Author(s): Andrew Cox, Junior, Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Fuh-Gwo Yuan, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Mechanical & Aerospace, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 53 An Investigation into an Automated Fiber Placement Process The commercial aircraft industry is constantly evolving to meet society's needs of efficiency, comfort, and affordability. To meet these needs, many aircraft companies are turning to composites for manufacturing parts of their craft. To do this, many are using machines that generate large-scale composite structures by an automated fiber placement (AFP) process. However, there is not as much information available about composites as their traditional metal counterparts. As such, a large amount of time is spent on inspection of each fabricated part, and of the aircraft as a whole. To look into possibly cutting down on this inspection time, a calendaring machine was modified at NASA Langley Research Center to produce material similar to what an AFP machine would make. The material was then scanned for defects using a system consisting of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer and an Air-Coupled Transducer (LDV/ACT). The material from the calendaring machine was found to match what would come out of an AFP machine, and it was determined that it is feasible to mount a scanning system to a much larger AFP machine to cut down on inspection time of parts by scanning these parts in real time as they are made.

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Student Author(s): Anna Cox, Senior, English, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Risa Applegarth, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: English, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Implications of the Purity Myth The process of overturning harmful double standards is a core goal of many social justice movements, and seems especially to characterize feminism. Feminists believe that people ought to have equal rights and opportunities regardless of gender, and thus focus especially on double standards that disenfranchise a particular group based on gender. One of the double standards that most dramatically influence the way that men and women are treated differently in our country is the “purity myth.” This myth dictates the way that men and women are seen as valuable or moral creatures, and it says that while men derive their moral value from a variety of factors such as strength, loyalty, and adherence to complex moral codes, a woman’s moral value comes solely (or primarily) from her virginity. In this paper, we seek to discuss the widespread implications of this myth, especially as it relates to marginalized, oppressed, and silenced groups. Student Author(s): Phillip Cox, Senior, Art History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Tania String, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: History, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Questions of Representation in Hercules and Antaeus (after Raphael) Hercules and Antaeus (after Raphael) is an engraving by Agostino Veneziano, a printmaker associated with the Marcantonio Raimondi workshop and the emergence of “reproductive” printmaking in the Italian Renaissance. The engraving, dated 1513, illustrates the classical hero Hercules wrestling the giant Antaeus. While reproductive printmaking as a practice has benefited from a re-appraisal by recent art historical scholarship, this specific print and the Hercules and Antaeus trope as a whole have resisted sustained study. The print displays significant divergences from canonical representations of the myth, principally in its unique arrangement of the fighters’ bodies and its inclusion of a third figure in the composition. These apparent innovations seem incongruous with what is known of the Raimondi workshop and its penchant for appropriation. Why does this print deviate from canonical representations of the myth? And how were these unique attributes interpreted by period audiences? This presentation will discuss evolving research on accepted practices of pictorial quotation by the Raimondi workshop, focusing specifically on how these practices raise questions about the print’s originality and authorship. Through elucidation of the myth’s greater iconographical history, it will be proven that there must have existed a nowmissing image from which the print was derived. Student Author(s): David Creasman, Senior, Biochemistry, Campbell University Mentor(s): Karen Guzman, Campbell University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 32 Investigating the Interactions of SR-A, TLR3, and TLR4 Receptors and the Impact on Cytokine Production Scavenger-receptor Class A (SR-A) is a key modulator of inflammation that acts through interactions with other receptors, such as Toll-Like Receptors 3 and 4 (TLR3 and TLR4). TLR3 and TLR4, respectively, are activated by molecules derived from viruses (such as double-stranded RNA) and microbes (such as LPS). This activation stimulates production of cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α). To better understand the interactions between SR-A and these two TLRs, we are monitoring TNF-α production as an indicator of the inflammatory response. Previous studies on TLR4 obtained conflicting results regarding SRA’s ability to inhibit or augment TNF-α levels stimulated by TLR4. SRA’s interactions with TLR3 are different from its interactions with TLR4 (i.e. SRA delivers ligands to TLR3), thus, studying TLR3 may reveal alternate ways that SRA regulates TollLike Receptors. In a mouse monocyte cell model, we are using ligands of each receptor of interest to probe how these receptors interact to influence the inflammatory response: LPS for TLR4, Poly I:C for TLR3, fucoidan for SRA. By monitoring the expression of TNF-α, SR-A, TLR3 and TLR4, we hope to clarify how receptor interactions modulate each other’s activity. We are currently developing a multiplex PCR assay to study this.

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Student Author(s): Connor Criscoe, Freshman, High School, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) A Computational Exploration of n-Body Dynamics vis-Ă -vis the Moons of Jupiter A primary concern in the field of astrophysics is the prediction of the motion of celestial bodies, which in most scenarios is essentially a variation of an â&#x20AC;&#x153;n-bodyâ&#x20AC;? dynamics problem. Though analytical solutions exist for the special case n = 2 (e.g., the simplified Earth-moon system), computational science serves as a valuable tool in predicting the behavior of more complex systems in which n >= 3. This research project developed an agent-based, deterministic model in three-dimensional Cartesian space for the Jovian planetary system, which includes Jupiter and its envoy of sixty-seven known moons (n = 68). To establish initial conditions for this model, data were obtained from NASA ephemerides describing the masses, radii, and state vectors of each individual body with respect to Jupiter. Using this information, the gravitational attractions, accelerations, velocities, and positions can be updated for a constant time-step, a process that is iterated many times in succession to simulate the motions of the bodies in the Jovian. Student Author(s): Dylan Cromer, Junior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): James Perkins, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Physics - Condensed Matter, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 40 First Steps in Comparing Analytical Surface Enhancement Models with Experimental Results Silver nanoparticles, when used as a Raman spectroscopy substrate, give rise to an effect known as surface enhancement. Oscillations of the conduction electrons on the surface of the silver nanoparticles enhance nearby electric fields, including the light scattered from these particles. This enhancement can increase the intensity of the light by a factor of up to ten billion. The cause of this enhancement, and the techniques and applications that take advantage of it, are still subjects of ongoing research. A review of the literature on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) shows that analytical approaches are limited to the simplest possible shapes and smallest number of particles, and cannot be extended to realistic situations. This research explores the limited analytical electrodynamic solutions for the most basic arrangements of nanoparticles, informing where computer-based approaches will be necessary. These analytical models provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of the dramatic increase in intensity created by surface enhancement. In addition, the first steps are taken to identify the computational techniques best-suited to modeling the more complicated arrangements. For future comparison, experimentally obtained Raman spectra from standard analytes on ferroelectric lithographic silver nanostructure substrates are also presented. Student Author(s): Hunter D'Abundo, Senior, Psychology, High Point University Mentor(s): Deborah Danzis , High Point University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 35 Relationships Between Personality and Perfectionism Research has shown that personality and perfectionism are correlated, but type of perfectionism may be important to consider. Self-oriented perfectionism involves expectations that we place on ourselves, while other-oriented perfectionism involves expectations we place on others. Socially prescribed perfectionism involves our beliefs about expectations other people have for us. This study examined the Big Five personality traits and the different types of perfectionism. Data was collected from 136 undergraduate students. Participants completed a variety of measures including the NEO-FFI measure of Big Five personality characteristics and the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, which measures self-oriented, other-oriented, and socially prescribed perfectionism. Correlational and regression analyses were run, and results showed that self-oriented perfectionism was most strongly associated with conscientiousness (r= .35), agreeableness(r=-.19), and openness(r=-.32). Other-oriented perfectionism was must strongly associated with conscientiousness (r=.26), agreeableness (r=-.26), and extraversion (r=.16). Socially prescribed perfectionism was most strongly associated with agreeableness (r=-.51), openness (r=-.25), and neuroticism (r=.31). In general, agreeableness is the most consistent predictor, such that more agreeable people have less perfectionistic expectations. Overall, different personality traits are important for various types of perfectionism.

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Student Author(s): Ashley Darr, Freshman, High School, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Toxicology, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Reproductive Effects of Atrazine on Drosophila Melanogaster Atrazine is an herbicide used before and after planting to reduce the growth of broadleaf and grassy weeds. Atrazine is found in 94% of U.S. drinking water. In this study, it was proposed that atrazine would act as an endocrine disruptor in converting male testosterone to estrogen. To collect information on the reproductive effects of atrazine, breeding populations of Drosophila melanogaster were exposed to varying concentrations. A control group that was devoid of atrazine was established and a serial dilution was performed on the liquid atrazine to establish concentrations of 0.1 %, 0.01%, 0.001%, 0.0001%, 0.00001%, and 0.000001%. D. melanogaster breeding cultures contained four females and two males in each of the 28 vials. After fourteen days of 22? incubation, the drosophila offspring had all gone through their life cycles. It was recorded after fourteen days that the concentration of 0.01% of atrazine showed the greatest amount of feminization with a female to male ratio of 6.812:1, as opposed to the control of 1.182:1. All groups that contained atrazine showed higher female to male ratios than the control. The chemical atrazine certainly does alter the amount of estrogen in an organism as it raised the amount of phenotypically female offspring. Student Author(s): Arinton Davis, Senior, Biology, NC School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Kim Monahan, NCSSM Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 20 RNAi of ERK Substrates in the RAS-RAF-ERK Pathway of C. elegans This research project examines the roles of potential ERK substrates in the RAS-RAF-ERK cell growth pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans. Cancer researchers are using this pathway as a model to find the cause of unrestricted cell growth by using RNAi to disable the RNA strands that code for substrates ERK phosphorylates; however, not all ERK substrates are known. Five ERK substrates were targeted in this research: gfp-1, op-50, pos-1, rskd-1 and toe3. C. elegans were used as the model organism since the RAS-RAF-ERK pathway in humans is almost 100% conserved in these nematode worms. The fRNAi strand gfp-1 was used as the negative control, and pos-1 and let60 were used as positive controls. In order to quantify the RNAi effect of the substrates, the number of protrusions on the worms whose respective substrate was disabled was counted and compared to let-60 disabled worms. The importance of each substrate in the cell growth pathway was then determined by whether the difference of protrusions was statistically significant when compared to gfp-1 disabled worms. RNAi of the target toe-3 resulted in a statistically significant change in the number of protrusions of the worms when compared to RNAi of gfp-1. Student Author(s): Riccardo De Cataldo, Sophomore, Biochemistry, High Point University Kaitlyn Griffith, Sophomore, Biochemistry, High Point University Mentor(s): Keir Fogarty, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 33 3-Dimensional Modeling and Printing of Electron Orbitals Everything in the entire universe is made up of atoms, which can be broken down into three subatomic particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. In quantum mechanics, mathematical shape functions called electron orbitals model electron behavior. In other words, mathematical shapes, plotted in spherical coordinates, represent the likelihood of finding an electron at a given location in an atom. Beginning level science students often find difficulty visualizing 3-dimensional models of electron orbitals since most representations are provided in 2dimensions. Our research has been in effort to create tangible, 3-dimensional representations of electron orbitals. Creation of the models requires a program capable of graphing the electron orbitals in 3D and exporting the graph as a stereolithography (.stl) file. The 3D printer used requires the use of .stl files to interpret graphical data. The free web-based applet, 3D Calc Plotter, was selected for this project. After a virtual model of the electron orbital was rendered, the .stl file was exported to the 3D printer and used to create the physical models of electron orbitals.

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Student Author(s): Jennifer Deane, Senior, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Writing), Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) Spoken Word Poetry I am an aspiring spoken word poet. Through help of my university, and support from peers and the writing community in Boone, I have been able to perform my work for the past four years of undergrad. I host open mics, poetry slams, and participate in them frequently. I even had to opportunity to open for former NC poet laureate Joseph Bathanti. I've taken almost every poetry course our school offers, including the "Poetry/Songwriting" class I'm currently enrolled in under my professor and mentor Joe Bryan. Through this Symposium, I'm hoping to perform my first group piece, written during my current course as well as a few individual pieces. Student Author(s): Stephanie deGuzman, Senior, Nutrition Science, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Natalie Cooke, North Carolina State University Suzanne Goodell, North Carolina State University Presentation: Public Health, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 38 The Development of the Self-Efficacy in Teaching Nutrition in the Community (SET-NC) Survey High self-efficacy is essential for nutrition educators because it correlates with higher quality outcomes. Training organizations could benefit from a survey to assess current and future nutrition professionalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; self-efficacy in teaching nutrition in the community. In order to create a valid and reliable survey, we engaged in a multi-step revision of the previously piloted Self-Efficacy in Teaching Nutrition in the Community (SET-NC) survey. In step 1, we revised the 35-item survey through research team discussions, resulting in a 33-item survey. In step 2, eight experts provided revisions and ranked itemsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; importance as a test of content validity, resulting in a 29-item survey. In step 3, we conducted cognitive interviews with 19 participants from the sample population and expanded the survey to 31 items. In the final stage, 11 experts not included in the first panel provided revisions and organized items in four proposed subscales, as a check of face validity. Based on results from the second expert panel, we prepared the final 32-item SET-NC for nationwide administration. After reaching our final sample size, we will conduct tests of reliability and factor analysis to determine the final survey structure. Student Author(s): Lucas deHart, Junior, Physics, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Adrienne Erickcek, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Cosmin Ilie, UNC Chapel Hill Presentation: Physics - Astrophysics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 4 Probing the Early Universe with Microhalo Substructure There is a gap in the cosmological record between the end of inflation and the onset of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis about a second later. In many models, the oscillations of a scalar field cause the Universe to become effectively matter dominated during this transition. Density perturbations grow faster during matter domination because the force of gravity acts without opposition. The inclusion of an early matter dominated era would allow for smallscale density perturbations to grow large enough to enhance the formation and structure of dark matter microhalos. Because dark matter cannot be observed directly and evolves over such a large time span, numerical simulations remain the only practical way to study the formation of dark matter structures. Previous simulations have assumed radiation domination took over immediately after inflation. Here, through numerical simulations, we show that including a transient period of early matter domination does increase the formation of substructure in dark matter microhalos at masses below the reheat scale. We also find that beginning our simulations at a redshift of 500 is sufficiently early to accurately simulate structure formation and that the concentration values of the simulated microhalos match well with those found by other research groups.

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Student Author(s): Megan Delamer, Junior, Biology, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Fred DeAngelis, Queens university of Charlotte Presentation: Education, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 47 Student Perceptions and their Impact on Grades At the college level, learning means more than simple repetition of facts and figures, focusing instead on understanding and application of broad concepts. Students are rarely asked to this at the high school level and often panic when asked to learn in this manner, especially in traditionally difficult classes such as physics. Students in these difficult classes frequently end up causing their own downfall before they even start the class by coming in either overconfident or with a failure mindset. The supplemental instructor program addresses how students learn and the corresponding study and application skills. It is led entirely by SI’s students who have taken the class previously. SI’s have a unique insight into students' thought processes. In this presentation I describe an independent research project underway to see how students’ perceptions of difficulty affect their grades on quizzes and exams. I am doing this by comparing post quiz surveys of students’ perceptions and expectations to their actual performance. Student Author(s): D-Jon-Nique Devone, Senior, Forensic Science, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Khalid Lodhi, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 22 Degradation of DNA from Whole Blood by UV Radiation and Exposure Time Biological evidence such as blood at crime scenes can be a vital evidence linking a person to a crime location. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) degrades rapidly when exposed to high temperatures and various intensity of ultraviolet (UV) radiations. The degradation of DNA can cause limitations in human identification. This research attempts to discover the amount of time and intensity it takes for UV radiations to degrade DNA to a point of where a genetic profile cannot be generated. Whole human blood was exposed at various wavelengths (λ), 254 λ, 302 λ, 365 λ, and natural radiations from the sun with 20 minute intervals up to 120 minutes. Exposed whole human blood was processed for DNA extraction by organic method followed by human DNA quantification using 7500 Realtime Polymerase Chain Reaction. Human DNA was amplified by Amplif Identifiler kit. The amplified DNA was separated by capillary electrophoresis by ABI 310 Genetic analyzer. Data was analyzed using GeneMapper ID v3.2.1 software. Very little DNA profile was observed after 20 minutes of exposure at 254, partial profiles were obtained after 302. No DNA degradation observed at 365. Human blood exposed to Natural UV showed steady degradation patterns after 20 minutes. Student Author(s): Tabin Dharanikota, Freshman, High School, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Arnav Goswami, Freshman, High School, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Mathematical Economics, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) An External View Into European Economics Greece’s economy recently collapsed and the country was on the verge of filing for bankruptcy. Greece’s banks temporarily closed, causing a major scare throughout the Eurozone. However, many other countries in Europe with similar natural resources and geography to Greece (such as Luxembourg and Germany) seem to be thriving in the last few decades. This study is conducted to determine the socioeconomic differences between Greece and other European countries, mainly through the economic indicators. Thirty different European nations’ economic information--such as average work hours, government spending as a percentage of GDP, and GDP per capita--was collected and analyzed. It was concluded that there were several social and economic differences between Greece and rest of the Europe. Main differences included significant government spending, high unemployment rates and high tax rates (with low tax collection) leading to low GDP per Capita, and higher inflation. There are also several economic policies identified in this paper that are unique to Greece, as compared to other European nations, which are negatively impacting their economy. In conclusion, we make certain observations that Greece could have done to avert their current economic situation.

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Student Author(s): Michael Diez, Senior, Mathematics, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Zhenlu Cui, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Mathematics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 30 Modeling Love Dynamics A competition model has been used to formulate love dynamics of two aged experienced lovers Romeo and Juliet. We investigate how Romeo and Juliet's feelings toward each other change over time. Using Maple, we find that the solution to the model can exhibit many different types of behaviors, depending on the value of the model parameters. By selecting a wide assortment of model parameters, we have ensured that there will be a varied group of models to perform numerous case studies. Based on our evaluation of these case studies, we can make several predictions about Romeo and Julietâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s relationship over time. Student Author(s): Julie Dixon, Junior, Business Administration, High Point University Mentor(s): Patricia Swafford, High Point University Presentation: Business, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Impact of Internal and External Factors on Service Firm Productivity Productivity reflects the output given the resources needed to provide the product or service. It provides important insight into how efficient a firm is operating. For example, when creating a sustainable competitive advantage, productivity measures can ensure that a company is using labor, machinery and factory systems in a profitable manner. Productivity is affected by many factors, both internal and external, thus this research focuses on three factors. The first two factors, employee training and employee autonomy are internal factors. While higher employee training is often tied to higher productivity, it may be seen as a predecessor to employee autonomy, which reflects the ability of the employee to have control of their job and related decisions. The other factor, customer knowledge, is an external factor that looks at how the knowledge the customer has regarding the product or service impacts the overall service process and its productivity. Based on literature from both the business and psychology disciplines and using secondary data from service based firms, the results of this research will aid in providing insights to the relationship between these three factors and productivity. Student Author(s): Avery Dominguez, Junior, Clinical Research, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Joseph Covi, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Biological Sciences - Zoology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 52 Developing a Test Model System for Hatching Crustacean Zooplankton Since most aquatic habitats contain complex zooplankton communities, multiple genera and life-stages should be examined to predict the impacts of environmental change. Most studies only assess impacts on active life stages of single zooplankton species. However, the majority of the inland zooplankton has a life-cycle dominated by a dormant embryonic stage. Only a few model species are readily available for testing during, or immediately following, this dormant stage. Specific environmental conditions are required to break embryonic dormancy in zooplankton, and initiate hatching. As a first step in developing a new model, this study assessed the effects of media-type and light on hatching success in the Redtail Fairy Shrimp, Streptocephalus spp.. Two media types were tested: a commercially available artificial fresh water solution (All Living Thingsâ&#x201E;˘) and diluted artificial seawater (Instant OceanÂŽ). Embryos were hatched under constant light or constant darkness. Between 55% and 65% of embryos hatched in diluted artificial seawater regardless of lighting conditions. In the commercial solution under constant light, 85% of embryos hatched; 23% hatched under constant darkness. This suggests that light cues overpower salinity or ionic cues that regulate hatching, and that diluted artificial seawater is preferable because it promotes hatching regardless of lighting.

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Student Author(s): Samantha Dove, Senior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Charlotte Boettiger, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Theresa McKim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 12 The Effect of Stress on HRV and Habitual vs. Goal-Directed Behavior Heart Rate Variability (HRV) is an index of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system balance and lower HRV has been implicated in a number of health conditions, including alcoholism. The objective of this study is to determine whether stress, induced by the Socially Evaluated Cold Pressor Test (SECPT), facilitates habit learning and impairs goal-directed behavior. We used the conditional S-R paradigm to test S-R learning and “re-learning” after response devaluation in healthy control participants during two lab visits. Participants were randomly assigned into one of three testing conditions. To measure changes in the biological response to stress, we examined changes in heart rate and heart rate variability. We predicted that an increase in heart rate and a change in HRV would result from stress. Preliminary analyses showed a significant change in heart rate from before to during stress manipulations (F(2,39)= 7.66, p=0.002). Participants stressed before devaluation showed no differences in heart rate before and during stress relative to controls (p=0.44). Results also indicated a significant change in heart rate from stress to post stress manipulations (F(2,39)= 10.19, p<0.002). Student Author(s): Matthew Drake, Senior, Economics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): John Whitehead, Appalachian State University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Economic Impact of the 2015 High Country Beer Fest The High Country Beer Fest (HCBF) is an annual event in Boone, NC where event-goers try craft beer, enjoy music, and attend seminars. Using the Survey Monkey platform, an online survey was issued to all participants who purchased their tickets online. This survey asked about spending habits during the event, both at the HCBF and in the surrounding area. In 2014, 55% of survey respondents lived outside Watauga County and 73% of those people stayed overnight in the area. The average total spending of respondents was $264 during their stay in the Boone area. This average, summed over the total number of non-local participants that purchased tickets online, shows direct spending of around $88,000 during the HCBF. This influx of money into the regional economy generates additional spending through circulation. Applying a RIMS II tourism multiplier shows a total economic impact of $130,000 associated with the HCBF. By applying this same methodology to the 2015 HCBF, we will ascertain the total economic impact of the event on the regional economy, pending completion of survey responses. Student Author(s): Julia Draper, Senior, Integrative Healthcare, Guilford College Mentor(s): Kathrynn Adams, Guilford College Presentation: Pre-Medicine, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Past as Prologue: The Relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Health Outcomes in Emerging Adults We carry our childhoods with us not just in memories, but also in our bodies—in the anatomy of our brain, the functioning of our physiological systems, and the development of our behaviors. Through a complex interplay of pathways—cumulative damage as a result of chronic stress, health risk behaviors developed to “cope” with that stress, and the biological embedding of adversities during sensitive developmental periods—psychosocial experiences of childhood transform into physiological disease years down the road. Despite several decades of research into this phenomenon, almost all studies have focused on older adults, once disease has manifested and preventative measures are no longer a possibility. To address this gap in the literature, this study focused on a diverse population of emerging adults, 18-29 years old, to investigate histories of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and how those experiences relate to the incidence of health risk behaviors and potential early biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk. Research included an online survey as well as an in-person acute stress-induction intervention, with a focus on blood pressure (BP) responses. Results indicate that emerging adults who report a history of ACEs are at greater risk for developing behaviors that are a detriment to their health.

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Student Author(s): Jessie Drew, Senior, Psychology, High Point University Mentor(s): Allison Walker, High Point University Presentation: English, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Effects of Narrative Medicine on Anxiety Residents with dementia at an assisted living home participate in narrative medicine workshops, which have a focus in poetry. Narrative Medicine is defined as a medical approach that recognizes the value of people's narratives in clinical practice, research and education. In other words, the residents are able to tell and share their stories through the workshops. The residents are given an anxiety screener prior to participating in the workshop and are screened with the same survey following the workshop. The intention of the research is to discover if the effects of narrative medicine lower anxiety in older adults with dementia. The workshops consist of a combination of listening to, reading, and writing poetry. There is also an observation aspect of this study that compares the resident’s moods and anxiety on days with workshops versus days without. The hypotheses are that the effects of narrative medicine will significantly lower anxiety in the participants with dementia and that the residents’ anxiety will be lower on days that they have done poetry versus days that there was no workshop. Student Author(s): Edem Dzotefe, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 25 The Interactions of Antimicrobial Therapeutics with Disulfiram, a Commonly Prescribed Medication Through the misuse and over-prescription of antibiotics, bacteria are becoming more resistant to antimicrobial therapeutics. Because developing newer, more powerful drugs is a time-consuming and expensive process, we have decided to take commonly prescribed medications and couple them with antibiotics in hopes of identifying novel synergistic interactions. Disulfiram (Antabuse), a drug that is used to support the treatment of alcoholism, works by inhibiting the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, which would normally breakdown any alcohol consumed. We hypothesized that the grouping of various antibiotics with disulfiram will yield a change in bacterial sensitivity. Through the method of disc diffusion, we have exposed both Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus to disulfiram and antibiotics simultaneously. We found that fosfomycin and minocycline, in the presence of disulfiram, generates synergistic effects, while cefotaxime produces antagonistic effects. Student Author(s): Tim Eldred, Junior, Bachelors of Science – Chemistry, University of North Carolina Charlotte Mentor(s): Jordan Poler, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Chemistry - Nanoscience, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanostructures for Water Purification Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters is a potential health hazard, and difficult to remove. Certain DOCs (humic and fulvic acids) react with the chlorine used for water purification to form chlorinated disinfectant byproducts (DBPs), which are known carcinogens. The EPA limits for DBPs are in the range of 0.01-1.0 mg/L. At such low concentrations, it is very difficult to efficiently remove the DOCs. Supraparticle assemblies of poly(vinylbenzyl trimethylammonium chloride) and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized. These assemblies function as anion exchange resins to adsorb and remove DOC. The functionalized SWCNTs were then characterized using Raman Spectroscopy, IR, and SEM. Raman data showed a significant increase in D:G band ratio indicating covalent bonding to the nanotubes. SEM images showed conformal polymer coating around the nanotubes. DOC can be extracted from water sources by adsorption to the polymer chains on the functionalized SWCNTs. These nano-resins are stable in water, and can be removed using electrophoresis, regenerated, and reused repeatedly. Significant adsorption of a DOC surrogate was observed using UV-Vis analysis. Adsorption studies show that our functionalized SWCNTs are more efficient than current industrial solutions and capable of removing DOCs below the EPA limits.

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Student Author(s): Alexa Erb, Senior, Communication, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Cynthia Gendrich, Wake Forest University Presentation: Communication, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 55 Intersectionality, Intimate Partner Violence, and Representation in Theatre and Film Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a major health problem that affects an estimated 1 in 3 women around the globe. Though IPV affects women of all identity groups, the majority of research that has been conducted focuses only on white women. Through this project, IPV is examined through an interdisciplinary, intersectional lens. With a focus on straight, cisgender, low SES, Latina women this paper aims to analyze the intersection of these identities, the cultural expectations/norms that come with them, and the role that plays in Intimate Partner Violence. Additionally, this project looks at how theatre and film have attempted to address this issue intersectionally. These art forms have the power to critique society as it stands and instigate lasting change, yet many of the films that met our criteria presented problematic interpretations of the issue. The paper breaks each film down and delves into what they do well and where there are missing links. Throughout the paper, dramatic literature is used to illustrate the presence and importance of intersectionality in situations involving IPV. Examining how these art forms choose to represent IPV and intersectionality provides us with significant information about how our society is dealing with these issues. Student Author(s): Ashley Everidge, Senior, Literature, Catawba College Mentor(s): Forrest Anderson, Catawba College Presentation: English (Literature), Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) Cather's Indefinite Decision In A Lost Lady (1923), Willa Cather uses the physicality of the railroad town of Sweet Water to saturate her characters with meaning. The lush description of the marshland surrounding the Forrester homestead juxtaposed with the novel's characters helps the novel straddle both the naturalist and modernist periods. This short video production and follow-up question and answer period reiterates the importance of the land, as well as the characters' roles within the story, creating a rich interpretation of this exciting novel. Student Author(s): Kendall Fallon, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Cindy Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 23 Identifying Dog Breeds Teaching labs that engage students, involve laboratory skills, and require student application of course content are very effective in the learning process. There are few genetics teaching labs that fit this bill on all levels. We are working to develop a teaching lab for the Genetics course at High Point University in which students amplify and sequence genetic markers in dogs to determine the dogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breed. This lab allows students to learn several laboratory skills including DNA extraction, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), DNA sequence reaction setup, and sequence data analysis. It also requires the students to apply the genetics concepts they are learning in class to a lab project. We have found that students are very engaged in this when they are able to choose dogs to include in the genetic screen. This research project has been focused on screening genetic markers that will be suitable for breed identification and composing protocols for the teaching lab. Student Author(s): Samantha Farquhar, Junior, Marine Biology/International Studies, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Thomas Lankford, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Marine Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 28 Age and growth of the invasive lionfish: North Carolina, USA vs Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean Lionfish are an invasive species that are now well established throughout the Atlantic. Originally from the IndoPacific, they have decimated local fishes' populations due to their rapid reproduction, tolerance to environmental conditions, voracious appetite, and lack of predators. Through the examination of otoliths, this study investigates the age structure and growth rate of lionfish from two locations: North Carolina, USA and Bonaire, Dutch Caribbean. This study's objectives are to (1) find the age and growth data of lionfish for these two locations and

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(2) investigate any variations of this data between these locations for environmental influences. Otoliths were extracted from lionfish individuals, embedded in resin, then sectioned with an Isomet low-speed saw for microscopic analysis. Preliminary results suggest that lionfish from NC have slower growth, but a greater age structure than that of lionfish from Bonaire. This could be attributed to location. In Bonaire, lionfish are hunted often and are easily accessible to the public, whereas in North Carolina lionfish are found miles off the coast and their harvesting is not as popular. Both locations also have drastic variations in their water temperature , which is a well-known factor affecting growth. Student Author(s): Jessica Feldman, Freshman, Studio Art, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Writing), Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Cultural Abandonment Due to Assimilation The term melting pot refers to the idea that societies formed by immigrant cultures, religions, and ethnic groups, will produce new hybrid social and cultural forms. America has become the hub of cultural diversity since the first Europeans settled colonies in the 1600s. Since then, ethnicities from all over the globe have stepped foot onto our soil. As of 2013, approximately 41.3 million immigrants lived in the United States, an all-time high for a nation historically built on immigration, accounting for nearly 13 percent of the U.S. population. For many of these immigrants the conditions for living in their home countries push them into leaving in hopes of a better life. People migrate for many reasons, including broadly political, socioeconomic and educational. No matter the reason the decision to relocate to America is a dramatic change for any migrant that often results in some sort of assimilation from their former culture. With this, these immigrants abandon most, if not all, cultural traditions, practices, food, and general ways of living in order to feel like they are a part of the American Dream or else risk failing to succeed in their new home. Student Author(s): Grayson Fenwick, Sophomore, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Finch Robots and Education The Finch is a new robot for computer science education designed as a result of a study at Carnegie Mellon's CREATE lab. The Finch robot can be used to provide an engaging introduction to programming. Students can learn basic and advanced programming concepts while creating fun programs that cause the Finch to move, detect obstacles, sense light, sense temperature, display colors, emit sounds, and draw. The Finch supports a wide variety of programming languages including Scratch and Java and thus can be used to teach programming to students as young as eight years old, as well as college students in an introductory computer science course. We used Finch robots in several programs at Appalachian State University in summer 2015 involving both high school teachers and elementary school students. Specifically, we created several course modules in which participants wrote Scratch programs to perform different tasks using Finch robots. Program participants initially completed modules consisting of simple activities and programming concepts and then later completed more advanced modules as they gained experience with the robots. This presentation discusses some of the modules that were created and illustrates how even young students can learn to program. Student Author(s): Terrel Ferguson, Senior, Economics, North Carolina A&T State University Quesion Bennett, Senior, Economics, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Alfredo Romero, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) How Likely Are People to Help Others? The question of whether or not a person will help the person next to them seems like an impossible question to answer because every person is different, but what if you could predict that statement with economics? Many of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problems stems from an uneven distribution of wealth and if we can figure out what makes people give away money voluntarily it could make great strides towards permanently erasing poverty on earth. People make the decision to give to charity or donate funds based on a variety of reasons and factors. We hypothesize that the dependent variable, the amount of money people give to charity, had four main independent variables that we think will predict that amount. The four variables that coincide with each other to produce this variable we suspect are:

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Age, whether or not their parents donated, Religious affinity, and income. This research can greatly help us understand how people work and what factors are needed to facilitate more charitable donations from all types of individuals. Student Author(s): Marisa Fernandez, Freshman, Interdisciplinary Studies and Performing Arts Management, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Philosophy, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Good, the Bad, and the Unethical: The Ethics of Propaganda Propaganda is all around us. It is in our schools encouraging us to recycle our water bottles; it is on TV urging us to vote for a certain candidate; it is pumped out by the government reminding you to register to vote. The question is not whether this is effective or not, but whether propaganda in itself is ethical. Looking at Kant’s moral, the use of propaganda is unethical. According to Kant’s Second Formulation of the Categorical Imperative, an agent should never be used merely as a means to an end and should be treated as an end in herself. How do different types of propaganda persuade moral agents, and which propaganda campaigns, if any, are considered more acceptable? This paper looks at multiple case studies of propaganda such as modern-day Chinese propaganda and American propaganda used during the Cold War, and weighs in on which of these, if any, is morally acceptable. Student Author(s): Eugene Filik, Junior, Physics, High Point University Mentor(s): Brad Barlow, High Point University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 37 A Pulsar with a Long Orbit- The 12th Double Neutron Star System Discovered in 2012, PSRJ1930-1852 is a milli-second pulsar, a city-sized star that rotates five times a second compared to Earth's rotation of once per day. Pulsars are the condensed remnants of high-mass stars that have reached the end of their lifetimes. In order for such an object to rotate so quickly, a nearby companion star is necessary to "spin up" the pulsar. Collaborators at West Virginia University recently discovered a companion to PSRJ1930-1852; however, the companion type was unknown. In May 2014, we observed the field around PSRJ1930-1852 using the 0.9-m SMARTS telescope in order to determine the companion type. A 2-hour long exposure shows no evidence of an optical counterpart, suggesting that the companion is not a main sequence star like the Sun. Using Kepler’s equations, we found the mass limits of the pulsar and companion star. Due to the companion star’s lower mass limit, we find the companion to be another neutron star. Thus, PSRJ1930-1852 represents the 12th double neutron star (DNS) system ever found; additionally, it has the longest orbital period of any pulsar in a DNS system. Student Author(s): Anthony Fish, Senior, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Olivia Bundy, Senior, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Thomas Edwards, Sophomore, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Ronnie Hatfield, Senior, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Donnie Fann, Senior, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Kartik Sharma, Senior, Health Care Administration, Methodist University Mentor(s): Dr. Warren McDonald, Methodist University Presentation: Undecided, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Determining Support for a Tobacco-Free Campus Objective: Many colleges and universities across the country have decided to become tobacco-free in an effort to improve the health of their students, faculty, and staff. The objective of this research project is to determine the feasibility of a making Methodist University a tobacco-free campus. Methods: Research includes quantitative analysis of the attitudes of Methodist University students, faculty, and staff regarding the possibility of making Methodist a tobacco-free campus. Online surveys will be conducted using Qualtrics analytic software. This data will be analyzed to determine if there is support for a tobacco-free campus. Results: Results are pending the completion of the surveys. Data from other schools, however, suggests that there is general strong support for tobacco-free campuses. Fears of decreased student retention rate and loss of revenue appear to be unfounded.

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Further, there appear to be financial benefits due to decreased health insurance and property insurance costs and decreased maintenance costs. Student Author(s): Darius Floyd, Freshman, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Adolescent Immigrant Aid On September 3rd, 2014, the United States Border Patrol reported 66,127 immigrant youths apprehended while attempting to cross border. This was an 88% increase from the previous year’s 35,209 apprehended youths. Many of these children are trying to escape desperate circumstances and violence in places like the Northern Triangle (Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador). Many have no parental guidance or have anyone to reunite with if they make it to the U.S. They are left to the power and authority of the border control in a land that they are unaccustomed to, waiting to be allowed their stay or be deported. The U.S. has taken the initiative by giving Central American countries money to fund facilities to aid at-risk adolescents. Though a good start, money alone will not repair this perilous cycle. America must do more. The U.S. government and outside organizations need to invest time and manpower, along with financial backing. The U.S. should facilitate this by assisting funding for education, create organizations to allow for them to be mentored and generate summer opportunities for them to make money. Incentives may be given to companies to go to these areas and spark change within the region. Student Author(s): Karnella Fobbs, Senior, Criminal Justice, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Miriam Delone, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Criminal Justice, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 3 Identifying the Accuracy of Criminal (Criminal Justice Myths) & Forensic Junk Science Forensic science shows have become ubiquitous on network and cable television. These cases are presented in brief 20 minute episodes. To what extent are the media messages about forensics and crime distorted? This research is based on a content analysis of a sample of Forensic Files episodes. The two research questions: 1) is the information presented in the episodes about forensic science reflective of what is used in criminal court cases or is the information riddled with “junk science”? 2) Does the information presented offer an accurate picture of crime, victimization and criminal justice or support commonly recognized “myths”? Student Author(s): Daniela Fontecha, Freshman, Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Marcus Jones, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Chemistry - Nanoscience, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 4 Investigation of Optical Properties of PbSe/CdSe core/shell Quantum Dots Over Time PbSe quantum dots have piqued the interest of many scientists because their tunable bandgaps lie in the near infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum. This range allows them to be used in many photovoltaic applications as well as bioindicators. However, PbSe quantum dots are susceptible to oxidation and therefore require a protective outer shell before they can be used in solar cells or biological systems. To address this issue, PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots were created by initiating a cation exchange procedure between the Pb atoms in the core and the Cd ions introduced from a Cd(OA)2 solution. The quantum dots were characterized using fluorescence and UV-vis-IR spectroscopy to measure the absorption and emission properties of the quantum dots. The absorption spectra of the core/shell quantum dots showed a blueshift relative to the core only quantum dots as expected from the reduction in core size. During shell growth, however, the core/shell particles underwent a subsequent redshift, suggesting that the initially asymmetric CdSe shell was becoming increasingly concentric over time. The quantum yield of the quantum dots increased with the growth of the CdSe shell as expected. Remarkably, after two weeks of storage, the quantum yield of the PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots further increased.

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Student Author(s): Jennie Forsythe, Senior, Plant Biology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Candace Haigler, North Carolina State University Erin Slabaugh, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Botany, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 35 Identification of putative glucan interacting residues in Arabidopsis cellulose synthases Cellulose is a major structural component of plant cell walls and is composed of beta 1,4-glucan chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases (CESAs). CESAs are large protein complexes localized to the plasma membrane of plant cells and are predicted to have eight transmembrane helices (TMHs) and a large cytosolic domain. Beta1,4-glucan chains are synthesized in the cytosol and must be translocated across the plasma membrane and into the apoplast where they are incorporated into plant cell walls. The first crystal structure of a cellulose synthase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsBcsA) revealed that translocation of the glucan chain occurs through a pore formed by six TMHs. Using this crystal structure, site-directed mutagenesis and phenotypic complementation, we will identify glucan-interacting residues in plant CESAs. Protein sequence comparisons were used to identify putatively homologous glucan interacting residues in Arabidopsis CESAs. We targeted large and/or polar residues in TMHs of AtCESA1 and AtCESA7. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we replaced these putative glucan interacting residues with alanine. These mutant CESA genes have been introduced into Arabidopsis cesa mutants, and the effects on CESA function will be studied through phenotypic complementation. We hope to gain a better understanding of glucan translocation in plant CESAs. Student Author(s): Tyler Foster, Senior, Psychology, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Rosalie Kern, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Friends and Self Esteem This study examines the relationship between self-esteem and the number of friends on Facebook. The study was based on previous research that addressed the number of Facebook friends and perceived social support (Mango, Taylor, and Greenfeild 2012). The researchers used Rosenberg’s (1965) self-esteem scale and three additional questions; their age, sex, and number of Facebook friends. The participants were recruited by a volunteer process through undergraduate classes. The researchers will use a Parson’s r to determine if there is a relationship between the number of Facebook friends and self-esteem. The data process is still ongoing, but based on the previous study, we expect to find a significant relationship. Student Author(s): Kevin Fowler, Senior, Environmental Technology and Management, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Elizabeth Nichols, North Carolina State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 50 Determining The Source of a Pipe Discharge from NC State’s Gym Using Negative Mode LC-TOF MS Screening for Organic Contaminants The discharge of wastewater into surface water is routine under the Clean Water Act and an NPDES permit. The aim of this project is to identify whether the pool in Carmichael gym is the origin of discharge from a pipe on North Carolina State University’s’ campus. Determining a possible correlation between the pipe and pool was done by comparing negative mode compounds found in samples. Field documentation included pH, conductivity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Water samples were taken by grab method. Sample points were the pool, the discharge pipe, upstream, and downstream. One liter grab samples were then condensed using solid phase extraction; evaporated and then reconstituted into 0.25mL samples for analyzation. Analyzation for negative mode compounds was completed by the Mark Stryner, from the EPA, using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry, measuring for time-of-flight. Non-targeted analysis is performed using an Agilent 1100 HPLC separation system coupled with an Agilent 6210 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This system uses proprietary software to identify chemicals based on specified molecular features (peak height, area count, etc.) that are extracted for comparisons to databases. Possible chemical formulas for an individual chemical are ranked according to the difference between calculated and measured mass, isotopic abundance, and isotope spacing to determine the most likely match (McMahen et al., 2015).

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Student Author(s): Aaron Frazier, Senior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Kari Eddington, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 28 Analysis of self-reference word usage of individuals with depression pre- versus post-treatment In attempting to modulate distress, people with depression often engage in self-focused, negative thinking patterns known as rumination. This tendency has shown to be maladaptive, often resulting in decreased motivation to carry out tasks needed to accomplish oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals. Language patterns suggestive of self-focus can be investigated by employing computerized text analysis, which allows large bodies of qualitative data to be studied efficiently. The current study will analyze archival data from a past study in which individuals diagnosed with depression received short-term, structured psychotherapy in order to test the hypothesis that depressives are more likely to use selfreferential words pre-treatment compared to post-treatment. Data were collected during cell-phone-based intensive experience sampling one week prior to starting treatment and again a week prior to treatment completion. Experience sampling included an open-ended item asking about current thoughts, responses to which will be analyzed using a computerized text analytic tool. Preliminary results of the present study (n=22) will be reported, as well as methodological implications for the novel approach to assessing changes in less conscious dimensions of thought. Findings in support of the hypothesis would suggest that treatment for depression is associated with changes in an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self-oriented thoughts and ruminative tendencies. Student Author(s): Samuel Fritz, Junior, Evolutionary/Environmental Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Increased Funding to Crime Prevention Programs as a Border Security Supplement In 2013, the United States spent a total of about 12 billion dollars on border security. Much of this funding goes to operations intended to prevent migrants from Central America and Mexico from crossing the border illegally. Despite the massive amount spent on border control, the Department of Homeland Security estimated that there were 11.4 million illegal immigrants living in the United States as of January 2012. Clearly our very expensive efforts at closing our borders have not stopped the tide of humanity rushing into the country. Often, migrants to the United States do not want to leave their home country, but feel they have no choice. Organized crime is often a driver for their exodus. If the flow of illegal immigrants coming to the United States is going to be reduced focus must be shifted from blocking the efforts of migrants to fixing the problems that cause them to leave. A focus on community based efforts to undermine gangs has already lead to a substantial reduction in reported knowledge of crimes by those countries citizens. Increasing the amount of funding these programs receive is a viable long term solution to the United Statesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; border security problem. Student Author(s): Nykesha Fyffe, Junior, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 49 Maintaining Constant Pressure and Concentration Within A Fluidic Device Individual muscle proteins are well understood, but how they function together at the smallest scale for optimized muscle function, in a weak heart for example, is still an unexplored region of medicine. We are designing and implementing a fluidic device for the synthesis of sarcomere-like structures, composed of actin and myosin, in order to study muscle on the micrometer scale. Fluids containing actin and myosin, among others, must be pumped into and out of the device. A fluidic device is used to introduce a fluid (A) into a volume that may contain a different fluid (B), while maintaining constant pressure and concentration within the sample chamber. The buffer concentration within the sample chamber should remain constant during an experimental process for proper protein function. A custom-built pH meter is placed within the sample chamber and is used to determine the concentration various stages during an experiment. Meanwhile, pressure is monitored with an automated pump. Observing the pH and pressure will also identify how much pressure can be placed within the control system that produces constant conditions. Once the concentration can be predicted and controlled, the fluidic device will be modified to a more complex state for introducing more than two fluids. This poster will focus on the process that was taken to design the custom-built pH meter for integration into the fluidic device.

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Student Author(s): Jessica Gada, Freshman, English, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Perks of Being a Wataugan: The Difference a Residential College Can Make This research aims to uncover results pertaining to the difference students of The Watauga Residential College experience in the amount of personal growth they can achieve during their first years of college, as opposed to students on the main campus. This program is an interdisciplinary, experiential, and community-based residential college within Appalachian State University. Information about this topic was gathered through interviews with Watauga students and by looking through past records about classes, missions, and goals within The Watauga Residential College, and also through interviews with students outside of the program. Overall, Watauga students describe a strong sense of community and friendship between students and faculty alike, while students on the main campus in other programs describe a serious lack of connection. Students of The Watauga Residential College collectively gain more skills in community living, as well as confidences in themselves, that are inherent byproducts of involvement in the program. These students are therefore better prepared for completing higher education successfully, and for integrating into society afterward. This research is significant because it allows for outsiders to see the effect that this program has on its participants, and how it allows them to grow. Student Author(s): Monica Galletto, Senior, Graphic Design, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Russell Flinchum, North Carolina State University Presentation: Graphic Design and Digital Imaging, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Contemporary Artists in Florence There is a tendency for people to accept art that they are familiar with and to value the old over the new. Florence, Italy, serves as a prime example of this phenomenon because millions of tourists visit each year just to see historic artworks. However, this city also hosts a community of contemporary artists, which is often overshadowed by the famous works of deceased artists. This project seeks to bring awareness to some of those contemporary artists by sharing their works and personal stories of creating new art in a historic environment. These stories are documented through interviews, photography, and film, and are compiled into a print magazine and video series. Artists and art enthusiasts alike can learn what influence the past has over present makers and how people assign artistic value. Ultimately, this ethnographic study reveals the struggles these artists face, shares their creative contributions, and teaches how we as the public can grow our appreciation for living makers. Student Author(s): Daniel Gallimore, Sophomore, Physics, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): James Perkins, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 39 Reevaluating the Acceleration of a Wheeled Cart on an Inclined Plane A model describing the acceleration of a wheeled cart ascending and descending an inclined plane is developed and experimentally evaluated. This research addresses the common misconception among introductory physics students that the motion of a gravitationally accelerated object is always independent of its mass or the mass of its components. This misconception stems from the exceedingly common use of a wheeled cart in physics instruction to demonstrate the mass independence of the acceleration of frictionless sliding bodies. However, by considering the distribution of mass between a cartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body and wheels, it is shown that the acceleration of the system is better approximated by introducing a mass dependent ratio related to the moment of inertia of the wheels. Also, a model including the rolling friction between the inclined surface and cart wheels is applied to the system in order to provide the most accurate possible interpretation of the cartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motion. This model, which has been used in prior physics instruction, assumes rolling friction to be symmetrical between the ascending and descending carts; however, experimental results consistently contradict this assertion, indicating that the model may require further revision.

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Student Author(s): Kristin Garner, Senior, Biological Engineering, North Carolina State University Joshua Axhoj, Senior, Biological Engineering, North Carolina State University Benjamin Goodes, Senior, Biological Engineering, North Carolina State University Derek Urquhart, Senior, Biological Engineering, North Carolina State University Douglas Royalty, Senior, Biological Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): John Rice, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Biological & Agricultural , Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Lagoon Sludge Transformation The goal of our project is to engineer a cost effective alternative to the current methods of pumping and spreading dead microbes (waste) in the bottom of lagoons. These lagoons are continually monitored to ensure that these levels do not exceed a specified amount. The current methods cost owners thousands of dollars annually to remove sludge. The alternative method that we will be constructing is a greenhouse that will dry the sludge that has been previously pumped out of the lagoons. This process will be aided by the use of solar fans to increase drying rates and improve energy efficiency. As sludge dries, it will be removed from the greenhouse and stored for either biofuel production or to sell as dried material for fertilizer. We will also be attempting to make a potent liquid fertilizer through pumping the greenhouse gases through a bolic acid solution. Our sponsor is highly educated in the waste management field and will be assisting our group with the design. If this greenhouse design is successful and projects like this become more common, tremendous amounts of money can be saved by hog farmers, mainly by minimizing transportation and disposal. Student Author(s): Lauren Garretson, Senior, International Studies, Elon University Mentor(s): Stephen Bloch-Schulman, Elon University Presentation: Philosophy, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Memory Destruction in the Creation of Post-Genocide Rwanda's "Walking Dead" This paper examines the destruction of the possibility of memory through an Arendtian lens as it relates to the creation of the phenomenon of post-genocide Rwanda's bapfuye buhagazi, survivors who are known as the "walking dead" because they have experienced a profound loss of subjectivity and their sense of self. The project is based upon a qualitative study of semi-structured interviews with Rwandan Genocide survivors. It combines the interview data with Hannah Arendt's work on memory destruction under totalitarian regimes, philosophical works on the similar phenomenon of the "living corpses" in Nazi Germany, and historical accounts of the Rwandan Genocide. Comparing what happened to these survivors of the Rwandan Genocide to the literature on Nazi camp's "living corpses" reveals the important role that memory destruction plays in this type of damage to subjectivity and one's sense of self. Ultimately, the paper argues that certain elements of the implementation of the genocide, as well as the intimate nature of the violent acts committed, destroy past memories and possibilities for future memory making, and are thereby an essential component of the creation of Rwanda's "walking dead." Student Author(s): June Garver, Freshman, Social Work, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) English Language Learner Program Reform in United States School Systems "That's an essential promise of America. Where you start should not determine where you end up,â&#x20AC;? (Barack Obama). English language learner students (ELLs) are currently the most rapidly growing student population in the United States. However, 25% drop out before the completion of high school. The lack of resources and funding of these programs results in the failure to provide students with the appropriate skills to become proficient in the English language. These students are also automatically put into a position to fall behind in their school work and become isolated from their English speaking peers. ELL programs vow that their goal is to teach their students English to ensure their academic success, yet it has been shown in schools across the United States that ELLs have one of the highest drop out rates. Dual-language immersion programs should replace current ELL classes because the methods used focus on teaching English while incorporating the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native language to provide for beneficial instructional time for foreign students. Despite differences in ethnic backgrounds, all children in the United States deserve equal opportunities in education and denying any student of that goes against the strong principle of equality that America was built on.

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Student Author(s): Julia Geaney-Moore, Senior, English and Psychology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Krista Craven, Guilford College Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 27 Community is What You Make It: Sense of Community at Guilford College Student Author(s): Elizabeth Gerdes, Junior, Chemistry and Biology University of North Carolina - Pembroke Mentor(s): Leonard Holmes, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Photorhabdus luminescens: Virulent Properties and Agricultural Applications Photorhabdus luminescensis a gram-negative, bioluminescent bacterium from the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is part of a symbiotic relationship with and resides in the gut of the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Photorhabdus luminescens produces many virulence factors, toxin complexes and antimicrobial compounds allowing it to kill insect hosts while simultaneously protecting itself from other bacteria. Due to its virulent properties, the Photorhabdus luminescens-Heterorhabditis bacteriophora relationship is a promising candidate for agricultural use as a biocontrol agent to infect a wide range of insect pests. It has been deemed safe towards humans, animals, non-target insects, plants, and the environment. The entomopathogenic nematode is exempt from registration regulations in most countries Student Author(s): Elizabeth Gerdes, Junior, Chemistry and Biology University of North Carolina - Pembroke Mentor(s): Leonard Holmes, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Photorhabdus luminescens: Virulent Properties and Agricultural Applications Photorhabdus luminescensis a gram-negative, bioluminescent bacterium from the family Enterobacteriaceae. It is part of a symbiotic relationship with and resides in the gut of the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Photorhabdus luminescens produces many virulence factors, toxin complexes and antimicrobial compounds allowing it to kill insect hosts while simultaneously protecting itself from other bacteria. Due to its virulent properties, the Photorhabdus luminescens-Heterorhabditis bacteriophora relationship is a promising candidate for agricultural use as a biocontrol agent to infect a wide range of insect pests. It has been deemed safe towards humans, animals, non-target insects, plants, and the environment. The entomopathogenic nematode is exempt from registration regulations in most countries

Student Author(s): Hannah Gillespie, Sophomore, Interdisciplinary Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Wilderness Therapy's Impact on Young Adults Wilderness therapy has foundational roots in deep ecology, ecotherapy, ecopsychology, adventure therapy, and indigenous cultures. Initiated in the 1970s, Wilderness therapy has been proven to increase self-esteem, behavioral change, interpersonal skills, and restoration from anxiety and fatigue, while rates of depression and feelings of helplessness decrease with populations ranging from adjudicated youth, at-risk teens, techno-addicted children to stressed adults. Between the 1970s and 1980s, multiple colleges, including Duke, Western Carolina, and Appalachian State, created pre-orientation wilderness retreats that encourage team-building, facing challenges, and exploration of both self and nature. These wilderness orientation programs have demonstrated effectiveness in goals such as stress management, leadership, and skill-building. Are these college wilderness orientation programs actually conducting non-clinical wilderness therapy? This research utilizes a dualistic approach, both through a thorough literature review and personal interviews. These interviews are conducted with wilderness pre-orientation participants and self-reported transformations in mental health and relationship with nature were qualitatively studied. This inquiry-based research explores the question, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is wilderness therapy and how does it impact young adults?â&#x20AC;?

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Student Author(s): Vinay Giri, Senior, Biology, Duke University Mentor(s): John Perfect, Duke University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 17 Identification of Transcription Factors Required for the Survival of C. Neoformans in the Central Nervous System Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that can invade the central nervous system of immunocompromised individuals. The resulting cryptococcal meningitis is responsible for approximately 625,000 deaths worldwide each year. Fungal proliferation in the cerebrospinal fluid poses a distinctly different challenge than survival in the lung or bloodstream, thus likely necessitating CSF-specific survival mechanisms. In order to directly identify the regulatory mechanisms required to promote survival, transcription factor deletion strains were screened individually via an ex vivo CSF assay. Twenty-eight genes of interest were identified as being important for cryptococcal survival in CSF. However, this method of individually screening strains is time-consuming and resource-intensive. Therefore, we are developing a more effective, high-throughput screening method using a rabbit model for cryptococcal meningitis and next generation sequencing techniques that will enable us to analyze hundreds to thousands of strains at once. We are currently analyzing the preliminary data of the rabbit experiment, and if successful, this model will provide a new method for in vivo screening of large strain libraries. Student Author(s): Ismael Gomez, Freshman, Biology, Nash Community College Mentor(s): David Beamer, Nash Community College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 41 A Comparison of Mitochondrial and Nuclear Gene Trees of the Seepage Salamander (Desmognathus aeneus) The seepage salamander, (Desmognathus aeneus) is a tiny salamander (<60mm) found in forested habitats in parts of North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. These salamanders remain hidden under leaf litter most of their lives. Their inconspicuous habitat and small size caused most naturalist to overlook them and they were nearly placed onto the federal endangered species list. Evidence provided by a recent survey showed that seepage salamander populations are more numerous than previously believed (Graham et al, 2012). Previously, we sequenced a 445 base pair fragment of the mitochondrial COX1 gene from specimens of 47 populations, which revealed the presence of several strongly supported clades. In order to provide a better understanding of the divergence of these taxonomic lineages, here we present a comparison of mitochondrial and nuclear gene trees of Desmogathus aeneus. Student Author(s): Ahmar Gordon, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Edward Shuffler, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Automated Beehive Surveillance Using Raspberry Pi The number of honey bees entering and leaving a hive throughout the day is an important metric for beekeepers monitoring the health of their hives. Activity at the hive entrance depends on many factors such as weather, colony health, and presence of an adequate food supply. Beemon is a vision-based bee monitoring system that can record sounds, capture video, as well as record temperature and humidity conditions within the hive. All of this data may be used to indicate swarm behavior, and could be extended to detect the presence of intruders, such as beetles. Additionally, the system provides an archive of easily perceived data that the beekeeper could manually inspect later, should an anomalous activity occur. Beemon is capable of handling videos taken outdoors without requiring artificial lighting or modifications to the beehive. It is also able to process videos in real-time to allow for constant surveillance. Plus, Beemon deals with the illumination changes and small motions from things like grass or leaves blowing in the wind. This presentation provides some details on the design and implementation of the Beemon system and will provide examples of the data collected. Student Author(s): Daniel Gore, Senior, Economics, Methodist University

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Mentor(s): Josiah Baker, Methodist University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) How Weaponized Interaction Theory Works This paper focuses on "Weaponized Interaction Theory," or (WIT), which is the use of weaponizing ideology to initiate economic change. This article also illustrates objective ways that weaponized ideology inspires social movements which can influence economic development. “Can newly ‘weaponized’ ideology significantly affect a country's socio-economic development? Can ideology influence the economics of organizations, or institutions? If so, can their impact be quantifiably measured in economic terms? This paper demonstrates how weaponized ideology, within an economic context, is used across a spectrum of social interaction fields. For example, strategic applications often involve interacting individual "agents" and the interconnectivity between groups. Such events spread from micro-interactions between individuals to macro-levels between states, or a meso-level of interaction. This paper specifically examines how American patriotic ideology and the weaponized use of the American flag affected the economy after September 11, 2001.

Student Author(s): Zane Gray, Freshman, Undecided, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Effects of Inquiry Based Learning in Watauga Residential College This research paper will explore the effects of inquiry based learning on Watauga Residential College’s goals of providing a community-based environment that supports creativity, ingenuity, and self-growth. Watauga College is a general education alternative at Appalachian State University, which allows students to take courses that are taught by Watauga professors, and nurture individual growth, strong community among students, and a close relationship with professors. Past curricula, interviews, and research regarding the execution of inquiry based learning will exemplify what kind of effect this learning style on students in Watauga Residential College, and whether it is actually conducive to producing the qualities that Watauga College wishes to instill in its students. This kind of research is important because in order for Watauga Residential College to truly possess the ability to give students the assets it desires, the examination of the learning method allows us to pinpoint the positive and negative effects of the program and to evolve consequently from the discoveries, and to create an environment that is better at serving the students in such a way as to provide said qualities. Student Author(s): Richard Gregory, Senior, Biology, High Point University Kelly Knutson, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 42 Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance: An Ongoing Battle The global increase of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections is a growing concern for public health. Antibiotic drug development is a constant and ongoing battle as scientists work to discover new and improved methods of treating bacterial infections. Past research has suggested that certain household products have synergistic effects when paired with antibiotics. This projects aims to explore potential synergistic interactions between the essential oil, linalool, and commonly prescribed antibiotics. Linalool is a fragrant, terpene alcohol derived from flower and spice plants and is a common ingredient in cosmetics, soaps and insecticides. Linalool has been shown to possess antibacterial properties against various microbes. To test this, we will use broth culture in addition to disk diffusion methods. We hypothesize that linalool, in the presence of antibiotics, will increase the effectiveness of antibiotic efficacy or increase bacterial sensitivity. Student Author(s): Julia Griffin, Senior, Industrial and System Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Chang Nam, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Industrial & Systems, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 43 The Role of Force Feedback in Retinal Microsurgery: A Human Interaction Perspective, a Meta-Analysis Technically, retinal microsurgery is one of the most difficult surgeries since it is performed at the threshold of human capability. If the retinal conditions are left untreated they can develop severe effects leading to irrevocable

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blindness. Thus a reliable retinal microsurgery operation is needed. Existing research shows promise for improving surgical safety by implementing various types of sensory input and output. The sensory information is used to inform the surgeon about the environment in the eye. This review examined literature that discusses human factors and ergonomics (HFE) of retinal microsurgery instruments’ sensory inputs and outputs with a focus on force and haptic feedback. Thirty four studies were reviewed on the following topics: (1) the variation between different input sensory devices and their performance, (2) the variation between alternative output sensory devices and their performance, and (3) the variation between alternative output sensory devices and their user satisfaction. This review identified that while HFE is important to the acceptance of retinal microsurgery devices, it is largely missing in the current research. The addition of direct comparisons between devices, measures of user acceptance, usability evaluations and greater realism in testing would help advance the acceptance of retinal microsurgery instruments in surgeries. Student Author(s): Imani Grimes, Junior, Food and Nutritional Sciences, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Salam A. Ibrahim, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 20 Interaction Between Bifidobacteria and Medical Drugs Probiotics are viable microorganisms that beneficially affect the host by improving the microbial balance. It has been proven that consumption of Probiotics on regular basis reduces the risk of serious illnesses. However, a decrease in the viability of such a beneficial microorganism could occur due to the use of different medications. The objective of this study was to determine the survival of bifidobacterium strains in the presence of commonly administered medical drugs. One tablet of each of the drug (Aleve, Aspirin, Glipizide, lesinopril, and Tylenol) was completely dissolved in 9ml of fresh MRS broth. Five different strains of Bifidobacterium sp. (B.breve, B.longum, B.infantis, B.adolesentis, and B.bifidium) were used for this study. Each strain was serially diluted to obtain an initial inoculum of approximately 6 log CFU/ml. Each strain was inoculated into MRS broth containing different drug and incubated at 120 min at 37°C. The survival rate was determined by plating onto duplicate MRS agar. Our result shows a reduction in bifidobacteria population by average of approximately 3.0 ±0.45 log CFU/ml. Our findings indicated that intake of medications has significant effects on the survival of bifidobacteria thereby affecting functionality of probiotics. Student Author(s): Autumn Grinstead, Freshman, Undecided, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Undecided, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Watauga Residential College Curriculum Watauga Residential College is a learning community with a curriculum made for students to truly learn and explore their own education through inquiry based and experiential learning. Compared to general education for incoming freshmen into a larger university campus, Watauga helps students challenge their previous way of learning. This presentation will explore the differences in the curriculum between the residential college and general education. It is significant to note that Watauga creates an environment to help students thrive. From interviews with the director of Watauga and information from the Appalachian State University’s library’s special collections evidence that Watauga Residential College is a more effective system way to learn is abundant. Student Author(s): Ben Groelke, Senior, Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Jennifer Burris, Appalachian State University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 51 Progress towards temperature measurements via power spectrum analysis of Brownian motion of an optically trapped microsphere Optical tweezers have been used for measurements of kinesin step size and elasticity of DNA, as well as many other biological systems, in order to better understand macroscopic function of tissues in the body for medical purposes. An optically trapped microsphere is mechanically analogous to a spring-mass system with a three dimensional trap stiffness. Because the system is Hookean, an external force acting on a trapped microsphere can be deduced from the displacement of the microsphere if the trap stiffness is known. Trap stiffness is dependent on the localized temperature-dependent viscosity of the aqueous medium. It is typical for the temperature of the

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trapped particle and adjacent medium to be increased due to laser light absorption, which can affect the accuracy of measurements of delicate temperature-sensitive biological systems. A non-invasive temperature measurement method was explored, via a power spectrum analysis of the Brownian motion of a trapped microsphere in water. Temperature was monitored with increasing laser trap optical power. The measured temperature at each power setting is presented, along with a description of increased accuracy of stiffness experimental values using temperature corrections. In the future, the analysis software written in LabView will be used for implementation in a large automated optical tweezers software/hardware system, and will be used for finding temperature in a feedback-optimized optical system.

Student Author(s): Erich Guebert, Senior, Psychology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Sheila Brownlow, Catawba College Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 2 Name Letter Matching After Cognitive Depletion Self-enhancement strategies are behaviors designed to increase implicit-self views, and typically we engage in these when we experience social, cognitive, or affective challenges. I studied how cognitive tasks ego-depleted people and resulted in changes to self-reflection, as measured by name-letter liking and matching. Ego-depletion was problematic for men, resulting in increased favorability for their name letters and their last names, although depleted women liked their last name less. Surprisingly, letter matching was seen more often in non-depleted people, suggesting that performing more cognitive tasks (i.e., coming up with matches) while depleted may have been too difficult, but that quick reflexive responses (for self-liking) may be a better test of depletion. Student Author(s): Fernando Guerrero Nava, Senior, Chemistry, Catawba College Mentor(s): Carmony Hartwig, Catawba College Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 48 Investigating the Mechanism of Heme-activated Artemisinin Metabolites through a Lipid-Based in vitro Assay Malaria, caused by Plasmodium parasites, is a devastating disease that is compounded by the growing emergence of parasite resistance to our most effective pharmaceuticals. Among those chemotherapies currently deployed, the endoperoxide antimalarial artemisinin is highly efficacious, yet the mechanism of action remains unresolved. Our previous research efforts demonstrate that fluorescent trioxane derivatives localize to digestive-vacuole associated neutral lipid bodies of P. falciparum in vitro and application of artemisinin results in the oxidation of a fluorescent BODIPY peroxyl radical indicator probe in treated parasite populations. Recent evidence further suggests the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and its associated kinase in artemisinin activity and resistance mechanisms. To explore the theory of artemisinin-induced lipid peroxidation further we modified an in vitro assay to determine the reaction of heme-artemisinin adduct formation in the presence of a phosphatidylinositol lipid standard under acidic conditions that simulate the environment of the digestive vacuole. The resulting extracts were analyzed using TLC and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Here we report the first evidence of a novel fluorescent product resulting from the formation of heme-ART adducts in the context of a phosphatidylinositol environment; thus further supporting lipid peroxidation as a potential mechanism of ART in the parasite. Student Author(s): Crystal Gunther, Junior, Chemistry and Environmental Sustainability, Meredith College Mentor(s): Alexandra Ormond, Meredith College Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 9 Natural Sources Used as Light Harvesters in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were prepared using natural colorants obtained from food sources and the properties of the natural colorants were analyzed. Food sources used in this project were blackberries, red cabbage, plum, swiss chard (stem), blueberries, Basella alba (stem), hibiscus tea, blackberry (leaf), spinach, Basella alba (leaf), and tomatoes. The samples were analyzed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy to identify the wavelength of maximum absorption or the range where each extract efficiently absorbs light. Fluorometry was used to determine the colorantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electron stability in its excited state, and cyclic voltammetry experiments measured the electrochemical properties of each extract. The DSSCs were composed using fluorine-doped tin oxide coated glass, titanium dioxide, the extract, and an electrolyte solution to facilitate electron transport. The voltage and current

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readings of the DSSCs were measured outside under sunny conditions and their efficiencies were calculated. The extract with the greatest efficiency was determined to be hibiscus tea and the extract with the lowest efficiency was determined to be Basella alba (leaf). Student Author(s): Maria Gurski, Senior, Chemistry and Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Constance Rogers-Lowery, Catawba College Presentation: Chemistry, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) How HuR and CP1 are Affected By KRas and Stressors in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a low five year survival rate at 7%. KRas, a signaling enzyme, is mutated and in turn activated in most pancreatic cancer cases. HuR is a RNAbinding protein that is unregulated in pancreatic cancer and is pro-tumorigenic. HuR's cleaved product CP1 is antitumorigenic, playing a role in apoptosis. KRas, HuR, and CP1’s relationship are being investigated by seeing how the activity of KRas affects levels of HuR and CP1 in Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Western blots were done to compare levels of HuR and CP1 in PDAC lines with mutated or knocked down KRas. Also various stressors, typical of the tumor environment, were used to test their effect on HuR and CP1. Depleted serum and gemcitabine were used as stressors to see if HuR and CP1 are being unregulated by the stressors, by KRas, or by both. When PDACs with mutated, activated KRas were stressed by serum starvation the HuR and CP1 levels increased. When a PDAC with wild-type KRas was serum starved the levels of HuR decreased. Also when KRas was knocked down it increased CP1 levels. Student Author(s): Chelsea Gustafson, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Jonathan Berg, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 11 Analyzing Genetic Variants to be Included in Newborn Screening Many disorders detected through newborn screening (NBS) are caused by rare recessive genetic mutations. Incorporating genome sequencing into NBS could improve the detection of these disorders and provide comprehensive analyses of the conditions. The selection criteria for which genetic variants indicate a positive test result must be analyzed to provide a test with a high positive predictive value. Five variant selection algorithms (VSA) with increasing sensitivity were used to screen for variants in 23 genes known to cause 25 disorders screened for in NBS. These VSAS were applied to the exome sequences of 478 individuals who were not expected to have any of the NBS disorders. The specificity of each VSA was calculated for each gene. Overall, specificity was very high for even the most sensitive VSAs, which might be explained by the requirement for two mutations to satisfy a “positive” screen for rare recessive disorders. Future investigations will attempt to further increase the sensitivity of the VSAs while noting the effects on specificity. The sensitivity of the VSAs will also be calculated by sequencing individuals known to have certain NBS disorders. Sensitivity, specificity, and population prevalence will then be used to calculate the positive predictive value for each VSA, which will in turn be used to optimize the screening algorithms used for each gene depending on the implications of a positive test result. Student Author(s): Bethany Hagopian, Senior, Psychology, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Rosalie Kern, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 58 Music Genre Preference and Machiavellianism The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between Machiavellianism and passivity in music genre preferences. This study is based on previous research conducted by Lau and Marsee (2012), which suggests that there is a relationship between Machiavellianism and aggression. This study combines the concept of Machiavellianism with research showing correlations between music genre preference and personality trait (Rentfrow, Gosling 2003 ). The materials included a music preference scale and the MACH IV scale to test for levels of Machiavellianism. The music genre preference scale consisted of eight genres of music ranging in passivity from hip-hop/rap to classical. The Machiavellian scale consisted of twenty questions asking participants to rate how much the statement applied to them. Data Collection is ongoing, but based on previous research we anticipate the results will be significant.

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Student Author(s): Andrew Haldeman, Freshman, Molecular Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Human Nature Why do people seek stability and order in life, when our general recreation consists of actions of uncertainty? This seeming contradiction was expounded upon utilizing surveys, an on campus social experiment, a review of scholarly research, reflection on the work of developmental psychologist founding fathers, as well as studies in the newer field of Ecopsychology. Stability fulfills two fundamental human needs as identified by Maslow-physiological security and socio-emotional safety. Also evident, people need stability in their lives to recover from psycho-social trauma. Interestingly, people who are immersed in or interact attentively with nature display psychological health in comparison with those who are subdued in the urban sprawl and digital dungeon. Something that exhilarates a person is seldom conceptualized as a particularly safe endeavor. This project explored how and why people need instability. It examines chaos as essential in achieving our need for esteem and selfactualization. In chaos, particularly in outdoor settings, people can and will be challenged with the potential to grow as a result of their struggles and achievements. Student Author(s): Megan Hall, Senior, Film Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Martin Scorsese’s Director’s Message in Taxi Driver The director’s message that Martin Scorsese was trying to portray in the film was that someone could be mentally unstable but would look completely ‘normal’ to us. The same person could do a kind or heroic act like saving someone from a life they weren’t meant for such as prostitution and still be mentally unstable. The elements that prove this as the director’s message are the dialogue, the sound effects, and the music. The spoken dialogue in the film shows how dark New York was at the time of the film. The dialogue in the film shows in the beginning how Travis talks about what kind of ‘scum’ that comes out at night and the kind of feelings he has toward them as well as how they need to be cleaned out of the streets. His dialogue and feelings change near the middle or so into the film when he buys some guns illegally Student Author(s): Nicholas Hall, Junior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brett Taubman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 24 Radiative Forcing of Aerosols in Boone North Carolina Aerosols are solid or liquid particles suspended in the earth’s atmosphere. Aerosols modify regional solar radiation budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight and through their role as seeds for cloud droplets. It is hypothesized that aerosols produced by pollution sources and tree emissions may have contributed to lack of warming in the southeastern U.S. during the past century. The objective of this study was to apply continuous aerosol measurements made over multiple years at the NOAA and NASA aerosol monitoring sites at Appalachian State University to quantify the seasonal dependence of aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), Aerosol radiative forcing is a measure of the capacity of aerosols to affect the energy balance in our atmosphere. We applied the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer code (SBDART) to calculate DRF, using the aerosol measurements collected from the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) site. The results of this study showed that the forcing effects of aerosols are seasonally dependent for Boone NC, with the measurements producing a more negative forcing value (eg. a larger cooling effect) for the summer months and a less negative forcing value (eg less cooling effect) for the winter months.

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Student Author(s): Anika Hannan, Senior, Global Studies and Public Policy, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Kavita Ongechi, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Public Health, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Association Between Women Empowerment and Child Nutrition in Bangladesh As the United Nations transition from the Millennium Development Goals to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), ending hunger and improving nutrition remains a top priority for international development. Despite this priority, child malnutrition in Bangladesh remains one of the highest in the world. Evidence suggests that the low social status of women in South Asia contributes to this rate. This research examines the association between women empowerment and child nutrition in Bangladesh, using data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Women empowerment factors include mobility, decision-making power, views on violence, and membership in microcredit or social organizations. Child malnutrition was measured using the following outcomes: stunting, wasting, and underweight. Based on bivariate results using logistic regression, views on violence and organization membership were statistically significant with malnutrition outcomes. However, when the controls of wealth status and parental education were added to the model, the relationship was no longer significant. These results suggest that wealth and education have a stronger effect on childhood malnutrition than women empowerment, and independently affect both child malnutrition and empowerment status. In order to create and improve existing policies focused on achieving the second SDG of ending hunger and improving nutrition, further research is necessary to better understand the relationship between wealth, education, empowerment, and child malnutrition. Student Author(s): Corrie Hansen, Senior, Nursing, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Kim Larson, East Carolina University Presentation: Public Health, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 5 An Evaluation of Water Filters in Rural Guatemala Two million deaths occur annually due to diarrheal diseases related to contaminated water in Guatemala. There is evidence that table-top water filtration systems are sustainable for developing countries. Since 2008, the ECU College of Nursing has partnered with a Guatemalan community organization on health topics. In 2014, an interdisciplinary team distributed table-top water filters to 71 families in a remote Mayan village. One year later, the team conducted in-home surveys with these families. The majority of families (71.4%) were using the water filters. Water filters were used daily for cooking and drinking. Sixteen families (28.6%) had broken water filters. Of the families with working water filters, 15% reported diarrhea, while 31% of families not using a water filter reported diarrhea. Only 55.4% of the families had concrete floors. More families with dirt floors reported diarrhea. The water filters were fragile; some homes did not have stable surfaces for placement. Evaluation of the outreach clinic in this village noted a decrease in intestinal infections from 2014 (53%) to 2015 (32%). Findings suggest water filter usage may contribute to a reduction in intestinal infections. Housing conditions should be taken into consideration for future disease prevention initiatives. Student Author(s): Taylor Harbold, Senior, Statistics, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Michelle Page, Senior, Statistics, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Courtney Rasmussen, Senior, Statistics, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Cuixian Chen, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Statistics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Zip Codes and Neural Networks: Machine Learning for Handwritten Number Recognition Neural Network is an idea taken from artificial intelligence that utilizes an oversimplification of the synapse processes that occur in the brain. By mimicking these processes, we create a simpler method for solving complex problems. We applied these techniques to predict the true value of hand-written digits from zip code data using prediction models generated in MATLAB and the RSNNS package in the program R-Studio.

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Student Author(s): Amelia Hardee, Senior, Industrial and Systems Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Rohan Shirwaiker, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Industrial & Systems, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 54 Evaluating silver-titanium orthopedic implants activated by low intensity direct current for infection control (Co-author: Zhuo (George) Tan) The number of orthopedic surgeries performed every year is increasing, which has led to the rise of incidences of surgical site infections (SSI). The cost associated with SSIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is alarming and one way to address this is to reduce the probability of acquiring an infection during surgery. Through the gradual release of ions, low intensity direct current (LIDC) activation of silver, has proven to inhibit bacteria growth. During this research, four prototype devices (silver with LIDC, silver without LIDC, titanium with LIDC and titanium without LIDC) were evaluated using a rat model. Using computer aided design (CAD), 3-D models were constructed for a battery housing and mold to encapsulate the batteries in a medical grade epoxy. These were then 3D-printed using fused deposition modeling (FDM), which creates the object layer by layer using a plastic filament. The devices were assembled and implanted into 48 rats. 14 days post-surgery the rats were euthanized and cultures were taken. The results illustrate antibacterial properties of silver-LIDC medical implants. Student Author(s): George Harper, Senior, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Robert Kelly, North Carolina State University Jonathan Conway, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 9 Biomass Degradation by Multi-domain Catalytic Surface-Layer Proteins in the Extremely Thermophilic Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis Caldicellulosiruptor species are anaerobic thermophillic bacteria isolated from globally distributed terrestrial hot springs that produce a large inventory of multi-domain plant biomass degrading enzymes. A subset of the Caldicellulosiruptor multi-domain enzymes has both catalytic glycoside hydrolase (GH) domains and surface layer homology (SLH) domains, which attach these enzymes to the surface of the cell. We hypothesize that the localization of these enzymes at the interface between the cell and substrate improves the efficiency of biomass degradation. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy was performed on C. kronotskyensis using antibodies raised against portions of two SLH GH enzymes, laminarinase Calkro_0111 and xylanase Calkro_0402, and confirmed cell surface localization. To understand the biochemical function of these enzymes, two truncations of Calkro_0111 around each of the two catalytic domains (GH16 and GH55) were produced recombinantly in E. coli. The optimal temperature of 75°C and optimal pH of 5 for both of these enzyme truncations were determined on laminarin. HPLC analysis of the oligosaccharides released by these enzymes showed that GH16 is an endoglucanase, while GH55 is an exo-glucanase. Understanding these large, multi-domain cell surface localized enzymes will help to optimize enzymes and engineered strains for industrial biofuel processes. Student Author(s): Austin Harrell, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brett Taubman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 26 Measuring The Energy of Fermentation The goal of this research is to measure the energy of a typical beer fermentation using calorimetry. The temperature of the fermentation vessel will be measured against a reference vessel (water). The fermentation vessel will be kept at a specific temperature using a Peltier cooler. The reference vessel will be kept at this same temperature using a submersible heater. The amount of electrical power used to maintain this reference vessel temperature will be used to find an energy value for the fermentation. The estimated energy production of the fermentation is 1.12 J/h. 4 If the amount of energy produced by fermentation is known, more efficient temperature regulation methods can be created. Better temperature control maximizes the efficiency of the brewing yeast and the production of desired secondary metabolites, which allows for more control over flavor. By monitoring the temperature of a beer fermentation, the endpoint a fermentation will be more precisely known, which increases the efficiency of the entire process by saving electrical energy and time.

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Student Author(s): Kayla Harris, Senior, Biology and Agriculture Education, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Salam A. Ibrahim, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 21 Viability of Probiotic Cultures in Greek Yogurt During Refrigerated Storage The objective of the study was to determine the viability of probiotic cultures in Greek yogurt during refrigerated storage. A total of 16 yogurt samples (8 Greek and 8 regular) of the same brand were obtained from a local store in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA. These products were kept at 4°C for 4 weeks and analyzed for viability of probiotic every week. Ten grams of each sample were mixed with 90ml of sterile peptone water. Appropriate dilutions were plated on MRS agar, M 17 agar and modified BIM 25 for the enumeration of Lactobacillus, streptococcus, and bifidobacteria respectively. Our results showed that the initial populations of yogurt and probiotic cultures were approximately 6.5 log CFU/g in both Greek and regular yogurt samples. During refrigeration period, the population of yogurt culture remained within the same range in all tested products. However the populations of bifidobacteria cultures were maintained in Greek yogurt whereas the population in regular yogurt the population decreased significantly (P <0.05) by 2 log CFU/g during refrigerated storage. Our study revealed an optimal beneficial consumption of Greek yogurt should provide higher bifodobacteria cultures compared to regular yogurt products and recommended as healthy options for probiotics in our diet. Student Author(s): Brian Hart, Senior, Politics and International Affairs, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Qiong Zhang, Wake Forest University Presentation: Political Science, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 55 China Dream Propaganda Art: Creating the Cult of Xi Jinping Since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has used publicly displayed propaganda art as a means of maintaining power. During the early years of the PRC, propaganda posters played a large role in establishing a cult of personality around Mao Zedong. In addition to posters similar to those of earlier periods, today’s propaganda art competes in a media-saturated world by using new mediums such as television, newspapers, and the Internet. Today’s propaganda art exists almost exclusively as part of President Xi Jinping’s “China Dream” campaign. The China Dream, which Xi made popular n 2013, is a nebulous concept that shares many of the materialistic components of the “American Dream,” but more importantly emphasizes the return of China as a wealthy and powerful nation. China Dream art deviates significantly from Maoist Era posters by heavily incorporating ancient Confucian concepts and images. The art focuses not on communist values, but on moralistic ones drawn from the teachings of Confucius. I argue that China Dream art is being used not only to create a new source of legitimacy for the Communist Party, but also to establish a cult of personality around President Xi Jinping. Student Author(s): Hallie Hartley, Senior, Environmental Technology and Management, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Elizabeth Nichols, North Carolina State University Presentation: Public Health, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 41 Can Designer and Illicit Drugs Determine the Source of Effluent Discharge at NC State Gym? Numerous designer and illicit drugs have been found in an effluent entering Rocky Branch Creek. A specific pipe entering the stream from NC State’s Gymnasium has been sampled to determine if concentrations were consistent in the pool and pipe effluents. Due to the fact that the pipe introduces effluents from the gymnasium’s pool, and possibly laundry, human excretions are prevalent in the sampling and give an indication of the presence of many hallucinogens, stimulants, psychedelics, and other illicit drugs. Using data gathered from the USEPA we gained an accurate representation of each of the types of drugs currently circulating through Rocky Branch Creek and from the pool and pipe, and we determined whether or not these three contributors are linked or if the water is being contaminated from an outlying source. Non-targeted analysis is performed using an Agilent 1100 HPLC separation system coupled with an Agilent 6210 time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. This system uses proprietary software to identify chemicals based on specified molecular features (peak height, area count, etc.) that are extracted for comparisons to databases. Possible chemical formulas for an individual chemical are ranked according to the difference between calculated and measured mass, isotopic abundance, and isotope spacing to determine the

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most likely match (McMahen et al., 2015). These systems will allow us to see both negative and positive mode detections of illicit and designer drugs. Student Author(s): Theodore Hartsook, Senior, Environmental Science, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Reed Perkins, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Trailheads as Vectors of Invasive Plant Species in Charlotte, NC Invasive plant species can negatively impact an ecosystem by disrupting habitats, replacing native plants, and causing lasting changes in biodiversity. This is a study on the impacts of formal and informal trailheads as vectors for invasive plant species in Charlotte, North Carolina and the surrounding area. Trailheads were ranked on an ordinal scale based on surface, width, and adjacent area to categorize the data. Invasive species were surveyed based on stem counts and ground cover estimates of the surrounding area. The species surveyed were: Ailanthus altissima, Ligustrum sinense, Ligustrum japonicum, Celastrus orbiculatus, Hedera helix, Lonicera japonica, Pueraria montana, Lolium arundinaceum, Microstegium vimineum. Ground cover estimates were determined by randomly selecting three one square foot areas and sampling above ground biomass after drying. Surveys were conducted for eight invasive species at four different trails. Preliminary results will be presented. Student Author(s): Sarah Harvey, Senior, Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rachel Smith, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 54 Analyzing CO Isotopologues Toward Young Stellar Binaries and Isolated YSOs using High-Resolution Spectroscopy Young stellar objects (YSOs) observed with high-resolution spectroscopy are windows into protoplanetary disk evolution, helping us better understand detailed chemical pathways in planet formation, including phenomena in the early solar system. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a valuable reservoir from which C and O isotopic analyses can be achieved when high spectral resolution is utilized. These analyses help us better understand protoplanetary chemistry, with relevant connections to meteoritic material. Reduced fundamental (Ď&#x2026; = 1â&#x2C6;&#x2019;0) rovibrational near-IR spectra of twenty-five YSOs were retrieved from the Cryogenic Infrared Echelle Spectrograph (CRIRES) archive (Pontoppidan et al. 2011). These data were taken at very high resolution (R~ 95,000) and were reduced using a customized IDL pipeline. Six binaries and 19 isolated (single) YSOs were compared for the presence of CO isotopologues (12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O, 12C17O). Thus far, some binaries showed a similar distribution of CO lines, while others varied in the amount of extinction in the same pair, and 12C17O lines were found in only one target, HH 100. This ongoing project involves calculating precise abundances of the optically thin isotopologues ( 13C16O, 12 18 C O, 12C17O) and evaluating variation across the sample, with attempts to determine any significant differences between binaries and single YSO systems. Student Author(s): Monica Hassett, Freshman, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Writing), Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Watauga Residential College: The Successful Alternate General Education Program This presentation examines the organizational and curricular development of a successful first-year experience in the Watauga Residential College program at Appalachian State University. Watauga Residential College is an alternative general education program that allows students to fulfill half their general education requirements through a selection of inquiry-based courses in a living and learning community. Historical background information on the changes in American higher education that took place during the 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is used to provide a context for some of the main reasons Watauga Residential College was started in 1972. Interviews of past and current Watauga faculty, as well as published essays, dissertations and meeting notes are used to explore this research topic. The dedication faculty members have to this program, both academically and socially, helps foster skills that are necessary for first-year students to succeed throughout the rest of their undergraduate studies.

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Student Author(s): Jessica Hatcher, Senior, English, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Jeffrey Reaser, North Carolina State University Jeanne Bissonnette, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Regional Differences in Pre-Service Teachers' Discussions of Dialect Studies suggest sociolinguistic knowledge generally remains underrepresented in teacher education programs. However, a recent study found that some pre-service teachers (PSTs) may be better informed than previous generations, suggesting it is important to reassess PSTs’ linguistic knowledge and examine how demographic factors influence sociolinguistic knowledge. The data draw from a four-week, online “mini-course” on language variation designed to better equip PSTs with the sociolinguistic perspectives and critical language pedagogies needed to be effective literacy instructors for diverse learners. This research examines data from two Southern universities and one non-Southern university to assess how regionality affects PSTs’ knowledge and development of sociolinguistic perspectives on linguistic diversity. Student discussions were analyzed using Haviland’s (2008) taxonomy of discourse strategies for maintaining white power and being evasive in recognizing whiteness as powerful. Posts were further coded for the presence of implicit and explicit commentary on how regional identity shapes the ways PSTs discuss social and regional dialects. Southern PSTs employ fewer “white talk” discourse strategies than their non-Southern peers. Additionally, Southern PSTs tend to explicitly address both regional and diverse social dialects while non-Southern PSTs focus almost exclusively on African American English. These differences may be attributed to the demographic makeup of each region. Student Author(s): Gabrielle Hayes, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Synergy Between Manuka Honey and Linezolid Against Staphylococcus aureus Antibiotic resistance has become a major public health crisis, with the rise in cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other resistant bacterial infections. There are over 11 thousand deaths caused by MRSA infections annually. With the increase in these difficult to treat illnesses, efforts to combat antibiotic resistance have become a major focus of microbiology research. However, due to the low economic return on investment and time consuming mature of creating new antibiotics, pharmaceutical companies have curbed antibiotic investigations in recent years. As a possible solution to the increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, approved pharmaceuticals and natural compounds have been investigated in conjunction with current antibiotics in an attempt to identify synergistic interactions. One natural product with synergistic potential is Manuka honey. Manuka honey has been demonstrated to possess antibacterial properties and is marketed as a treatment for wounds and other infections. Our initial screen on plates containing 5% Manuka honey revealed synergistic effects on the growth of S. aureus with antibiotic discs including tetracycline, linezolid, and minocycline. Pursuing the synergy between Manuka honey and linezolid, we have conducted experiments using an antibacterial component of Manuka honey called methyl glyoxal (MGO). Purified MGO exhibits synergistic activity equivalent to that of Manuka honey. This synergistic relationship could impact the treatment of drug resistant infections by incorporating MGO into existing drugs or treatment plans. Student Author(s): Michael Helms, Senior, History, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Ross Bassett, North Carolina State University Presentation: History, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Role of Firearms in America's Technological Revolution America’s 19th century technological revolution gave birth to modern mass-production methodologies and the rise of large corporations. The role of firearms in the history of American business and technological development has been touched on by notables like Alfred Chandler Jr. and David Hounshell, but their examinations of the gun industry focused mostly on the rise of federal armories and Colt’s early ventures, and not the rich tradition of private manufacturing that radically transformed the American firearms industry in the 1850’s and 1860’s. My research looks at the rise of the American gun industry from 1850 to 1870 with a particularly strong focus on the technological advances in the development of a reliable repeater, of cartridge ammunition and of the production technologies used to manufacture these increasingly complex guns. I also focus closely on the patents and intellectual property lawsuits that followed many of these advances; challenges that rose, in one instance, to a veto by President Grant. My oral

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presentation will focus on the highlights of this remarkable 20 years, including the rise of Smith & Wesson’s manufacturing empire and the direct challenge that this presented to the democratization of innovation; a democratization that patent laws were intended to foster. Student Author(s): Meredith Hemphill, Sophomore, Plant Biology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Candace Haigler, North Carolina State University Jonathan Davis, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Botany, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 60 Mapping the membrane topology of cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins in live cells Cellulose is synthesized by complexes that contain cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins. CESAs are trafficked through the Golgi but active at the plasma membrane, where they synthesize cellulose from UDP-glucose and extrude the polymer through a pore formed by their transmembrane helices (TMHs). Crystallographic studies of BcsA cellulose synthase in Rhodobacter spheroides revealed a motif that functions in substrate gating. This motif is conserved among plant CESAs, yet topology predictions place it in the apoplast. If the function is conserved, this region should face the cytosol. We are probing the topology of a CESA from Physcomitrella patens, PpCESA5, transiently expressed in tobacco leaves. PpCESA5 is fused to a short region of self-assembling GFP and co-expressed with the complementary portion of saGFP targeted to either the cytosol or Golgi lumen. Fluorescence indicates that both fragments of saGFP are in the same cellular compartment. PpCESA5 tagged with saGFP on the amino- or carboxyl-terminus indicates the orientation of the termini, and serial truncations after each TMH map the intervening topology. Preliminary results show that the carboxyl-terminus of PpCESA5 faces the Golgi lumen/apoplast. This indicates that there are an odd number of TMHs in PpCESA5. These data are consistent with a BcsA-like topology for PpCESA5. Student Author(s): Cory Henderson, Junior, Anthropology and Biology University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Robert Anemone, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Anthropology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45) The Application of 3-D Imaging as an Instructional Tool This research concerns the use of virtual three-dimensional modeling as an instructional tool that allows students to create, analyze, and measure computer models of a wide variety of anthropological artifacts including bones, fossils, lithics, and pottery. We create virtual models of real artifacts using a variety of 3D imaging tools including CT scanners, laser surface scanners, and photogrammetry: 3D printers then allow us to create physical models of these objects for hands-on use in the instructional lab. We demonstrate every step of this process, from anthropological artifact to virtual and printed model, in order to demonstrate the power of three dimensional modeling as a pedagogical tool in anthropology. Student Author(s): Sydney Hendricks, Junior, Public Health Studies, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Essie Torres, East Carolina University Presentation: Health and Physical Education, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 55 Assessing Eastern North Carolina Latino Community’s Readiness for Health Prevention through the Community Readiness Model North Carolina has one of the fastest growing Latino populations in the nation. These “new-growth” communities have a limited infrastructure for a language specific health care system, specifically in Eastern North Carolina (ENC) due to migrant status, which increases limitations on access to care, adequate housing, and sanitation resources. The purpose of this project is to increase the Latino community’s awareness and community-relevant health-promoting interventions. A community readiness assessment was conducted in collaboration with the Association of Mexicans in North Carolina (AMEXCAN). Interviews were conducted in two phases, phase 1 was conducted with 7 service providers and community leaders. Phase 2 was conducted with 25 members of Latino Communities from ENC. Data was collected 2014-2015 using various methods, face-to-face interviews, on-line and paper survey. The community was found to be at stage three, “Vague Awareness.” The community members realize the problems accessing health care but feel no immediate urge to address it. Some common themes from the data of phase 2 show that there is a lack of health workers, insurance, and translation resources. Outcomes for this study include an improved infrastructure for providing preventive health services via process improvement strategies that will reduce the barriers within the population.

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Student Author(s): Joseph Henry, Junior, Biology and Chemistry, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Xiaoping Pan, East Carolina University Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Impacts of Two Synthesized Indenopyridine Compounds on Spermatogenesis and Gene Expression In an effort to generate male contraceptive drugs, two synthesized indenopyridine compounds from RTI institute were used to test their spermatocidal effects in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The four specific aims were, to test the spermatocidal effects by measuring the brood size in exposed hermaphrodites; to compare the potency of the two drug candidates; to perform mating assay to confirm the spermatocidal effects; and to perform gene expression analysis to test the impacts on sperm-related genes. N2 hermaphrodite C. elegans were dosed at L4 larvae stage with 60 µM of drug 1 and drug 2 for 48 hours and then placed in a drug-free plate. For the next 5 days each day the parent worm was transferred to a clean plate and the eggs and hatched larvae were recorded. Results showed that both drugs inhibited reproduction and brood size. The C. elegans Him-5 (male) strain were also exposed and underwent histological examination. We found that drug 1 is more potent then drug 2 in reducing brood size and producing spermatid deformities. The mating assay between female and male CB4108 strains confirmed that both drugs inhibits brood size by causing spermatogenesis defects and drug 1 was more potent than drug 2. The expression of eleven spermatogenesis-related gene cnb-1, elt-1, fer-1, spe-5, spe-8, spe-10, spe-11, spe-12, spe-17, spe-27, and gmeb-4 were tested. We found that all tested genes, except spe-5, were down regulated, and spe-5 was upregulated. This provides insights on how the two tested drug affect spermatogenesis at a molecular level. Student Author(s): Nicole Hernandez, Senior, Kinesiology, Campbell University Madison Sanderford, Senior, Kinesiology, Campbell University Mentor(s): Douglas Powell, Campbell University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 7 Compared Analysis of Muscle Activation During Piston Resistance Training and Free-Weight Training Purpose: To compare muscle activation during exercise using a nitrogen-piston resistance home gym (Nitroforce) to free weights. Methods: Thirty recreational athletes performed five repetitions of squats and toe raises using the Nitroforce and free weights at 70% of their one-rep max. Muscle activation was recorded by surface EMG electrodes at the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral gastrocnemius, and medial gastrocnemius. Results: During the squat condition, a significant difference between the Nitroforce and free weight muscle activation in the vastus medialis was recorded at p= 0.039, but no significant difference in the vastus lateralis at p= 0.367. A high correlation was found with both vastus medialis and lateralis between free weight and Nitroforce conditions at p<0.001. There was no significant difference recorded between the Nitroforce and free weight mean muscle activation for the toe raise in the lateral or medial gastrocnemius at p= 0.400 and p= 0.442, respectively. A low correlation was found with both the medial and lateral gastrocnemius between Nitroforce and free weight conditions during the toe raise at p= 0.281 and p= 0.075, respectively. Discussion: Both resistance training methods yield similar neuromuscular benefits. Further studies are needed to test upper body muscle groups, and to assess the Nitroorce equipment for space use. Student Author(s): Michael Heslink, Senior, English Literature, High Point University Mentor(s): Matthew Carlson, High Point University Presentation: English (Literature), Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Third Turn of the Screw In an essay on Alfred Hitchcock and Henry James, Donatella Izzo interprets Hitchcock’s film Blackmail as an indirect adaptation of James’s novel The Wings of the Dove. Izzo describes this move as “unwarranted” since there is no evidence to suggest a relationship between the two works, but states that the parallels arose out of her paranoid interpretation of each, making Hitchcock’s film a “hallucinatory” adaptation of the novel. Like Izzo, I intend to go beyond traditional notions of adaptation and argue that Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 film The Shining is a hallucinatory adaptation of James’s classic ghost novella The Turn of the Screw. Although there is no evidence to suggest that Kubrick was drawing directly from James’s novella, my analysis reveals similar tropes and plot devices both artists used to create pieces of psychological terror involving the relationship between a caretaker and his or her subjects. Through the use of mirrors, doubles, and suggested subplots, these works call the motives and

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sanity of their characters into question. This paper ultimately concludes that Kubrick and James employ these elements to inspire the kind of “paranoid interpretation” that Izzo writes about. Student Author(s): Marah Hild-Ladebauche, Senior, Mathematics, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Fred DeAngelis, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Mathematics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Labs in Physics Education Labs are an integral part of a science student's standard education, but what are the benefits of participating in a lab? I believe that science students and teachers can both potentially benefit from the labs. My study examines the assumption that after completing the lab, students should be able to reflect on their experience to better understand the content. I am using the beginning level physics classes at my university. I completed a trial study for one class in the spring of 2015 that indicated the lab does improve student understanding as measured by a set of questions presented before and after the lab.. Also, there was a correlation between student performance on graphing in the lab and overall performance on the related test. This semester, I am pursing these findings with two additional classes studying the same lab as the previous semester to look for potential growth among students. I added a component to examine students’ mastery of graphing to see if it is possible to predict their energy lab outcome based on their graphing ability throughout the semester. Student Author(s): Daphne Hill, Junior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Blair Wisco, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 11 Negativity of Intrusions for Dysphoric Individuals Cognitive theories state dysphoric individuals interpret ambiguous situations negatively. But, when remembering those situations, do they recall them as ambiguous or negative (i.e., have negative intrusions)? Additionally, rumination, or thinking repetitively about one’s distress, leads to negative memories among dysphoric individuals. In this study we examined dysphoric negative intrusions when remembering ambiguous scenarios. We recruited 99 subjects who were dysphoric or non-dysphoric based on the Beck Depression Inventory. First, participants completed an Interpretation Bias Questionnaire (IBQ) where participants answered why an ambiguous situation occurred (e.g. your parents have called you twice and ask you to call back ASAP. Why?). Participants were randomly assigned to then ruminate or distract. Then, participants were asked to recall the situations from the IBQ and their responses were coded for negative, positive, or neutral intrusions, phrases not in the original description of the situation. We predicted that dysphoric individuals who ruminated would have the most negative intrusions. The results concluded that dysphoric individuals who ruminated did not significantly differ from the other three groups, F(3, 99)=1.96, p=.13. These results may be explained because the situations in this study were less relevant to participants’ lives. Rumination may have larger effects on memory of personal experiences. Student Author(s): Heather Hill, Senior, Microbiology, North Carolina State University Alisha Palekar, Sophomore, Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): John Godwin, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 23 Social Hierarchy Among Selectively Bred Zebrafish This research focuses on characterizing aggression across two lines of zebrafish selectively bred to exhibit differences in stress coping. The proactive line zebrafish exhibit active movement in a novel environment while the reactive line zebrafish instead exhibit freezing more. We hypothesized that in size matched pairs, proactive line males would be more aggressive and dominant. Sets of two zebrafish were placed into a nine liter tanks for five days and observed. The proactive line fish became aggressively dominant to the reactive fish (14 out of 14 trials, p-value = 0.0002), and showed tenfold higher chasing behavior (p-value = 0.0021). During testing, the proactive line fish increased chasing more than the reactive line (p-value = 0.0007). Further testing with pairs from the same zebrafish lines (n=8 of each pairing, 16 total) showed that strong dominance relationships developed in both proactive-proactive and reactive-reactive pairs (p-value = 0.0015). Dominant proactive male pair members were not more aggressive than dominant reaction male pair. Interestingly, subordinates of the proactive line were more aggressive than the subordinates of the reactive line (p-value=0.007). This study shows that dominant-subordinate relationships are established in male zebrafish and that aggressive behavior is predicted by stress coping style.

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Student Author(s): Seren Homer, Junior, Environmental Studies and Biology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Bronwyn Tucker, Guilford College Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 21 Guilford College Sustainable Food Systems Program: Guilford Farm The Greensboro/High Point area was listed number one for food hardship in the nation, according to FRAC’s April report (How Hungry is America?). In response to this report, a committee of 4 faculty and 3 students formed to create a Sustainable Food Systems (SFS) major proposal at Guilford College. The committee was further split into three subcommittees to address: (1) the proposed curriculum for the SFS major, (2) the utilization of the Guilford farm as a unique teaching and outreach resource through the program, and (3) how the SFS major could facilitate Guilford College’s involvement in food hardship concerns in the Greensboro/High Point area. This presentation focuses on how the Guilford farm could be used as a teaching and outreach resource through the program. A report was created composed of potential experiential courses, pre-college experiences, and certificate programs utilizing the farm, and potential future infrastructure improvements for the farm itself. Trials of several of these courses and infrastructure changes have been run with encouraging results. With the approval of the major at Guilford College, more of these changes may be implemented so Guilford College can be a unique and engaging institution for sustainable food systems education. Student Author(s): Christina Honeycutt, Junior, Special Education, High Point University Mentor(s): Sarah Vess, High Point University Presentation: Special Education, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 18 How Do Commonly Measured Reading Related Constructs Correlate in a Sample of Struggling Readers? Approximately 40 percent of students in the United States are considered non-fluent readers (Begeny, 2009). This research examines three factors of reading fluency- phonemic awareness, phonics knowledge and working memory- and their relationship with reading fluency and other factors. A tier 3 reading intervention was given to 18 students who were intervention resistant to tier 2 reading interventions, in hopes that Helping Early Literacy with Practice Strategies (HELPS; Begeny, 2009; 2013) would help them to increase their fluency scores. For the purposes of this research, participants’ scores on the Gray Oral Reading Test, Fifth edition Fluency test (Wiederholt & Bryant 2012), Woodcock Johnson Word Attack Phonics test (WJ-III ACH; Woodcock, McGrew,& Mather, 2001,2007), Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing test (Wagner, Torgesen & Rashotte 1999), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition Digit Span subtest (Wechsler, 2003), and DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency curriculum- based measures (Good & Kaminski) were analyzed. No statistically significant correlations were found between the reading constructs. Interestingly, an inverse correlation was demonstrated between the participants’ GORT Fluency score and the WISC-IV Digit Span score leading to questions from the researcher about the relationship between working memory and reading fluency. Student Author(s): Julia Horiates, Junior, Biology and English, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Christopher Balakrishnan, East Carolina University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 46 Conservation Genetics of the Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis The brook trout species of eastern Pennsylvania, Salvenlinus fontinalis, are of special interest as their numbers have declined dramatically due to a variety of environmental stressors such as mining, logging, water withdrawal, and acid deposition. Genetic analyses of these fish are required to help determine patterns of genetic diversity and to infer patterns of population connectivity. Microsatellites are repetitive structures within the genome, thus are highly susceptible to mutation and suitable for analyzing patterns of regional population variation. We are in the process of genotyping brook trout for a panel of eight microsatellite loci. We sampled 16 Salvenlinus fontinalis individuals from each of four streams (total of 64 individuals) of eastern Pennsylvania by fin clip. We then extracted DNA, amplified loci via PCR and estimated allele sizes using Geneious 6.0 software. We then converted allele sizes to repeat numbers based on the structure of the loci in question. To date we have analyzed five tri-and tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA markers to investigate allelic diversity of the Eastern Brook Trout (Salvenlinus fontinalis). One we have amplified the panel of 8 loci, population genetic analyses using Arlequin software will be used to test for genetic divergence between populations from different watersheds.

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Student Author(s): Brianna Horton, Senior, English, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Margaret Bauer, East Carolina University Presentation: English, Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) East Carolina University Under the direction of a faculty mentor at East Carolina University I have helped to create an award winning publication of art. My creative work poses to answer the question: How and Why are North Carolina writers and works pertaining to or focused in North Carolina important to the literary world? By publishing poetry, fiction and nonfiction, interviews with North Carolina writers, articles and essays about North Carolina writers, literature, and literary history and culture this work helps to answer the question. The work is published at East Carolina University by undergraduate interns and graduate assistants under the guidance of a faculty member. Methods used to explore this question are as follows: library research, archival research, editing and proofreading, usage of MLA style, professional writing, business correspondence techniques, marketing and publicity, publishing, and grant writing. An advanced knowledge of computer technology was needed to complete this research work including Dreamweaver, Website Development, Indesign, Filemaker, as well as Excel and Word for Macintosh. Once created, the work sits as an award winning publication that serves the literary community as a cross between a scholarly journal and a literary magazine. Student Author(s): Josiah Howard, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 41 Finding Synergistic Interactions between Tacrine and Antibiotics Antibiotic resistance has been identified in bacteria across the world and has become a problem in the global medical field. Synthesizing new antibiotic drugs requires a great deal of money, time, and plenty of luck. Synergy is the interaction between two different compounds that together produce a greater effect than either compound would produce singly. We designed a screen that identifies synergistic interactions between antibiotics and tacrine. Tacrine, is a previously prescribed Alzheimer’s medication that has been described by previous studies to inhibit topoisomerases and damage mitochondria, which make it an interesting candidate for a synergistic relationship with antibiotics. A sublethal concentration of tacrine was added to media where E. coli (a common gramnegative bacterium) and S. aureus (a common gram-positive bacterium) were grown with the presence of antibiotics. The antibiotic zone of inhibition was measured to determine if there was a synergistic relationship. Possible synergistic interactions with tacrine from our initial screen include, ciprofloxacin, oxacillin, and sulfamethazole/trimethoprim. Student Author(s): Victoria Howerton, Sophomore, Business, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) Eco-Feminism in Art and Social Issues Different ancient cultures were once founded on a peaceful coexistence with nature that promoted women and their role in the community. It was believed that everyone and everything was connected through their creation by a higher being who was perceived as a female. However, patriarchal civilizations began to arise, and progress became more important than preservation of nature. This became a male attitude of domination, which undermined women’s importance, and thus lead to the oppression of both women and nature. Contemporary eco-feminists, such as Ana Mendieta and Helene Aylon, seek to connect with themselves and nature, redefining the relationship between the human and nonhuman. This series of photographs will explore the idea of the connection between femininity and nature, and how both have been exploited by male-based societies. The relationship between women and nature is portrayed through this medium in a style inspired by the works of well-known eco-feminist artists of the 1980’s and 90’s. Humans were once able to live with nature, and in order to improve the environmental and social situations, society needs to relearn how to live on this earth without destroying it and the people on it.

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Student Author(s): Clare Howerton, Senior, Nursing, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Kim Larson, East Carolina University Presentation: Undecided, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Understanding the Community Facilitator Role in the ¡Cuídate! Pilot Project North Carolina is a region of the country in need of sexual risk reduction (SRR) programs for Latino adolescents. In 2013, ¡Cuídate!, an evidence-based SRR program, was tested with Mexican and Central American youth in eastern NC. The program was implemented in the school-based health Center of a middle school and a high school. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to understand the role of the community facilitator in delivering Cuidate!. Interviews were conducted with three community facilitators, two years postprogram intervention. Content analysis was used and a consensus was reached among three research team members. We identified four areas for future program implementation. The first, program sustainability, indicated the important role of the school and staff, and the cultural relevance of the program. The second, program improvements, included bringing in parents and community partners, more time for specific activities, follow-up with students, and on-going facilitator mentoring. The third, training activities, included training in classroom management, cultural knowledge, and adolescent development. The fourth area, facilitator qualifications, included creating a non-judgmental atmosphere through familiarity and trust, and comfort with sexual health and culture. Results emphasize the importance of the role of the facilitator in successful program implementation. Student Author(s): Sydney Huff, Sophomore, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Good Life Across the Ages The secret to living the good life lies in age. According to the U-bend, happiness rises and falls depending on your age. If we follow this theory, it means that the age in which you are the happiest is when you are under thirty or above fifty. Age does affect if an individual can live the good life, as well as how the individual changes their view of the good life as they grow older. The first age range of under thirty and the last age range of over fifty-one seem to be the most susceptible to being able to live their versions of the good life. The middle age range of thirty to fifty however seem to struggle and most times they do not seem to be living their good life, instead trying to just not live a bad life. Student Author(s): Jasmine Hughes, Senior, Biology and Chemistry, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Elizabeth Ables, East Carolina University Presentation: Biomedical Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 26 The Effects of Overexpression and Knock-Down of SH3PX1 on Escort Cells Sorting Nexin-9 (SH3PX1 in Drosophila) is a protein that is involved with actin formation and the process of endocytosis. In Drosophila Schneider 2 cells, targeted knock-down(KD) of SH3PX1 resulted in the formation of protrusions around the cell. It is unclear whether SH3PX1 plays similar roles in filopodia formation in vivo. Follicle formation in Drosophila ovaries requires the activity of escort cells: triangular cells with long thin filopodia that wrap new germ cells and assist in their encapsulation by somatic follicle cells. Preliminary studies in my lab demonstrated that SH3PX1 mutants have increased escort cell number and follicle encapsulation defects. The purpose of this research is to determine the effects that KD of SH3PX1 will have on escort cells. My hypothesis is that the KD of SH3PX1 will cause escort cells to have similar morphology changes that where seen in the preliminary results from KD of SH3PX1 in S2 cells. In order to test this hypothesis, I will conduct fly husbandry to create fly lines that have KD of SH3PX1 and determine if the KD of SH3PX1 results in increased number of escort cells or altered morphology. These studies can provide understanding of the biological role of membrane curvature.

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Student Author(s): Emma Hughes, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Cecile, Appalachian State University Presentation: Pharmacy, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 53 High-throughput Drug Organic Anion Transporters in Caenorhabditis elegans Potential drug-drug complications are assessed with new pharmaceuticals as they can account for up to 20% of hospital admissions. This research employs a non-mammalian model, the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), to examine drug transport by organic anion transporters (OATs). The C. elegans OAT shares approximately 25% sequence homology to human OAT isoform 1 and transports negatively charged substrates similar to human OATs. The known OAT substrate fluorescein is utilized in this high throughput fluorescence based assay. In the presence of fluorescein, steady-state conditions show accumulation of fluorescein into the C. elegans intestine by fluorescence microscopy. Quantifying this fluorescence with a fluorescent microplate reader allows measurement of fluorescein uptake in the model system. Competition for uptake occurs if co-treatment of fluorescein with a nonfluorescent drug reduces accumulated fluorescein levels. When compared to control levels, drugs known to interact with OAT1 such as p-aminohippurate, benzylpenicillin and probenecid reduce fluorescein accumulation by as much as 54%. Additional experiments with other non-fluorescent drugs are needed to establish this high-throughput method in a non-mammalian model to predict drug-drug interactions. Student Author(s): Allanah Hund, Sophomore, Psychology and Criminal Justice, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) The Effects of Intelligence on the Good Life This paper explores the folk wisdom “ignorance is bliss” and explains how one’s intelligence can play a role in determining the quality of one’s life. It examines the universal concepts that Maslow defined as the hierarchy of needs that must be met for life satisfaction, which in turn will help achieve self-actualization. It defines the different types of intelligences, such as cognitive, social, and emotional, that are most useful in providing the means for each of the goals. Several journal articles were used to provide statistics and studies done by researchers on how national IQ (intelligence quotient) scores reflect that nation’s GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and overall happiness. Most of the articles consider emotional intelligence to be the most useful in finding satisfaction and happiness as well as having enough intellect to be virtuous. It also examines the negative effects of intelligence and how too much knowledge can lead to unhappiness. Student Author(s): Nadia Idris, Senior, Food and Nutritional Sciences, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Salam A. Ibrahim, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 19 Effect of Gums and Proteins on Acid Whey Retention from Greek yogurt There’s an increasing demand for Greek yogurt due to its higher nutritional value compared to regular yogurt. As a result, production of acid whey has increased at an alarming rate. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of gums and proteins on acid whey retention from Greek yogurt. These ingredients have affinity for binding water molecules and are able to modify the rheology of food systems. In this study, we investigated the effect of different gums and proteins on water holding capacity (WHC) of yogurt. Skim milk was supplemented with 0-0.5 % (w/v) of gums and proteins, inoculated with yogurt culture (3.0 %, v/v), fermented and stored at 4 C. Next day approximately 20 g of yogurt was centrifuged at 4C for 10 min (1300 g). The supernatant was poured off, remaining yogurt was weighed and the percentage of WHC was calculated. Statistical analysis showed that gums and proteins significantly increased the WHC of yogurt. Our results showed that all levels of inulin (P < 0.01) and 0.1% pectin (P < 0.001) have significantly higher WHC compared to the control sample. Similarly, higher WHC was observed in yogurts produced with all the protein tested. These results indicated that gums and proteins could be used as a stabilizer during Greek yogurt production.

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Student Author(s): James Inscoe, Senior, Computer Science, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Bogdan Czejdo, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Computer Science, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 41 Developing systematic process for dealing with robot failures in robotics research This paper is related to experiments with various robot behaviors. There were numerous robot behaviors investigated including avoiding walls and other obstacles, following or avoiding human. It is a common experience to observe and deal with various failures in systems involving robots. There can be many types of problems related to hardware, software and connecting equipment. This paper describes selected failures and the systematic method used to deal with them. Our approach was based on developing the architecture of hardware and software modules interacting with each other. First, we identify modules and interactions that can cause this failure. We classify these suspects according to: (a) probability of causing the failure, (b) ability to verify, and (c) the ability to repair the module. If the point of failure is identified, then the ability to fix it must be determined. If we can fix it, we do so. If the point of failure is not identified or repair is not within our abilities then: determine work-around or request manufacturer repair. In the paper we described three cases of failures: dropping Wi-Fi connection, Wi-Fi discovery failure and Invalid Time message. If we are not prepared to deal with failures, the failures can derail the research. Student Author(s): Lauren Irby, Senior, Financial Economics, Methodist University Mentor(s): Josiah Baker, Methodist University Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Moral Hazards Associated with Marrying in the Military A moral hazard exists whenever people are incentivized to act in their own interest at the detriment of others. This term originated from the insurance industry, but can be applied broadly to any opportunity for individual gain by unethical, immoral, or illegal means. The presence of a moral hazard exists within the military community. The U.S. military unintentionally incentivizes marriage, creating moral hazards; this is done through benefits provided to married soldiers and families that are not available for unmarried personnel. Evidence suggests that personnel manipulate â&#x20AC;&#x153;the systemâ&#x20AC;? to take advantage of the U.S. military marriage incentives. Information that supports moral hazards in military marriage is evident in higher marriage rates, lower marrying ages, elevated fertility rates, and increased divorce rates. To analyze these alarming statistics associated with military marriages, a comparison of a non-military population is necessary. The regions used for this analysis include Cumberland and Orange County, North Carolina. Cumberland County is necessary because of its proximity to Fort Bragg, a major military hub. In contrast, Orange Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population has a similar age distribution, but it has comparatively very few active military personnel. Student Author(s): Mena Issa, Junior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Elizabeth Gerdes, Junior, Chemistry and Biology, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Neveen Issa, Sophomore, Biology, University of North Carolina at Pembroke Mentor(s): Leonard Holmes, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Heterorhabditis Bacteriophora: Ecofriendly Biological Control Agent The entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Photorhabdus luminescens that lives in the nematode gut. Heterorhabditis bacteriophora has a wide range of susceptible insects, however it is safe to humans, non-target insects, and wildlife. This presentation will be review of the current technology and applications of the beneficial nematodes in agriculture.

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Student Author(s): Kaitlyn Jackson, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Kevin Kiser, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Experiencing Transformative Education through Applied Learning (ETEAL): Development of a Free STI Test for College Students In 2011, 1.4 million chlamydia infections and 300,000 gonorrhea infections were reported in the U.S. These infections are caused by bacteria, Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), respectively. Young women (ages 15-24) are the most susceptible to these infections, which can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and infertility. In addition, individuals who are infected are two to five times more susceptible to acquiring HIV if they are exposed to the virus. Regular testing is imperative due to the high rate of asymptomatic cases of these infections. The goal of this study was to develop and offer a free CT/NG test to UNCW students who were participating in free HIV testing at the student health Center. Because the majority of students are young and sexually active, this research was critical to understanding the dangers associated with contracting chlamydia and gonorrhea and how to minimize the risk of transmission. This study also aimed to increase awareness of asymptomatic chlamydia and gonorrhea infections. To reinforce the impact of combining research and service learning on their educational development and future careers in science and/or medicine, ETEAL-supported students reflected on each semester’s experiences. Student Author(s): Chaeyeong Jang, Junior, Biochemistry, Salem College Matthew Cottam, Senior, Biochemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Michael Gross, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Materials, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 24 Novel Processing of Porous Ceramic Nanocomposites for Fuel Cell Electrodes Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are attractive for power generation because they (1) convert fuel to electricity up to two times more efficiently than combustion methods; (2) have high fuel flexibility; and (3) emit significantly less CO2 and smog-forming particulates than combustion technologies. There has been a major effort to lower the operating temperature of SOFC to lessen degradation rates in power output, system complexities, and cost by decreasing the infiltrate particle size coating the surface of a porous ceramic scaffold in infiltrated electrodes. However, little work has been done to increase the surface area of the ceramic scaffold even though the scaffold surface area ultimately dictates performance over time. Increasing surface area is challenging because the scaffold is typically sintered at 1100-1500°C. We have developed a novel processing method that preserves nanomorphology in porous ceramic scaffolds upon sintering at 1100°C by forming an in-situ carbon template in sol-gel materials. Importantly, the carbon template can be removed by oxidation at low temperature. The result is porous ceramic scaffold surface areas up to 10 times larger than traditional methods. The amount of carbon template and sintered scaffold surface area are highly tunable by manipulating the sol-gel recipe and processing conditions. Student Author(s): James Jenkins, Senior, Biology, Davidson College Mentor(s): Rachid El Bejjani, Davidson College Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 33 The effect of Alzheimer's disease gene APP/apl-1 on neuron development The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is best studied for its role in Alzheimer’s disease (Alexander, Marfil, & Li, 2014). However, APP is highly expressed in normal brains and its role in neural function remains unclear (Nicolas & Hassan, 2014). Caenorhabditis elegans are useful model organisms because they are easy to study and APP has a conserved gene in C. elegans (apl-1). We have inserted a transgene that overexpresses the intracellular domain of apl-1 (AICD) into the genome of C. elegans, and I have found that it causes 21.7% of axons to be misguided compared to the wild type (p<0.0001). To determine a mechanism for this defect, I am testing for the involvement of rab-6.2, lin-10, mys-1, and feh-1 because the literature suggests those genes may be involved in apl-1 signaling. Deleting rab-6.2 in animals overexpressing apl-1 worsens the defect in axon guidance by 7% when compared to animals with the transgene alone (p=0.016). This data suggests that rab-6.2 may inhibit apl-1, since increasing apl1 and decreasing rab-6.2 both decrease proper axon guidance. In the future, I plan to investigate more genes known to interact with apl-1 and mutate C. elegans at random to discover genes not currently in the literature.

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Student Author(s): Zachary Johnson, Senior, Biology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Sabrina Robertson, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Neurobiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 8 Training Tomorrow's Neuroscientists The field of neuroscience is evolving at an unprecedented pace due to new technological advances and recent large scale, national and international initiatives such as the BRAIN initiative. The BRAIN initiative, which was launched by the White House in 2013, rivals the Human Genome Project in scale and promises to propel neuroscience research forward through the development of innovative neurotechnologies. This rapid evolution of modern neuroscience raises the important question of how to best train tomorrow’s neuroscientists. Here we describe a research-based course, Mapping the Brain that explores a unique approach in neuroscience education. The goal of the course, having been first completed this Fall 2015, was to introduce emerging technologies in the neuroscience world to N.C. State students. After exploring basic neuronal signaling properties using the SpikerBoxtm and cockroaches, students pursued a collaborative research project in mice. By combining a recombinase-based intersectional genetic strategy with Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs), students mapped norepinephrine neurons, their projections, and explored the effects of activating these neurons in vivo. By engaging N.C. State students in an active neuroscience research project and exposing them to cutting edge technology, we hope to enhance student learning and inspire future innovation in the field.

Student Author(s): Abby Johnston, Freshman, Undecided, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45) Trash in Perspective Trash is a part of everyday life. Although trash is glaringly present in our environment, it is often ignored. In modern America, most trash is not biodegradable. What doesn’t make it to the landfill is subject to the elements. It may be windswept, washed away, baked, or partially buried. What lingers after the initial utilitarian purpose of an object is exhausted? Often trash is quite grotesque, but to the careful observer, beauty may be found. This project explores trash as an informative phenomenon. It seeks to answer the question, “How can beauty make the problem of street litter more visible on campus?” Students of Appalachian State University pass garbage every day in route to any of their travels. This project adopted a multi-layered process of engagement combining observation, photo cataloging, mapping of found objects, harvesting of trash debris, and recycling all pertinent substances. It examines the widely held belief that removing one extra piece of trash will not make a difference and the implied fatalism of consumerism which leads to insurmountable quantities of garbage. The art is intended to both educate the campus community and inspire activism by illuminating the problem that lays in front of everyone. Student Author(s): Addie Jones, Sophomore, Sustainable Development, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45) The Ethics of Ecoart Since prehistory, humans have been creating art through the use of all-natural materials. Ecoart is a form of contemporary art that inspired a movement determined to promote awareness of the human relationship with the natural world. As this relationship has grown distant, artists have successfully launched a new genre of art using natural objects such as boulders and salt crystals, but completed in a way that overpowered the landscape. Because these artworks are natural, they decay and have an impermanence that is unconventional. This ephemeralist approach is often desired with ecoart, spreading some ecological message with impermanent ecoart, while sometimes stimulating all senses and have their piece be interactive with the viewer to create a connection. However, these artworks can be ethically controversial due to their disruptive nature to other organisms. This project combines a review of literature, comparative analyses of various impermanent arts and artists, and explores the ethical use of environmental art through the establishment of sculptures using natural objects on the campus of Appalachian State University.

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Student Author(s): Illa Jones, Senior, Foods and Nutrition, Meredith College Mentor(s): Jennifer McMillen, Meredith College Presentation: Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 14 Surveying the Food Climate of Meredith College: A Qualitative Study Dietary intake patterns change during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. This research seeks to understand how transitioning to college life may contribute to changes in students’ dietary patterns. Six focus groups were conducted to gain participant perspective of dietary patterns before and during college. Results indicated that increased independence contributes to nutrition confusion, fosters priority lineup, and increases focus on convenience in reference to diet. Further analysis developing an explanatory model revealed that all themes were interdependent with nutrition confusion being central. Therefore, increasing nutrition knowledge may improve diets during the transition to college. Student Author(s): Amber Jones, Junior, English, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Analyzing Destructive Relationships in Gilda In the film noir Gilda, directed by Charles Vidor and theatrically released in 1946, depicts the manipulative, volatile, and destructive relationships between Gilda, the titular character and an archetypical, flirtatious “temptress,” played by Rita Hayworth; Johnny Farrel, a gambler and thug, played by Glenn Ford; and Ballin Mundson, the wealthy owner of an illegal casino under scrutiny of the local authorities, played by George Macready. The central conflict portrayed of the film is produced as Gilda’s wild personality and penchant to tease comes in direct, abusive, and often violent opposition to the two men that seek to dominate her throughout the narrative. In this paper, the use of the mise en scène, is explored through lighting, framing, and props, to illustrate how Vidor explores the violent, love-hate cycles Gilda and Johnny undergo and the vicious conflicts between the genders and battles power in relationships between these highly erratic individuals. Student Author(s): Matthew Jordan-Steele, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Constance Rogers-Lowery, Catawba College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 32 Phenomenal Phenolics: An Association Study of Avenanthramide and Tocopherol in Avena sativa Oat (Avena sativa) is a staple of the human diet, offering an array of health benefits. Most notably, the phenolics in oat display anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-carcinogenic properties. Two major phenolic compounds in oat are tocopherol and avenanthramide. Tocopherol is a fat-soluble, phenolic, vitamin E compound that is known primarily for anti-oxidative properties. Avenanthramide is a soluble phenolic compound that is uniquely found in oat. Consumption of oat yields a lower total and LDL cholesterol, subdues inflammation, relaxes arteries, and via avenanthramides contributes to the reduction of coronary heart disease. The goal of this project is to identify regions of the oat genome associated with tocopherol and avenanthramide. Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) are used to accomplish this task. GWAS analyzes diverse oat populations and locates specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in the oat genome associated with tocopherol and avenanthramide. The GWAS found many significant markers across multiple populations. Since these markers were found across varying locations it is indicative of a high probability of association with the traits. Therefore the markers, if significant, within the QTLs could show the location of candidate genes that influence tocopherol and avenanthramide production. Student Author(s): Kenya Joseph, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Kirill Afonin, University of North Carolina Charlotte Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 43 Cellular Uptake of siRNA Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery in Whole Blood and Lymphocytes The newest frontier of drug delivery and disease treatment is nanotechnology utilizing therapeutic nucleic acids. Nucleic acid based nanoparticles functionalized with multiple short interference RNAs (siRNAs) and formulated with lipid-like carriers for efficient intracellular delivery can act as an active pharmaceutical ingredient. Due to the route of administration, it is important to study how this therapeutic technology interacts with blood and

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lymphocytes to elucidate possible undesirable side-effects. This investigation examines the cellular uptake by whole blood and lymphocyte isolations from human donors of fluorescently tagged functional RNA nanoparticles. Lymphocytes are isolated from each blood sample and the siRNA nanoparticles are introduced. Fluorescence changes indicating the uptake of the nanoparticles by the cells are measured via flow cytometry and analyzed. Experimentation has shown a marked difference in nanoparticle uptake when the formulation is introduced after the samples are serially diluted as opposed to introduction to undiluted human blood samples. This indicates that the experimental protocol may affect apoptosis and cell morphology of lymphocytes, promoting their interaction with nanoparticles. Further experimentation aims to examine which constructs have the most efficient cellular uptake by blood cells, which lipid-like carrier works best for uptake and mechanisms for cellular entry. Student Author(s): Amber Kalu, Sophomore, Psychology, North Carolina Central University Mentor(s): Dr. Kuldip Kuwahara, North Carolina Central University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) A 21st Century Creative Reading of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Frankenstein, a novel written by Mary Shelley, is a text that is very alive and relevant to the 21st Century reader. In this paper, I wish to express just how people can be so alike, but feel they are so different due to status, looks, or groups they are involved with. I decided to take a deeper look into three of the main characters' lives because I believe they have a deeper story to teach us. Even though this narrative was written in the 19th Century, the messages still apply to this generation. The message in this paper is universally applicable to anyone no matter the walk of life, culture, or status. I feel confident that it will soften your heart, open your eyes, and shine a light on the root of most of the problems we face today in the 21 st Century. This paper will discuss topics such as acceptance, love, deep friendships, and more. It will show how three men all embark on a similar journey. It is a journey for knowledge, love, understanding, and friendships that relates to our common humanity and poses the question: Is this work of science fiction relevant today? Student Author(s): Christiane Kamariza, Sophomore, Computer Information Technology & Entrepreneurship, Methodist University Mentor(s): Whitney Larrimore, Methodist University Presentation: English (Writing), Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) An Analysis of Facebook’s Negative Effects on Users In today’s world with technological advancements, social media makes communication easier and faster. However, critics of social media argue that face-to-face communication is the most effective way to communicate. It is true that Facebook, the most popular social media site, allows people to keep in contact with family, friends, and loved ones scattered abroad, but Facebook can also negatively affect society and individuals in various ways. For example, critics argue that regular users of Facebook tend to be less happy than moderate users of Facebook. The purpose of my research was to investigate whether Facebook really affects users’ happiness, so I asked the following research question: How does Facebook make users unhappy? I researched secondary sources to collect the data necessary to address the research question. Most of my information I collected from online journals, articles, and books from the Methodist University Library. The results of my research suggest Facebook makes users unhappy–negatively impacting relationships, negatively affecting mental health, and decreasing work productivity. My research findings and analysis suggest that individuals should use Facebook with caution. Student Author(s): Bethany Kautz, Senior, Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Beth Gardner, North Carolina State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 20 Correlation Between Water Quality and Turtle Abundance Research was conducted to examine the question: What aspect(s) of water quality most correlate(s) with turtle abundance? To answer this question I ran 7 turtle traps and conducted 4 water quality tests (i.e. temperature, pH, nitrogen, and phosphorus). Data collected from trapping included number of turtles captured and species of turtles captured. I trapped and collected water quality data from three different sites within James Pate Philip State Park in Bartlett, Illinois between June 1 and July 25. Two sites were a marsh and the third site was a retention pond. Data collected was analyzed by site and collectively. Line graphs were used to look for general trends and possible

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correlations. The graphs showed a possible correlation between turtle abundance, and phosphorus, temperature and pH. The data was then fit to a Poisson regression, where water quality was the dependent covariate and total number of turtles caught was the independent variable. AIC values were used to perform model comparisons and check for significance of correlations. From this information, the correlations between number of turtles and temperature, and number of turtles and ammonium were shown to be significant for site 1. All other correlations were insignificant. Student Author(s): Mathew Kelley, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Carol Babyak, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 21 Carotenoid and Chlorophyll Pigments in the Peel and Flesh of North Carolina Varieties of Apples Apples contain various phytochemicals that contribute to their nutritional value. Organic pigments such as carotenoids and chlorophylls found in apples are important for human health, because they are involved in the proper execution of cellular communication, as well as immune, vision, and reproductive functions. The goal of this research is to quantify the compounds, zeaxanthin, lutein, β-carotene, chlorophyll a, and chlorophyll b, using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection at 450, 645, and 666 nm. Separation conditions have been optimized using a C18 column (Dionex, Acclaim 120, 5 ¾m, 4.6x150 nm) and gradient elution using acetone and water. The linear range of the method is 2 -10 mg/L and calibration curves with R2 values greater than 0.9920 have been achieved. Peel and flesh ethanol extracts of North Carolina varieties of apples will be analyzed, and sample chromatograms have been constructed. Extracts were initially diluted with acetone--for compatibly with the LC eluent--but a waxy precipitate was observed. In future work, extracts will be diluted with ethanol, and some may be saponified in order to investigate the diester moiety of the pigments. Student Author(s): Richard Ketchum, Senior, BSIT ICT, East Carolina University David Moore, Senior, BS ICT, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Lee Toderick, East Carolina University Presentation: Engineering - Electrical & Computer, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) Cyber Attacks From the Internet Cyber attacks happen everyday on the internet bur are limited to a few well known services originating from a few well known offending countries. We will collect and analyze data collected over several months to determine attack locations and where possible methods and purpose of attacks. We will show trends of attacks from certain countries as well as trends of attacks on certain common services provided by standard servers that are typically connected to the internet. This research will demonstrate the danger posed by cyber attacks that individuals and organizations face on a daily basis and that it isn't just a small problem but is growing over time. Take for example the compromise of such large companies as Home Depot, Target, JP Morgan, and Sony. Also, vulnerabilities that have been discovered such as heartbleed, SSL version 3 and TLS version 1, and a Linux Bash vulnerability called Shellshock that was discovered after 30 years, illustrating that long established systems can be at risk. I will be the primary researcher working with a co-researcher and faculty member Mr. Lee Toderick to help integrate findings into classes that will further education and investigation into cybersecurity and defense. This research will also prepare me to be successful in graduate school research. Student Author(s): Chelsey King, Sophomore, Associate of Science, Gaston College Erin Spurrier, Junior, Gaston College Madison Staves, Sophomore, Gaston College Mentor(s): Ashley Hagler, Gaston College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 34 Study of the Intrusion of Non-Native Invasive Earthworm Species in North Carolina The ubiquitous earthworm is the largest member of the class Oligochaeta, having over 6000 species. Of these, approximately 182 taxa can be found in North America, 60 of which are invasive, non-native species. These invasive earthworms are suspected to have been brought to North America by European settlers. Though small, these earthworms have a tremendous impact on the ecosystem to which they are introduced. Earthworms process leaf litter from the forest floor, often reducing several inches of decaying organic matter to bare soil. Some of the

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effects of this stripping of the litter layer include exposure of the roots of trees, reduction of understory vegetation, elimination of hiding places for small terrestrial amphibians, and reduction of available carbon in the soil due to the increase of microbial activity. Researchers studied to what degree these non-native earthworms have penetrated ecosystems in North Carolina by collecting earthworm specimens from a variety of locations within the state. These earthworms were then identified using DNA barcoding. Researchers used the Qiagen DNeasy Kit #69504 to isolate part of the cytochrome c oxidase gene. After isolating, the CO1 gene is then amplified using PCR and purified using a gel purification method. The purified DNA samples were then sent to the DNA Analysis Facility on Science Hill at Yale University for Sanger Sequencing. The results of that sequencing compared to known species in the NCBI’s BLAST database for identification. This identification gives researchers insight into the impact the invasive earthworm species have had, and will continue to have, on the various ecosystems within North Carolina. Student Author(s): Hannah Klemmer, Junior, Research Triangle High School Mentor(s): Amy Grunden, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 5 Cloning and Over-expression of Beta-type Carbonic Anhydrases from Photobacterium profundum Algal biofuel as an alternative fuel source is beneficial because it is both renewable and reliable. Carbonic anhydrases aid in enhancing photosynthesis by making dissolved carbon dioxide available for the photosynthetic enzyme Rubisco through the interconversion of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide. The goal of this study is to characterize a beta-type carbonic anhydrase from the marine bacterium Photobacterium profundum for its potential use in marine lipid-producing algae. Evaluation was completed through cloning, recombinant expression, and characterization of the carbonic anhydrase. PCR amplification was done using P. profundum chromosomal DNA as template. Gene-specific primers were designed to amplify Ppr_β from P. profundum. The PCR product was then ligated into the pET28a vector using NdeI and XhoI as restriction enzymes. Escherichia coli XL1-Blue competent cells were transformed with the plasmid construct. The modified plasmid was purified from the transformants confirmed to haxe the Ppr_β gene. The Ppr_β clone was then transformed into E. coli BL-21 lambdaDE3. Future work will determine if the recombinant expression of the P. profundum beta-type carbonic anhydrase in algae would be a viable addition to algae in order to increase photosynthesis, and therefore lipid accumulation in the algae. Student Author(s): Margaret Kocherga, Senior, Chemistry, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Daniel Rabinovich, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Chemistry - Inorganic, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) New Thione and Selone Complexes of Mercury and Copper Thiourea and selenourea derivatives have been used in studies pertaining to the sequestration of heavy metals, photocatalysis, and the preparation of copper and gold complexes of biological relevance. Since it has been suggested that the well-known toxicity of mercury is linked to the biochemical roles of selenium, it is important to further develop the coordination chemistry of mercury and other soft metal ions with sulfur- and seleniumcontaining molecules. This presentation describes the synthesis and reactivity of bulky N-heterocyclic thione (NHT) and selone (NHSe) ligands whose coordination chemistry is virtually unknown. More specifically, complexes of general formula LHgX2 and LCuX, where L is a thione or selone ligand and X = Cl, Br or I, have been isolated and fully characterized. A description and comparison of several of their molecular structures obtained by X-ray crystallography will be included in this presentation together with a summary of a series of competition studies between thione and selone analogues conducted to assess the affinity of these metals for the sulfur or selenium atoms. Student Author(s): Chris Kolischak, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Christopher Thaxton, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 32 The effects of road salt application on trace metal mobility, a case study of an urbanized headwaters stream Road salt application can have significant impacts on stream chemistry. Sodium chloride (NaCl) is the most commonly used deicing agent, and if not removed, it contaminates the soil and water systems year round, and for years after salt application ceases. Salt contamination may lead to heavy metal leaching, because concentrated

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sodium has the capacity to displace other cations such as metals bound to the soil and chloride can form soluble aqueous complexes with metals. Our study investigates the relationship between salt application and heavy metal mobility. We hypothesize that heavy metal mobility is enhanced by salt application. We tested this hypothesis by examining salt and metal concentrations in the Boone Creek (BC), in Western North Carolina, during two sampling campaigns 8 years apart. Total metals and aqueous metals were quantified during the first and second sampling period, respectively. Preliminary results indicate a significant relationship between sodium and iron, calcium, magnesium, and copper concentrations in BC. Student Author(s): Michael Konrad, Sophomore, Business Management, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Business Administration, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 23 Technology in the Adolescent Mind This project explores how technologies and nature affect adolescents in contemporary Western society. Today, we see children playing more with their thumbs on electronic devices than playing hide-and-seek. Clearly, technological overexposure at a young age interferes in the natural course of physical and psycho-social development in children and adolescents. Youth attraction to technology grows everyday with social media, gaming, and videos rising in pervasiveness. Any addiction can be damaging to the brain especially at a young age. This addiction creates separate worlds and personalities within the body. An unknown is what happens when youth are exposed to direct nature after living a life saturated with technology. Ecotherapeutic interventions demonstrate that humans can reverse their addiction but, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Does it leave long term negative side effects in its wake?â&#x20AC;? Contemporary journalists such as Richard Louv, and Eco-Artists such as Chris Jordan and Nyjah Grant, provide compelling arguments in support of increased ecological wellness on personal and planetary levels. Through a review of literature, analysis of contemporary Eco-artists, and personal reflection, this poster aims to provide commentary and inspire audience examination of potentially harmful technological overuse in modern youth culture. Student Author(s): Annalisa Kristoffersen, Senior, International Economy and Environment, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Shea McManus, North Carolina State University Presentation: International Relations, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 51 Climate Change Refugees: Warming Up to New Policy Climate change is predicted to displace millions of people within the coming decades, yet there is no international plan to assist these vulnerable populations. The aim of this study is to identify how an international political response can be structured to meet the needs of environmentally induced migrants, called climate change refugees, or environmental refugees. Drawing on scientific evidence and case studies, it demonstrates that increased carbon dioxide levels cause the depletion of resources, decreased security and inevitably forces refugees out of their territories. An analysis of scholarly literature on relevant international laws and conventions reveals that a political framework exists to address the effects of climate change, but not to support climate refugees, despite the economic feasibility. This research argues that industrialized countries should be responsible for mitigating the environmental refugee crisis because they contributed to climate change the most. It proposes that the international community needs to go beyond addressing climate change effects, using economic policy tools relating to carbon dioxide emissions and industrialized countriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wealth to assign responsibility for accepting and resettling climate change refugees and ensure that millions of people will not suffer unfairly.

Student Author(s): Molly Kucmierz, Sophomore, Biology, Appalachian State University Christina Donovan, Sophomore, Theater Technology and Design, Appalachian State University Lex Scott, Sophomore, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English (Writing), Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Women and the Good Life

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The good life is subjective by nature. Its definition changes from culture to culture, and while there are many overarching themes of the good life, it is the little details that begin to define a certain society from another. A woman’s ability to live the good life is heavily influenced by her culture. This impact can be illustrated by examining religious beliefs, women’s roles in society, and the perpetuation of rape culture. Research was conducted on the religions of Islam and Christianity. Through comparison of Western and Eastern religious values, as well as an in-depth examination of women’s roles in Western culture, the divide between what women and men consider to be the good life can begin to be uncovered. Student Author(s): Samia Ladner, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 50 Excess Power Index: A Sexual Dimorphic Trait in Bees Sexually dimorphic traits vary between the sexes of a single species. These differences can reflect selection for specialized biological roles. A multitude of studies have identified insects that exhibit sexual dimorphism for a single variable trait, such as color or antennae length. The excess power index (EPI) is an estimate of insect flight performance that is inferred by the combination of a number of morphometric characteristics. We calculated the EPI of two species of bee, Melissodes bimaculata and Xylocopa virginica, and 1 species of wasp, Pachodynerus erynnis. In both species of bee, females were larger in every trait we measured in isolation. However, when these variables were combined into a single allometric variable, males had a significantly larger EPI. This trend was not present in the wasp, P. erynnis. We will continue to explore EPI in additional species in order to determine if our data are reflective of a larger trend in bees and wasps. Student Author(s): Juliette LaFargue, Senior, Psychology, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Christy Buchanan, Wake Forest University Terese Glatz Wake Forest University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 56 Parents’ Beliefs, Emotions, and Behaviors in Response to “Typical” Adolescent Behavior Negative beliefs and stereotypes about adolescents influence parents. Yet culture affects views of adolescence. For example, African-American parents are less likely to endorse negative beliefs about adolescents than Caucasians. This study extends understanding of parents’ reactions to “stereotypical” adolescent behavior by examining variation in parental beliefs, emotions, and behaviors by ethnicity, adolescent gender, and adolescent behavior. We expected Caucasian parents to ascribe more stereotypical beliefs, and different emotions and behaviors, than ethnic minority parents. A nationally representative sample of 393 fathers and 504 mothers of adolescents in 6th-12th grade participated in an online survey that included a randomly-assigned vignette of an adolescent boy or girl exhibiting externalizing or internalizing behaviors. Participants were asked about hypothetical beliefs, emotions, and behaviors, and perceived self-efficacy were this their child. Beliefs reflecting negative stereotypes were most frequent among Caucasians. Internalizing elicited more worry and supportive behaviors than did externalizing, which elicited more controlling behaviors and frustration. PSE was lowest for Caucasians, vignette females, and vignette internalizing. Findings support research suggesting Caucasian parents are more likely to endorse and be affected by negative stereotypes of adolescence than other ethnicities. Results suggest more helplessness, but more sympathy to girls and internalizing problems. Student Author(s): Colleen Lasar, Senior, Certified Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Libby Puckett, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 40 Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of Chemiluminescent Esters Using Acyl Chlorides and Phenols Chemiluminescent reactions provide a simple and effective means of demonstrating important chemical concepts, and thus a systematic experiment was developed to isolate the best reagents for producing intense chemiluminescent reactions. Chemiluminescent esters were synthesized by reacting oxalyl chloride, adipoyl chloride, and phthaloyl chloride with 2,4,6-tricholorphenol and 4-nitrophenol; the resulting esters were checked for chemiluminescent properties by combining a hydrogen peroxide solution with a variety of strong and weak acceptors. A selection of the acceptor solutions were determined acceptable and discernable in suboptimal lighting conditions. The intensities and reaction rates of the various chemiluminescent reactions were analyzed using

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fluorometer emission spectra and photographic documentation. The effects of temperature and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide on chemiluminescence were also observed. Bis(4-nitrophenyl) oxalate consistently showed positive results when checked with most of the acceptor solutions. Bis(2,4,6-tricholorphenyl) oxalate showed similar results, but was typically dimmer than the Bis(4-nitrophenyl) oxalate ester. Temperature had a profound effect on the light intensity from the reaction, where heated solutions exhibited a more distinctive light color, and cooled solutions emitted a less intense light. Additionally, increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide resulted in a more intense chemiluminescent light. Student Author(s): Kako Lavendier, Senior, Anthropology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Samuel Thomas Parker, North Carolina State University Presentation: History, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) The Production of Fine Ceramic Table Ware from Roman Cyprus: Continuity or Discontinuity? The vast and far-reaching economy of the Roman Empire saw a myriad of products circulate throughout the ancient world. Of those, ceramics are not only abundant, but each unique type is also distinct in terms of it region of production and distribution. The unique characteristics of each ceramic type permits that they are widely used to date ancient archaeological sites. During the Roman period, Cyprus produced two distinct red-slipped fine tablewares, Cypriot Sigillata (1st-2nd centuries AD) and Cypriot Red Slip (4th-7th centuries AD), which are both widely distributed throughout the eastern Mediterranean. Scholars debate the possibility of continuity from the earlier Cypriot Sigillata tot he later Cypriot Red Slip. Some argue that the former fine ware evolved into the latter, while others argue for no continuity. The Cypriot fine ware collection housed at North Carolina State University is a modest but methodologically excavated, well stratified, corpus from Roman Aqaba (the ancient port of Aila on the Red Sea now in southern Jordan). A recent analysis of this pottery supports the argument for discontinuity in Cypriot fine ware production. Student Author(s): Evyn Lee, Senior, Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Burris, Appalachian State University Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Biophysics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 45 Raman Mapping: The Automation of Pinhole Alignment and Stage Scanning in Confocal Raman Spectroscopy Confocal Raman spectroscopy utilizes the lateral and axial spatial filtering of the Raman signal. This filtering occurs prior to the spectrometer via a pinhole aligned to the focus of a telescope. This spatial filter allows for the blockage of excess noise and unwanted signal, leading to higher resolution spectra and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. The manual lateral and axial alignment of the spatial filter requires high precision and is time consuming. Using LabVIEW, an automated method of the alignment of the pinhole with the Raman laser has been explored. In conjunction with the automation of the pinhole, a LabVIEW program was developed for the automation of stage motion for a 3-D raster-like scan of a sample. These two programs were combined for the automation of data acquisition on the Raman tweezers apparatus. The algorithm and the preliminary findings will be presented.

Student Author(s): Joshua Lemli, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Christopher Thaxton, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 32 Mapping the Blitesphere: An Extensible Approach to Spatial and Temporal Mapping of Solid, Liberated, Anthropogenic Rubbish The ubiquitous presence of solid, liberated, anthropogenic rubbish (SLAR) in once pristine environments is an indicator of the impact of human civilization on the biosphere. The deleterious effects of SLAR in marine ecosystems â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the ultimate sink for many geophysical processes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have been well documented. Recent research suggests that the majority of marine SLAR is from terrestrial sources. Reducing SLAR pollution requires understanding how SLAR is transported from source to sink. Extant SLAR data is difficult to consolidate, owing to disparate forces driving environmental research. Additionally, there is a lack of data regarding spatial and temporal distribution of SLAR in terrestrial systems. This project aims to provide an entry point for future

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researchers to create an extensible system to categorize and map SLAR in terrestrial environments. A literature review on SLAR in both marine and terrestrial environments is included. A review of methodologies for categorizing and quantifying SLAR is provided. A photographic technique for rapid spatial and temporal mapping of SLAR is tested and results are discussed. Possibilities for future physical data capture techniques are investigated and recommendations are made. Predicting terrestrial SLAR source â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hotspotsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; based on geophysical and social data is explored. Student Author(s): Marina Leonidas, Junior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Alexander Schwab, Appalachian State University Michael Hambourger, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 30 Iron(II) Tris(bipyridine) Crosslinked Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Networks Four bipyridine-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxanes) (bpyPDMS) were synthesized from four different molecular weights (3000, 5000, 25000, and 50000 g/mol) of amine-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (NH2PDMS). The polymers bpyPDMS and NH2PDMS were characterized with GPC and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The number average molecular weights of the NH2PDMS polymers and bpyPDMS polymers were determined from NMR and titrometric measurements. The lowest molecular weight bpyPDMS was mixed with iron(II) tetrafluoroborate or iron(II) chloride forming a cross-linked polymer network of PDMS with iron(II) tris(bipyridine) crosslinks. These networks were characterized using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC results indicate the addition of iron suppresses crystallinity and that excess iron may lead to chain scission. Student Author(s): Ariel Lewis, Senior, Economics, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Alfredo Romero, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Fertility and Depression: What is the Connection? Previously, many believed infertility was the main cause for people to be depressed as a result of psychological stress. However, fertility may also effect depression through mental and physical pressure. In recent studies, the most depressed people are married with children in the United States. In this research, we will look at the correlation between depression and fertility and how it affects a male and female. In addition, we will show how the affects of fertility on males is higher than females. This research shows that males suffer more from each additional child. In conclusion, higher income and more spousal support will help with depression. Student Author(s): Hui Yi Grace Lim, Senior, Biology Duke University Mentor(s): David Sherwood, Duke University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 18 Identification and Characterization of Novel Regulators of Anchor Cell Invasion in Caenorhabditis elegans The basement membrane (BM) is a dense, cross-linked extracellular matrix that underlies all epithelial and endothelial cell layers. During developmental processes including embryo implantation, cells traverse the BM in a tightly regulated process known as cell invasion. Misregulation of cell invasion, however, is implicated in many diseases, most notably during cancer metastasis. To study BM transmigration in vivo, I used anchor cell (AC) invasion in C. elegans as a model given its amenability to genetic analysis and live-cell imaging. The AC is a specialized uterine cell that breaches the BMs separating the uterine and vulval tissues in a precise, stereotyped manner, allowing me to easily identify mutants with blocked or delayed invasion. While many key genes have been identified that regulate AC invasion, gaps still remain. The goal of this study is thus to identify and characterize novel genes controlling AC invasion that could provide a more complete understanding of this highly regulated process. I first screened mutants from an earlier forward genetic screen for a protruding vulval (Pvl) phenotype, which can occur after a block or delay in AC invasion. Of the 76 Pvl mutants identified, I found three with AC invasion blocks that were distinct from known genetic mutants, and am in the process of characterizing them for defining features of BM transmigration, such as changes in actin localization and formation of pseudopodia. These findings can potentially open up new areas of research into elucidating possible associations with known genes and regulatory pathways.

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Student Author(s): Ian Lins, Sophomore, Psychology, Pfeiffer University Michael Huneycutt, Sophomore, Business, Pfeiffer University David Hackney, Sophomore, Environmental Science, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Luke Dollar, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Earth Science, Performance Session 1 (10:30 - 11:30) Primitive Survival For our project, we looked at different aspects of survival. In order to look at the true meaning of survival, we put ourselves in a survival situation. For the experiment, we went out in to Pisgah National Forest. Here we wanted to experience what primitive survival really felt like. Three people went and we were each allowed to take to items, so we had a total of thirty items. We spent three full days out in the wilderness doing everything we could to adapt to our surrounding. Our results showed that we were not only able to survive, but we thrived. We concluded that in order to survive you must be prepared, be able to adapt, and always keep an open mind. Student Author(s): Trenee Little, Senior, Biology, Campbell University Katria Farmer, Senior, Communication Studies, Campbell University Mentor(s): Rene Ibarra, Campbell University Presentation: Foreign Languages & Literature, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Globalization in 20th Century Mexico Shown Through Mariana of Las Batallas en el Desierto by Mexican Writer José Emilio Pacheco This paper is an in-depth analysis of the evolution of 1950’s Mexico through the historical novel, Las Batallas en el Desierto by Mexican writer José Emilio Pacheco. In order to view the socioeconomic changes of the time period, this analysis focuses on Carlos, the main character, and the interactions he has with other characters throughout the novel. This work demonstrates how adult Carlos looking through the eyes of his younger self is the perfect catalyst to see the impacts of war and modernization on the citizens of Mexico. A majority of the research in this study is focused on the symbolic nature of Mariana, as her brief yet unforeseen encounters with Carlos hold a number of complexities to be discussed. Though there are few scenes where the reader is actually in Mariana’s presence, a great deal of the novel pertains to her; she is a character that can be viewed both literally in cohesion with the plot and metaphorically in accordance to the history. To conclude, this paper reflects on the progression of globalization in the development of 1950’s Mexico that is seen through the understated mentions of Mariana throughout the novel. Student Author(s): Frederick Liu, Freshman, Chemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Amanda Jones, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 39 Title: Importance of Phosphine ligand Design in the Elucidation of Homogeneous Gold (I) Mechanisms Although gold (I) complexes are known to catalyze a vast range of reactions, less is understood about exactly how the underlying reaction works. As part of efforts to design and synthesize new functional ligands, which will assist in the elucidation of these mechanisms, we have prepared a series of phosphine ligands and their corresponding gold (I) chloride precatalyst complexes. The complexes targeted incorporate two bulky biphenyl substituents and have been characterized in solution using NMR spectroscopy and in solid state using X-ray crystallography. Our design originated from the concept of steric stability. With large supporting substituents, it is proposed that these groups will provide added durability to the gold catalyst during the reaction. In future studies we will use these new catalysts to obtain information concerning the kinetics of intermolecular alkene exchange via observation of dynamic NMR processes. Student Author(s): Kunal Lodaya, Senior, N/A NC School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Robert Gotwals, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Biological Sciences - Neurobiology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 29 Cross-species Comparison of Auditory Template Function in Songbirds The song learning process in songbirds is theorized to rely on a selection-based template model. Individuals are born with a neurological model of song, and acquire this song through the function of preactive and latent

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neurological templates. Preactive templates activate through the normal process of growth, and require no external stimulation; latent templates activate through specific external auditory stimuli. The purpose of this study was to compare the dynamics of these two types of templates in two different species – song sparrows and swamp sparrows. The nature of these dynamics was described through a comparison of isolate and normal song in both of these species. This comparison was completed using two computational algorithms for pairwise correlation of signals – cross correlation and dynamic time warping. Isolate swamp sparrow song was found to have significantly higher correlation with corresponding normal song than isolate song sparrow song, indicating a potential difference in auditory template function in these two species. Specifically, the results point towards a greater influence of preactive templates on swamp sparrow song than on song sparrow song. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of song learning in birds, and by extension, our understanding of the language learning process in humans. Student Author(s): James Lohr, Senior, Biology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Constance Rogers-Lowery, Catawba College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Botany, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 36 Preparation Methods on the Differential Accumulation of Metabolites in Brassica Oleracea subsp. italica Epidemiological studies have shown that broccoli is capable of inhibiting carcinogenesis and has anti-inflammatory properties, which help to reverse age-related illness. The mechanism is not fully understood but previous studies reveal glucosinolates, natural compounds within broccoli, can be broken down into beneficial isothiocyanates. This process is possible due to the plants enzyme, myrosinase. However, there is also evidence that the epithiospecifier protein breaks down glucosinolates into nitrile products which do not benefit human health. Glucosinolates have been shown to provide the anti-carcinogenic benefits to humans and remains of much interest. However, preserving glucosinolates remains a “balancing act” as myrosinase and the epithiospecifier protein have been shown to denature as well as remain active at different temperatures. In this study we performed a non-targeted analysis on the differential accumulation of broccoli metabolites utilizing HPLC-MS analysis. The focus of this study was to investigate common household preparation methods the consumer may utilize and commercial preparation on the fate of broccoli metabolites. Our data suggests light microwave steaming of broccoli from its fresh state retains more compounds than in its flash frozen steamed state. Student Author(s): Austin Lowry, Freshman, High School, North Carolina Central University Carissa Tai, Freshman, High School, North Carolina Central University Mentor(s): Lori Tyler, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Nanoscience, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Detection of Melamine in Milk with Raman Scattering Melamine is a crystallized compound often used in the production of rubber and other commercial materials. Milk producers add melamine to milk to make it appear to have higher protein content. In 2008, thousands of infants died in China from drinking formula with added melamine. Most existing methods to detect melamine inside milk are expensive and involve tedious sample preparation. We report an efficient and simple method to prepare liquid and powder samples, which is gold nanoparticles-based Raman scattering. A great linear correlation (R2= 0.99) was found between the melamine concentration ranging from 0.6–5.0 mg/L and the Raman intensities at 698 cm-1 (a characteristic Raman peak from melamine). For each trial, we tested melamine-spiked and normal milk samples. The first two trials tested mixed and centrifuged milk samples, and melamine was not detected. In the third trial, we tested milk samples with added acetic acid to intensify the signal, without success. For the fourth trial, we added methanol to the milk sample, also to intensify the signal. With the added methanol, Raman scattering has been successfully used to detect melamine in raw powdered milk and in melamine-spiked liquid/powder milk. Student Author(s): Caitlyn Lowry, Freshman, Nursing, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Pre-Medicine, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Changing Face of Immigration Each year more than 57,000 children from Central America and Mexico cross the United States border illegally, one-third of which will be caught by the U.S. Immigration Services. The amount of illegal immigrants, in particular child immigrants, that have been detained while trying to enter the United States has increased drastically by 90%.

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The average detention Center is equipped to hold 250 people at a time yet they are being forced to house twice that due to the influx of children crossing the border, resulting in unsanitary living conditions. These children are housed in overcrowded cells where they huddle together under thin grey Mylar blankets for warmth. Many are not given the proper food or water. James Lyall, staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona said, “This current situation is a recipe for abuse of vulnerable children,” and called it “inhumane and inadequate.” The government needs to be providing these facilities with funding so that they can expand their capacity. There also needs to be trained professionals brought in to help these children as well as adults who struggle from mental illnesses such as post dramatic stress disorder, from or prior to their journey. Student Author(s): John Lu, Sophomore, Chemistry and Mathematics, Duke University Nona Kiknadze, Sophomore, Undecided, Duke University Phil Reinhart, Senior, International Comparative Studies, Duke University Mentor(s): David Toole, Duke University Presentation: Pre-Medicine, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 42 Schistosomiasis Prevalence around Lake Victoria, Tanzania and Efficacy of a Previous Mass Drug Administration Campaign Schistosomiasis is the deadliest neglected tropical disease, and it impacts primary school attendance, lowers growth proportions, and delays cognitive development. This study aimed (1) to quantify the burden of the schistosomiasis infection in four communities in Rorya District, Tanzania, (2) to identify risk factors for infection, and (3) to determine if prior treatment campaigns lowered prevalence. By using CCA-antigen urine rapid tests (N=1600), schistosomiasis was found to be highly prevalent among both adults and children in the four tested communities, with prevalence ranging from 90% to 97% for adults and 85% to 90% for children. Major risk factors implicated in such high prevalence include youth, no prior treatment, and proximity to Lake Victoria. Comparing the number of uninfected people who were previously treated in a 2014 campaign (N=216) and the number of people not previously treated (N=216) showed that SHED Foundation’s 2014 MDA led to a 57% increase in the percent of uninfected people (7% to 11%). As a result of these findings, mass drug administration campaigns (MDAs) were launched in the four communities in coordination with the Shirati Health, Education, and Development (SHED) Foundation. In total, over 8,000 community members were given free praziqauntel in the past five months. Student Author(s): Calvin Macemore, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Carol Babyak, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 16 Examining the Effects of Urbanization on Boone Creek Boone Creek is a mountain headwater stream that drains an urbanized area in western North Carolina. Total metals, anions, and total suspended solids (TSS) were monitored monthly at six sites to determine if the stream was impacted by urbanization. ICP emission spectroscopy was used to measure the concentrations of Ca, Na, Al, and several transition metals. Six months of data indicate that the As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Se concentrations were below the detection limit at all sites. The Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations increased at the downstream sites, which are more urbanized than upstream, but all concentrations were less than 0.588 ppm (n=3, SD=0.007) except in the case of a rain event when the highest concentration reached 3.07 ppm (n=3, SD=0.02). Anion concentrations (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) also increased at the downstream sites, but were diluted below the confluence of a tributary. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations ranged from 2-9 ppm for all sites. Chloride concentrations depended on weather conditions due to road salt with the high being 331.4 ppm (n=3, SD=3.4) in January, 2015. A direct correlation between the concentrations of Cl- and Na was observed for all six sites (R2 = 0.972). TSS results were relatively low throughout all six sites (< 3 mg/L). Student Author(s): Brandon Macer, Senior, Mathematics, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Bogdan Czejdo, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Mathematics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 36 Machine Learning Accuracy Analysis Using Support Vector Machine Model There are many models for machine learning, such as Support Vector Machine (SVM) or Artificial Neural Networks. In general, each model creates a decision boundary based on training data. This decision boundary can

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be more precise or less precise depending on many factors. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between the accuracy of machine learning model and the size of the training data, the proportion of truth sets and false sets, and the shape of the decision boundary. In order to facilitate these experiments, we created an implementation platform of the SVM model using the Anaconda Python environment. This platform is flexible and allows for exploration and visual demonstration of various machine learning models. We used this platform to analyze accuracy of the machine learning SVM model and determined the variation of accuracy depending on the size of the training data and the proportion of truth set and false set. In addition, we experimented with different shapes of decision boundary--such as hard-edged and curved--and we also determined variation of accuracy for these different shapes. More specifically, we addressed both accuracy indicators false positives and true negatives, and total inaccuracies. As a result of our research, we created a platform to experiment with machine learning and a method to reasonably predict accuracy for provided learning set or provide direction about the training set so that the accuracy will be of the required level. The study concluded that the greatest influencing factor of accuracy was shape border length, regardless of relative area. Student Author(s): Alexander Mandarino, Senior, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 39 External force measurement methods in optical tweezers Optical tweezers have been used to measure forces in the picoNewton range typically in biological systems. A custom-built optical tweezers system has been implemented and optimized by our group. In order to test that the system accurately measure forces, we have investigated a well-known force measurement technique utilizing Stokes’ drag. Here we present measurements of varying Stokes drag forces applied to silica microspheres and demonstrate that the apparatus is suitable for picoNewton force measurement. Next we will apply this method to myosin/actin microsphere configurations for better understand muscle operation at the micrometer scale. Student Author(s): Lauren Mantikas, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Jeffrey Taylor, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences – Anatomy & Physiology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 4 Concurrent Validity of Maximal Jump Height Measurements of Clinical, Wearable, and Research-grade Instrumentation Maximum jump height (MJH) is measured in a controlled setting, such as a research laboratory or gymnasium sideline. Obtaining measures of MJH during a game situation may give additional accurate insight into overall performance. PURPOSE: To evaluate the concurrent validity and reliability of MJH measured by clinical, wearable, and research-grade instrumentation in collegiate basketball players. METHODS: Three methods, repeated three times, were concurrently utilized to measure MJH on twenty-one (9M, 12F) collegiate basketball players: an electronic jump mat (JM), a wearable jump sensor (JS), and 3D motion analysis (MA). A repeated measures ANOVA statistically compared the differences in three methods of MJH measurement (p<0.05). 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were calculated to compare the JM and JS against the criterion standard. RESULTS: There were significant differences in average MJH when measured by the JM (43.4cm, p<0.001) and JS (55.7cm, p<0.001) compared to the MA (52.6cm). 95% LOA, in relation to the criterion standard, suggest that both the JM (9.2±4.5cm) and JS (3.3±6.5cm) may lack precision in measuring MJH. CONCLUSION: The JM and JS recorded imprecise MJH values that were significantly different than the criterion standard. Student Author(s): Jennifer Marshall, Junior, Chemistry, High Point University Mentor(s): Andrew Wommack, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 13 Functionality of the Osteocalcin Disulfide Bond Disulfide bonds can be critical to the stability and structure of proteins. Osteocalcin, or bone gammacarboxyglutamic acid protein, is produced by osteoblasts and is the most abundant noncollagenous protein found in bones. The constitutively-expressed protein contains a single disulfide bond that is highly conserved across many species. In addition to the common post-translational modification of the disulfide bond, osteocalcin contains three γ -carboxyglutamate residues. Osteocalcin is also found outside of bone tissue but contains the native form of glutamate residues. These residues have undergone decarboxylation under the acidic conditions of bone resorption

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by osteoclasts. Circulating levels of undercarboxylated osteocalcin are suggested to be involved in a wide range of interesting biological functions including increasing insulin sensitivity in adipose and skeletal muscle tissue, and enhancing skeletal muscle mitochondrial density. To investigate the latter effect, we have chemically synthesized the 46-amino acid murine osteocalcin using a flow chemistry approach to solid-phase peptide synthesis. With osteocalcin and the disulfide-null derivative, we will investigate the importance of the disulfide group to mitochondrial biogenesis in differentiated C2C12 myotubes using Western blot analyses. Student Author(s): Sarah Martin, Senior, Animal Science North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Daniel Poole, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Zoology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 15 Hair Coat Phenotypeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Effect on Thermoregulation of Heifers Infected with Fescue Toxicosis Fescue toxicosis develops in cattle that consume endophyte-infected tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), this results in economic losses to the beef industry. One symptom of this disease is elevated body temperatures. A slick gene, originally identified in Senepol cattle, creates short slick hair and more efficient regulation of body temperature in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine if hair coat phenotype impacts thermoregulation capabilities of heifers experiencing fescue toxicosis. Angus X Senepol heifers (n=31) were blocked by weight and hair type, Slick (S) or Rough (R), were placed in Calan gates then randomly assigned to receive either endophyte-infected fescue haylage (E+) or non-infected fescue haylage (E-; control) for 63d. Temperature measurements were taken weekly using a laser thermometer, rectal thermometer, and a thermal camera. Data from individual animals in the respective treatments, E+S, E-S, E+R, and E-R were analyzed using a repeated measures program in SAS, mean temperatures and standard errors were then graphed. On average heifers with the slick phenotype were able to better prevent their surface temperatures from increasing than those possessing the rough phenotype. Therefore, integrating the slick gene into cattle may be beneficial in counteracting the increase in body temperature related to fescue toxicosis. Student Author(s): Brian Masters, Senior, High School, North Carolina State University Hannah Klemmer, Junior, High School, Research Triangle High School Mentor(s): Amy Grunden, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 6 Effect of Different Nitrogen Sources on the Growth of Four Species of Dunaliella Dunaliella is a unicellular green microalgae and candidate feedstock for biofuel. Dunaliella requires no prime agricultural land or freshwater for growth. It grows fast, has no cell wall and can accumulate up to 60% cellular dry weight as oil. However, Dunaliella requires nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon to grow. The production of nitrogen fertilizers used to grow algae both consumes energy and is a source of greenhouse gases. Since digestion of algal biomass yields amino acids We were interested in determining whether amino acids could be used as a potential alternative nitrogen source for Dunaliella strains. To learn more about the use of amino acids in this algae, four different nitrogen sources (potassium nitrate, amino acids glutamine and glutamate, and a media without nitrogen) were used to grow four species of Dunaliella (D. viridis, D. salina, D. primolecta, and D. tertiolecta). The working hypothesis for the study is glutamine will prove to be more effective in growth of Dunaliella due to the additional nitrogen (an extra amine group) in the molecule over glutamate. Our growth study showed glutamine better supported growth of both viridis and primolecta, while Dunaliella salina showed a negligible growth response on amino acids. Student Author(s): Maxwell Maurer, Sophomore, Physics, High Point University Mentor(s): Briana Fiser, High Point University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 51 Agarose as a Mucus Simulant For Use In a Biomimetic Cilia System Mucociliary clearance is a complex process in the lung, which involves the coordination of arrays of biological cilia and the propulsion of the fluid mucus. When this process does not function as it should, diseases such as immotile cilia syndrome or cystic fibrosis can occur. To further our understanding of biological cilia-driven mucus movement, a biomimetic cilia system consisting of flexible and magnetic core-shell microrods can be used with fluids similar to natural mucus, which is a viscoelastic fluid. We investigated the properties of the polysaccharide agarose, for use as our mucus simulant, by adding fluorescent beads one micron in diameter to varying

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concentrations of agarose solutions and tracking their thermal motion. Bead paths in concentrations of 0.1-0.5 percent agarose in 150mM sodium chloride were analyzed. We present results on the beads’ thermal motion in these concentrations and show that increasing the agarose concentration caused the fluid to become highly elastic. This trend is similarly seen in natural mucus, as an increase in the percent solids in mucus also results in an increase in fluid elasticity. Student Author(s): Nicholas McCauslin, Junior, Environmental Studies Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Reed Perkins, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 56 Relationship between hydraulic fracturing and seismic activity in the Marcellus Shale This study examines the relationship between hydraulic fracturing with horizontal drilling and seismic activity in the Marcellus Shale region of Pennsylvania and Ohio. Hydraulic fracturing (Fracking) has been a major environmental issue and is often thought to be linked to seismic activity. The main theory behind this claim is that the release of water, sand, and chemicals into the ground to break up bedrock would increase pressure; this pressure then releases in the form of an earthquake. In order to test this claim earthquake location and frequency occurring four years prior to the initiation of horizontal drilling and compared that data to earthquakes four years after horizontal drilling started. The results were not conclusive. The total number of earthquakes stayed relatively the same, but the earthquakes moved closer to the areas where wells were located. Student Author(s): Mary Clare McGinn, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Sandra Cooke, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Effects of Various Algal Food Sources on Cyclopoida In both the laboratory and in nature, zooplankton feed on various forms of algae. The zooplankton cyclopoida are small crustaceans from the subclass Copepoda found in both saltwater and freshwater habitats. The purpose of this experiment was to test which algal food source fed to cyclopoida lead to best survival and reproduction. We hypothesize that the cyclopoida fed the Chlorella would have the highest survival and reproduction rates. The cyclopoida were collected from Oak Hollow Lake, located in High Point, North Carolina. The established cultures contained 50 mL of filtered Oak Hollow Lake water, with an initial sample of five cyclopoida per dish. Over the course of several weeks, a total of four different algal foods were tested on the cyclopoida: Selenastrum, Ankistrodesmus, Chlorella, and Scenedesmus. The cyclopoida were fed 50 µL of each algal food per week. There were three replicates per each algal food source. The samples were kept in an incubator that had a standard light/dark cycle during the course of the research. The incubator was kept at 21.8 °C, an average temperature for the cyclopoida found in Oak Hollow Lake. In order to calculate the reproduction and survival of each culture, 1 mL was sampled from each replicate and the number of cyclopoida were counted. This experiment helps to highlight the importance of the availability of a certain algae in Oak Hollow Lake.

Student Author(s): Matthew McHenry, Junior, Chemistry, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Eric Brustad, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Cofactor Engineering of Heme-Binding Enzymes for the Catalysis of Non-Natural Reactions For years, scientists have used rounds of mutagenesis and screening to engineer heme-binding enzymes to catalyze nonnatural reactions. Although making amino acid substitutions in the protein has proved to be a powerful approach, other research has focused on making modifications to the heme cofactor itself. These cofactor engineering efforts have had some success, but have all suffered from the same shortcoming: the enzyme preferably binds native heme over non-natural heme derivatives. My research question is: can heme enzymes be engineered to selectively bind heme derivatives over native heme? We hypothesize that these orthogonal enzyme:heme derivative pairs will have improved catalytic activity in non-natural reactions, and access to new substrates, relative to the enzyme:native heme pair. We have synthesized several novel phenyl-substituted heme derivatives via cross metathesis reactions. Efforts to engineer heme enzyme P450BM3 for selectivity in phenyl heme binding are ongoing, through cloning and screening mutant P450BM3 libraries. Preliminary data indicates the P450BM3:phenyl heme pairs are active catalysts of non-natural cyclopropanation. I am also working on engineering P450 BM3 to bind various other heme derivatives possessing non-iron metals and different chemical functional groups on the porphyrin scaffold.

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Student Author(s): Mollie McKinley, Junior, English Literature, High Point University Mentor(s): Laura Alexander, High Point University Presentation: English (Literature), Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Mary Wroth's Pamphilia to Amphilanthus and the Limits of the Self There are many posing mysteries of Lady Mary Wroth’s Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, most of which researchers have tried to solve by studying two different versions of the same sequence. Wroth became the first womansonneteer of her era to use Petrarchan values, and to do so in a way that caught the eyes of her society. Deeply influenced by her family’s writing talents, Wroth seized the title as one of the most educated women of her time. Her heavily erotic phrases, and whole sonnets for that matter, exuded feminine beliefs and values. Silenced by a male-dominated society in the early 1600s, Wroth stayed controlled by her own experiences with betrayal and unattainable love which created a sense of hiding for her, and set her voice aside from others as she was able to articulate her emotions as she felt them, no matter the ridicule. Wroth’s journey to find an authorial voice, one that established a gender-ambiguous “self”, invented her specific writing style, which included her Petrarchan style and ability to live through her female characters, such as Pamphilia. Wroth’s previous experiences with love and rejection shape herself to establish her voice through the new process of sonnet writing, and using her gender indeterminacy to give her agency to write as a woman. Student Author(s): Chauncey McNeill, Senior, Chemistry and Criminal Justice, University of North Carolina Charlotte Mentor(s): Jordan Poler, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Chemistry - Nanoscience, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Binding of Novel Earth Abundant Metal Coordination Complexes as Molecular Spacers to Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes We will report on the binding to and aggregation of carbon nanotubes by novel metal coordination complexes acting as molecular spacers. These complexes act to enhance available Electrical Double Layer Capacitance and add a significant pseudocapacitance increasing the specific capacitance, specific energy, and power. We will present results using compounds like 4-(tert-butyl)-2,6-bis((2-(phthalazin-1-yl)hydrazono)methyl)phenol (m2 methoxo) dizinc(II) which use earth abundant metals and therefore enable a sustainable solution to a difficult societal problem. Kinetics of binding show zeroth order behavior supporting an independent binding model. Onset of aggregation and conductivity studies support an ion-pair binding model that differs significantly from previous studies in this area. Adsorption isotherm data are fit my the three parameter BET model which is statistically significant when compared to Langmuir and Freundlich models. Membrane resistance measurement suggest that the tub-tube distances are separated due to the intercalation of these molecular spacers. Molecular modeling of the ion-accessible surface area around the SWCNTs will be presented in the context of the enhanced capacitance found on these thin films materials. Student Author(s): Victoria McQuade, Senior, Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Carlos Goller, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Delftia acidovorans: Life in the Sink Delftia acidovorans is an opportunistic pathogen that has been found in sinks, soil, and wastewater. This bacterium persists in often stressful environments, and this may be due to genes that allow for improved tolerance to stressors such as heavy metals. In order to characterize how Delftia acidovorans survives and persists around us, we addressed the questions a) where is this microbe found and b) what mechanisms does it have to deal with stressors. Presence of D. acidovorans in drains was assessed with an environmental survey. Using real time PCR to detect a Delftia-specific sequence, several of the samples tested positive, suggesting the presence of D. acidovorans in these environments. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed with two common laboratory D. acidovorans strains to evaluate the resistance of this bacterium to common metals. Based on growth at numerous metal concentrations, the strain D. acidovorans 396R showed higher resistance to different metals when compared to D. acidovorans SPH-1. Putative metal resistance genes from 396R were cloned. As several samples taken from metal environments were positive for D. acidovorans, we hypothesize that the increased metal resistance displayed by this bacterium is a contributing factor for its success in these habitats.

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Student Author(s): Andrea Medina, Sophomore, Advertising, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Effects of Mass Media Communications on the Perceptual Concept of a Good Life Every person is able to identify specific characteristics that bring satisfaction and happiness to their life, but for some reason they seem to become less valid if they deviate from the established, more-widely accepted ones. As the percentile of happy people has steadily decreased over the years, this paper aims to search for a cause of the conflict between the individual and mass-media inflicted definitions of a good life. In one hand, there are the individual factors that construct a personal definition of happiness: perception and experience. On the other, there is the main influencer of public opinions and standards: mass media communications. While the mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main purpose is to facilitate the flow of objective information, its effects have reached far beyond that simple task. The media has stretched its influence to the most intimate aspects of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life in order to assure the expansion of its business, amplifying the clash between the two perspectives as a consequence. For this reason, it is imperative to explore and understand the implications of empowering mass media trends in areas as personal and individuallybased as the components of happiness and a good life. Student Author(s): Sam Migirditch, Junior, Physics and Mathematics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Biophysics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 53 Lorenz-Mie Scattering Models of Gold Nanoshells in Optical Tweezers Optical tweezers have been used for studying microscopic biological systems, and consist of a highly focused Gaussian laser beam which can trap a microsphere near its focus. Typically, the microsphere is attached to a moving biological structure in order to monitor motion or an external force. Metallic nanoparticles have become recently of interest in the field due to their potential increased trap stiffness from plasmonic effects. In this work, Lorenz-Mie scattering models are used to predict the trapping forces and stiffness for single gold nanoshells of various geometries trapped in optical tweezers. The parameters of trap beam wavelength, trap beam polarization, silica nanosphere size, and nanoshell thickness are varied and results are compared to expected values in order to find an optimized stiffness for a single nanoshell-laser system. This work will be modified in the future for the optimization of trap stiffness while simultaneously minimizing sample heating.

Student Author(s): Benjamin Migirditch, Junior, Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Biophysics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 50 Automation of spatial filter tilt in confocal Raman spectroscopy The diagnostic capabilities of Raman spectroscopy have been combined with the precision and power of optical tweezers into an instrument known as Raman tweezers, typically used for structural or composition measurements of biological systems. A spatial filter placed within the system acts as a limiting aperture in the image plane, allowing improved spatial resolution and increased signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman spectrum. Optical alignment by hand can be tedious and experiments may be difficult to replicate. Here we present progress towards the optimization of tilt of the spatial filter in a confocal Raman tweezer system. The software and algorithms developed here will be used in a fully automated five dimensional spatial filter alignment of confocal Raman tweezers. Student Author(s): Clare Milburn, Sophomore, Sustainable Development, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Granting Amnesty in the United States There are roughly eleven million undocumented immigrants in the United States. This population cannot be ignored. Many factors stand in the way of illegal immigrants, making it nearly impossible to become a citizen. Eleven million people with no legal protection or rights is unfair. It is necessary to allow them to come out of the shadows to become citizens. For many, America is the land of opportunity. In other countries, opportunity is non-

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existent. In Latin America, countries are bereft of jobs and riddled with gang and drug violence. While America is not without poverty and violence, it does have a working system that provides jobs to most who are willing to work for them. American politicians have done little for amnesty reform because of fundamental disagreements. Illegal immigrants can rarely become citizens, not because they do not want to, but because they do not have the opportunity. Amnesty should be granted in the most cost efficient way by allowing undocumented immigrants to pay a small price to be background checked, granting them a green card allowing them to follow naturalization steps. This process allows people to pay taxes, make more money for their families, and live unafraid of deportation. Student Author(s): Eni Minerali, Junior, Biochemistry, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Kimberly Petersen, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 31 Asymmetric Synthesis of Enantioenriched Lactams The desymmetrization of prochiral diesters with a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst to produce highly enantioenriched lactams is described. The substrate scope of the prochiral diester is increased to generate an enantioenriched allcarbon quaternary center while optimizing the reaction conditions. Student Author(s): Mitchel Modlin, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Christopher Thaxton, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 25 A Viability Study of Moso Bamboo Cultivation in North Carolina Bamboo is a valued resource utilized daily by about 2.5 billion people around the world, mainly for construction and cuisine purposes. The vast majority of this bamboo usage is in Asia; however, the plant has grown as a commodity elsewhere in the world because of its versatile uses and quick growth rate. Of the approximately 1250 different species of bamboo throughout the world, we present investigations on Phyllostachys edulis, also known as Moso. Moso bamboo is a temperate species that can grow in climates similar to that of the Southeastern U.S. and parts of the Pacific Northwest. A GIS analysis of suitable locations within North Carolina for cultivating Moso indicates areas in the state that would be able to nurture a hypothetical bamboo nursery. Suitability is defined using ideal parameters for growth of Moso regarding mean annual temperature, monthly mean minimum temperatures, average annual precipitation, soil characteristics (including pH and soil type), and elevation. The results of this project will yield information relevant to individuals or entities that have an interest in cultivating bamboo, either for personal or commercial purposes. The research involved will also give insight into the viability of bamboo as a sustainable product in the modern world. Student Author(s): India Moffett, Sophomore, Studio Art, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15) Gaia in Green: Honoring the Goddess in Contemporary Ecofeminist Art From ancient times, human reverence for the Earth is evident in art, myth, and behaviors of cultures across the globe. The Divine Goddess is one archetype of interest who is conceptualized as “Earth Mother” in past and present Indigenous cultures such as the Inca, Aborigines, and ancient Greek mythology where she appears as Pachamama, Old Woman, and Gaia, respectively. In contemporary Western Cultures the Sacred Feminine manifests in the burgeoning field of Ecofeminism which embraces qualities of shared power platforms, emphasis on the web of interconnectedness, and deep ecological environmental stewardship which mirrors human health. Thorough review of literature, examination of pertinent ecofeminist artists’ work, and collaborative eco-art sculpture installation combined in a multi-layered investigation of the Divine Goddess. This ecofeminist design entailed communal creation of the sculpture, use of natural materials, and site selection in ASU’s Civic Garden. Ultimately, this process explores how contemporary Ecofeminist Art conducted in reverent conversation with the Goddess embodies virtues of the ancient Sacred Feminine. It validates equality for all people through respectful artistic interactions with the Earth, retells the herstory of the Divine Goddess, and engages womyn and men on college campuses in conversation about our relationships with each other and the Earth.

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Student Author(s): Erin Monahan, Senior, Psychology, High Point University Mentor(s): Deborah Danzis, High Point University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 13 Relationships Between Childhood Trauma, Disordered Eating, and Self-Esteem Research has shown correlations between eating disorders and childhood abuse and self-esteem (Brodski & Hutz, 2012; Jaite et al., 2011; Kent, Waller & Dagnan, 1999; Lawler, 2007). However little research has examined the role of other traumatic experiences such as natural disasters, violent crimes, kidnappings, etc. The purpose of the present study was to examine the connections between disordered eating, other traumas, childhood abuse, and selfesteem. Participants included 87 female and 20 male undergraduates. Participants completed the Rosenberg SelfEsteem scale to measure feelings of self worth, the Minnesota Eating Behavior Survey to measure disordered eating, and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire Short-Form to measure childhood abuse. In addition, participants reported if they had experienced traumas such as natural disasters or death of a loved one. Results showed correlations between disordered eating and both emotional abuse and emotional neglect. In addition, there was a correlation between disordered eating and self-esteem. Other forms of trauma did not correlate with disordered eating. Results suggest that childhood emotional experiences may be critical, but more general traumas may not be, in the development of disordered eating. It may be important to address childhood experiences during treatment of disordered eating. Student Author(s): Faith Montgomery, Sophomore, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): David Sitar, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Astrophysics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 7 Introductory Astronomy Laboratory Visual Back and Camera Upgrade Project A positive introductory astronomy lab experience is essential for drawing in new prospective majors and promoting an open attitude towards science for general education students. In order to provide students with a more engaging learning experience we are in the process of upgrading the Rankin GoTo Laboratory. Two “piggybacked” refracting telescopes; an 80mm Explore Scientific apochromatic refractor with a 480mm focal length and an 80mm Lunt achromatic refractor with a 560mm focal length, were tested on top of an 11-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope (SCT). An SBIG STF-8300C CCD camera was included in the imaging experiment. The CCD has built in color capabilities and is 17.96x13.52mm, a significant upgrade from our current black and white cameras with a 4x5mm CCD size. The SCT was also tested with the SBIG camera. All telescopes were tested to find the most effective and user-friendly imaging setup. The SCT and SBIG camera demonstrated best results. Student Author(s): Alaina Monts, Senior, Women's and Gender Studies, Theatre University of North Carolina Greensboro Mentor(s): Sarah Cervenak, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Women's and Gender Studies, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) “Take You to Paradise” : Meshell Ndegeocello, Liminality, and Radical Black Sexualities Meshell Ndegeocello’s refusal to acknowledge the meaning that will inevitably be placed on her Black, queered body in her performance and her music challenges Western notions of gender that seek to facilitate a discussion deeming Black sexualities deviant. Trying to analyze her oeuvre based off of an identity model limits the depth of analysis. In order to more fully examine her work, this paper will look at what happens when a Black woman chooses non-identity as an identity. Instead of assigning an identity to her and reading her work via that lens, through this non-identity, or gender and sexual liminality, Meshell Ndegeocello opens the door for discussions about the radical possibilities existing within illegible Black sexualities, and eventually towards an erotics of nonidentity.

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Student Author(s): Tyler Moore, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Mentor(s): Conner Sandefur, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 58 Mathematical model of transcription factor-DNA binding dynamics Cells respond to environmental stresses by changing genome-wide gene expression levels through the use of transcription factor proteins. Investigation of transcription factor-DNA binding dynamics is important to understanding transcriptional regulation. Competition chromatin immunoprecipitation (cCHIP) technology was used to obtain genome-wide measurements of protein-DNA binding dynamics. cCHIP measures the displacement of a naturally occurring constitutive protein by an inducible protein controlled with a gal promoter system. The current methodology uses a simplified statistical model to predict DNA-protein dissociation (turnover) rates. This project was designed to improve upon the current model to more accurately quantify protein-DNA turnover rates of proteins with short residency times. We developed a mechanistic mathematical model, which was implemented in Python 3.4 and informed by published experimental data. The mechanistic equations describe five terms: free constitutive protein, free induced protein, the free unbound DNA [D], constitutive bound to DNA, and induced bound to DNA. We show that our mechanistic model is able to capture the induced protein dynamics through incorporation of positive feedback via the gal promoter system. With the gal induced protein dynamics captured, the turnover rate of transcription factors with short residency times may be quantified. Student Author(s): Natasha Morales Castellanos, Senior, Chemistry and Mathematics, Salem College Mentor(s): Frank Marini, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 14 Deciphering the Hierarchy of Stroma in Breast Cancer Utilizing Multispectral Analysis It is well-known that the tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells. The Marini lab group has previously shown that tumor cells recruit stromal cells like mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These cells enhance tumor growth, structure, and vascularization. In fact, we believe the amount of tumor stroma is directly linked to the aggressiveness of a tumor and that it may be an indicator of poor patient prognosis. Certain types of stromal cells found in tumors may not be very aggressive; these are referred to as “MSC-like”. In other tumors, however, stromal cells are aggressive; these are referred to as “matrix-remodeling”. The Marini lab group believes each stromal cell type expresses different biomarkers which help to identify them. Therefore, the goals of this study were to examine the contribution of stroma to tumor development and to identify different types of transitioned stroma. In order to do so, a mixture of human MSCs and breast cancer cells were injected into SCID mice. The tumors were then removed, sectioned, and stained with different biomarkers. Multispectral imaging was used to create a markerspecific spectral library. Further data analysis will help identify what certain markers within the stroma contribute to tumor growth and development. Student Author(s): Brianna Morris, Junior, Biology, Elizabeth City State University Dayton Bell, Junior, Biology, Elizabeth City State University Mentor(s): Hirendranath Banerjee, Elizabeth City State University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 37 Title: Effect of Novel Rhenium Compounds on Different Cancer Cell Lines War against cancer was declared by President Nixon in the seventies, it is still a deadly disease with very few therapeutic strategies, henceforth, and search for novel drugs to treat cancer is of out most importance. Among metal drugs, Platinum has been routinely used to treat many forms of cancer; however, due to the high price of Platinum that causes very high cost of cancer chemotherapy, search for alternate metal drugs with high efficacy in cancer treatment is needed. Rhenium based compounds have shown effective anti-cancer properties. In this study we investigated the effect of several novel rhenium compounds on prostate, leukemia and other cancer cell lines. The cancer cell lines were treated with different doses of these novel rhenium compounds for 48 hours and the IC50 for each compound was determined by Trypan Blue cell death assay and MTT cell proliferation assay, the mechanism of cell death was assayed by DNA stoichiometric and apoptotic studies. Further pharmacological studies involving initial ADME and pk/pD estimations validated plasma stability and hepatic P450 microsomal

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activity. Thus our initial studies confirm the anticancer properties of these novel rhenium compounds, however, further in vitro and in vivo studies will be necessary to take these drugs from bench to bed side. Student Author(s): Marc Muraski, Senior, Biology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Melanie Lee-Brown, Guilford College Emil Nilsson, Wake Forest University Rebecca Alexander, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Cloning and Characterization of tRNA(Ile) Lysidine Synthetase in Burkholderia cenocepacia Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen and implicated in infections in the pulmonary system of immunocompromised cystic fibrosis patients. Of particular interest is the gene that encodes tRNAIle lysidine synthetase (TilS). The TilS gene is highly conserved among bacteria and is responsible for post-transcriptional modification of the wobble position cytosine (C34) in the tRNA Ile2 anticodon region. This chemical conversion switches the CAU anticodon to LAU where L is lysidine, enabling both aminoacylation with isoleucine (instead of methionine) and decoding a mRNA AUA (instead of AUG) codon. Loss of the TilS gene can impair the cellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to translate the AUA codon efficiently, leading to a loss in fitness. Prior work by our collaborator suggests that small modifications to the TilS gene leads to an increase in planktonic growth for B. cenocepacia under environmental stress. In this study TilS and methionyl tRNA synthetase (MetRS) were cloned and expressed from B. cenocepacia genomic DNA. The isolation of these two proteins allows for kinetic analysis using B. cenocepacia tRNAMet to identify a baseline for substrate specificity. The MetRS protein was verified using an activity assay in which the MetRS enzyme successfully aminoacylated its cognate tRNAMet. Student Author(s): Michael Murphy, Sophomore, English, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) How to Correctly Watch a Movie All too often, movies are taken for granted. Works of literature are praised for the countless hours of revision and work put on the clock to be completed. Movies are often very similar, and while often only given recognition for their entertainment value, many films are often as complex if not more so than literature. Through the use of miseen scene directors are able to produce complex narratives that push the audience to make connections through audio and visual stimuli. Spielberg, in the movie Jaws, uses the aforementioned techniques to develop one of the most complex characters in modern cinema, Captain Quint. In my paper I examine the internal conflict that transforms Quint throughout the film by pointing out various changes that he undergoes. Furthermore I discuss other aspects of film that are cleverly hidden and require critical analysis to uncover. It is time to recognize the medium of film as not only entertainment, but a form of academic stimulation. Stimulation that can come from movies other than Interstellar or Inception. Student Author(s): Conner Murray, Junior, Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Douglas Call, North Carolina State University Qiwen Cheng, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 38 Enhancement of Anaerobic Digestion with Electrically Conductive Particles The treatment of high-strength wastewater by anaerobic digestion is a commercially available, but sparsely utilized, method for simultaneously degrading waste and harnessing methane as a renewable resource. Previous technology involved converting organic matter into methane gas through syntrophic interactions with microorganisms. Recent findings have shown that improving the electron transfer from syntrophs to the methanogens can further increase methane production in a process known as direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) where electrically conductive particles (ECPs) serve as cell-to-cell electron conduits when added to anaerobic digesters. Our research aims to determine how variability in ECP properties impacts methane production from lab-scale anaerobic digesters. We are investigating the impact of particle size, conductivity and concentration as well as particle enrichment phases in order to maximize methane production in our digesters. These particles in conjunction with real waste streams from the South Durham Water Reclamation Facility produced initial results that show graphite particles yielding similar or better methane production as compared to non-augmented controls while other ECPs

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experienced reduced methane production. Augmenting the wastewater systems with and without ECPs will translate to treatment facilities and agricultural wastewaters on how this method can improve energy recovery, thus improve the economics of anaerobic digestion technology. Student Author(s): Shanon Murray, Junior, Sociology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Malin Pereira, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: English (Literature), Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Anatomy of Racism: A Dissection of Racial Oppression and Social Injustices in the Work of Contemporary African American Poet Wanda Coleman Contemporary African American poet Wanda Coleman represents a unique addition to the African American literary canon through her didactic poetics. Her poetry is a reflection of her experiences growing up in poverty, surrounded by images that contrast the American Dream. Coleman has been recognized for addressing issues of class, gender, and family in American society, while her adamant stance against racism has not been the central focus of much scholarly research. By identifying that racism extends far beyond the use of the “N” word, Coleman educates her audience through the poems “Drone,” “Business as Usual,” and “Late Broadcast News,” about the specific features of racism, including economic inequality, poor quality of health care, and the unwarranted killings of African American men and women. It is important that both consumers and producers of the tradition recognize the subtle markings of racism, that it is systematically embedded into the pores of a nation that has historically profited from the dehumanization of African Americans. Only then, can enthusiasts of the tradition reexamine the historical context which originally placed blacks at the bottom of society’s chain, and be propelled towards social activism to challenge the current system of oppression inflicted upon minority groups. Student Author(s): Dakota Murray, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Mitch Parry, Appalachian State Univesrity Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Evaluation of Source Separation Algorithms Applied to Beehive Audio Colony collapse disorder is the term given to the global widespread death of honey bee hives. Honey bee pollination is directly responsible for one third of the food that humans eat; when honey bee populations decline, so does the global food supply. Due to the implications to agriculture, research into colony collapse disorders and beehives is of great importance. Researchers addressing the problem analyze data which may include audio files recorded from bee hives. Often these audio recordings are not fit for analysis due to being recorded using low quality equipment or containing interference or background signals. Analysis of corrupted recordings may produce confounding results. The goal of this presentation is to discuss and evaluate a method of separating the desired source of a bee-hive audio recording from the other, undesired background sources. Several variations of this source separation algorithm are evaluated for their effectiveness in separating various examples of beehive audio recordings that are representative of real world situations. Student Author(s): Lauren Musa, Senior, Mathematics, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Yufang Bao, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Mathematics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 43 Finding Face Outlines Using the DRLSE and Geometric Properties of the Face This research focused on finding face outlines in images. The DRLSE level set method was applied to grey-scaled front facing images to identify possible face boundaries. Along with the DRLSE, an algorithm is implemented to discern face-like outlines by using geometric properties of the face, such as face length and chin location. The algorithm executes a re-initialization feature to improve the speed at which the DRLSE will move toward the face boundary. Re-initialization occurs when the found outline doesn’t stratify the algorithm’s standards for face-like. Overall, speed and accuracy was improved by pairing the DRLSE with this algorithm.

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Student Author(s): Regina Nasrallah, Freshman, English, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Andrea Roller, Appalachian State University Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Life is Death: Anyone Who Says Differently is Selling Something Americans watch films like Saving Private Ryan and play violent video games where the purpose of the game is to pursue and murder others; yet we are all shocked when there are campus shootings or mass murders in our country. Overexposure to bloodshed directly correlates with this strange phenomenon. In games and movies, we treat violence as entertaining and prevalent; violence becomes so normal that we don’t think twice about viewing it. When violence occurs in our world, however, we are all shocked and shaken. The word “death” has become a taboo, people would rather say “passed away” or “lost” than address the reality. This is the natural human reaction to gratuitous destruction. We mourn the loss of human life and hold memorials to commemorate the time we had with our passed loved ones. That is because we know human life is important, the value is instinctive. If this is true, why do we surround ourselves and our children with violent and grotesque media? In this paper I will be exploring through academic database and personal research the answers to this and many other questions. Student Author(s): Raimie Neibaur, Freshman, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) How Anecdotes and Misconceptions Affect Perceptions of Residential College Program The Watauga Residential College is a community that forms through shared academic and living experiences. No barriers separate the academic, cultural, and social components of Watauga staff, students, and faculty. Because of where Watauga is located within Appalachian State University and who is a part of the program, many people see it as a separate entity from the main campus and believe that it has not historically followed University guidelines. Using a number of articles by faculty discussing social and academic aspects of Watauga College and two surveys I conducted, conclusions can be made relating to Watauga and how they become a part of the Learning Community. While not all the evidence hinders the college, they still create a false understanding of what it is trying to achieve for students who want a more intimate relationship between academics and social groups. Underlying problems all Colleges and Universities must take into consideration for the continuation of higher education advancement can be derived from these surveys. Whether or not the schools are what they seem to be, perceptions associated with them cause a false image to form around them. Student Author(s): LaTasha Nicholson, Senior, Material Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Ericka Ford, North Carolina State University Chunhong Lu, North Carolina State University Presentation: Textiles - Engineering, Chemistry & Science, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 18 Dissolution Temperature of Lignin and Poly(vinyl alcohol) Gel Fibers The ultimate goal of this research is to fabricate high performance fibers with high modulus and strength. Gel spinning is a technique used to produce high performance fibers. In this study poly(vinyl alcohol) and lignin were used along with the gel spinning technique to produce gel fibers. The gel spun fibers then went through the drawing process to better align the polymer chains thus making the fibers stronger. The dissolution temperature of the drawn gel fibers could be observed using Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO/water mixture as solvent. This characterization technique would help better understand the interaction between the solvent and the fiber, which would further provide insight about the optimization of the drawing process for better mechanical properties. Student Author(s): Nathan Norris, Senior, Kinesiology, Campbell University Mentor(s): Jennifer Bunn, Campbell University Douglas Powell, Campbell University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 7 The Impact of Altered Visual Input and Auditory Stimulations on Balance and Postural Stability PURPOSE: To determine the effects that visual and auditory inputs have on balance and postural stability. METHODS: Center of pressure (CoP) of 30 participants in four different visual conditions (eyes open,

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eyes closed, moving dot with no sound, and moving dot with sound) was measured with a modified Wii Balance Board. IKKOS goggles that displayed the dot and emitted an auditory clicking sound were worn during these two conditions. Mediolateral, anteroposterior, and total excursions were calculated. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the mean anteriorposterior (p < .001) and mean total CoP (p < .001), but not for mean mediolateral CoP (p = .469). Post-hoc analyses revealed that the eyes open condition exhibited smaller mean CoP excursions than the other conditions (p < .05). The largest CoP excursions occurred during the eyes closed condition. DISCUSSION: Visual input of any form contributes to better balance and less sway. Other than the eyes open condition, wearing the IKKOS goggles resulted in the least amount of sway which indicated that the subjects did benefit from the goggles. Perhaps training programs with the IKKOS goggles can be developed to maintain or improve balance by relying more on vestibular and proprioceptive information. Student Author(s): Sean Norton, Senior, Political Science and Russian Studies, University of North Carolina Greensboro Mentor(s): William Crowther, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Caught Between: Transnistria's Separatist Conflict in the Regional Context This project evaluates the possibility of a recrudescence of the Transnistrian conflict since the outbreak of conflict in Ukraine through a review of the relevant historical context as well as an analysis of changes in the EU, Russian, and Transnistrian stances. While several frozen conflicts exist across the former USSR, broad similarities exist between the Ukrainian and Moldovan separatist regions. Like Ukraine, Moldova is split between the Westernoriented majority of the country and a large Russian-oriented minority. This has resulted in a division between the region of Bessarabia, between the Prut and Dniester rivers, and the breakaway region of Transnistria, on the east bank of the Dniester. While the share of Russians in Transnistria’s population is low in comparison with Crimea and the Donbass, ethnic fears played a role in the eruption of a brief civil war in 1991. The involvement of Russian forces ended the fighting without a resolution on the status of Transnistria, “freezing” the conflict. This conflict has remained inactive, but with Moldova caught between domestic Western ambitions and Russia’s campaign to maintain influence in the region, it is possible that armed conflict could re-erupt either spontaneously or due to Russian interference in Moldova’s internal affairs. Student Author(s): Jesse O'Campo, Senior, Chemistry and Biology, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Mentor(s): Leonard Holmes, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Effect of Environmental Factors on Growth Kinetics of Photorhabdus luminescens Phase-I cells using a 2 L Sartorius Stedim Biostat® A+ Fermentation System Photorhabdus luminescens, a pigment-producing enteric bacterium and symbiont of Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, was studied in batch cultures to determine the specific growth rates and doubling times. The purpose of this research is to investigate the growth kinetics of Photorhabdus luminescens in a bioreactor containing complex growth media at different environmental conditions. Fermentation parameters were controlled over the course of the bacterial growth. The reactor parameters included pH, temperature, agitation and aeration. The specific growth rates and doubling times of P. luminescens were determined. The study showed that the parameters of 1.0 vvm, pH 7.8, 28°C and 300 RPM had the highest specific growth rate 0.59 h -1 and the shortest doubling time 1.2 hr. Student Author(s): Moira O'Neill, Senior, Sociology and Anthropology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Gail Webster, Guilford College Presentation: Social Work, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 51 Developing Partnerships to Address Food Hardship in Greensboro, NC Guilford College is located in the Greensboro/Highpoint region, which according to the Food Resource and Action Center, is considered number one in food hardship in the nation. Because Guilford has a campus farm and Quaker values of stewardship, equality, justice and community it is the perfect school to work on addressing this issue. This past summer, a group of four faculty members and three students worked to develop a proposal for a Sustainable Food Systems major at Guilford. A research question developed as a result of this work: In what ways can students in the proposed major best address food insecurity in Greensboro? The work resulted in a list of various potential

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partners for Guilford students in a Sustainable Food Systems major, and a map of food deserts in Greensboro. Greensboro has a wide variety of organizations and groups working on this issue who could all benefit from working in a collaborative partnership. The proposed major plans to develop ways in which these organizations can work together in order to best serve the needs of the community. Student Author(s): Ruici Ong, Senior, Environmental Science and Policy (A.B.), Duke University Mentor(s): Chantal Reid, Duke University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Smallholder Coffee Farmer Perceptions of Climate Change in Espírito Santo, Brazil Climate change causes droughts, floods and extreme weather events that threaten smallholder farmer livelihoods. Smallholders respond to adverse environmental change by innovatively adapting agricultural and livelihood practices, yet their perspectives are little included in national adaptation strategies. This qualitative research project explores smallholder farmer perceptions of local climate change and their adaptation strategies. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 smallholder farmers of conilon coffee, a Brazilian variety of Coffea canephora, from 7 municipalities in Espírito Santo, SE Brazil. Preliminary analysis of interviews with NVIVO suggests that conilon farmers perceive and adapt to environmental changes in the context of the farm ecosystem, and interactions with farmer cooperatives and rural extension agencies. Adaptive strategies include irrigation system change, altering agrochemical use, increasing agroecology practices, growing lucrative crops. Farmers perceived increased pathogen attack and poorer processed bean yields as a function of drought timing. Increased pathogen incidence in relation to climate change is a poorly explored area of agricultural research. Finally, farmers perceived assistance from social and public entities as necessary to surmount obstacles to adaptation. Policy-makers should foster strong connections between farmers, farm cooperatives and rural extension agencies as part of a climate change adaptation strategies. Student Author(s): Emily Oshita, Senior, Chemistry, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Shubo Han, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 39 Evaluation of Lead Contamination in Southeastern North Carolina Water Sources by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry Heavy metal contamination in drinking water is a serious global health hazard and a recent coal ash spill into North Carolina rivers has caused concern about the safety of area potable water sources. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require that the maximum lead content for potable tap water be no more than 15 parts per billion (ppb). 34 samples collected from water sources in Southeastern North Carolina were tested using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) to determine the concentration of lead as an indicator heavy metal contamination. Samples were deposited at -900 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 120 seconds, quieted for 30 seconds, then the potential was scanned up to 0.00 mV. A Lead stripping peak was detected at -400 mV by anodic stripping speed of 25 mV s-1. The limit of quantification was found to be 0.11 ppb and the dynamic range was 0.11 ppb to 22.22 ppb. The lead levels in the tested samples were found to be in the range of 0.92 to 2 ppb, suggesting that tap water sources in Southeastern North Carolina area are safe to drink. Student Author(s): Morgan Packer, Senior, Biochemistry, Campbell University Breann Zeches, Junior, Biology, Campbell University Clayton Brown, Senior, Biology, Campbell University Mentor(s): Taek You, Campbell University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 12 Binding Interactions Between a MafA Pdx-1 Fusion Protein and the Insulin Promoter Over 30 million people in the United States suffer from diabetes, a disease characterized by the body’s inability to produce or properly utilize insulin to effectively control blood sugar levels. Due to the high prevalence of this disease in American society, the demand for research is high. Understanding the mechanism of glucose dependent insulin transcription in humans is an important aspect of this research for clinical application. MafA and Pdx-1 are two of the insulin transcription factors which bind to multiple sub-sites of the insulin promoter for transcription activation. Our previous work has led us to engineer a fusion protein containing the DNA binding domains of both

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Pdx-1 and MafA, separated by two repeats of a linker sequence. The Gibson assembly method was used to construct the recombinant fusion protein gene. Following expression and purification we will perform quantitative binding assays to characterize the fusion protein’s binding affinity to the insulin promoter. Transfection of human cells with cloned insulin promoter region will reveal binding affinity in the human cell in vivo. Student Author(s): Jose Pagan, Senior, Biochemistry, Biology & Chemistry, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Guozhou Xu, North Carolina State University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 56 Structural characterization of ERECTA family of receptor kinases(ERfs) ERECTA (ERfs) is a family of receptor kinases in Arabidopsis, classified as leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) consisting of 3 genes, ERECTA, ERL1, and ERL2. ERfs are composed of leucine rich repeats extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular kinase domain. ERfs play a crucial role in stomata development and regulation of longitudinal growth in Arabidopsis. EPF/EPFL family of cysteine-rich peptides act as a ligand to regulate ERfs receptor activity. The main objective of this research is to unravel the structure of extracellular domain(ECD) of ERf receptor kinases and thereby determining the molecular mechanism of differential binding and activation of ERfs by EPF/EPFL. Using baculovirus mediated insect cells (Sf21,Sf9) we aim to express ERfs recombinant proteins. Various chromatographic techniques such as of Nickel chromatography, ion-exchange, and gel filtration chromatography will be used to purify the recombinant proteins. X-Ray crystallography and other biophysical tools will be used to determine the structures, functions and to characterize these proteins. This structural elucidation of the ERECTA receptor kinase will provide insight into ligand-induced receptor activation and its role in regulation of stomatal development. Student Author(s): Ashle Page, Junior, Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Christopher Wohl, NASA Langley Research Center Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 22 Investigation of Polystyrene Latex Microsphere Adhesion to Wind Tunnel Surfaces In order to determine the interactions that aeronautical structures have under operational conditions, researchers have investigated surface-airflow aerodynamics using small-scale prototype structures in wind tunnels. Forces such as lift and drag can be computationally modeled using experimental data of airflow properties with respect to the model structure. To ascertain airflow properties, particles are released into the wind tunnel, “seeding” the air, and are analyzed using images collected through high-resolution photography through flow visualization. NASA researchers have investigated polystyrene latex (PSL) microspheres for use as seed material for flow visualization in wind tunnels. PSL microspheres, however, have been observed to strongly adhere to wind tunnel and model surfaces. The most significant surface contamination occurs on the cleaning screens that provide laminar flow in the test section. Agglomeration of particles on these screens, and other surfaces, leads to skewed results of patterning airflow in wind tunnel testing. To provide insight into the mitigation of particle contamination, this study investigates the adhesion mechanism of PSL microspheres to wind tunnel screens. Adhesion was tested through controlled particle introduction to representative screen surfaces in a small-scale wind tunnel. The contaminated screen surfaces were inspected using high-resolution photography, and optical and confocal microscopy.

Student Author(s): Michael Paolino, Junior, Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Jennifer Cecile, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 47 Calibration of a Custom Built Fluorescence Anisotropy Instrument Organic Anion Transporters (OATs) are membrane proteins responsible for the uptake and excretion of drugs across cell membranes. To investigate the OAT structure and function, we have constructed a custom steady-state fluorescence anisotropy instrument. The functionality of the custom built system has been tested, and the findings are presented here. When exposed to 450 nm polarized light, a fluorescent molecule is most likely to be excited by absorption of a photon whose electric vector is parallel to the transition moment of the molecule. The probability of excitation increases as the angle between the electric vector of the incident photon and the transition moment decreases. Upon fluorescence relaxation, the molecule emits a photon polarized in the direction of the transition

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moment. Since the polarization of light emitted from a sample of fluorophores is dependent on the orientation of the molecules, the emission is anisotropic. More massive objects will be less susceptible to the Langevin force and will exhibit longer rotational correlation times than less massive objects. Anisotropy and rotational correlation time measurements on freely diffusing coumarin and fluorescein-coated silica beads confirm correct and optimized instrument function are presented herein.

Student Author(s): Anna Paschall, Senior, Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Mark Stoneking, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 25 Purification and Quantification of Mitochondrial Genomes Using Exonuclease V for the Detection of Heteroplasmy Increasing rates of purification and quantification of mtDNA is crucial for the detection of heteroplasmy during sequencing. Mitochondrial heteroplasmy, characterized by sequence differences in an individual’s mitochondrial genome, shows variations between biological populations and tissue types. The sequencing process is complicated by the need to separate nuclear and mitochondrial genome fragments. Therefore, a novel enzyme, Exonuclease V (ExoV), was evaluated as a purification method for the preferential isolation of mtDNA prior to sequencing. ExoV destroys any linear DNA present in a sample, including both fragmentary mtDNA and nuclear DNA, allowing for higher yields of complete mitochondrial genomes. The efficacy of ExoV was examined with blood, salivary, and skeletal muscle samples (collected at autopsy). Through the use of nuclear and mitochondrial probes, quantitative PCR, agarose gels, and digital droplet PCR, it was demonstrated that ExoV decreases the presence of nuclear material in the sample while preserving complete mitochondrial genomes. Following digestion, restriction enzymes were used to illustrate the presence of long and the absence of short fragments of genomic material. Higher rates of mitochondrial genome purification can allow for improved differentiation of tissue-specific and strand-specific heteroplasmies to better evaluate their indications for disease prevalence amongst populations. Student Author(s): Katherine Pate, Sophomore, Global Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Undecided, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Examining the Good Life Through Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs This paper explores the ever-developing interpretation of the ‘good life’ through the humanistic lens of Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. An emphasis is put on ‘self actualization,’ a highly contemplative concept which tops Maslow’s pyramid stressing that once humans meet fundamental types of needs we are then free to explore higher level thinking and focus on acquiring ‘peak experiences,’ as the optimal state of being. This paper introduces these concepts individually, examining various studies which show that people who live life in certain ways are more self-actualized or have more peak experiences. Commonalities amongst the self-actualized are that many have less religious affiliations and are a part of less oppressed identities. While some definitions of these terms conflict with one another, research generally concludes that those who lead lives that facilitate selfactualization will also have more peak experiences and have ‘better’ lives. Through Maslow’s model we are able to more clearly take on determining who lives the ‘good life’ and how to measure these factors. Student Author(s): Shivaliben Patel, Senior, Chemistry, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Shubo Han, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 17 Voltammetric Studies of the Interactions of DJ-1/Park 7 Gene with Quercetin DJ-1, a multifunctional protein, has been reported recently to have chaperone activity by preventing the aggregation of proteins in certain cases of familial early onset Parkinson’s disease. DJ-1 shows a flavodoxin-like helix-strandhelix sandwich structure and may help to protect neurons from oxidative stress. Quercetin is a flavonoid antioxidant that is naturally abundant in fruits and vegetables. Quercetin has been found to inhibit the aggregation of alphasynuclein, a major component of Lewy bodies, protein clumps that are the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. In this research, the synergy effect of the antioxidant activity of Quercetin and DJ-1 has been investigated by adsorptive cyclic voltammetry. Multiple anodic peaks, which represent the antioxidant process, were found in both Quercetin and DJ-1 solutions. Both solutions showed weak surface adsorption mechanisms at a glassy carbon

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electrode surface. Interestingly, a significant enhancement of the peak currents was observed when quercetin and DJ-1 coexisted in a phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4, suggesting a possible surface catalytic mechanism of electrooxidation (i.e. a synergy effect of antioxidant activity). The results may help to understand the neuroprotective mechanism of DJ-1 in prevention of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease. Further research will focus on the characterization of self-assembled layer of DJ-1 protein by atomic force microscopy. Student Author(s): Ravikumar Patel, Junior, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brooke Hester, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics - Biophysics, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 52 Optimization of imaging in an optical tweezers system using a tunable field lens Optical Tweezers are used for precision measurements of small-scale forces, on the order of nano- to picoNewtons. In an optical tweezers system, a microsphere is trapped near a laser beam focus and simultaneously vied on a camera. The axial equilibrium position of the bead in the optical trap is dependent on the trapped beat size. A smaller particle will trap at a different viewing plane than a larger particle, requiring an adjustment of the field lens. The goal of the project is to automate the adjustment of the focal length of a tunable field lens in order to optimize the image of the trapped microsphere. The working principle of a tunable lens is an optical fluid sealed with an elastic polymer membrane, and the focal distance of the lens is controlled by the current flowing through the coil of an actuator, causing a change in pressure on the container. Using an image analysis program, the current of the tunable lens will be adjusted while measuring the derivative of the image value, and repeating until the highest average is achieved. A progression of images will be presented, with the final image having the highest derivative. The final steps of this project include integration into EZ Tweeze, an optical tweezers automation package. Student Author(s): Christopher Pawlyszyn, Senior, Applied Physics and Chemistry Appalachian State University Mentor(s): James Sherman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Physics, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Background Southeast United States Aerosol Optical Properties and Their Dependence Upon Meteorology Aerosol effects on SE U.S. radiation budget are highly-seasonal. Aerosol loading is much higher in summer, due largely to high levels of biogenic secondary organic aerosol and sulfates. Aerosol loading is lowest in winter. Aerosol optical properties relevant to radiative forcing have been measured continuously at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research facility (AppalAIR) since the summer of 2009. AppalAIR is the only site in the eastern US to house co-located NOAA ESRL and NASA AeroNET instrumentation and is located in the mountains of Boone, NC. Lower tropospheric sub-micron (PM1) light scattering and absorption coefficients measured over seven summers and six winters are presented here, in addition to PM1 organic and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations measured during summers 2012-2013 as well as winter 2013. The objective is to determine the influence of aerosol sources and meteorology along the air mass back-trajectories on aerosol loading and composition. PM1 aerosol mass was dominated by organic aerosol and sulfate during the periods measured. Aerosol light scattering and organic aerosol concentrations were positively correlated during summer with temperature and solar flux along the parcel back-trajectory and negatively-correlated with rainfall along the back-trajectory. Wet deposition was a major factor in the difference between the upper and lower scattering coefficient quartiles for both summer and winter. Summer PM1 light scattering coefficient declined by approximately 30-40% since 2009, with smaller decreases during winter months. Long-term studies of aerosol optical properties from the regionally-representative AppalAIR site are necessary to determine the relationships between changing SE U.S. air quality and aerosol effects on regional climate and weather. Student Author(s): Alexander Pearson-Moyers, Senior, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington Brett Pinnix, Senior, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Robert Boyce, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 58 Effectiveness of North Carolina Basic Law Enforcement Physical Fitness Training on Police Recruits: Expected Improvement Guidelines for Police Instructors Physical fitness programs are essential parts of Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) for police recruits in North Carolina. Police officers are tested for physical fitness before and after their time in the training program.

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Currently, the instructors do not have a reference as to how much a police officer should increase in their physical fitness during the course of the program. Such data would be effective in not only setting goals for the individual recruit, but could also be used to determine the effectiveness of each individual program. Therefore, the following question is proposed: How much does a recruit increase their physical fitness capacity during their time in the program? The data was collected from eight Centers across the state of North Carolina using muscular endurance, muscular strength, power, and cardiovascular measures. A paired sample T-Test was used to compare the pre- and post-scores. The data was divided by gender, males n=627 and females n=119. All physical fitness variables increased significantly (p < .001), and tables will be provided to illustrate improvement trends in the full report. Student Author(s): Samantha Peart, Senior, Marine Science, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Kathy Dunlop, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Presentation: Marine Sciences, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Error and Precision of Photogrammetric Methods in the Deep-sea The effects of climate change are well studied in oceanic surface waters and coastal areas, however, impacts are least known for the deep-sea. The Station M time series data set has been collected for 26 years to examine the effect of climate change on the deep-sea carbon cycle. As part of the time series, measurements of animal body size are gathered to calculate biomass and respiration rates. This is important to better define the role of deep-seafloor animals in the deep-sea carbon cycle. Measurements of deep-sea animals at Station M are made from Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) video footage using paired lasers and laser measurement algorithms. In this study ROV video data of a calibration target were collected at 4000 m and analyzed to quantify the effect of length and angle on measurement error. This data was used to develop a correction factor that can be used to achieve more accurate measurements of epibenthic megafauna. Student Author(s): Madison Peregoy, Senior, Biology, Greensboro College Mentor(s): Jessica Sharpe, Greensboro College Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) A Review of Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome My research questions included: if pharmaceutical drugs or dietary therapies are more effective in treating IBS and its symptoms, which course of action is more often recommended, the role of the patient-physician interaction, the influence of dietary therapies, and more. To answer my research questions, I interviewed primary care physicians who would usually be the initial consultation, gastroenterologists who would then be referred to for advanced testing and treatment, naturopathic doctors for alternative treatments to allopathic medicine, and nutritionists who are often referred to by physicians for dietary counseling. I conducted sixteen total interviews with these professionals about their preferred methods of treatment and their perceived effectiveness. I obtained demographic information describing the professionalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; training, occupational settings, the typical IBS patient they encounter, and the frequency of treating patients with IBS. My results showed that the psychological component of IBS was a significant factor, and it made the professionalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; settings more crucial because it prioritized the time availability for consultations. The first overall procedure for treating IBS was to determine the cause, which could be food allergies, a separate organic disease, stress and anxiety, or other causes. The physicians would then proceed based on their own educated opinions. Student Author(s): Stephanie Perez, Senior, Marine Biology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Julie Koester, University of North Carolina Wilmington Presentation: Marine Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 11 Silicon Requirements in Coccolithophores with STIL Channels Marine phytoplankton such as coccolithophores play a critical role in the global carbon cycle as primary producers and producers of calcite from their liths. Recent studies detected silicon transporters (SITL), similar to those found in silicifying phytoplankton, in addition to silicon within the calcite liths of the coccolithophore Scyphosphaera apsteinii. However, SITL were not found in other ecologically important coccolithophore species. I hypothesize that coccolithophores with SITL, Scyphosphaera apsteinii, Calcidiscus leptoporus, and Coccolithus pelagicus, incorporate silicon into their liths, whereas coccolithophores without SITL, Geophyrocapsa oceanica, and Emiliania huxleyi, do not. I will test for silicon signal in the liths of the five species using X-ray analysis with scanning electron microscopy. Cells will be harvested in mid-exponential phase to ensure that cells are

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physiologically healthy and liths have normal morphology. Different regions of the liths will be analyzed for presence of silicon. Additionally, I will dissolve liths to measure the concentration of silicon in the dissolved solution. My results will provide insights on physiological and morphological requirements for silicon during calcite lith formation. Student Author(s): Kiana Perez-Jimenez, Sophomore, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Mentor(s): Noah Switzer, University of North Carolina - Pembroke Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 15 Inside the Mind of a Terrorist This argumentative essay examines how social and psychological factors may influence or inspire an individual to become a terrorist or participate in terroristic acts. Terrorism is an ongoing problem around the world. Research suggests there is no way to predict who will become a terrorist; however, by analyzing the psychological aspects of belonging, conformity, deindividuation, and moral disengagement, we can discover why someone might become a terrorist. Terrorists target certain age groups that can be easily manipulated into joining their group, such as someone looking for a sense of belonging and purpose. Members then internalize group norms through the process of conformity. Groups act to deindividualize their members resulting in reduced normative constraints. These reduced normative constraints assist in convincing the individual that he or she is not bound by typical ethical standards. Through this process of moral disengagement, terrorists dehumanize targets and push away any emotion that the situation might evoke. By analyzing this psychological process, one can begin to understand why someone might become a terrorist. Student Author(s): Isabel Pernia, Freshman, Political Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Effects of Language on Intergenerational Relationships Among Immigrants One of every four children in the United States lives with at least one foreign-born parent; eighty-eight percent of those children are second-generation. Second-generation immigrants typically acquire the language spoken in the receiving country, while their parents (first-generation immigrants) tend to retain their native language and neglect the new one for lack of time, money or interest. The language one speaks determines how one conceptualizes the world. In combination with the existing generation gap, the linguistic acculturation gap further divides children from parents, because they even differ cognitively. Additionally, Second-generation immigrants find difficulty coping with the clash of the culture and language instilled by their parents and the culture and language acquired in the receiving country. To reconcile this, second-generation immigrants forge their own identities of hybrid values, customs, and language. By contrast, first-generation immigrants in adulthood often neglect to learn the language of the host country, relying instead upon their children and local ethnic communities. First-generation immigrants tend to rely on their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s linguistic assimilation in order to communicate with the outside world, which stresses the child. Language changes the way people relate to the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and one another. For immigrant families, language differences build conflict within the parent-child relationship. Student Author(s): Weston Petroski, Senior, Nutrition and Dietetics, Appalachian State University Brooke Wilson, Senior, Nutrition and Dietetics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Martin Root, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 16 Quantification of Pentacyclic Triterpenoids in 2014 Season North Carolina Apple Peels Pentacyclic triterpenoids are found in a variety of medicinal plants and foods. In particular, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and betulinic acid, found in apple peels, have anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and cancer inhibiting properties. This project aimed to extract and quantify these three acids in North Carolina apple peels for the 2014 season. A total of 48 North Carolina apple cultivars were studied during the 2014 season. Apple peels were collected and stored in -80° C. For extraction and analysis, peel samples were freeze dried, ground, and soaked in ethanol overnight. Samples were then re-extracted in ethanol. The filtrate was dried and resuspended in methanol for HPLC analysis. All three triterpenoids were quantifiable in the 48 cultivars analyzed. Average total triterpenoid content was 18.8 mg/g dry peel weight, ranging from 2.0 mg/g (Roxbury Russet) to 36.3 mg/g (Virginia Gold). Betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acid averaged 0.264, 3.64, and 14.9 mg/g, respectively. Russeted

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cultivars, such as Roxbury Russet and Sour Rusty Coat seemed to contain less total triterpenoids than waxy cultivars such as Virginia Gold and Sweet Sixteen. Apple peels are a reliable source of pentacyclic triterpenoids. Total amounts may vary more than 10 fold across cultivars. Student Author(s): Lucas Piedrahita, Sophomore, Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Zoology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 22 Foot Preference Related to Lateralization in Coquerel’s Sifaka Lemurs (Propithecus coquereli) Both hand and foot preferences are indicators of cerebral lateralization, which is evolutionarily advantageous because it enhances brain capacity. Studying lateralization in lemurs furthers the understanding of the evolution of primate cerebral lateralization. In this study, fourteen Coquerel’s sifaka lemurs were studied to determine their foot and hand preferences, if they had a preference. Coquerel’s sifaka lemurs are good research subjects for foot preference because the species moves in a sideways leaping manner when moving on the ground. Foot preference was determined by which foot the lemur led with while moving on the ground, and hand preference was determined by which hand the lemur reached with and which hand they supported themselves with while in trees. Hand preference results suggest that most of the lemurs have no hand preference, which may be because they need to be equally proficient at reaching and supporting with both hands in order to be efficient foragers. The foot preference results show that a majority, ten out of fourteen, of the lemurs have a left foot preference when moving on the ground. This supports the idea that the Coquerel’s sifaka species has cerebral lateralization and therefore enhanced brain capacity. Student Author(s): Jessica Pierce, Sophomore, Women's Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Gilda: Female Oppression in Film In the 1946 film Gilda, directed by Charles Vidor, Rita Hayworth’s character Gilda is a bold and sexual woman facing oppression from the man she loves and the people around her. Gilda has lost the man she loves and has married another, but when she is faced with meeting Johnny again her oppression becomes obvious to the audience. In her conflict with Johnny Gilda is positioned in the scene in a way that amplifies the oppressive nature in which Johnny views her. During this time period, Gilda’s flirtatious nature does not bode well for a woman. By analyzing the positioning of the characters it is easy to see that Gilda is continuously positioned to the left of the men in her life, making her a more negative character in the eyes of the audience. Student Author(s): Ariel Pinkham, Senior, Chemistry, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Anthony Kennedy, East Carolina University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 46 Investigating the effects of disaccharides on bacteria Colonies of e-coli were treated with various concentrations of disaccharides and stored at -20 °C. After thawing the survival rate of colonies was determined and the effect of varying sugar hydrophobicity on the survival rate will be discussed. The results of these experiments and experiments to examine bacteria growth at 37°C in varying concentrations of sugars will be presented. Student Author(s): Brett Pinnix, Senior, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Alex Pearson-Moyers, Freshman, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina Wilmington Mentor(s): Robert Boyce, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 48 New NC Police Physical Fitness Assessment Tables: Are the current tables used by North Carolina Police Academies still relevant? The State of North Carolina Basic Law Enforcement Training Program (BLET) is using the physical fitness assessment tables that were developed through the Cooper Institution in Dallas, Texas. It is a concern that these physical fitness standards do not adequately reflect the physical fitness capacities of the police recruits in North

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Carolina (NC). Therefore, there is a need to develop updated physical fitness assessment tables that better reflect the abilities of the potential officers. Our research serves two purposes: 1) To develop new physical fitness tables from recent (2013-2015) NC police recruit scores to be utilized in the NC BLET Program 2) To compare the Cooper Institution physical fitness tables and the new physical fitness tables being proposed for use. Data was collected from eight NC law enforcement academies. The physical fitness tests conducted include muscular endurance, muscular strength, power, and cardiovascular assessments. The data was sorted by gender and age categories. On average, the NC police recruits’ median test scores were 24% above the median scores of the Cooper Institution Tables. From this comparison, the need is justified to update the current BLET physical fitness standards tables. Student Author(s): Joshua Pinos, Senior, Computer Science, Fayetteville State University James Fisher, Junior, Computer Science, Fayetteville State University Joshua Cutolo, Senior, Computer Science, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Sambit Bhattacharya, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Computer Science, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 46 Autonomous Real Time Tracking of Humans Using A Ground Based Multi-Camera System. In this paper, we describe a computer vision project supported by an industry – university partnership that has synergies with the local community containing one of the largest military installations in the country. The initial direction of this research is related to ground based surveillance from stationary cameras, where various aspects of human detection, human movement detection, and human trajectory classification are key components. The core theme of the research is the exploration of machine learning models to accomplish these goals and what hardware and software should be utilized to achieve real-time application. More specifically, we describe the creation of an environment that consists of a mobile lab with different stationary and remotely controlled cameras, including workstations and laptops utilizing high powered Graphical Processing Units (GPUs). Open source software libraries for machine learning and computer vision are used for aiding advanced algorithm development. Multiple programming languages and paradigms are also implemented for analyzing their efficiencies in regards to image processing. Preliminary results favor a parallel computing solution, alongside a reduction of the image search space by Bayesian-based heuristics for human classification. For future endeavors, we hope to apply these results to an aerial based system, where other aspects will be explored. Student Author(s): Emma Plyler, Senior, South Iredell High School Mentor(s): Stephanie Smith, Ohio University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Communication is Key: The Relationship Between Verbal Ability and the Detection of Word Visual perception has been considered an important aspect when trying to accurately detect word production (i.e., how the mouth forms words). This study examines the impact of verbal ability on the relationship between detection of word production and visual perception. Participants in this study were asked to respond to two questionnaires; The first measured verbal ability using questions taken from a retired version of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). The second assessed how well each participant could detect word production when a speaker’s mouth was either covered or uncovered using a within subjects design. When looking at verbal ability and word detection accuracy rates, verbal ability did not relate to performance for any of the spoken words. However, one of the words used in the detection task yielded significant error rates. Every participant who answered the question incorrectly responded with the same word, participants entered that they heard the word "mirror" when the spoken word was actually "near". No relationship was found with verbal ability but does represent an error in participants' auditory and visual perception. Student Author(s): Dylan Powell, Freshman, Undecided, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Foreign Languages & Literature, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Reading in Between Both Lines with Bilingual Newspapers All languages are made to enhance communication between the sender and the receiver. Spoken or written, words are used to keep people informed on important issues. For a unilingual person the presence of many different

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languages can be overwhelming. I argue that keeping the population of non-English speakers informed through community newspapers will promote assimilation into American society. Nearly six million illegal immigrants in the United States come from Central America (Pew Research Center). With outlets to speak through such as advice columns and opinion sections, Hispanics will be able to express themselves and ask questions about the nation. I will be referencing the Cherokee Phoenix newspaper that used many similar principles to push diglossia in the early 1800’s. The Cherokee Phoenix shows how a paper with similar goals would be utilized today (Perdue). The information made readily available to Spanish speaking immigrants creates better informed residents of the United States. Translated policies on citizenship and immigration reforms as well as the opportunity to discuss such policies results in higher morale. Ultimately the increased exposure to the written English language will encourage all readers to begin learning this foreign language. Student Author(s): Warren Powers, Senior, English, Chowan University Mentor(s): Bryan Herek, Chowan University Presentation: English (Literature), Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Legacy of Slavery on American Productions of Othello Othello is one of Shakespeare’s most frequently staged plays. What separates this play from his others, and perhaps a significant reason for its popularity today, is the focus on race. Othello dramatizes the sixteenth-century marriage between a black man and a white woman. Despite being legalized by the Supreme Court in Loving v. Virginia in 1967, interracial marriage is a still a contentious issue in America today. It is easy to assume that the same kind of contentiousness would exist in Shakespeare’s England. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the different lenses through which race and racism can be viewed and explore the implications that these differences have on productions of Othello. I argue that we can better appreciate the moral lesson regarding racism that is typically presented in contemporary American productions by better appreciating the different foundations of Elizabethan audience’s views on race. In short, my paper explores the ways in which the legacy of American slavery influences the way in which the tragedy evokes both pity and fear in today’s audiences, and the way in which that legacy complicates the catharsis experienced by audiences in Othello’s tragic demise. Student Author(s): Lindsay Preston, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Carol Babyak, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Elemental Analysis of Raw and Refined Samples of Vegetable Oil and Biodiesel Using Inductively Coupled Plasma – Optical Emission Spectroscopy The use of oil-based fuels as substitutes for fossil fuels is growing in popularity among the automotive industry. Prior to engine use, the oils must undergo physical and chemical refinement, or transesterification, for their conversion into the renewable fuel known as biodiesel. Elemental concentrations in biodiesel must meet ASTM D6751 specifications to avoid engine fouling and minimize emissions. A method has been developed to quantify calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus in raw and refined samples of vegetable oil and biodiesel using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Instrumental parameters were optimized to facilitate high loadings of volatile organic solvents. Oxygen was also added to the plasma using an auxiliary gas module (AGM) to prevent soot deposition and plasma instability. Two samples (raw soybean oil and biodiesel) were analyzed and were found to have higher concentrations than those reported by an outside laboratory, indicating possible spectral or matrix interferences in the method. Method detection limits (MDLs) were higher than the majority of biodiesel samples. Percent recoveries of a laboratory-fortified blank (LFB) ranged from 84-134% (n = 9). Future work will consist of matrix-matching solutions to address method sensitivity and quantifying additional elements (sodium and potassium). Student Author(s): Allison Price, Senior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Steven Buzinski, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 40 Highly restrictive goals turn temptations into multifinal means People frequently strive to adhere to “cold turkey” policies, forming goals with restrictive demands (e.g., no more chocolate, ever). These restrictive goals (e.g., a restrictive diet plan) provoke a threat to an individual’s freedom, which activates psychological reactance (the goal to restore personal freedom). In the absence of a restrictive goal,

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indulging in a temptation (e.g., eating a brownie) satisfies a single goal, namely the temptation goal (e.g., to eat something tasty). However, when a restrictive goal is activated, indulging in a temptation satisfies the additional goal of restoring personal freedom. A single act, or means, that satisfies one goal (i.e., “unifinal”) is perceived as more instrumental, and when it satisfies multiple goals (i.e., “multifinal”) as more valuable. Therefore, we hypothesize that setting a highly restrictive (vs. non-restrictive) goal turns temptations into multifinal means, consequently increasing the temptations’ perceived value. To investigate this hypothesis, we are conducting two studies. Study 1 manipulates goal restrictiveness and measures multifinality outcomes (i.e., perceived instrumentality and value) for temptation- and goal-related means. Study 2 manipulates the accessibility of the temptation-related goal by either having people participate in the study just before or after having consumed a “filling meal” and measures perceived instrumentality and value. Student Author(s): Mary Pruitt, Junior, English Literature and Graphic Design, High Point University Taylor Daniel, Junior, Graphic Design, High Point University Mentor(s): Allison Walker, High Point University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) From Beginner to Innovator: A Beekeeper's Journey Beginning in January of 2015, my partner and I completed a project for High Point University’s Year of the Arts, tackling the theme of Dangerous Artwork. Our solution was a hand-constructed Apiary, adhering to nationwide hive inspection regulations, within a respectively small budget, and maintains our end vision of an artistic sculpture. Its main function is operating as thriving home for Apis mellifera, the honey bee. Sections within the apiary are devoted to displaying intricate parts of the internal design for viewing while providing the ability for collection of both honey and comb. The entire construction of the hive has been photographed, documented, displayed, and explained utilizing the strengths of our individual talents. During the summer of 2015, I participated in a summer research program with goal of conducting extensive research, photography, and graphic design to publish a self-written and illustrated book on beginner beekeeping, with a section comprising of my previous apiary project that was installed on High Point University's campus. Extended from a summer session, this project will continue for an entire yearly cycle of the honey bee, capped by the creation of a beekeeping club on campus to carry forward what has been established. Student Author(s): Chloe Prunet, Sophomore, Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Factors Affecting the Good Life For every cause, there is always an effect, even if it is a negative one. It would be impossible to get through a single day without being influenced by something. Maybe everything doesn’t happen for a reason, but it sure does impact a minor or major change in our life. Our lives are helplessly affected by ourselves and society. We don’t realize it, but not only do our actions affect us, our age, mental health and society factors do too. Depending what happens when we are young can also affect the way we act when we are older. These affects play a part in the way we live. Sometimes we don’t notice or we don’t care about the events around us because we think they won’t affect us, but we are wrong. The aim of this paper is to show us the need to realize that the smaller problems are sometimes the ones that effects us more than the bigger ones. The small problems, that keep getting ignored, will overtime pile up and cause more stress that could have been avoided earlier. Student Author(s): Caroline Puckett, Freshman, Studio Art, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: International Relations, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Refugee Status It needs to be known that most of the immigrants who try and come to America from the Mesoamerican reign, do so in order to stay physically and mentally protected or safe. In the areas of Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and other Central American countries, mesas (gangs), drug cartels and drug transporters control the economy as well as many social interactions forcing civilians to leave and then inevitably come to America. In Europe the same situation happens to citizens of the middle east area, the difference between these two parts comes down to the success of entering and then staying into the country where they are headed. Europe currently has adopted an open

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door policy for the refugees on the way and those waiting still. “In Germany… the government expects to receive more than 800,000 requests for asylum this year, quadruple the number registered in 2014”. In contrast the immigrants that attempt to come to America are faced with deportation, denial of asylums, and extremely strict requirements to legally enter. America needs to redefine our refugee status and become more open towards immigrants coming from the Mesoamerican reign, because many migrants are leaving to keep them and their families safe. Student Author(s): Anne Pursifull, Senior, Nutrition Science, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Natalie Cooke, North Carolina State University Suzanne Goodell, North Carolina State University Presentation: Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 33 Impact of a Pre-Service-Learning Training on Students' Skills Needed to Deliver a Pre-Packaged Educational Curricula in the Community Service-learning provides an opportunity for students to gain discipline-specific skills, while providing community organizations with a steady pool of volunteers. However, because students may lack the skills needed to effectively serve the community, skills-based training may need to be incorporated into service-learning courses. Students in a community nutrition service-learning course at North Carolina State University engaged in 7 weeks of training before teaching a 6-week long nutrition education course to community members. The training included three layers of activities: basic, which introduced the students to material necessary to build skills for their servicelearning experience; directed, which allowed them to refine a targeted skillset; and collective, which allowed for the application of multiple skills. Through qualitative interviews with 12 of the 19 Fall 2013 students, we determined the impact of a pre-service learning training program on the development of skills necessary to successfully teach a nutrition education course. Thematic analysis of the data revealed two major themes: (1) “layered learning” activities facilitate skill building and (2) a stressful, yet supportive, environment facilitates growth. Together, these aspects of course design allow students to develop skills and their self-efficacy in those skills. Student Author(s): Jonathan Raby, Sophomore, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Defining Altruism as the Key to the ‘Good Life’ In this work, I explore the relationships between the good life, happiness and our nature as human beings. I also compare various methodologies of searching for the good life. From the sources I have gathered, I explore the logical fallacies associated with attempting to define the good life through economics, or even Maslow’s Hierarchy. Throughout, the "good life" will be used interchangeably with the term ‘happiness,’ seeing as how both words allude to an optimal lifestyle for any given person over an extended period of time. The results of my research have found age to be the factor with the highest (albeit non-linear) correlation to happiness. I conclude by discussing why altruism satisfies both our animalistic and human needs. Altruism, in this sense, being a prolonged mindset most frequently characterized by seemingly selfless acts of kindness towards others. Student Author(s): Loryn Rader, Freshman, Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) The Methodology and Effectiveness of Teaching a Respect for Nature at Watauga Residential College No other creature on Earth consciously destroys the environment upon which it relies quite like humans do. The human populous seems generally apathetic in this sense, and with the Earth undergoing more ecological crises than ever, there has at no time been more need for action. In this presentation, I research how Watauga Residential College, an interdisciplinary studies community within North Carolina’s Appalachian State University, goes about teaching a respect for nature. Watauga Residential College is an experiential, inquiry-based program in which students live in the same dormitory and have much closer connections with professors than is the norm in universities. I will study the methodology and effectiveness of the programs efforts to teach environmental appreciation and life-long stewardship by using personal interviews with students and specific examples from past coursework and syllabi. I then compare these methods to that described in various scholarly articles discussing the

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teaching of environmental appreciation. These studies will evidence the efficacy of Watauga Residential College’s methods for changing the cultural understanding of nature in both a personal and community-based sense, exemplifying it as a model for others of incorporation of environmental education into higher education. Student Author(s): James Rager, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Vernon Coffield, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Anatomy & Physiology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Effects of 17-Beta-Estradiol on Bone Development and Ossification in Danio rerio Studies have demonstrated that estrogen plays a significant role in bone development and ossification in mammals. To date, however, little is known about the sex hormone’s role in bone ossification in zebrafish, Danio rerio. In this study, zebrafish embryos were raised in increasing concentrations of 17β-estradiol (10-11 M - 10-9 M) and stained to determine bone ossification. Embryos were treated with 17β-estradiol and stained with Alcian Blue/Alizarin Red. Measurements of specific endochondral bones and body length were obtained and analyzed. Additional embryos were stained using calcein dye, which fluoresces when bound to calcium, indicating the onset of bone ossification. Lateral/dorsal images of the embryos were obtained from day six through day eight and blindly scored. Data from the first staining method suggests a significant dose-dependent increase in total body length and an increase in the length of specific endochondral bones. Calcein staining data supports the hypothesis that 17β-estradiol accelerates the rate of vertebral bone ossification. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol may be responsible for the increased rate of skeletal abnormalities seen in aquatic animals living in areas contaminated with potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Our future experiments aim to further characterize this correlation by examining additional EDCs and their effect on skeletal development. Student Author(s): Maria Ramirez Perez, Junior, Chemistry, Salem College Mentor(s): Lindsay Comstock, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 6 Analysis of Phosphorylation Using Cofactor Mimics Phosphorylation is a key post-translational modification whose regulation is essential for cell function, as aberrant expression of the kinases responsible for phosphorylation can result in disease. The research presented here utilizes adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogs functionalized with an azide as a novel method to study phosphorylation events. While previous work indicates that a model peptide substrate can be modified by the ATP analog using Protein Kinase A, absolute determination of the resulting azide-modified peptide product via high resolution mass spectrometry has not been attained. The research presented here focuses on ascertaining the integrity of the azidemodified peptide model using a phosphate spectrophotometric assay. Student Author(s): Jeffrey Ramsey, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Cecile, Appalachian State University Presentation: Pharmacy, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 59 Impact of Natural Products on High-Throughput Fluorescence Assay for Drug-Drug Interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans Many natural products are thought to reduce inflammation or mitigate negative effects of hormonal changes or depression. Available without a prescription, these supplements may have unintended side effects when coadministered with medications, especially if usage is not shared with physicians or pharmacists. Varied pharmacokinetic profiles may occur due to competition of a component within natural product extracts at a transporter binding site or due to changes in transporter regulation at various absorption, distribution or excretion sites in the body. In an attempt to identify these potential problems, it is desirable to treat Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a non-mammal model for drug transport, with natural products and screen for possible drug interactions in a high-throughput fluorescence assay. However, little is known about the fluorescence of natural products and metabolites in C. elegans. In this work, various extracts of Moringa oleifera, a plant found in tropical climates and Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s Wort) are examined by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in buffered solutions. In addition, the natural products are introduced to C. elegans to determine if background fluorescence from active ingredients or metabolites results in significant fluorescence accumulation that may impact the desired high-throughput fluorescence assay for drug interaction screen.

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Student Author(s): Tim Ransom, Senior, Computational Mathematics, Appalachian State University Scott Shuffler, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University James Corsi, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Web Automated Grading System (WAGS) As industry moves further into the digital age, the desire for coding skills and computer science knowledge increases. Teachers and professors often look for new, engaging, and customizable methods of educating their students about computer science concepts. The Web Automated Grading System (WAGS) seeks to provide a unified resource for professors to create, assign, and evaluate conceptual exercises in the classroom. The system has support for several different programming languages including Python, Java, C, and Prolog, as well as problems designed to test understanding of concepts such as sorting, hashing, binary trees, and more. WAGS has been designed for ease of use on mobile devices and desktops to allow a focus on learning subject matters. The system has both a repository of commonly used problems and support for instructors to create their own exercises if they so desire, most of which implement easy-to-use drag-and-drop interfaces to solve complex coding exercises. WAGS is currently under development by a team of undergraduate students, and has a beta version available for public use. Student Author(s): Aleksander Ratzloff, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Spark as a Cluster Computing Platform In the world of cluster computing, Hadoop has been making rounds as being the â&#x20AC;&#x153;go-toâ&#x20AC;? cluster computing platform. However, another technology known as Spark has been growing in prominence. Spark is built on top of the Scala programming language, which has many analogues and interoperability with Hadoopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Java. Spark, however, has shown to have better performance than Hadoop, due to its use of Resilient Distributed Datasets, or RDDs. Because of its better performance and compatibility with other software on the Hadoop stack, Spark is well on its way to replace Hadoop as one of the next major cluster computing platforms. This presentation provides some details on setting up a functional Spark cluster. Also, it will lay out the process and shortcomings of using a sample Spark program to classify news articles. The talk will discuss its future goals of the Spark cluster in the Department of Computer Science at Appalachian State University for solving several real world applications. Student Author(s): Zachary Riley, Senior, Chemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Yvon Bryan, Wake Forest University Pete Santago, Wake Forest University Presentation: Pre-Medicine, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 53 Digital Imaging for Objective Airway Assessments Shows High Inter-rater Reliability Amongst Anesthesiology Researchers Predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in anesthesiology is subjective due the variability found in the clinical exam of the oral cavity. The exam, the Mallampati classification, is based on a visual assessment based on visibility of oral structures with inter-rater reliability for this and other similar methods being very low. We aim to implement a more objective method using ImageJ software, a digital imaging program from the National Institute of Health. Several researchers including medical and undergraduate students were instructed in the use of ImageJ, which required minimal time and training in order to perform the analysis. Inter-rater reliability appeared to be significantly higher than that of the current subjective measurements by measuring the areas of the entire oral cavities in ratio with areas of other oral structures, including and excluding the teeth and tongue. Inter-rater reliability tests were also performed after previous research demonstrated high intra-rater reliability. Additional photographs were also analyzed in patients undergoing thyroid surgery in an IRB approved study. In the future, correlations between digital imaging analysis and patient outcomes may provide insight into airway management.

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Student Author(s): Jesus Rios, Sophomore, Accounting, Nash Community College Alyssa King, Freshman, Psychology, Nash Community College Jaired Mobley, Freshman, Biochemistry, Nash Community College Indersen Mirchandani, Sophomore, Biology and Computer Science, Nash Community College Mentor(s): David Beamer, Nash Community College Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 46 Mimicry In Two Genera Of Salamander The salamander genera Desmognathus and Plethodon are co-distributed in portions of the southern Appalachian mountains. Certain localized populations of these genera exhibit red pigmentation on their legs and samples of both species were collected across their range in an attempt to create an index of color and pattern. The presence of red pigment in salamanders of two different genera suggests that mimicry may be a possible explanation for these coloration patterns. In an effort to document the extent of red leg pigmentation we photographed the dorsal aspect of ~100 Plethodon and Desmognathus. Here we present an index of leg pigmentation and pattern that we have created to gain a better understanding of the extent of mimicry throughout the areas of sympatry. Student Author(s): Christian Roberts, Senior, Criminology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Randy LaGrange, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Citizen Perceptions of Police, Police Perceptions of Citizens: An Analysis and Explanation of Conflicting Perspectives Overall, citizens view the institution of law enforcement in a favorable light. However, recent reports of policecitizen encounters have continually portrayed law enforcement as evil or corrupt. Little evidence exists when attempting to define how police perceptions of citizens contribute to these aversive interactions. Through an application of the symbolic interaction theory this paper seeks to investigate the extent to which citizens are impacted by police perceptions. Specifically, this investigation aims to test several research hypotheses relating to residents in low-income, high crime neighborhoods. Pursuant to this endeavor it should be possible to discuss, at length, how police perceptions of citizens impact citizen perceptions of police. This project will rely upon peerreviewed literature, and national statistics to reach an ultimate conclusion. The overarching goal of this project is to provide an explanation for the perceptions of police officers and citizens in regard to approval ratings of law enforcement. Student Author(s): Lori Roberts, Senior, Biology, Guilford College Mentor(s): Melanie Lee-Brown, Guilford College James Brown, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 30 Antimicrobial activity of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) against opportunistic, potentially pathogenic bacteria The rise of antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria is a major health concern worldwide. Most large pharmaceutical companies no longer prioritize the discovery of new antimicrobials, and so the exploration for new targets or compounds has fallen primarily to small labs and biotech start-ups. Of interest to many labs are plant-derived compounds based on alternative medicines. In this study Goldenseal (Hydrastis caradensis) crude extract was tested because of its known antimicrobial properties. Previous studies reported that Gram-positive organisms are more sensitive to the antimicrobial effects of Goldenseal than Gram-negative bacteria, however these studies used limited numbers of Gram-negative organisms and only Staphylococcus species representing the Grampositive bacteria. The aim of this study is a comprehensive analysis of the antimicrobial effect of Goldenseal on a wide range of culturable, aerobic species that span Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria (which include the preponderance of important human pathogens). Both minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bacteriocidal concentration (MCC) of a crude Goldenseal extract were determined for each species.

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Student Author(s): Jasmine Robinson, Junior, Biology, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Shirley Chao, Fayetteville state University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 1 Hemp Seed Formulationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Effect on Feeding in Red Four Beetles (Tribolium Castaneum) Approximately $500 million of revenue is lost each year due to insects infesting stored grains. Beetles of the species Tribolium castaneum are one of the many culprits that contribute to this loss. Pesticides have been created for this purpose but not many people are comfortable with toxic chemicals being sprayed on and around their food. The ideal solution is to create a pesticide that will not cause harm to people but will effectively control these pests. The objective of the current study was to determine the efficacy of a patent-pending formulation composed of Cannabis seeds. Beetles were exposed to the formulation through feeding experiments. Findings show that beetles fed the formulation weighed less, fed less than the controls, and had their nervous system disrupted. The formulation appeared to have anti-feeding properties and show promise as a safe alternative to current toxic insecticides. Student Author(s): Monique Robinson, Senior, Economics, North Carolina A&T State University Jocelyn Elliott, Senior, Economics, North Carolina A&T State University Mentor(s): Alfredo Romero, North Carolina A&T State University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) The Rising Popularity of the Natural Hair Trend and It's Effects on the Hair Industry as Relaxer Sales are Declining The global hair industry has experienced a rapid transition of the type of products their consumers demand based on a specific hair type. For the last 50 years, relaxed hair as dominated natural hair, meaning that relaxed hair care products were the majority products on the shelves. In 2015, the tables are rapidly turning, more consumers are stepping away from relaxers and allowing their hair to grow back to its natural state. Companies are producing brand new natural hair care lines to add to the market to supplement the increasing trend of the natural hair type. With the increase in popularity for natural hair care products there has been a decline in relaxed hair care products. However, relaxed hair care products may not become a rare commodity because it is still high in demand for some of the population. This research will: (1) identify the trend of consumers with hair type relaxed versus hair type natural, (2) how the swift move to natural is affecting the hair industry, (3) find out if the relaxed hair type products will eventually become a very rare commodity for consumers to access, (4) identify the regions where the transition is prevalent, (5) if relaxed hair care products are still succeeding in the areas where the change is not prevalent, and (6) the effects that the natural hair trend has had on the hair industry by allowing companies to expand their products to appeal towards a variety of consumers Student Author(s): Kristen Rogers, Senior, NC School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Kim Monahan, NC School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) RNAi of DCR-1 Gene to Inhibit Overactive Ras Protein Pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans Mutations in the RAS protein are associated with 90% of pancreatic cancers as well as numerous other cancers. One therapeutic strategy would rely on inhibition of this mutated protein, which would limit cell growth. In this experiment RNAi of the gene target DCR-1 was tested in an attempt to inhibit the faulty protein pathway. The dcr-1 protein is a molecular target activated later on in the RAS-RAF-ERK protein pathway. A certain strain of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans was lab developed to have a mutation in the RAS gene, which causes constitutive activity of the Ras protein. This mutation causes multiple protrusions of the vulva. These mutated worms were fed RNAi of the DCR-1 gene. This resulted in the offspring of the C. elegans no longer expressing multiple protrusions showing that the faulty protein pathway had been interrupted and the DCR-1 gene was in fact a cell growth prohibitor. In the future, the dcr-1 gene could be tested in cancers related to abnormalities in the RAS-RAF-ERK pathway such as pancreatic cancer to see if interfering with the dcr-1 gene would inhibit excessive cell growth and stop the cancer.

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Student Author(s): Lauren Rogers, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Philip Ashmore, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brett Taubman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 16 Quantifying Bisphenol - A Concentration in Canned Craft Beer Bisphenol-A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor, is a binder for plastics. As a result of its ubiquity in packaged foods, 93% of the United States population is exposed to BPA.1 The FDA believes BPA is safe at the current levels found in foods;2 however, there are still questions about the effects BPA has on the human body, even at low concentrations. Recently, the craft beer industry has moved towards canning as a preferred packaging method because it is less expensive, decreases light exposure and is easier to recycle. BPA is used in the can liner to prevent beer leaching the metal in the aluminum cans. An assessment by Health Canada determining BPA concentration in canned beer showed that one of two craft beers tested had the highest concentration of BPA when compared to the others, most of which were from macrobreweries 3, although no research has been conducted on how much BPA is actually consumed from the beer.4 The purpose of this study is to quantify BPA in canned beer using HPLC. The amount of BPA leached into the beer will be investigated in different beers under varying storage conditions, temperatures, pH, and alcohol concentrations. Student Author(s): Luis Roldan, Sophomore, Chemical and Biomanufacturing Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Christopher Duran, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 54 Developing non-growth conditions for Methylomicrobium alcalaphilum 20ZR to be used in a trickle-bedreactor The effects of the 2008 European financial crisis were devastating, causing a dramatic increase in unemployment, morbidity, and suicide rates, especially in Spain. The aim of this study is to examine how the crisis and adopted austerity policies affected mental health in Spain and to investigate if these events provide enough reason to explain the worsening health of the nation. Drawing on statistics and scholarly literature, this study analyzes the health effects after the crisis across various demographics, finding that widespread unemployment and the fear of being unemployed in Spain contribute most to deteriorating health. The youth population proves most vulnerable during times of crisis, as they internalize a “discouragement effect” keeping them from school and employment. The research argues that austerity policies play a role in negatively affecting health, but it is the lack of strategic reforms to institutions that proves to be the root cause of increased unemployment, and thus worsening health, among youth. Policy suggestions are offered to address root causes of youth unemployment which can help protect against the “discouragement effect” and thus worsening health. This research adds an alternative for Spain when considering recovery strategies after the crisis, whose effects are still being felt today.

Student Author(s): Lindsay Roth, Senior, International Studies, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Shea McManus, North Carolina State University Presentation: International Relations, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 52 Running of the Bulls: Stimulating youth in Spain to run ahead of unemployment, mental health disorders, and the “discouragement” effect The effects of the 2008 European financial crisis were devastating, causing a dramatic increase in unemployment, morbidity, and suicide rates, especially in Spain. The aim of this study is to examine how the crisis and adopted austerity policies affected mental health in Spain and to investigate if these events provide enough reason to explain the worsening health of the nation. Drawing on statistics and scholarly literature, this study analyzes the health effects after the crisis across various demographics, finding that widespread unemployment and the fear of being unemployed in Spain contribute most to deteriorating health. The youth population proves most vulnerable during times of crisis, as they internalize a “discouragement effect” keeping them from school and employment. The research argues that austerity policies play a role in negatively affecting health, but it is the lack of strategic reforms to institutions that proves to be the root cause of increased unemployment, and thus worsening health, among youth. Policy suggestions are offered to address root causes of youth unemployment, which can help protect against the “discouragement effect” and thus worsening health. This research adds an alternative for Spain when considering recovery strategies after the crisis, whose effects are still being felt today.

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Student Author(s): Jay Rubin, Senior, Mass Communications, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): Mark West, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Hopi Prophecy and Myth In this paper, I will discuss the political nature of myth in Hopi culture. The control of ritual and of the interpretation of myth in Hopi culture is the control of power. I will also discuss the conflict between the Hopi Traditional Movement and the Hopi Tribal Council and how that conflict was played out as an intra-tribal attempt to control prophetic myth. This means the Hopi have at different times interpreted their anticipated savior and sign of purification as a US citizen, a Mormon, and at one point Hitler. The Hopi village of Hotevilla was founded in 1906. Many Hopi view this villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaders of recreating Hopi myth without the required knowledge or authority. However, it is Hotevillaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of the emergence myth, through the Hopi Traditionalist Movement, that most Hopi-outsiders believe is the authoritative version. The Hopi Traditionalist Movement gained traction with the outside world during World War II when several members from the Hotevilla village were imprisoned for draft evasion. As a result of imprisonment, the Hopi Traditionalist Movement developed connections with members of countercultural movements who helped spread their version of Hopi myth. Student Author(s): Emily Rutledge, Senior, Economics, Salem College Mentor(s): Megan Regan, Salem College Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Playing to Win: Market Economies in Multiplayer Online Video Games Economics can often seem like an intimidating topic to students, especially when they have nothing to relate it to. But what if, without realizing it, students already knew the basics. In many massive multiplayer online video games (MMOs), these economic foundations exist, and the skills that are learned within them can be applied to real life and within the classroom. This paper seeks to examine the existence of market economies within MMOs. Case studies of various games will be conducted to show this relationship. This paper will go on further to discuss the implications of this, including how MMOs can be used in teaching environments, as well as a more clinical way to examine behavioral economics. Student Author(s): Rachel Ryding, Senior, Sociology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Melissa Roberts, Senior, Sociology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Stephen Sills, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Identifying Opportunities: Geospatial Analysis as a Tool for Targeted Redevelopment Vacant spaces present a complex set of problems for communities across America. The presence of vacant spaces within neighborhoods is strongly associated with socioeconomic distress and capital disinvestment. Additionally, the presence of vacant spaces increases the likelihood of long-term, cyclic disinvestment and deterioration. Thus, revitalization efforts may be most effective when deployed in areas with high concentrations of vacant spaces. Researchers working with the Center for Housing and Community Studies (CHCS) developed a three-pronged model to evaluate a targeted redevelopment region located in the city of High Point, NC. First, we conducted a comprehensive literature review on the nature and impacts of vacant spaces within communities. We then employed a GIS application created by Loveland Technologies to conduct remote external property assessments among several census tracts identified in the city of High Point core city revitalization plan. Lastly, CHCS researchers are creating a map that identifies the number and geographic concentrations of vacant and abandoned properties in this region, overlain with geospatial data from the U. S. Census, HUD, EPA and the City of High Point. When completed, the findings of the project will steer the methods of High Pointâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s targeted redevelopment efforts to improve its most distressed communities.

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Student Author(s): Piyanka Saha, Junior, Chemical Engineering & Bioprocessing Science, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Robert Kelly, North Carolina State University Laura Lee, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 15 Investigation of Novel Cellulose-Binding Tapirin Proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor Species In traditional bioprocessing systems for the production of biofuels, plant biomass must undergo thermal/chemical pretreatment and enzymatic degradation before sugars are readily available and fermented into alcohols. By utilizing bacteria from the extremely thermophilic genus Caldicellulosiruptor, these multiple steps can be combined into one step for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Key novel proteins, named tapirins, were identified in these microorganisms and shown to be capable of binding to insoluble lignocellulosic biomass. To investigate these proteins further, two tapirins were deleted (individually and simultaneously) from the genome of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. These knockout strains were created through multiple crossovers obtained by selecting for or against uracil auxotrophy and/or high temperature kanamycin resistance. Further testing of the knockout strains in C. bescii will provide information on the strains’ ability to solubilize lignocellulose, specifically switchgrass and Avicel (crystallized cellulose). Another tapirin, Calkro_0844 from Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensis, is being expressed in Escherichia coli using Gibson Assembly to construct the desired vector with the tapirin insert. A C-terminal fragment of the Calkro_0844 protein has been crystallized and the binding domain identified; however, the entire tapirin protein will be crystallized in order to gain a more comprehensive view of how the protein functions. The potential for these thermophilic organisms to bind and degrade biomass is promising and, with more extensive testing, a better understanding of these abilities can be achieved and utilized in bioprocessing. Student Author(s): Robert Sakaguchi, Junior, Anthropology, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Mary Good, Wake Forest University Presentation: Anthropology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 54 The Construction of Identity in the Fa’atama Community of Samoa In the island nation of Samoa, the idea of a man being “in the manner of” a woman, or a fa’afafine is an accepted reality within the culture. A woman being “in the manner of” a man, or fa’atama seems disgraceful and unusual to Samoans. Fa’atama is a new concept in Samoan culture. The possibility of a woman who is masculine in mannerisms and lifestyle is seemingly unheard of and rarely even acknowledged, yet they do in fact make up part of the population in Samoa. The objective of this study was to investigate how the Samoan heteronormative society views the non-heteronormative community (of fa’atama), women who dress and act as men, and how fa’atama construct their own identity within this heteronormative society. Methods for research included review of various secondary sources such as scholarly articles and journals as well as primary sources and personal interviews with fa’atama and other Samoans in Apia and various rural villages on the island of Upolu in Samoa. The research has found that fa’atama are not as well respected as fa’afafine within the Samoan community. In addition, fa’atama break heterosexual norms within traditional Samoan culture and in some cases admire the male dominated society and replicate the role of males within the culture. In my research I argued that fa’atama can be seen as a multifaceted spectrum rather than a single identity within the study of gender. A better understanding of fa’atama will hopefully lead to greater acceptance of the non-heteronormative community within Samoa. Student Author(s): Talha Salman, Freshman, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Parallel Journeys: A Comparison on European and American Immigration As of 2010, 3.8 percent of the United States (US)’ population was made up of illegal immigrants. In the same year, European nations had an average of 1.3 percent. Since then, US numbers have stayed consistent while European numbers have experienced a sharp increase. Illegal immigration into Europe is catching up to that flowing into the United States. This sharp increase has led to similarities in issues the United States has been facing for decades, but their responses have varied greatly. This paper delves into which response has been more effective and which response is more aligned with moral standards and would be of greater economic good. Studies have proven the necessities of immigrant labor to support the US economy and European countries have outlined a plan the United States could follow to attain a mutualistic relationship with migrants. To compound that, the US’s intervention

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throughout Latin America in the 20th and 19th centuries led to issues which causes people to immigrate to the country. It is therefore, without a doubt the US’s obligation to take responsibility for those displaced. As a country, there is an obligation to reform immigration policy and create an environment more inclusive of different backgrounds. Student Author(s): Nicole Salonia, Senior, Psychology, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Christy Walcott, East Carolina University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 31 Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms and Family Functioning in Children With Food Allergies Having a food allergy is stressful thing for a child and their family. This is a chronic illness that requires vigilance, time and effort in order to prevent anaphylaxis, a life threatening allergic reaction. There has been research done on the physical effects of food allergies on children, but less is known about how this affects children psychologically. This study will be administered via an online survey to children 8-years-old and older, who have diagnosed food allergies, and their parents. The severity of the food allergy and the level of family functioning will be measured in addition to post-traumatic stress symptoms. It is hypothesized that there will be a link between these three factors. Student Author(s): Samantha Salvato, Junior, Dance Performance and Marketing, University of North Carolina Charlotte Mentor(s): Kim Jones, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte Presentation: Arts - Performing, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 5 Dance Reconstruction: American Modern Dance Choreographer: Paul Taylor Modern dance emerged as an art form in the early twentieth century. Most of the pioneers of this genre are deceased, creating a profound importance to preserve their legacies. This research concentrates on the work of Paul Taylor, whose choreographic career began in the mid-1950s. The objective of my research is to establish an understanding of Taylor’s lost work, Tracer (1962), its history of production, and existing evidence, as preliminary to reconstructing the dance. Tracer was last performed in 1965 and evidence of the dance exists as artifacts. I gathered programs, critiques, images, and set/ costume designs by artist, Robert Rauschenberg at the archives of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Juilliard School of Performing Arts, and Paul Taylor’s American Modern Dance Company. I developed a contextual understanding of the work through films of other works from this period of Taylor’s oeuvre. This research will be further developed through embodied knowledge and interviews, and eventually performed, during a residency at UNC Charlotte with Taylor’s Taylor 2 Company in Fall 2016. I will continue to assist UNCC Assistant Professor of Dance, Kim Jones, selected by Taylor for the project. Student Author(s): Patrick Saracino, Senior, Exercise Science, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Lisa Sprod, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 20 Effects of Static Stretching vs. Dynamic Warm-Up on Jump Performance of High School Aged Football Players PURPOSE: The present study aims to investigate the acute effects of pre event static stretching (SS), dynamic warm-up (DWU), and no warm-up (NWU) conditions on vertical jump (VJ) and standing broad jump (SBJ) performance on high school aged football players. METHODS: Participants performed three test sessions at the same time of day on nonconsecutive days. A five minute moderate intensity jog was followed by an initial assessment of VJ and SBJ. Participants performed their assigned treatment condition. Participants performed a post warm-up assessment of VJ and SBJ. Each participant performed each treatment condition. The treatment order was randomly selected prior to the first day of testing. RESULTS: 5 male participants (Age 16.2 ± 1.48 years old, BMI 30.66 ± 9.78) completed the intervention. No significant differences were found on jump performance between the pre-treatment jump assessment and the post-treatment jump assessment for SS, DWU, or NWU. Although not significant, decreased VJ performance was found with SS (1.27 ± 2.84, p = 0.374) and SBJ performance with NWU(3.32 ± 6.53, p = 0.319). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that neither SS nor DWU protocols augment or diminish jump performance in high school aged football players.

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Student Author(s): Lori Saunders, Senior, Biology, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Shirley Chao, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Toxicology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 29 Hemp Seed Formulation Increases Mortality and Disrupts Nervous System of Ants Carpenter ants are common pests that are capable of extensive damage to property. CannaMix, a patent-pending insecticide developed at Fayetteville State University, is composed of a formulation with hemp seed. Based on feeding studies, higher mortality rates were observed in CannaMix-treated ants compared to controls. Treated ants also exhibited disrupted nervous systems with lower acetylcholinesterase activity. Findings indicate CannaMix may be a promising insecticide that is selective for insects but nontoxic to humans. Student Author(s): Melissa Savas, Senior, Exercise Science, High Point University Mentor(s): Sara Arena, High Point University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 26 The Relationship Between Xbox Gaming Performance and Physical Function As videogames become more interactive, it has been a growing curiosity if they could be used to assess and possibly improve our physical function. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between game performance on the Xbox Kinect and physical function in young adults. Fourteen participants played Xbox Kinect Adventures (Reflex Ridge, Space Pop, and 20,000 Leaks). Physical function measures included dominant lower limb muscle strength (knee flexion/extension, hip flexion/extension), dominant upper limb reaction time (motor, visual, physical), and balance (AP and ML Center of pressure range and velocity). Balance measures were not correlated with game performance (p>0.05). Knee flexor, knee extensor, and hip extensor strength were all positively correlated with the scores in Reflex Ridge (r=0.7746, 0.6573, 0.6234 and p=0.001, 0.011, 0.017, respectively). Motor (r=-0.698, p=0.006) and physical (r=-0.662, p=0.010) reaction times were both negatively correlated with the scores in Space Pop. Motor (r=-0.679, p=0.008) and physical (r=-0.626, p=0.017) reaction times were also negatively correlated with the scores in 20,000 Leaks. Achieving higher scores in these games may indicate that an individual has good levels of physical function. These results conclude that training with these games could help improve physical function. Student Author(s): Cailyn Scanlan, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Vernon Coffield, High Point University Angela Bauer, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 26 A Study into the Effects of Resveratrol on Bone Development in Danio rerio Resveratrol, a naturally occurring phytochemical found in grapes and red wine has been shown to have many health benefits as well as increase bone growth in some mammalian species. Resveratrol is thought to exert many of these health effects (including those on bone growth) through its ability to weakly bind and activate the estrogen receptor. Little is known, however, about the effects of resveratrol on bone ossification in Danio rerio (zebrafish). This study investigated the effects of resveratrol on vertebrae ossification in D. rerio. Embryos were exposed to increasing concentrations of resveratrol (10 -8 M -10-4 M) for 12 days. To determine the effects of resveratrol on ossification, embryos were then stained with calcein dye from day 6 to day 12. Calcein is a fluorescent dye that adheres to calcium ions, thereby serving as a marker for ossified bone. Specimens were imaged using confocal microscopy and vertebrae were scored according to their degree of ossification. Results indicate that resveratrol accelerates ossification of vertebrae at all concentrations beginning day 6 as compared to untreated controls. This data supports the hypothesis that resvertatrol can affect bone development in D. rerio and merits further investigation into resveratrolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mechanism of action.

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Student Author(s): Emily Schmidt, Senior, Chemistry, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Jordan Poler, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Chemistry - Nanoscience, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) AER- NanoResin for the Removal of DPBs During Water Purification Dissolved organic matter in public water sources is a potential health hazard, and is difficult to remove. Carcinogenic Disinfection Byproducts (DBPs) result from chlorination of water. As maximum contaminant levels of specific DBPs continue to drop, focus has been placed on the development of new materials to combat this issue. The functionality of commercially available resins materials are limited by the fact that adsorbates can only with the outermost surface area. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) offer an ideal alternative for absorption processed, owing to their immense surface area. However, SWCNTs are hydrophobic and aggregate in an aqueous environment. To combat this, we have synthesized an AER-NanoResin, composed of SWCNTs with a conformal coating of poly(vinylbenzyl trimethylammonium chloride). This exploits the enhanced NOM removal of the quaternary ammonium resin, and utilizes the immense surface area of SWCNTs, acting as a scaffolding for the resin. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) was used to obtain particle sizing and zeta (ζ) potential data for the AERNanoResin dispersion. DLS indicated the size of the particles in dispersion to be 338.5 ± 1.9 nm. Next, zeta potential was measured to be + 24 ± 1.0 mV. The electrophoretic mobility was determined to be +1.85 ± 0.08 (microns/s)/(V/cm). Student Author(s): Jamie Schnuck, Senior, Exercise Science and Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Roger Vaughan, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 13 Characterization of the Metabolic Effect of Beta–Alanine on Markers of Oxidative Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Skeletal Muscle Background: β-alanine is a common component of numerous sports supplements purported to improve athletic performance through enhanced carnosine biosynthesis and subsequent intracellular buffering. To date, the effects of β-alanine on oxidative metabolism remain largely unexplored. This work investigated the effects of β-alanine on the expression of proteins that regulate cellular energetics. Methods: C2C12 myocytes were cultured and differentiated under standard conditions followed by treatment with either β-alanine or isonitrogenous nonmetabolizable control D-alanine at 800μM for 24 hours. Metabolic gene and protein expression were quantified by qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. Results: β-alanine-treated myotubes displayed significantly elevated markers of improved oxidative metabolism including elevated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) (up 5.8±2.2 fold) and increased mitochondrial content (evidenced by concurrent increases in cytochrome c content). β-alanine also significantly enhanced expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2), leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content (up 1.6 ±0.1 fold). Conclusion: β-alanine appears to increase the expression of several cellular proteins that are associated with enhanced oxidative metabolism, suggesting β-alanine supplementation may provide benefits for athletes and those suffering from metabolic disease. These observations require additional in vivo experimental verification. Student Author(s): Johanna Schoenecker, Junior, Environmental Science, Queens University of Charlotte Mentor(s): Reed Perkins, Queens University of Charlotte Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 47 Cross Education Effect in Activities Requiring Accurate Muscle Activation Cross education is a phenomenon that causes an improvement of skills in the contralateral homologous limb by neural adaptation after unilateral training. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cross education effect occurs after unilateral muscle driving exercises in right-handed individuals. 20 right-handed individuals of whom seven were male and 13 were female, performed two times ten repetitions of a unilateral muscle driving training with their dominant (right) arm. The task was generated with the surface EMG-biofeedback system “proactive”. In the test, subjects had to retrace a profile on the computer monitor by controlled activation of their biceps brachii musculature. The root mean square deviation of both arms was assessed before and after the training sessions. A significant average improvement of 17.5%+-17.9% (p=0.019) was measured in the trained limb whereas the performance of the contralateral limb also improved significantly by 11.5%+-19.0% (p=0.001). This

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allows to make the conclusion that cross-education effects may be observed in tasks that require accurate muscle activation. The findings could be clinically relevant in rehabilitation or in recovery from neuromuscular diseases. Student Author(s): Alexander Schomo, Senior, Psychology University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Kate Nooner, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Biological Sciences - Neurobiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 29 g. Nautilus: Improving Brain Assessment Accessibility One issue in the field of mental health treatment is while the prevalence of mental health problems increases, the ability of professionals in the field to asses and treat these problems has not. Past research has indicated that brain based assessments can be an effective tool in the process of diagnosing and treating various mental health problems. One limitation of traditional EEG, a common method of brain-based assessment, is the cost and the relative low availability of the means to conduct these assessments. The present work details the methodology of conducting EEG with the g. Nautilus, much less expensive, more portable, and easier to use than traditional EEG. Participants consist of college undergraduates and are given a cognitive task during their EEG. The Go NoGo task is a basic attention task and produces a large, readily measurable EEG signal comparable to that of a traditional EEG. Student Author(s): Kathryn Scruggs, Sophomore, Applied Nutrition Science North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Tim Wallace, North Carolina State University Presentation: Anthropology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 13 Maize: Tradition, Change, and Womanhood This paper explores the cultural context of why people eat what they eat and the role of staple foods in household economies. My fieldwork was carried out in the summer of 2015. I focused on maize production, preparation, and consumption in the small Kaqchikel Maya community of San Jorge La Laguna near the Lake Atitlรกn region of Guatemala. Ethnographic methods of participant observation, formal observation, and interviews were the principal means of data collection. Women are seen here as primary preservers of maize and Maya culture due to the uniquely close relationship between womanhood and maize in San Jorge La Laguna. In this paper I describe the way globalization affects household economies and their consumption of maize in San Jorge. I argue that these changes serve to adapt the tradition of maize to the modernizing world and ultimately perpetuate the central role of maize consumption in Maya culture well into the future. Student Author(s): Hannah Seddon, Senior, Biochemistry North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Julie Horton, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 2 Glutathione Depletion Impacts MMS and H2O2 Sensitivity of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an antioxidant that protects cells from oxidative stress. Intracellular GSH has been found to affect DNA damage and repair and redox regulation. XRCC1 is a protein able to coordinate the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER is initiated by DNA base damage formed by alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), or oxidizing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2). The three mouse fibroblast cell lines used in this study expressed wild-type XRCC1 protein (XWT), or the reduced form of XRCC1 (Xred), or had no expression of XRCC1 (X-). Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated MMS hypersensitivity in X - cells, but no further sensitization was seen by pre-treatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis. Both Xred and XWT cells were sensitized 1.7-fold by BSO pre-treatment. The X- cells displayed slightly more sensitivity to H2O2 and all three cell lines were sensitized by BSO pre-treatment. Glutathione assays revealed depletion of the intracellular level to about 60% of the control value by a 1 h exposure to MMS in X WT and Xred. The X- cells demonstrated a lesser glutathione depletion. Following a 1 h exposure to H 2O2,glutathione levels were decreased to about 50% in all three cell lines.

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Student Author(s): Hannah Shaheen, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Sandra Cooke, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) DOC Effects on Daphnia magna In limnological ecosystems, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) can interact with various substances and can alter light penetration and photosynthetic rates of aquatic plants. This experiment was designed to understand how different concentrations of DOC affect zooplankton populations. To monitor death and reproduction rates, populations of Daphnia magna were cultured in varying concentrations of DOC derived from maple and beech leaves, with low-DOC pond water serving as the control. We hypothesized that the DOC levels would affect zooplankton in different ways, such as blocking light radiation in higher concentrations and stimulating algal growth (D. magnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary food source) in the lower concentrations with higher light penetration. Maple and beech leaves were collected from the Piedmont Environmental Center and boiled to extract their DOC. After filtration, Daphnia were cultured in 10%, 25%, 50% and 100% relative concentrations of Maple and Beech stock, and compared to the control. Populations were assessed throughout a fourteen day period at various intervals, consistently feeding them an algal food source. Results from this experiment are an important step in understanding how DOC affects Daphnia life cycles and will shed light on the direct and indirect environmental effects on zooplankton. Student Author(s): Megan Shannahan, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Rachel Kohman, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 56 Temporal changes in LPS-induced microglial cell activation in adult and aged mice Microglia, the brainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resident immune cells, express distinct forms of activation including the classic proinflammatory (M1) and alternative neuroprotective (M2) phenotypes. Microglia acquire the M1 and M2 phenotypes at distinct time-points after a brain injury, indicating a time-dependent shift in activation (Hu et al., 2012; Wang et al., 2013). Normal aging primes microglia towards the M1 phenotype that leads to increased basal inflammation and a prolonged neuroinflammatory response following an immune challenge. Presently unknown is how aging affects microglia activation across an extended time period. This study evaluated whether adult and aged mice show differential temporal profiles of microglia activation following an immune challenge. Aged and adult female C57BL/6J mice were administered an intraperitoneal injection of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. Locomotor and anxiety-like behaviors were assessed 4 hours, 1, 2, 3, or 7 days following LPS or saline exposure. Hippocampal expression of genes associated with the M1 phenotype showed age and timedependent differences in expression both basally and following LPS. Similarly, aged mice showed differential expression of M2-associated genes basally and in response to LPS relative to young mice. The current data indicates that the onset and duration of an anti-inflammatory response is altered in aged subjects. Student Author(s): Hannah Shapiro, Sophomore, Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University Kenneth Erickson, Sophomore, Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Nils Peterson, North Carolina State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 28 Which Species to Conserve: Evaluating Children's Species-Based Conservation Priorities There is currently a meager understanding of the species attributes viewed as important for conservation by children, despite arguments for biodiversity conservation that hinge on the speciesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; value. We conducted a study of children between the ages of 4 and 14 on Andros Island, The Bahamas to determine how they prioritized wildlife species for conservation based on five attributes: endemism, use for hunting and fishing, rapid decline in population size, visibility around their home, and ecological significance. Children tended to rank ecological significance as the most important attribute for prioritizing wildlife for protection with other attributes being not significantly different from one another. However, participants in a local environmental education program placed greater prioritization to species experiencing rapid population declines. We also found differences in preference based on gender, age, and participation in outdoor activities. These findings elucidate how children value biodiversity, and

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suggest children’s conservation priorities may align with those of conservation biologists, especially after exposure to environmental education. We suggest that better understanding which wildlife attributes are seen as important to children for conservation prioritization can lead to more informed biodiversity conservation decisions as the perspectives of children can bridge the gap between public preference and scientific opinion. Student Author(s): William Shaw, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Meghan Blackledge, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 10 Importance of Specific Amino Acids on the E. coli MazEF Toxin-antitoxin System Death of an entire population is not seen as advantageous in the public eye. In bacteria however, large-scale cell death is sometimes necessary for the survival of future generations. Under various types of stress, E. coli will undergo programmed cell death via a MazEF-mediated pathway. MazEF, a toxin-antitoxin system, is comprised of two main components, the toxin MazF coded by mazF and the antitoxin MazE, coded by mazE. When bound together, MazE inhibits the enzymatic function of MazF and the cell grows normally. However, when MazE dissociates from the toxin, MazF commences its function as a sequence specific endoribonuclease, cleaving mRNA at ACA sequences and thereby killing the cell. Based on a published crystal structure, the most intimate interaction between these two proteins takes place between a hydrophobic cleft on MazF and residues 71 to 75 of MazE. According to previous publications, it is believed that amongst these 5 residues, IDWGE, the Center tryptophan is a key component in the binding of MazE to MazF, and thus a key to its activity. We have synthesized IDWGE, ΔMazE5, to evaluate its utility as an analog for the full length MazE. Initial studies on ΔMazE5 as well as progress toward the cloning, expression, and isolation of both MazE and MazF for enzyme assays will be presented. Student Author(s): Cyrus Shea, Freshman, Communications, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) What is Watauga and Why Should You Care? College is a volatile time for first year students, because for some the flood of knowledge and newfound freedom can be overwhelming. When overwhelmed by homework and deadlines, staying motivated can be a challenging task in itself. By implementing a structured living/learning environment, the Watauga Residential College creates a sense of community that encourages students to excel. When students are a part of a living learning community, students are encouraged to succeed through community engagement in an academic setting. This paper uses primary sources such as interviews with current students, as well as secondary sources such as the Virginia Fox dissertation and the Watauga College Constitution from the archives at Appalachian State University, to explore the methods implemented by the Watauga Residential College to create a living learning community through the curriculum and classes it offers. Along with exploring how the classes create a living learning community, this paper also explores the benefits associated with being a part of a living learning community, inside and outside of the classroom. Student Author(s): Terrance Shelton, Sophomore, Chemistry, Winston-Salem State University Nykeera Cockrane, Freshman, Nursing, Winston Salem State University Mentor(s): Fenghai Guo, Winston-Salem State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 61 Development of Rhodium Catalyzed Conjugate Addition Reactions of Arylzinc and Application to the Synthesis of Bisteppogenin Heterocycles have continued to be the focus of intense synthetic activity both in academia and industry. Over 75% of the top 200 brand name drugs are heterocycles or contain heterocycle subunit. Heterocycles also account for more than 50% of all known organic compounds. Rhodium catalyzed carbon carbon bond formation is very valuable in forming the carbon skeletons of complex heterocycle synthesis. Rhodium catalyzed carbon carbon bond formation reactions using arylboronic acid/organometallic reagents in 4-quinolones and O-heterocycles such as benzopyrans have been developed. We are also interested in applying this new C-C bond formation strategy to the synthesis of some bioactive natural products such as flavonoids and biflavonoids, one of the most abundant classes

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of plant constituents, known for their rich biological/pharmacological activities including anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Student Author(s): Edward Shuffler, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Devin Sink, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Ahmar Gordon, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Christopher Smith, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Aquarium Monitoring and Control Using Embedded Systems Maintaining an aquarium is a task that requires nearly 24/7 monitoring and awareness. Some of the most vital parameters for a healthy ecosystem include pH, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential. Since parameters can change radically without warning, having a system in place to be able to take action quickly is a valuable asset. This presentation will demonstrate a system that is designed and built using an Arduino with an ethernet shield attached, as well as several probes solely for the purpose of monitoring an aquatic ecosystem. This system is able to display current parameter values, as well as previously recorded values, so that the user can view trends over time. In case of an emergency, or when there is an abnormality in one of the sensor readings, this system will allow users to take action from anywhere through a Web interface. Student Author(s): Siesa Shuman, Freshman, Undecided, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Stay True or Stay Alive Watauga Residential College is an experimental learning and living community that was established in 1972. In the beginning of Watauga’s history the founder’s had specific goals for Watauga. They wanted to have an interdisciplinary program in which every class had a focus on the arts, however emphasis in the program was placed on community and the sharing of culture and ideals. Today there is still an emphasis but it is placed on the interdisciplinary curriculum and inquiry based learning and there is less focus on community. My presentation explores and analyzes the evolution of Watauga Residential College and the shift in goals. I do this by using personal accounts of professors who worked in Watauga throughout the years, interviews of the founders, meeting minutes, and curriculum books. The journey that Watauga has made can also be used to analyze the changes that take place in other programs especially in experimental programs. These programs are forced to change because of the importance placed on learning in the classroom and not on a sharing of ideas outside of intellectual ones. Watauga can be used an example to teach other programs how to adapt and keep the program running.

Student Author(s): Anastasia Shymanovich, Senior, Sociology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Zechariah Etheridge, Senior, Sociology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Stephen Sills, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Sociology , Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) The Center for Housing and Community Studies of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Advances in GIS are making large-scale structural surveys of urban areas more feasible than ever. When combined with traditional sociological survey methods, the quality of comprehensive neighborhood assessments may be significantly improved. Within this framework, the Center for Housing and Community Studies (CHCS) of UNCG has developed a multi-modal data collection method for systematically cataloging Greensboro’s housing stock. We assessed housing and community conditions by two means. First, we conducted visual external assessments of multiple variables using the Loveland Technologies Software, a custom GIS application first implemented in Detroit. Next, we conducted one-on-one interviews with neighborhood residents using a standardized survey instrument to gather information on in-home living environments. The results allow us to map multiple aspects of Greensboro’s housing stock at multiple scales. When combined with resident interview findings, the results of these data guided efforts to develop a streamlined system for referring residents in need to our community housing partners. This process helps housing advocate organizations target their efforts more efficiently and reduces

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duplication of efforts. In the near future, the CHCS will expand this model in assessing each of Guilford County’s 210,000+ property parcels. Student Author(s): Karen Sieber, Senior, American Studies, Urban History, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Robert Allen, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Individualized Major Program, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Mapping the Mill Village: Digitally Recreating Gastonia's Loray Mill in 1920 Mapping the Mill Village is a digital history exhibit about the Loray Mill in Gastonia, NC. The mill was the largest cotton mill in the South and the scene of a strike in 1929 that is often studied by labor historians. This exhibit provides an interactive map that documents the 2000+ residents of the Loray Mill Village in 1920, using data drawn from census records, city directories, and other sources. Information on each resident is mapped onto a series of historic Sanborn Fire Insurance maps of Gastonia. This visualization provides a snapshot of who lived where in the village, where they came from, and what job they did, and where they fit in the community. This helps illuminate what life was like in the mill village from a variety of voices, telling both individual’s stories as well as uncovering greater trends. The project is designed to be dynamic and expandable, with the capability of adding links to articles, photographs or oral histories related to particular families. The next phase will include a visualization of 1930 data to analyze movement and change across decades. Protocol was also created to develop similar projects for other mill villages, “lost neighborhoods,” or historic downtown areas. Student Author(s): Bryanna Sierra, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Didier Dreau, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 14 Periostin and Transforming Growth Factor Beta Induced Expression and Breast Cancer Progression Composition and density of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play preeminent roles in breast cancer progression. The ECM protein periostin (POSTN) is correlated to poor outcomes in breast cancer. POSTN shares structural similarities with the ECM protein transforming growth factor beta induced (TGFBI). Cancer progression is associated with decreases in epithelial markers with increases in stemness features, characteristics influenced by ECM proteins. Thus, here we assessed in vitro, expressions of POSTN and TGFBI in mammary cell series (67NR, 4T07, 4T1) and human cell series (MCF10A, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) by ELISA following incubation with transforming growth factor ß (TGFß). Additionally, the growth and phenotype of MDA-MB-231 cells, i.e., expression of the epithelial and stemness markers E-cadherin and CD133, respectively, were determined. Cells secreted significantly different baseline concentrations of POSTN whereas higher and similar TGFBI concentrations were measured. The POSTN/TGFBI ratio tended to increase with the aggressiveness of the mice and human tumor cells tested. In the condition tested, the expression of CD133 and E-cadherin in MDA-MB-231 cells were not significantly altered following incubation with TGFß. Taken together, these observations support an increase in POSTN expression following TGFß incubation in breast cancer and a possible association with tumor progression. Student Author(s): Jose Silva Cantu, Sophomore, Criminal Justice, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Patience Perry, Appalachian State University Presentation: Arts - Visual, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Indoor Confinement Among Our Children: Addressing Concerns of Nature Deficit Disorder When people think of childhood disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) first come to mind, despite Nature Deficit Disorder being just as common. Nature Deficit Disorder is growing to become a larger issue in America where people are increasingly glued to their phones, tablets, television, video games, or just indoors in general. Today's children are isolated from nature causing mental, emotional, and physical ramifications and exacerbating those with ADD and ADHD. A growing body of literature clarifies what Nature Deficit Disorder is and the suggestion of increased time outside is the purported solution, but “Is that enough?” Fundamental research questions need to be addressed. “What precisely are the symptoms of Nature Deficit Disorder?” Further, “How do the symptoms and psychosocial effects present in terms of short or long periods of time?” This presentation attempts to focus on etiology, prevention, and therapeutic treatment for youth dealing with problems associated with confinement from the outside world.

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Student Author(s): Brandon Skinner, Senior, Biology, Barton College Mentor(s): John Dogbe, Barton College Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Determination of the Rate of Ethanol Production by Yeast in Wine In wine making, yeast cells are inoculated in grape juice where they metabolize carbohydrates into ethanol and carbon dioxide through fermentation. The purpose of this project was to determine the rate at which yeast produce ethanol in wine throughout various stages of wine making. Each day, a sample of wine was collected, prepared for analysis, and analyzed using a gas chromatograph. The resulting chromatogram was used to calculate the percentage of ethanol in the sample. The results were plotted on a graph, and the slope of the graph was used to determine the rate of ethanol production. Two trials were conducted. During the first trial, the ethanol concentration increased rapidly during the first fifteen days, slowed down near 15% ethanol, then began rising and approached 23% ethanol. The overall rate of ethanol production for the first trial was determined to be an increase of about 0.02% ethanol per hour. In the second trial, the ethanol content increased rapidly during the first seven days, then remained steady at about 16% ethanol. The rate of ethanol production for the second trial was determined to be an increase of 0.09% ethanol per hour, with little to no increase after the first seven days. Student Author(s): Natalie Smith, Junior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University William Sink , Junior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Nicholas Hall, Junior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Alex Merwin, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Brett Taubman, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 22 An Investigation of the Chemical and Optical Properties of Aerosols in the Southeastern U.S. Aerosols are solid or liquid particles suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere. These particles cause millions of deaths throughout the globe each year and significantly impact the Earth’s climate, making it an increasingly important area of research. Currently, viable methods for simultaneous characterization of the chemical and optical properties of aerosols are not available. This research employs a new method to characterize chemical properties of aerosols collected on quartz fiber filters from a low-volume sampler connected to a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) located at the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) facility in Boone, NC. The chemical characterization of the aerosols involves the direct thermal desorption of quartz fiber filters by GC-MS. The standards used to analyze the PM on the filter include anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene, levoglucosan, cispinonic acid, and methacrylic acid. These standards are markers for both anthropogenic and biogenic sources including biomass burning, combustion of fossil fuels, and secondary organic aerosols from vegetation. The implications of this study will help improve climate models and identify the optical properties of particulate matter based on specific chemical signatures. Student Author(s): Cambray Smith, Sophomore, Nutrition Science and International Studies, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Tim Wallace, North Carolina State University Presentation: Anthropology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Hope for Health: Exploring Healing Methods and Perceptions of Medical Affliction in the Evangelical Community of Santiago Atitlán This research describes a student ethnographer’s investigation into the “illness process” and healing mechanisms used in the Tz’utujil-speaking town of Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala, specifically looking into the Evangelical community. The researcher wanted to learn more about the paradigm of affliction within this community of faith in relationship to illness. The study took place during the summer of 2015, and the student used interviews, pile sorting, questionnaires, and cognitive mapping as primary research methods. She learned that there is a basic healthcare framework available in Santiago, but there are several layers of barriers that limit access for every-day members of the community. The Evangelical community helps to mitigate some of these obstacles while simultaneously providing hope to its congregants.

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Student Author(s): Christopher Smith, Senior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Mitch Parry, Appalachian State Univesrity Presentation: Computer Science, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 31 Analysis of Frequencies in Beehive Audio Recordings Bees have a critical job in nature: to help pollinate plants in order to sustain life. Beehives house a colony of bees that pollinate plants in the surrounding area. By studying the sounds the bees make while in the beehive, the overall health of the bee colony could be estimated. This could be done by comparing the current data with that of other similar days as well as other similar times in a day. This study focuses on the preliminary results of gathering data over a large span of time, and then studying the trends in the frequencies that were produced in the beehive. In this study, we use nonnegative matrix factorization to separate frequency spectra from different sounds. Student Author(s): Stella Sommer, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Stephen Williams, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Physical, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 23 Comparison of Quantitative Vapor-phased Infrared Intensities with Density Functional Theory Calculations for Vibrational Modes of Oxygen Groups in Alcohols and Aldehydes Recently measured quantitative IR spectra of several gas-phased have different intensities of their O-H stretching bands and C=O stretching bands. Alcohols with several functional groups (including other than alcohol â&#x20AC;&#x201C; groups), with multiple carbon bonds, and aromatic alcohols show increased intensities for the O-H stretch band. The most surprising difference was found between phenol and benzyl alcohol. The intensity for the O-H stretch band of phenol was more than two times stronger as the corresponding intensity for benzyl alcohol. Similar effects were observed for the intensities of C=O stretch bands for a number of aldehydes. Aromatic aldehydes were having significantly higher intensities than aliphatic aldehydes. However, for some infrared spectra of aldehydes, the integration of a separate C=O stretch area is a difficult task because of overlapping signals. For this project, Density Functional Theory computations were compared to the infrared spectra of the alcohols and aldehydes. Similar trends were investigated. The surrounding molecular structures have an influence on the intensities of O-H stretching and C=O stretching bands in vapor-phased and also in computed infrared spectra. Student Author(s): Natalia Soto, Freshman, Business Management and Administration, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Co-Housing Immigration Solution: Invest in Opportunity In an effort to better manage and track the actions of South American immigrants in the United States, co-housing community principles can be applied along the southern border. Co-housing communities are living quarters intentionally grouped and centered around a common goal. They provide opportunity for American economic growth while managing the incoming immigrant rate and rate of departure. By taking unskilled and uneducated immigrants and providing them with various opportunities within the co-housing community, immigrants will gain necessary skills to improve their home countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conditions following their residency term. In providing immigrants with public education, experience in a particular trade, life and stress management skills, and training in anti-corruption tactics, immigrants may combat poverty, a lack of education, and government corruption in South America. The projected long term benefit is a slowed rate of immigration followed by a decreased need for South Americans to migrate. Further, American employment opportunities are provided in educating and managing these co-housing communities, and American citizens may obtain a bilingual skillset while fulfilling their civic duty. By developing the immigrantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; skillsets in co-housing communities along the southern border of the United States, economic profits may be achieved while managing the rate of immigration.

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Student Author(s): Shelby Spencer, Freshman, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Liberal Studies, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Replacing Your "Real" Family: The Residential College Effect It’s hard to feel homesick when you’re at home, so it’s no surprise that freshmen in residential colleges quickly become comfortable in their surroundings. The rapid integration into the community of people they live and learn with leaves little room for insecurity and feelings of alienation. Watauga Residential College at Appalachian State University is no exception to this. Those involved in the experiential and inquiry-based learning community of Watauga cherish this unique program in which professors and students join together to form a family that is much different than anything found on main campus. This presentation will outline the ways in which freshmen are welcomed into the close-knit community of Watauga Residential College, and how this affects their college experience. By highlighting how each of Watauga’s aspects is specifically catered to providing its participants with an immersive experience that combines the concepts of living and learning, it’s clear why newcomers feel so at home in this environment. Through personal interviews and archival records related to Watauga, the correlation between freshman comfort and the residential college atmosphere becomes undeniably clear: when students feel they are a part of something, they are able to thrive. Student Author(s): Jordan Stack, Junior, Computer Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Mitch Parry, Appalachian State Univesrity Rahman Tashakkori, Appalachian State University Presentation: Computer Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Hierarchical Storage and Spectrographic Visualization of Beehive Audio in Python This research visualizes a large dataset of over 1000 hours of collected audio files recorded from local beehives. The intent behind visualizing and analyzing this large collection of audio is to recognize audible trends that may occur in the hive in order to gain insight into the hive’s behavior. The main aspects explored are the skills and techniques used for spectrographic visualization of audio samples using Python’s MatPlotLib library and storing/managing the results using a hierarchical storage schema. The particular application discussed is a graphical user interface implemented in Python using TkInter. The application communicates with and retrieves the spectrographic results from a remote server and then displays the results to the user, giving the user the ability to visualize and interact with large amounts of data that may span multiple audio files. Student Author(s): Courtney Stewart, Junior, Exercise Physiology, East Carolina University Rachel Pearce, Junior, East Carolina University Keerthana Velappan, Junior, University Studies, East Carolina University Caroline Abashian, Junior, Speech and Hearing Sciences, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Jennifer Matthews, East Carolina University Presentation: Health and Physical Education, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 12 Enforcement Official Perceptions of Underage Alcohol Consumption in a College Town Alcohol is easily accessible to minors, and past studies related to alcohol law enforcement discuss the various outlets for obtaining alcohol, and funding limitations within law enforcement. This research study hoped to discover the methods of enforcing alcohol consumption laws, as well as the officials’ perceptions on underage alcohol consumption. Two enforcement officials (a law enforcement official and a university enforcement official) who worked at or near a public, 4-year institution in the southeastern United States participated in semi-structured interviews. For each interview, a guide was used and identical questions were asked. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Findings showed that enforcement officials perceived underage alcohol consumption as a widespread problem in the United States, not just on college campuses. The officials believed that alcohol law enforcement was effective in the college town, and that students perceived the law enforcement with various emotions. Findings discovered various enforcement methods used by the officials, such as looking for youthful appearances to detect underage drinking. Funding helped enforce alcohol laws in the college town. Enforcement officials believed that collaboration between the law enforcement and institution was crucial.

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Student Author(s): Hallie Stidham, Senior, Physics, Mathematics, High Point University Jacob Brooks, Senior, Physics, High Point University Mentor(s): Brad Barlow, High Point University Presentation: Physics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 36 HPU's Chip 'n' Ship and NASA Micro-g NExT Program Experience The High Point University Panther CLAWS Team designed and constructed a rock chip sampling device for microgravity bodies. The design incorporated a commercially-available, unmodified pneumatic air hammer that was mounted inside of an aluminum housing. The device also featured three interchangeable collection cartridges that were made specifically to mitigate cross-contamination between rock chip samples. The final product was tested in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. We are sharing our story with our fellow students and local media outlets. In addition, we created related activities for children at an annual outreach event called HPUniverse Day, where hundreds of local children and their families engage in handson activities and demonstrations. Student Author(s): Viktor Stromberg, Senior, Environmental Science, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Christopher Thaxton, Appalachian State University Presentation: Environmental Sciences, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 25 Methane Emissions Associated with Unconventional Natural Gas Well Production The United States has seen a steady rise in natural gas production over the past decade. The primary anthropogenic source of methane is the natural gas and petroleum industry. A previously published air quality dataset for the natural gas production area surrounding Pittsburgh, PA was reanalyzed to examine spatial trends between observed methane mixing ratios and natural gas production and other methane emission sources. The hypothesis is that unconventional natural gas (UNG) wells, or wells that use horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, or both are the primary methane emission source in the region, and that greater production volumes increase methane emissions. Landfills, coal fired power plants, and cow farms, are also methane sources within the region, however cow farms were not considered in this study due to a lack of publically available spatial datasets. Gas production volumes given by the Pennsylvania department of environmental protection (PADEP) were significantly correlated with higher methane mixing ratios. This leads to the conclusion that increased methane concentrations may be apportioned to dense clustering of UNG wells. However, further examination of methane-to-propane enhancement ratios revealed samples with anomalously elevated levels of methane, which will be analyzed to discover any methane sources unrelated to natural gas production. Student Author(s): William Stutts, Senior, Motorsports Management, Winston-Salem State University Mentor(s): Kyu-soo Chung, Winston Salem State University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 47 Facilitators and Barriers in Experiential Learning: The Case of Motorsports Management Majors in HBCU Because of the disciplineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s close connections to the industry, Sport Management actively incorporates studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experiential learning into its curriculum. Nonetheless, only a few systematic approaches have been made to understand what components facilitate and prevent studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; engagement in such educational activities in Sport Management. Therefore, this research aims to explore what experience sport management students gain from participating in experiential learning. This includes their perceived incentives to participate in these experiences. It also includes the barriers they perceive as keeping them from getting all the possible knowledge and experience from this type of learning. Using in-depth interviews, the researcher asks students what facilitates and bars them from fully engaging in experiential learning in the sport industry. The interview and data analysis occur simultaneously as the participants currently attend several experiential learning opportunities. The results will be explained at the presentation but from the small sample size it is believed that the barriers consist of different ethnicity and incompatible culture in a sporting event. The incentives would be to make contacts in the industry and gain experience to be used later on in a career. This study provides perspectives of how students implement experiential learning into their education and future careers.

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Student Author(s): Abigail Sullivan, Freshman, Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Kirsten Clemens, Appalachian State University Presentation: English, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Jaws: Fear of Water, Fear of Life Jaws hit the theaters in the summer of 1975, causing a world wind of terror for beach goers that year. Steven Spielberg, the director of jaws, changed not just tourists mind set but also changed cinema forever, ranging from the use of perspective shots to creating long lasting effects on its viewers. Police Chief Martin Brody, played by actor Roy Scheider, had an ongoing fear of the water that was challenged when a Great White preys on his townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coast and waterways. Chief Brody is forced to face the twenty-five foot long shark that summer when the shark puts not just the town at risk but also his family when his son is nearly attacked in the estuary; recognition of the threat that the shark poses and the challenge Brody must face is revealed through sound and elements of mise en scene such as the positioning of the camera and the placement of characters in individual scenes. Student Author(s): George Tabor, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Jennifer Cecile, Appalachian State University Darren Seals, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 31 Exploring the Possible Roles of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptides in Invadopodia Function Drug resistant, invasive tumors are among the most devastating cancers. It is the goal of this project to explore the potential relationships between these two phenotypes in a variety of tissue culture model systems. Invadopodia are actin-rich protrusions of the cellular membrane that exert a motive force on the extracellular matrix and release proteases required for its degradation and remodeling. Thus, invadopodia allow a cell to free itself from its native environment and invade other tissues, a frequently deadly phenomenon. Organic anion transporting-polypeptides (OATPs) are proteins that mediate xenobiotic exchange across the cellular membrane and colocalize with lipid raft domains (LRDs) and caveolins in humans. Interestingly, invadopodia require LRDs and caveolin-1 for proper functioning in breast cancer cells. To determine if OATPs are present in invadopodia-competent cells, fluorescence transport assays will be performed on prostate, breast, and head and neck cancer cell lines. Once an appropriate model is identified, OATP antagonists will be used in conjunction with morphological and in situ zymographical analyses to determine if OATPs are required for invadopodia formation and/or function. If OATPs play a role in invadopodia activity, they may contribute to the enhanced invasive phenotype of certain cancers and therefore serve as viable therapeutic targets. Student Author(s): Alexandra Tabor, Senior, International Studies North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Shea McManus, North Carolina State University Presentation: International Relations, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 30 Women Factory Workers in Bangladesh In a country where the garment industry accounts for approximately 78% of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total exports, factory work offers millions of women in Bangladesh the opportunity for stability. However, it also exposes them to deplorable conditions in factories. There are two purposes of this research: to investigate the benefits and dangers of the industry and to analyze reform recommendations that will preserve the benefits these women workers receive and improve their economic conditions. Drawing on statistical data and economic analyses research shows the benefits of economic independence, greater social mobility, and opportunities for education. In-depth interviews illustrate the drawbacks of the industry including dangerous working conditions, unsustainable living conditions, and increased harassment. After analyzing several reform policies, this study argues in order to create sustainable positive change for women workers the reform policies must be focused on providing education for young women, improving working conditions, and increasing representation in politics. With the increasing growth of global supply-chain networks, this research contributes to literature advocating for the needs of workers at the bottom of the supply-chain. Policy recommendations specify a ground-up approach involving the local Bangladeshi government and local NGOs with representation of Bangladeshi women.

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Student Author(s): Calla Telzrow, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Andrew Wommack, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis and Antimicrobial Assessment of a Plant-Derived Cyclic Peptide Jatropha, a genus of woody trees and shrubs ubiquitous in the dry tropics, is prevalent in Latin American, Asian, and African ethnopharmacology. Peptides isolated from Jatropha species exhibit diverse biological activity, including purgative, wound-healing, antimalarial, and antifungal effects. Cyclogossine A, a cyclic heptapeptide with the primary structure VLATWLG, is isolated from J. gossypiifolia. Although Cyclogossine A has been previously synthesized, its biological activity remains unreported. Due to its rigid structure and hydrophobic side chains, Cyclogossine A possesses therapeutic potential. Access to Cyclogossine A was enabled by semi-automated, Fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis. HPLC purification and TOF mass spectrometry were utilized to confirm the synthesis and purity of the primary structure. After optimizing the cyclization reaction, which formed an amide bond between the C-terminus and N-terminus of the linear peptide, the naturally occurring ring structure was created. In addition, to investigate effects on potency, an engineered form of Cyclogossine A was synthesized and cyclized. This non-natural form of Cyclogossine A contains deoxythreonine, an alkene-containing derivative of threonine, in lieu of threonine. Deoxythreonine was synthesized through a series of reactions from methionine. NMR spectroscopy data confirmed the desired synthesis and cyclization of both the natural and engineered peptides. In future experiments, the antimicrobial effects of both peptides will be tested on a library of bacteria, parasites, and fungi. Student Author(s): Kelly Thompson, Junior, Integrative Physiology and Neurobiology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): John Godwin, North Carolina State University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Neurobiology, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 12 Isotocin Expression in Thalassoma bifasciatum Brains Isotocin is a neuropeptide hormone that is the teleost homologue of the mammalian oxytocin (OT). Past research indicates isotocin (IT) plays an important role in regulating social behaviors in fishes. Since IT is the teleost homologue of OT, it is likely that they share similar functions and areas of expression. Well known functions of OT include an inhibitory role in the stress response in mammals as well as influences on social behavior. Using in situ hybridization with digoxigenin labeled probes, I identified sites of IT expression in the brains of two stressed and three unstressed bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum), a teleost fish that shows socially controlled sex change. I hypothesized that IT would be expressed in the magnocellular preoptic area and confirmed this. I also hypothesized that there would be greater IT expression in the stressed fish than in the unstressed fish due to greater OT expression in response to stress in rats. I did not find a clear difference in expression between treatments, possibly due to a small sample size. My future studies will focus on comparing IT expression across the different sexual phenotypes in order to investigate a potential influence on social and sexual behavior in bluehead wrasse. Student Author(s): Christina Tingle, Senior, Chemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Susan Fahrbach, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 50 Is Older Really Wiser? Age-Based Changes in Synaptic Structures in the Brain of the Honey Bee The ability to adapt and grow in response to new experiences is a universal property of brains. This can be seen particularly well within the mushroom body â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the center for auditory and olfactory learning and memory in the brain of all insects, including honey bees. Through anatomical studies of the mushroom bodies in honey bees (Apis mellifera), we conducted a focused study of how an insectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brain changes as it ages under natural conditions. Honey bees were marked on their thorax on the first day of adult life and then returned to their hive for later collection in the field. At the ages targeted for study, brains were dissected, fixed, sliced, and labeled with fluorescent markers for filamentous actin, synaptic vesicles, and cell nuclei. Images of the labeled brain slices were captured using a confocal microscope. The stored images were then analyzed in terms of density of synapses within specific regions of the mushroom bodies. Data analysis is ongoing, but from this study, we can expect to discover

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the temporal pattern of changes in these synaptic structures, and then go on to investigate the reasons behind this trend. Student Author(s): Nicole Tipton, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Stephen Williams, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Assigning Acetol: Simulated IR Spectra Using High Level Ab-Intio Methods Acetol is an oxygenated volatile organic compound (OVOC) of atmospheric importance suspected or shown to be an aerosol precursor. This molecule is produced via sundry mechanisms including biomass burning, anthropogenic mechanisms, or (primarily) via the O2-initiated oxidation of isoprene - one of the greatest contributors to organic emissions to the atmosphere. In order to fully understand the vibrational dynamics of acetol, a spectrum was simulated using CFOUR and Gaussian 09 set of programs. Recent work has indicated that acetol has no observed symmetry, which was confirmed with a geometry optimization, and single-point energy calculation about the methyl substituent. In addition to the geometry optimization, the harmonic and anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities were calculated with second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory and triple zeta with polarization (tzp) basis set. The scaled theoretical wavenumbers showed good agreement with experimental values. Using excellent quantitative IR spectra obtained from the NWIR, vibrational modes, overtones and combination bands are being assigned with the aid of the CFOUR calculations, helping to better understand and utilize the spectra.

Student Author(s): Samantha Tracy, Junior, Biology and Psychology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Sara Levens, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 21 Emotional and Cognitive Mechanisms in Social Networking Behaviors Social networking has become an increasingly significant component of society, particularly in collegiate environments. College culture breeds opportunities for self-discovery and subsequent outlets for emotional reactions and commentary. This study investigates the underlying emotional and cognitive mechanisms that give rise to social networking behaviors. Participants completed an online survey measuring social media involvement, Twitter and Facebook usage, online social support relationships, reward seeking behavior, and emotion regulation. Results reveal that an individual’s tendency to seek rewarding activities positively correlates with online social support relationships. In addition emotional regulation habits significantly predict social media usage and online social support relationships. Specifically, an increased tendency to positively reinterpret stressful situations predicted greater social media usage and greater online social support, suggesting that individuals who use Twitter and Facebook more frequently may be reframing life events to increase the online social support they receive. Interestingly, findings also revealed that greater suppression of one’s emotions predicted greater social media usage yet worse online support relationships. This finding suggests that individuals high in emotion suppression may be using Facebook and Twitter more to project a specific social image or profile, or, as a method for consuming and spreading information. Student Author(s): Maria Trujillo, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Veronica Segarra, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 8 Mapping the Sorting Signals of the Cytoplasmic Domain of Atg27 Proteins perform different cellular functions such as structural support and transport of solutes. It is essential that these proteins be delivered to where they are needed. Membrane trafficking is an important process that allows for the distribution of specific macromolecules, such as proteins, throughout the cell. Protein transport is carried out with the help of sorting signals, which are short stretches of amino acids that mediate the transport of proteins to their designated compartment or organelle. Autophagy is a specialized type of membrane trafficking during which unneeded or damaged cytoplasmic components are taken to the degradative organelle of the cell for recycling. Irregularities in autophagy can lead to human diseases like cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Because autophagy is highly conserved in eukaryotes, baker’s yeast has been a great model system to better understand autophagy and its connection to human diseases. One of the key trafficked proteins in autophagy is

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Atg27, a membrane protein with a single cytoplasmic domain. Our research attempts to identify sorting signals on the cytoplasmic region of Atg27. We are doing this by genetically engineering yeast expressing fluorescent Atg27 molecules lacking parts of its cytoplasmic domain. We evaluate the effects of these mutations using fluorescence microscopy. Student Author(s): John Tunnell, Junior, Pre-Med, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Donald Poe, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 49 Increasing Free-throw Percentage Using the Visualization Technique Research has shown that visualization techniques have often been used in numerous sports to enhance performance. In addition, recent studies have shown that good athletic performance can, after the performance has ended, influence the perceptions of athletes about their tasks. For instance, golfers who have had good rounds imagined that the cup that they were putting at to be bigger than did golfers who had had poor rounds. Softball players who had hit well in a game imagined the ball to be bigger than players who had not hit well. However, these empirical results all showed that good athletic performance affected perceptions of target size. The current study investigated whether this link could be reversed. That is, could one change perceptions of target size and have this positively affect performance. Pfeiffer University varsity basketball players were split into two groups with half of them instructed to shoot free throws as they normally would, and the other half being instructed to carefully visualize the basket as being twice its normal size. The hypothesis is that the visualization technique will significantly increase their made free throw percentage. Data are still being collected. Student Author(s): Emily Turner, Freshman, International Business, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Immigration: The True Cost for Opportunity in America Many Mexicans are faced with the decision to come to America with the 60% of the population of migrants who make it across the U.S-Mexico border or the lucky 3% of the Mexican population to obtain a green card each year. Naturalization is a process that many do not have the opportunity to complete because of limitations such as costs, quotas, and time requirements leave only a select few of immigrants the chance to be granted a green card. Reform to the legal process would not only benefit the immigrants but also the United States, as more legal immigrants would boost the economy as it will help build businesses thus creating more jobs for Americans and balance out the aging population thus strengthen social security. Research shows with the use of analyzed statistics and cost found in the immigration process that the legal process must be improved; therefore, the United States must reduce barriers for immigrants and create a more simple process for granting visas. By taking part of the budget for border protection and investing in increased quotas and lower fees, more immigrants would be incline to get a green card, which would lessen the issue of border control. Student Author(s): Grace Tworek, Senior, Psychology, Catawba College Mentor(s): Sheila Brownlow, Catawba College Presentation: Psychology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 5 Active vs. Passive Language Use in APA-Style Writing I examined how first-person, active APA-style writing influenced views of authors and topics when compared to third-person, passive writing. Students read a short research article written in first-person, active or third-person passive; the article was the same length and reported the same study, results, method, references, and so forth. Participants provided attitudes toward the purported authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s qualities and the research quality, and also provided free write to describe the author. Results indicated that active writing was seen as more understandable, but that authors were viewed as more successful when the active tone was used. Thus, a trade-off of competence for approachability may be needed to write academic work in a more engaging style.

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Student Author(s): Rebecca Ulrich, Sophomore, Biochemistry, High Point University Mentor(s): Meghan Blackledge, High Point University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 29 Probing the Structure-Activity Relationship of Escherichia Coli Extracellular Death Factor Bacteria use chemical signals for cell-to-cell communication to learn about and respond to their environment in a process called quorum sensing (QS). When dense bacterial populations encounter stress from viral invaders, nutrient deprivation, or harsh environmental conditions, quorum sensing provides a mechanism for individual bacterial cells to modify their behavior to respond appropriately to the stressor. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one such mechanism and allows the population to create a bacterial shield to protect the colony from the stressor. In E. coli, PCD occurs through the MazEF toxin-antitoxin system and is mediated by the QS pentapeptide, E. coli extracellular death factor (EcEDF). Previous research has determined the amino acid sequence of EcEDF and described the essential and non-essential amino acid residues for EcEDF activity. A more comprehensive understanding of EcEDF and the chemical functionalities at each amino acid is needed to better understand EcEDF and MazEF interactions in E. coli. Towards this end, a library of rationally designed EcEDF analogs has been synthesized. These analogs can be screened in cell-based assays for their ability to promote or inhibit PCD in E. coli. Efforts towards the synthesis of analogs as well as assay development and optimization will be presented. Student Author(s): Maria Valverde, Sophomore, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Dinene Crater, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 44 In Vitro Analysis of Transcription Repression by GerE during Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis Bacillus subtilis is a gram positive, rod shaped, aerobic soil bacteria. In times of environmental stress, the bacteria carry out sporulation. Desiccation, UV radiation, and extreme temperatures are a few among other environmental stresses of which the spore becomes resistant to. It will remain in this state until the environment has reestablished conditions appropriate for germination. Many proteins play a role in sporulation, most interestingly, GerE. The appearance of the regulatory protein GerE is essential at the late stage of spore development in the mother cell. It not only activates the essential genes for spore formation, but also represses the transcription of several sigma Kdependent genes, including cotA, cotE and cotH. We have identified GerE binding sites on the promoter region of these genes, and hypothesize that GerE binds to these promoter regions to repress transcription from the sigma K associated RNA polymerase. Through the use of a non-radioactive DNA binding assay, the binding characteristics of purified GerE to these promoter regions will be analyzed. Future directions will include in vivo analyses of the function of GerE mutants on these promoters. The completion of this project will enhance our understanding of the role of GerE in the regulation of sporulation. Student Author(s): Vamsi Varanasi, Freshman, Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Joseph Tracy, North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Materials, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 8 Longitudinal Alignment and Optical Characterization of Gold Nanostars in Electrospun Polymer Fibers The objective of this study is to align branched nanoparticles in polymer fibers on the macroscale by electrospinning and to learn how alignment affects their optical properties. Branched gold nanoparticles, or â&#x20AC;&#x153;nanostarsâ&#x20AC;? (GNSs), were synthesized and suspended in a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) solution, which was then electrospun to produce a GNS-embedded polymer fiber nanocomposite. The PEO fibers and embedded GNSs were imaged by electron microscopy to assess the orientation of the GNSs and to measure the fiber diameters. The GNSs aligned along their longest axis parallel to the axis of the fiber due to shearing during electrospinning. The fibers were then aligned on the macroscale by deposition on a rotating mandrel, orienting all of the fibers in the same direction and thus aligning the GNSs on the macroscale. Aligned fiber mats exhibit polarization-dependent optical absorption, where the absorbance is redshifted and blueshifted for light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis, respectively. This result is consistent with the observed alignment of the long axes of GNSs parallel to the fibers.

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Student Author(s): Haley Vartanian, Senior, International Studies, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Akram Khater, North Carolina State University Presentation: History, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 48 The Myth of the Peddler: A re-examining of early Lebanese-American roles in the US For more than 150 years Arabs, and in particular Lebanese immigrants, have lived and worked in the United States. But our understanding of this ethnic group remains skewed by lack of historical research, and stereotypes that regard them as outsiders to American society and values. For example, the first wave of Lebanese-Americans are portrayed in many accounts as solitary young men who worked as peddlers to make a living for their families back in Lebanon. However, data gathered from the 1909 Syrian-American Business Directory and 1910 US Census indicates that this may not have been the case: there were much higher proportions of Lebanese women and families in the US at the time than previously thought, and a significant number of Lebanese business owners in occupations other than peddling. These findings call for a revision of the current conception of early LebaneseAmerican history, as well as further examination of the continuous contribution of the Lebanese diaspora to the country they chose to call home. Student Author(s): Alan Vasquez Soto, Sophomore, Physics, High Point University Mentor(s): Brad Barlow, High Point University Presentation: Physics - Astrophysics, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) There and Back Again: The Disappearing Pulsations of CS 1246 Hot subdwarf stars were once main sequence stars, like the sun, that deviated from normal stellar evolution due to binary interactions and evolved into extreme horizontal branch stars. Several of these stars exhibit rapid pulsations driven by iron opacity instabilities. CS 1246 is a rapidly pulsating hot subdwarf discovered in 2009 that is dominated by a single 371 second pulsation. At the time of its discovery, the pulsational amplitude was one of the largest known, making CS 1246 an ideal candidate for follow up studies. Observations in 2013 implied that the pulsational amplitude had decreased significantly. Since then we have continued monitoring the star using the robotic SKYNET telescopes in Chile, in order to further characterize any changes. Our recent observations show that the pulsational amplitude has gone down by a factor of six: CS 1246 is barely a pulsator anymore. The decay in amplitude over time is reminiscent of a damped harmonic oscillator. Here we present six years of photometry for CS 1246 and discuss possible scenarios that might explain its interesting behavior. Student Author(s): Cierra Vickers, Freshman, Biology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Sociology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Gender Roles: The Transition of Coming to America and the Benefits for Women In 2013 the state of North Carolina alone had 749,426 foreign born people living within its borders. Out of those residents 52.2% are Latino and 47.8% of that population are female. In many aspects the culture shock associated with immigrants coming to America is very negative, causing damage that can be mentally, emotionally, and physically harmful. However in this instance culture shock can be a positive change in the life of immigrant women. The lives of women in Latin America are viewed as very unimportant, except for performing wifely duties. There are limited jobs available for women in these Latin American countries because they do not possess the education or skills needed to preform said jobs. In Mexico, in the years 1994-2014 hundreds of women were tortured, raped, and murdered only because they were women. America has the ability to serve as a safe haven for these women from the war their own country and the men in their lives are waging against them. By making the path to citizen ship easier for these women, and allowing them to remain in the U.S they will be able to receive the help they need and create a new life for themselves.

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Student Author(s): Michael Vidmar, Senior, Chemistry, University of North Carolina - Asheville Mentor(s): Amar Nath, University of North Carolina - Asheville Airat Khasanov, University of North Carolina - Asheville James Perkins, University of North Carolina - Asheville Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 45 Mossbauer elucidation of zero valence iron and iron oxide components of an engineered solid solution of nanoparticles Development of chemically engineered nanoparticles useful as an enduring adsorbant media for the remediation of pollutants in water, has great import for many environmental remediation efforts. A novel synthesis for a zero valent iron adsorbing reactant is incorporated into a contaminant absorbing matrix of nanoparticles is under development. The progress of the synthetic development efforts for these particles is analyzed with 57Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy. The Mossbauer analysis is able to track the oxidative state(s) and relative composition of each iron containing component produced within the solid solutions of adsorber materials being developed. The materials are also analyzed over time to assess the stability of the products. Several variations of the synthetic approach were prepared in an anoxic environment and each analyzed after exposure to standard atmospheric conditions. A selected synthetic approach is refined and compared with a more conventional preparation of adsorber to assess the level and rates of oxidation of iron particles within the materials. Mossbauer Spectroscopy is utilized to support the efforts of a chemical engineering project. Student Author(s): Gabriella Villalon, Senior, Biology, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Susan McRae, East Carolina University Presentation: Biology, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) A Pedigree Approach Tracing the Inheritance of White Egg Coloration in Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) Despite studies that have investigated the physiological impact and evolutionary significance of egg coloration in avian populations, very little is known about the inheritance of egg color. Eastern bluebirds typically lay pale blue eggs; white eggs are uncommon but observed in most populations. This dichotomy provides a model system for investigating a simple genetic trait, possibly governed by a single locus. My research takes a pedigree approach to investigate the heritability of white egg coloration in the Eastern bluebird. This was accomplished by assembling breeding and egg color data from a 5-year field study of a population of individually-marked bluebirds. Genetic parentage of selected broods hatched from either white or blue eggs was then verified, as instances of mismatch between social and genetic parentage are common in this species. Nine published microsatellite loci isolated from congeneric and related passerine species, and selected for high allelic variability, were initially screened in order to develop a panel of microsatellite markers with sufficient exclusion probability for this population. PCR reaction conditions were then optimized, and products multiplexed for fragment analysis. The pedigree based on genetic parentage assignment will be used to survey candidate genes for the white egg trait, with the aim of gaining a better understanding of genetic egg color variation in this and other avian populations. Student Author(s): Cheyenne Wagi, Senior, Anthropology, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Mentor(s): Michaela Howells, University of North Carolina - Wilmington Presentation: Anthropology, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 9 Tie the Knot, Grow a Baby: The Effects of Marital Status on Neonate Growth in American Samoa Cross-culturally, maternal marital status is linked to neonate body size, with smaller neonates experiencing risks of health complications throughout their lifespans. Married women are assumed to have greater access to socioeconomic resources, resulting in larger and presumably healthier neonates. We tested the influence of marital status on access to prenatal care (PNC), and the relationship between PNC and neonate size (weight, head circumference, and chest circumference) in American Samoa. We analyzed medical records of 149 Samoan women who gave birth in American Samoa between October 2010 and October 2011. The number of PNC appointments was positively correlated with the three neonate size variables (r>0.19, p<0.05). We found that neonates of married women were significantly larger in all size variables after controlling for age and number of pregnancies (ANCOVA, p<0.05). Married women had significantly more PNC appointments than unmarried women, even after controlling for the aforementioned variables, as well as gestation period (ANCOVA, p<0.001). The results suggest that married women in American Samoa receive more PNC and are having larger neonates than their unmarried counterparts. Differences in PNC may indicate status inequalities, and when taken together, this study suggests that marital status may have intergenerational implications for body size.

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Student Author(s): Raven Walker, Freshman, Communications Electronic Media and Broadcasting, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Liberal Studies, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30) Do Selective Programs in Universities Brainwash Students? Once assimilated into a cult, there’s no turning back. In fact, cults often become the lives of those involved. One doesn’t regret the decision to join a cult - because members have strong relationships and common goals. Cult may be a strong word, but it’s often easy for specialized programs in universities to be labeled as “cult-like.” Whether it be honors colleges, learning communities, Greek life, or a residential college - the programs can’t escape the stigma of being insular. This is no exception for Watauga Residential College at Appalachian State University. Watauga’s program Centers around the idea of living and learning. Extremely close relationships between professor and student, student and fellow student, student and mentor are forged - there’s nothing else like it within the university. Yet, negative perceptions have surrounded Watauga for years. With research conducted in Appalachian State University’s Special Collections unit, specifically analyzing historical recordings, outsider's opinions, and interviewing present students, this presentation will prove that these perceptions played a pivotal role in shaping Watauga. By understanding Watauga’s history and how it has developed over the years, it will become easier to analyze, understand, and develop similar programs in other universities, while preventing negative perceptions. Student Author(s): Amy Walker, Freshman, Sustainable Development, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Oral Session 4 (2:45 - 3:45) Why Education Is Destined For Failure (And How to Stop It) A longstanding debate in education is over the type of schooling that best provides a holistic education; that combines both experiential education and an atmosphere that encourages students to delve deeply into their classwork. The residential college rose to meet that expectation. Watauga Residential College is an alternative education program within Appalachian State University that allows students to replace part of their general education with courses that encourage students to develop into critical thinkers. The learning style is built on an “inquiry model,” which provides the grounds for students and educators to develop intimate relationships and learn together. Watauga is one of many residential colleges that have found success in education. Many other attempts, however, have failed. The research will explore founding principles of both Watauga and other residential programs, the courses offered, student and faculty comments, and dissertations to determine why these schools have ceased, and what aspects create that magical learning environment. By examining the failures of other residential colleges, Watauga can improve its own program in addition to knowing what mistakes to avoid, and lead the way for educational programs around the world. Student Author(s): Fionna Walsh, Freshman, Applied Physics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Europe vs. America on Illegal Immigration Illegal immigration is not only America’s problem. It is a global issue. From 1990 to 2005 the amount of international immigrants worldwide increased by about 26 million, leaving us with a whopping 191 million international immigrants in 2005 alone. These numbers are the legal immigrants, and no one really knows how many global immigrants are illegal, but the “International Organization for Migration in Geneva estimates the number to be between 15% and 20%”. In 2000 the United Nations Population Division began a study to see if replacement population was a solution to the decline of the population around the world. “Eight countries and two regions…have been selected for this study…The countries and regions are France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the United States of America, Europe, and the European Union.” Illegal immigration is not an issue that ends with America, it spreads throughout the entire world. “We need to see this from, say, halfway to the moon looking down. Then it’s perfectly clear: Europe’s North Africa problem is the United States’ Central American and Mexican problem. Illegal immigration, south to north, is a global crisis.”

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Student Author(s): Anna Warner, Junior, Psychology, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Mentor(s): Rebecca Muich, University of North Carolina - Greensboro Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Prisoners of Progressivism: Huxley's Attempt to Preserve Our Human In this paper, I argue that Huxley’s motive in writing Brave New World is to show what a ghastly universe awaits humans if we do not preserve our established practices and beliefs, and instead become charmed by the dangers of rapid scientific progressivism. Huxley urges that makers of society should preserve the already established beliefs and practices regarding love, sex, religion, and abstract thought without new age deviation. He does this by creating a “perfect” scientific fantasy. He then dismantles the benevolence of the progressive fantasy as he concludes that a scientific world will ultimately come at the price of our dignity; high-tech brainwashing will defeat creativity, thus making us all the same. Huxley invites us into a world that unremorsefully obliterates art, literature, love, and religion. Huxley riddles this work with taboos in the hopes that a modern audience will recoil at such a progressive world, and seek traditional contentment. Moreover, this paper offers a paradigm into Huxley’s window of reasoning; Brave New World is a hopeful endeavor to sell a societal plan of tradition. Ripping away what all humans cherish out of life makes the audience feel perplexed and vulnerable so that we might adopt his social blueprint. Student Author(s): Joyah Watkins, Senior, Biology, University of North Carolina - Charlotte Mentor(s): Karl Castillo, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Sarah Davies, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Marine Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 16 Characterizing Symbiodinium Communities in Coral Reefs Across Different Species and Thermal Regimes The physiology and health of scleractinian corals are mediated through a symbiosis with their endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae within the genus Symbiodinium. These photosynthetic organisms provide nutrients to the coral host enabling the growth and proliferation of both symbiotic partners. As the ocean environment continues to change, the characterization of Symbiodinium diversity becomes increasingly critical to understanding coral-algal symbiosis and how this relationship can help corals adjust to a changing climate. In this study, we sampled three distinct thermal environments located along the Belize Barrier Reef System. The distinct thermal environments were characterized based on differences in maximum temperature and thermal variability (high, moderate, and low) using high-resolution satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) records. To investigate Symbiodinium diversity across different thermal environments and coral species, we employed metabarcoding and next-generation sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal RNA gene (ITS-2) of Symbiodinium across three species of reef-building corals (Pseudodiploria strigosa, Siderastrea radians, and Siderastrea siderea). Our research is ongoing, however, we hypothesize that there will be significant differences in the distribution and prevalence of symbionts with respect to thermal environment and host species. Student Author(s): Hannah Watson, Senior, Health and Exercise Science, Pfeiffer University Mentor(s): Vinson Sutlive, Pfeiffer University Presentation: Exercise Science, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 8 The Effect of Different Rest Intervals on the Exercise Volume Completed During Bench Press Lifts When training a number of factors such as intensity, volume, frequency, repetition, velocity, duration and rest period need to be well-thought-out in order for specific improvements to be made. The purpose of this study was to compare two different rest intervals on the bench press volume completed over four sets with 75% of a one repetition maximum load. A group of 8 Division 2 college-aged female student athletes volunteered for this research study. Three different testing sessions took place for each participant. Testing procedures followed a published protocol (Rahman Rahimi, 2005). The volume completed for the bench press was significantly different between the 2 minute and 5 minute rest interval rest conditions (F = 74.67, p < .0001). The volume was significantly different between each of the four sets especially between the second, third and fourth (F = 59.70, p < .0001). There was a statistically significant interaction for rest intervals by sets (F = 12.00, p < .0001). Results revealed that a greater rest interval between sets allowed a greater number of repetitions to be completed. There

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was a statistically significant interaction between the two rest intervals; results for set 1 in both rest intervals were similar. Student Author(s): Whitney Watson, Senior, Criminal Justice, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Karen McElrath, Fayetteville sSate University Presentation: Criminal Justice, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 2 Reporting Sexual Assaults to Campus Police: Comparisons Between HBCUs and PWIs Research that has examined sexual assault on campus has focused largely on Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs), with less attention on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). This project will attempt to address that gap by investigating sexual assaults reported to campus police at HBCUs and PWIs in one southeastern state. Secondary data were obtained from 50 colleges and universities for the year 2012, and supplemented with secondary data from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, a national database. The results show substantive differences in reported sexual assault at HBCUs compared to PWIs. The findings also suggest that HBCUs and PWIs differ greatly in terms of number of alcohol violations and other factors. Future research will expand the study to other states, so that multivariate analysis of reported sexual assaults on campus could be better understood with a larger sample. Student Author(s): John Watters, Senior, NC School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Myra Halpin, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Chemistry - Analytical, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 59 Fabrication and Characterization of the Micro-Impedance Detector for Enumeration of Circulating Tumor Cells Currently the only FDA approved device to count Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) is the CellSearch TM system. Our research group has developed microfluidic devices that allow a greater clinical sensitivity for a wider range of cells. These devices are comprised of two functional components: CTC isolation bed and impedance counter. The overall goal of this project was to develop and test a new impedance counter fabricated using hot-embossing and lithography as fabrication techniques. The specific goals of my studies were: (i) evaluation of different bonding strategies used for the final assembly of the components into the functional unit and (ii) testing of the unit using cultured cells and polymer microbeads. Different bonding methods to hold together this multi-piece device were tested. The new generation detector was more sensitive to direct changes in solution conductance than the first generation module and showed a larger relative response to 15 µm beads. Proof of concept using HeLa cells was achieved and compared to the first generation module. These data support the conclusion that the new generation impedance module is similar in performance to the first generation device, but more easily mass fabricated, and therefore favorable for the CTC counting device. Student Author(s): Lyndee Weaver, Freshman, Architecture, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Clark Maddux, Appalachian State University Presentation: Education, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15) What Exactly is Watauga? (And Why Everyone Should Care) This presentation serves to help figure out how and why we should change others’ perceptions of Watauga Residential College and create a restructured version of this program. Watauga Residential College, a part of Appalachian State University, is one of the few successful and thriving residential college programs of it’s kind in the United States. Just like any university, organization or brotherhood, Watauga Residential College has a long, complicated history that we can learn from today. Additionally, Watauga, set in the mountainous town of Boone, North Carolina, has received many stereotypes from those outside of the program. Many of these stereotypes have negative connotations. The evolution of these stereotypes help to show how Watauga Residential College has changed since its founding. Knowing how Watauga originated allows us to figure out where we’re going or what needs to be changed. Analyzing how Watauga Residential College has changed through time shows how adaptive the program has become. These conclusions can be tailored and used for the betterment of other universities and groups in the future.

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Student Author(s): Caroline Webb, Freshman, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Interactions Between Immigrants and United States Law Enforcement In a recent study conducted on immigrants, “27.0 per cent stated that they had called police for assistance following violence or abuse from an intimate partner while in the US”. Documented and undocumented immigrants face conflict regarding the decision to call law enforcement and risk deportation, or remain quiet and suffer the consequences. The origin of distrust in law enforcement derives from communication barriers with officers, cultural insensitivity, and discrimination towards Latinos. Countless immigrant women have been sexually assaulted and robbed by Mexican law enforcement officers on their journey to America, establishing a relationship formed on distrust. Various officials have proposed solutions including extensive language requirements for police officers that work in immigrant neighborhoods, especially along the border. Immigration status amnesty programs would make immigrants feel safer when communicating with law enforcement, potentially increasing their likelihood of reporting sexual assault, medical emergency, and criminal activity. Further, the renewal of the Violence Against Women Act is necessary to promote programs that assist abused women (and men), as well as immigrants who aren’t inclined to seek assistance. Immigration reform is essential to make immigrants comfortable with reporting abuse, medical emergency, and dangerous criminal activity, especially in highly populated immigrant neighborhoods. Student Author(s): Samuel Weeks, Junior, Biology and English, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Izzy Pinheiro, Junior, Interdisciplinary Studies, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Nakisa Sadeghi, Junior, French, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Mentor(s): Jordynn Jack, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Presentation: Individualized Major Program, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 37 Experiencing Music in the Waiting Room Environment The therapeutic potential of music as a healing tool has been widely acknowledged. While the doctor’s examination room, the operating room, and geriatric facilities are common sites for these studies, little research currently exists that examines the impact of music in the waiting room. The purpose of this study is to investigate how people in a waiting room at UNC Memorial Hospital convey their experience when live musical performances are introduced to the space of the waiting room. Participants will include staff, patients, caregivers, and friends/family of patients that are in the physical space of the waiting room. Two of the co-investigators will play classical music and sing in the waiting room of a consenting department’s waiting room in UNC Hospital. One co-investigator will take ethnographic observations of the individuals in the waiting room, and all investigators will participate in conversations with interested individuals about their experiences. Notes from these informal interviews will be taken and comment cards will be available for those who would prefer to give feedback without engaging in conversation with investigators. Interview notes, ethnographic observations, and feedback cards will be analyzed. Student Author(s): Sheila Welborn, Senior, Communications-Advertising, Appalachian State University Dianna Hawkins, Senior, Communications-Advertising, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Thomas Mueller, Appalachian State University Presentation: Communication, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Integrated Media Marketing Campaign The key role of an advertising agency is to optimize client spending through integrated marketing that engages the client’s specific target audience. This presentation was developed as a comprehensive media campaign for the Childcare Network, a leader in childcare services in the Charlotte metro area. Childcare Network combines a curriculum individualized for children of every age, built on activities that contribute to education in a safe, happy environment. This campaign demonstrates how the right media mix will extend the reach and exposure of the Childcare Network, resulting in a return on investment (ROI) sure to please the most discriminating chief financial officer (CFO). The research for this project incorporated investigating costs, run times, air times, and impressions for the various media sources, to assure the client achieved premium value. The campaign incorporates an

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integrated media marketing mix that includes television, radio, print, and out-of-home advertising. It projects across a four-week period, leading up to the Come-See-Me Festival, a family fun spring event that attracts more than 125,000 participants each year in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Student Author(s): Aaron Wells, Sophomore, Sustainable Technology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Undecided, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Natural and Urban Environments Effects on Health In recent years, scientists have been spending more time and research efforts delving into the connections humans have with the natural world and the impact those connections have on our mental health in an increasingly urban world. This paper explores many articles related to natural and urban environments, and the effects they have on human health to conclude that it is possible to maintain a positive state of mental wellbeing in urban areas, but it is something that requires deliberate thought on the part of those in charge of local planning. Adequate green spaces must be a part of urban Centers in order to achieve the nature connectedness associated with positive mental health. Student Author(s): Jaiza Wesley, Junior, Psychology, Bennett College Mentor(s): Santiba Campbell, Bennett College Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Does the Gender/Sexual Orientation of the Perpetrator and the Type of Retaliation Affect African American Female College Students Perceptions of Domestic Violence? Due to the gaps in research involving domestic violence perceptions and homosexual couples, this study will analyze how perceptions can be altered concerning domestic violence base on gender, sexuality, and retaliation of the victim. Female African American college students will complete a questionnaire after reading one of 6 domestic violence scenarios based on gender of the victim and perpetrator, couple sexual orientation and meditate of retaliation. Each participant will be randomly assigned one of the scenarios. Following the reading, they will respond to questions in regards to the heinous nature of the crime, retaliation, penalty of offense and the participantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emotions. It is hypothesized that gender and sexual orientation will negatively affect how the participants view the scenarios based on the seriousness of offense and agreement with penalty. Student Author(s): Kayla White, Freshman, Global Studies, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Economics, Oral Session 1 (9:30 - 10:30) Economic Benefits of Immigration People around the world migrate to the United States, in search of jobs and a better life. With an aging world and dropping birth rates many countries are experiencing extreme financial crises, the younger generation is not large enough to take care of the elderly. The United States is not experiencing this problem because immigrants are entering the country, expanding the population and evening out the ratio of young to old. Skilled workers entering into the American work force allow for movement towards new inventions and improved products. Skilled workers make more money and are able to spend more of it in the United States producing a faster turn over and a higher demand. Unskilled workers are willing to take jobs that Americans will not take. They tend to send most of their money back to their native countries and benefits their native countries economy. At the same time the United States economy benefits because these workers are paying taxes and putting money into the US economy. Immigration is often viewed as a terrible thing but in reality the network of skilled and unskilled workers entering into America is benefiting the economies of both the U.S. and the immigrantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s country.

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Student Author(s): Rachel Wilkinson, Senior, Zoology, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Markus Petters, North Carolina State University Hans Taylor, North Carolina State University Nicholas Rothfuss, North Carolina State University Presentation: Atmospheric Sciences, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 61 Measurements of fluorescent particle concentration in and around west coast storms using impinger collectors and fluorescence microscopy Aerosols play an important role in understanding the formation and properties of clouds. Aerosols can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) in atmospheric clouds. Biological aerosols are particles with biological origin that contribute to CCN and IN concentrations. Fluorescent biological aerosols have shown a direct correlation with IN concentration, appearing in higher frequency before precipitation takes place. In this study impinger solutions were collected from the atmosphere, in and around storms along the West Coast, so biological particle concentrations could be measured. The solutions were investigated using a hemocytometer and fluorescent and bright-field microscopy. The total and fluorescent concentrations as well as size distributions of particles having diameters larger than 1 micron were determined. The total concentration average was ~ 3*10^7 m-3, with a range from 3*10^6 m-3 to 10^8 m-3. The fluorescent particle concentration average was 10^6 m-3, with a range from 6*10^5 m-3 to 4*10^6 m-3. The average median size for total concentration was 1.2 micron. The average median size for fluorescent particles was 1.9 micron. Determining concentrations of biological aerosols in the atmosphere may lead to a better understanding of how biological aerosols affect clouds and precipitation. Student Author(s): Howard Willett, Senior, Chemistry, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Michael Hambourger, Appalachian State University Presentation: Chemistry, Poster Session 3 (1:00 - 2:15), Poster Number 19 Comparison of Photochemical Reactions for Waste Water Purification The Fenton reaction is a well-known means to oxidize organic compounds in wastewater. However, the mechanism of this process remains poorly understood. Traditional Fenton chemistry involves iron(II)-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, leading to the oxidation of organic contaminants. This process may be improved upon by Fenton-like chemistry involving cobalt(II) and peroxymonosulfate (PMS). Kinetic studies of both reactions have been performed using Allura Red as a model dye. Dye degradation was monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. Initial results agree with literature on the cobalt/PMS system, showing improved performance relative to traditional Fenton chemistry. For both systems, the rate of reaction is increased in the presence of light. However, ferrous ion appears incapable of catalyzing sulfate radical formation from PMS, while cobaltous ion is a poor catalyst for hydroxyl radical formation from hydrogen peroxide. Future studies are planned to investigate whether other firstrow transition metals can catalyze the decomposition of either of these two oxidants. The results of the photochemical processes will be compared to alternative photocatalysts for the degradation of organics, such as bandgap illuminated titanium dioxide, in hopes of producing a viable method of removing recalcitrant pollutants from wastewater. Student Author(s): Alleya Williams, Junior, Psychology, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Psychology, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Expanding Experiential Learning in Higher Education Before starting school, parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; goals are to find ways that will capture their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention so that the child develops an interest in learning. Then children are forced to attend school where they are taught in a way that would have been deemed ineffective a year earlier. As these same children progress in school, their learning becomes less productive and more constructive. The general population in the United States does not naturally learn in the way that traditional schools are structured. Therefore, the reality is not that smarter and more studious students make the better grades, but that those who are more adaptive regurgitate information more efficiently. The first five years of a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life is crucial to their development, both physically and mentally. Young adults who

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pursue higher education are in a crucial point in their lives. Young adults are learning key practical skills for their choice of profession. Continuing the same concepts of traditionally learning information for a test could be detrimental once the student must apply the information in an actual workplace. Young people need to remember and understand the different aspects of their profession in order to contribute to society. Student Author(s): Adonia Williams, Junior, Political Science, Fayetteville State University Mentor(s): Hsiaofen Hemstock, Fayetteville State University Presentation: Political Science, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 1 Does China’s Hunt for Energy mean Neocolonialism in Sudan? Since England’s departure from Southern Sudan, China is swift to take hold of Sudan’s natural energy resources. Between China’s enormous population, mounting economy and dwindling natural resources, it is vital to continue producing enough energy for social stability. In order to acquire energy China has begun to rely on underdeveloped countries such as Sudan, due to its untapped resources. This study will use Sudan to provide insight on China’s aggressive energy acquisition and will debate how China is birthing a new kind of colonialism in Sudan. After reading this research one will be able to determine whether China has entered a new era of colonialism or not for oneself. Student Author(s): Adam Williams, Freshman, Economics, Appalachian State University Mentor(s): Joe Bryan, Appalachian State University Presentation: Political Science, Oral Session 2 (10:45 - 11:45) Unintended Consequences of Anti-Immigration Laws In the autumn of 2011, Georgia’s agriculture industry faced a vast shortage of labor and loss of efficiency. The prior year, in 2010, Governor Nathan Deal signed into law House Bill 87. This law enacts harsh penalties on those who provide false documentation when seeking employment, while also forcing residents to provide documentation when encountering a police officer. These clauses forced unauthorized immigrants out of the state. HB 87 was successful in opening jobs for Georgian residents; however, legal residents were unwilling to fill the gap left by the immigrants. The agriculture industry demands backbreaking labor for cheap wages, qualities that most U.S. citizens do not seek in their employment. Due to the unwillingness of U.S. labor, groups and organizations similar to the North Carolina Growers Association have been successful in giving farmers more readily available access to immigrant labor. These associations can serve as a template for future legislation and offer better economic outcomes as compared to Georgia’s HB 87.

Student Author(s): Hillary Wilson, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Veronica Segarra, High Point University Presentation: Biology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 7 Exploring Methods in Art-Driven Science Outreach In our modern information-driven society, visual cues and data have taken on a new level of importance. New ways of representing and conveying information are constantly emerging—many of them highlighting art as a useful tool for presenting information in creative ways. This is particularly true in the sciences, where it is necessary to convey complex and often abstract topics in a concise and clear manner. Many times this is achieved by impactful illustrations and animations generated as a result of collaborations between scientists and artists. In this way, art can help inform and drive science, as well as support innovation and a creative mindset. Conversely, we believe that young artists could draw inspiration from scientific insights into the natural world around them. We have established a science outreach program that integrates art and science as a way to reach out to underserved student populations. In this program, undergraduate student researchers from High Point University meet with local high school artists to talk science and generate ideas for research-inspired art. We seek to encourage the ability of undergraduate scientists to communicate their research to an informal audience in an accessible way, while engaging young artists with scientific principles in a way that is relevant to their career aspirations and opens up new sources of creative inspiration. We measure efficacy through outcomes such as the ability to foster peermentor relationships and to clarify the scientific identities and career aspirations of the participants. Student Author(s): Tyler Wilson, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University

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Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 3 Synergistic Effects of Amoxapine and Beta-lactam Antibiotics Against MRSA Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a growing concern in the field of healthcare today. The antibiotics that we currently use are becoming less effective due to the ability of bacteria to quickly develop resistance. Meanwhile, large pharmaceutical companies are hesitant to invest in the development of new antibiotics due to their low economic return. Our goal is to restore bacterial sensitivity to existing antibiotics by finding synergistic effects with common medications and compounds. Amoxapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant used in the treatment of major depressive disorder. We designed a series of experiments to determine if amoxapine would have a synergistic effect with a variety of antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Our results demonstrate that combining non-lethal doses of amoxapine with oxacillin and penicillin successfully restores sensitivity of MRSA to these antibiotics.

Student Author(s): Hannah Woolard, Senior, Chemistry, East Carolina University Mentor(s): Shouquan Huo, East Carolina University Presentation: Chemistry - Inorganic, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 27 Regiospecific acylation of cycloplatinated complexes. Scope, limitation, and mechanism. Recently we have discovered a regioselective acylation of cyclometalated platinum complexes in which the cyclometalated platinum complex was selectively acylated by reacting with acetic anhydride in acetic acid. It was further discovered that the acylated complex could also be directly prepared in a cascade intramolecular cycloplatination-acylation reaction by reacting the organic ligand with potassium tetrachloroplatinate in a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride. The scope, limitations and mechanism of this newly discovered reaction were investigated. This was done by designing, synthesizing, cycloplatinating and acylating a series of ligands with structural modifications. Optimization of the reaction conditions indicated that many other solvents such as acetonitrile, benzonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, and chlorobenzene could be used in the acylation reaction. The reaction showed great tolerance to various linker groups, as well as many electron donating/withdrawing groups. Based on the mechanistic studies conducted, the most likely mechanism of the acylation reaction involves electrophilic attack at the metalated carbon, platinum migration, and re-aromatization.

Student Author(s): John Wright, Senior, Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Robert Kelly, North Carolina State University Jonathan Conway North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 18 Implementation of a High Temperature Kanamycin Resistance Selectable Marker in the Hyperthermophilic Biomass Degrading Bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor bescii Caldicellulosiruptor bescii is a species of hyperthermophilic bacteria, which thrives in high temperature environments (>70°C) and is capable of breaking down plant biomass including cellulose. These unique qualities of C. bescii make it a rich reservoir for robust industrial enzymes and give it significant process advantages as a biofuel production host. To be able to develop C. bescii into a biofuel production strain, a system to allow genetic manipulations of the chromosome is necessary. A genetic system using complementation of a uracil auxotroph mutant is currently functional, but is encumbered by significant non-transformant background. The goal of this work is to improve this genetic system by implementing a High Temperature Kanamycin resistance gene (HTK) as a selectable marker in C. bescii for more rapid and effective selection of mutant strains. Experiments have determined the concentration range where kanamycin is effective for selection of C. bescii, and HTK selection is currently being used for various gene “knock outs” and “knock ins” using two different selection strategies. These genetic manipulations will be used to test hypotheses about the importance of selected biomass degradation enzymes, with the goal of producing strains with improved biomass degradation ability for biofuels production processes.

Student Author(s): Nicole Wright, Senior, Biology, High Point University Mentor(s): Patrick Vigueira, High Point University Presentation: Biological Sciences - Microbiology, Oral Session 3 (1:30 - 2:30)

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Combinatorial Effects of Antibiotics and Manuka Honey on Escherichia coli Bacteria are becoming more resistant to antibacterial drugs, and developing new drugs to combat antibiotic resistance is a time consuming and expensive process that yields low economic return. As a possible strategy to overcome antibiotic resistance we combined existing antibiotics with natural products attempting to find synergistic effects. Manuka honey is a monofloral honey that is imported from New Zealand and has been found to posses antimicrobial properties making it an ideal natural product to test with. We hypothesized that the combination of approved antibiotics with the honey will produce a change in zone of inhibition (zoi). We used disc diffusion to combine medications that can be used topically or orally, with Manuka honey to determine if the combination had significant effects on the growth of Escherichia coli. We found that some of the drugs when combined with Manuka honey produce synergistic effects while others induced antagonistic effects.

Student Author(s): Sarah Wu, Senior, Computational Science, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Robert Gotwals, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Engineering - Civil, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 45 Sensitivity Analysis of Nanoparticle Concentrations in Wastewater Treatment and Biosolid Application for Environmental Risk Assessment Nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit novel properties that can enhance industrial processes and products, but also pose risks to the environment. As the presence of NPs in consumer society increases, it becomes critical to model their uncertain and potentially toxic fates when released into aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Many NPs are predicted to end up in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where they either are discharged into receiving streams or accumulate in biosolid waste. However, considerable uncertainties exist in model inputs, which vary between NP species and will change with future trends in resource consumption, NP production, and the global climate. In this project, a sensitivity analysis was devised for a series of models describing TiO2, Ag, and ZnO NP pathways through WWTPs and land application units (LAUs) for biosolids. Findings include: (1) for WWTPs, the most influential inputs are transformation rate coefficients, residence times, and source values; (2) for LAUs, the key process driving NP transport is erosion by runoff; and (3) the source of variance among outputs is dependent on the NP core. These results provide insight on the most significant factors in predicting environmental NP concentrations and on the direction of future lab-scale research in NP exposure modeling.

Student Author(s): Zhan Wu, Senior, Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Mentor(s): Fan Yuan, Duke University Presentation: Engineering - Biomedical, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 27 Role of Small GTPase Rab7 on the Electrotransfection Efficiency in Mammalian Cells Electrotransfection is a method of gene delivery which utilizes electric pulses to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA) into cells. Though the method has been applied in clinical trials and studies, its specific mechanisms remain largely unclear. The main purpose of this study was to examine effects of Rab7 inhibition and overexpression on the electrotransfection efficiency (eTE) in mammalian cells. Stable Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing dominant-negative (DN) mutated and wild-type (WT) Rab7 proteins were generated separately. Both stable cell lines were electrotransfected with pDNA encoding the luciferase gene (luc-tdT), and their eTEs were determined via the luciferase assay. It was found that both Rab7 DN and WT could affect the eTE of luc-tdT in HEK293 cells. Specifically, Rab7 DN and Rab7 WT treatments significantly reduced the eTE in HEK293 cells, compared to the non-treated control, the extent of which depended on the clone in each type of stable cell line. Overall, these data collectively suggested that Rab7 expression levels might influence electric field-mediated gene delivery in HEK293 cells.

Student Author(s): Sunwoo Yim, Senior, Computational Science, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Robert Gotwals, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Biological Sciences - Genetics, Poster Session 4 (2:30 - 3:45), Poster Number 42 Comparison of Support Vector Regression Models of Transcription Factors E2F1 and E2F4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Binding Specificities to DNA Sequences

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Currently, there is a lack of data on the differences in binding specificities between transcription factors (TFs) with highly similar structural domains. This study focused on human TFs E2F1 and E2F4 by using support vector regression (SVR) to train models from genomic-context protein binding microarray (gcPBM) data. These models were analyzed in such a way that the significant features weights could be extracted. Analysis of the most significant features of each model showed that nucleotide interdependency in the six-base long flanks on either side of the core significantly contributed to the binding preference of both TFs. The models were also compared by core and by TF, and the features with the greatest deviation between pairs of models were studied. E2F1 compared to E2F4 had a higher specificity for A and T trinucleotides in the flanking regions of the core binding sites and the preferences of E2F1 were more easily predicted by sequence features than those of E2F4. Finally, comparison between preferences for different cores demonstrated that the SVR model had higher accuracy when predicting sequences with nucleotide cores consisting of GCGC as compared to those consisting of GCGG.

Student Author(s): KyungMin Yoo, Junior, Chemistry with Biochemistry, Wake Forest University Mentor(s): Mark Welker, Wake Forest University Presentation: Chemistry - Biochemistry, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 59 Development of enhanced tissue adhesives by chemically modifying hyaluronic acid with a catechol amine Over 50 million people undergo surgeries every year, which traditionally require invasive stitches or sutures to achieve tissue healing. A surge in the 1960s introduced the idea of using biodegradable tissue adhesives, such as biopolymer aldehydes and fibrin gels to close surgical wounds to avoid unsightly scars and complications associated with stitches and sutures. However, the current adhesives have several issues such as cytotoxicity and lack of mechanical durability. To optimize this system, we proposed a base of hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized with a catechol group. HA is a repeating disaccharide that plays a large role in connective tissue in vivo, and is widely used as a biodegradable scaffold for tissue engineering. Addition of catechol amine in the form of dopamine to this compound would increase adhesive properties while simultaneously reducing cytotoxicity. In this study, amine was coupled to HA with 1,3,5-triazine and N-Methylmorpholine (NMM), and analyzed with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;H-NMR as well as UV-vis spectrometry. Testing of the mechanical properties such as adhesiveness and crosslinking is being performed. Future studies will focus on enhancing its mechanical properties by amplifying the concentration of amine linkages or diversifying the amide with other amino-functional groups. Successful development of an improved adhesive would enhance wound healing and decrease complications.

Student Author(s): Mounir Zerrad, Junior, Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University Mentor(s): Gavin Williams, North Carolina State University Christian Kasey North Carolina State University Presentation: Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular, Poster Session 1 (9:30 - 10:45), Poster Number 49 High-Throughput Biosensors for Polyketide Synthetic Biology Erythromycin A and its derivatives are among the most important antibiotics in the last fifty years. Semi-synthetic analoging of erythromycin A has yielded very useful molecules that have reduced side effects, higher potency, and extended half-life. While this has proven to be useful, the traditional method of creating these homologous polyketides largely involves organic synthesis, which due to the complexity of erythromycin A, tightly limits the possible derivatization of that molecule. This hurdle needs to be surmounted because producing various analogs of erythromycin A can lead to new drugs that have further increased characteristics over the current panel of derivatives. Erythromycin A can be biosynthesized and engineering this biosynthetic pathway to incorporate various extender units will lead to a more diverse panel of erythromycin A analogs. In order to engineer erythromycin A biosynthesis, we have developed a high-throughput biosensor-guided approach that can detect polyketides. In the wild-type state, the biosensor responds to erythromycin A, several biosynthetic intermediates, and multiple semi-synthetic derivatives with an indiscriminate profile. Our group has been successful at using directed evolution to engineer this biosensor system to be highly discriminate against semi-synthetic derivatives. My goal is to continue using directed evolution to engineer repressor protein system to further become selective against the biosynthetic intermediates that vary slightly from erythromycin A. My results have thus far show that engineering this biosensor to become selective against the small changes in molecular structure between the biosynthetic intermediates is possible. Having tailored biosensors for polyketide antibiotics highly facilitates using metabolic engineering and molecular biology to optimize production of pharmaceutical compounds like erythromycin A.

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Student Author(s): Jennifer Zou, Senior, Computational Science, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Mentor(s): Robert Gotwals, North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Presentation: Chemistry - Materials, Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15), Poster Number 43 Heat-Reflecting Window Coatings: Improved Design with Novel Materials Optical filters for window coatings, composed of alternating dielectric and metallic material layers, are designed to achieve heat-reflecting properties, through infrared light (>750 nm) reflection, while maintaining high visible light (380-750 nm) transparency. The performance of a 7-layer structure composed of alternating materials, indium tin oxide (ITO) and silver (Ag), was simulated using a finite-difference time-domain solver in the range of 300 to 1500 nm. Comparison to experimental performance demonstrated great agreement, validating our model. We then substituted silver with an idealized metal (M1) that had an electron concentration of 5x10 14 electrons/cm2. The performances of 3-, 5-, and 7-layer ITO/Ag and ITO/M1 optical filters were optimized by varying metal layer thicknesses. We found that the ITO/M1 device displayed higher transmission and comparable reflection values across a wide range of layer thicknesses, suggesting a more robust structure. Similarly, ITO layer thicknesses were varied to determine optimal ranges. The composition of these results yielded an optimized 7-layer structure with a 41% increase in visible transmission over that of traditional filters. We demonstrate the improved performance of heat-reflecting window coatings by substituting traditional silver with our idealized metal.

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STUDENT PRESENTER INDEX LISTED ALPHABETICALLY Student Presenter Abashian, Caroline

Abdeally, Ibrahim

Ahuja, Chaarushi

Aiken, Corey

Aiken, Corey

Albanese, Katherine

Alford, Hunter

Ali, Lela

Allison, Melody

Allred, Adrianna

Presentation Type

Discipline

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Health and Physical Education Poster 12 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 223 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 44 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 4 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 15 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 113 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 113 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 221

Institution

East Carolina University

Physics - Astrophysics

East Carolina University

Public Health

Duke University

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Wake Forest University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

North Carolina State University

Political Science

North Carolina State University

Psychology

Methodist University

Environmental Sciences

Guilford College

172


Andersen, Lauren

Anderson, Asia

Antin, Michael

Ashmore, Philip

Atkinson, Evan

Atkinson, Macon

Augenreich, Marc

Avery, Megan

Awartani, Layth

Axhoj, Joshua

Azoro, Martina

Baeten, Amanda

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 17 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 217 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 114 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 16 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 217 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 217 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 220 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 10 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 55 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 221 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 2 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 222

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

Communication

North Carolina Central University

Human Relations

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - General

Appalachian State University

Communication

Appalachian State University

Communication

Appalachian State University

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Exercise Science

Campbell University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Guilford College

Engineering - Biological & Agricultural

North Carolina State University

Biology

Fayetteville State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

173


Bahl, Shay

Bakewell, Catherine

Baldwin, Charity

Barbour, Alexandra

Barbour, Kaitlyn

Barker, Helen

Barker, Samuel

Bartholomew, Sarah

Basista, Claire

Bass, Amelia

Baucom, Allison

Bazemore, Darryl

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 57 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 44 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 1 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 215 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 10 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 19 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 57 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 221 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 216 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 35 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 217

Environmental Sciences

Queens University of Charlotte

English

High Point University

Biology

Fayetteville State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Guilford College

Engineering - Mechanical & Aerospace

North Carolina State University

Psychology

High Point University

Economics

Pfeiffer University

Liberal Studies

Appalachian State University

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Education

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Botany

Catawba College

Communication

North Carolina Central University

174


Beck, Matthew

Becker, Andrea

Belcher, Natalie

Bell, Adam

Bell, Dayton

Bennett, Andrew

Bennett, Quesion

Bent, Brinnae

Benton, Rachel

Benton, Thomas

Benton, Thomas

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 11 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 57 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 10 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 17 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 48 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 218 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 1 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 44 Slane Student Center

Chemistry - Biochemistry

High Point University

Sociology

Wake Forest University

Biological Sciences -Neurobiology

Gaston Early College High School

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Elizabeth City State University

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Economics

North Carolina A&T State University

Engineering - Biomedical

North Carolina State University

International Relations

North Carolina State University

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

175


Bertoni, Caroline

Bethel, Nigel

Beverley, Ryan

Beyer, Logan

Bharde, Sana

Billups, David

Boles, Johnathon

Bolton, Harrison

Booth, Ryan

Borden, Tyler

Boston, Jaimi

Bowman, Kimberly

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 62 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 27 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 222 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 116 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 28 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 215 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 38 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 217 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 33 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 14 Slane Student Center

Anthropology

Wake Forest University

Biological Sciences - Botany

Elizabeth City State University

International Relations

Appalachian State University

Special Education

Duke University

Biology

East Carolina University

Biology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Biological Sciences - Anatomy &Physiology

Catawba College

Earth Science

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Gaston College

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Elizabeth City State University

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

176


Bradley, Colton

Brailer, Caroline

Briggs, Mackenzie

Brockmann, Nadine

Brooks, Jacob

Brower, Alice

Brown, Claire

Brown, Clayton

Brown, Kelsey

Brown, Victoria

Buchanan, Brandon

Budam, Abigail

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 19 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 49 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 223 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 215 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 220 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 223 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 9 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 52 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 34 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center

Physics - Nuclear, Particle, Atomic, North Carolina State University & Molecular

Health and Physical Education

Wake Forest University

Liberal Studies

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Catawba College

Physics - General

High Point University

English

Appalachian State University

Statistics

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Campbell University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology North Carolina State University

Environmental Sciences

Queens University of Charlotte

Physics - General

Appalachian State University

Public Health

University of North Carolina Greensboro

177


Budam, Nhung

Bundy, Olivia

Burleson, Baylen

Burris, Kathleen

Butler, Kelsey

Butler, Logan

Cafasso, Jacqueline

Campbell, Kenneth

Campbell, Kenneth

Candler-Miller, Grace

Carnaghi, Matthew

Carr, Madison

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 3 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 218 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 40 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 222 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 217 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 217 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 34 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 35 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 220

Public Health

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Undecided

Methodist University

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

Psychology

Catawba College

Exercise Science

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

North Carolina State University

Political Science

High Point University

Communication

North Carolina Central University

Communication

North Carolina Central University

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Physics

High Point University

English

Appalachian State University

178


Carter, Bryce

Carter, Krystal

Casey, Ryan

Chamberlain, Russell

Chaplain, Jessica

Chew, Kimberline

Chodavadia, Parth

Clark, Hannah

Clark, Nicole

Cleveringa, David

Cockrane, Nykeera

Coffey, Madeline

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 34 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 3 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 44 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 221 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 6 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 223 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 38 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 113 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 61 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 218

Atmospheric Sciences

Appalachian State University

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

High Point University

Physics

Appalachian State University

English (Literature)

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Duke University

Public Health

Duke University

Liberal Studies

Appalachian State University

Biology

High Point University

Psychology

Methodist University

Chemistry - General

Winston-Salem State University

History

Wake Forest University

179


Colbert, Sarah

Conteh, Mankaprr

Corsi, James

Cottam, Matthew

Cox, Andrew

Cox, Anna

Cox, Phillip

Creasman, David

Criscoe, Connor

Cromer, Dylan

Cutolo, Joshua

D'Abundo, Hunter

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 6 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 113 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 116 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 53 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 221 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 218 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 32 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 217 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 40 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 35 Slane Student Center

Chemistry - Materials

High Point University

Political Science

Wake Forest University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Materials

Wake Forest University

Engineering - Mechanical & Aerospace

North Carolina State University

English

University of North Carolina Greensboro

History

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Biology

Campbell University

Computer Science

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Physics - Condensed Matter

University of North Carolina Asheville

Computer Science

Fayetteville State University

Psychology

High Point University

180


Daniel, Taylor

Darr, Ashley

Davis, Arinton

De Cataldo, Riccardo

Deane, Jennifer

deGuzman, Stephanie

deHart, Lucas

Delamer, Megan

Devone, D-Jon-Nique

Dharanikota, Tabin

Diez, Michael

Dixon, Julie

Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 114 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 215 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 20 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 33 Slane Student Center Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 120 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 38 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 4 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 47 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 113 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 30 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 222

Arts - Visual

High Point University

Biological Sciences - Toxicology

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Biological Sciences - Genetics

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Chemistry - General

High Point University

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Public Health

North Carolina State University

Physics - Astrophysics

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Education

Queens University of Charlotte

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Fayetteville State University

Mathematical Economics

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Mathematics

Fayetteville State University

Business

High Point University

181


Dominguez, Avery

Donovan, Christina

Dove, Samantha

Drake, Matthew

Draper, Julia

Drew, Jessie

Dzotefe, Edem

Edwards, Thomas

Eldred, Tim

Elliott, Jocelyn

Erb, Alexa

Erickson, Kenneth

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 52 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 220 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 12 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 218 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 218 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 221 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 25 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 216 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 218 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 55 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 28 Slane Student Center

Biological Sciences - Zoology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Economics

Appalachian State University

Pre-Medicine

Guilford College

English

High Point University

Biology

High Point University

Undecided

Methodist University

Chemistry - Nanoscience

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Economics

North Carolina A&T State University

Communication

Wake Forest University

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

182


Etheridge, Zechariah

Everidge, Ashley

Fallon, Kendall

Fann, Donnie

Farmer, Katria

Farquhar, Samantha

Feldman, Jessica

Fenwick, Grayson

Ferguson, Terrel

Fernandez, Marisa

Filik, Eugene

Fish, Anthony

Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 113 Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 120 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 23 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 223 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 28 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 220 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 216 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 218 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 114 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116

Sociology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

English (Literature)

Catawba College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

High Point University

Undecided

Methodist University

Foreign Languages & Literature

Campbell University

Marine Sciences

University of North Carolina Wilmington

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Economics

North Carolina A&T State University

Philosophy

Appalachian State University

Physics

High Point University

Undecided

Methodist University

183


Fisher, James

Floyd, Darius

Fobbs, Karnella

Fontecha, Daniela

Forsythe, Jennie

Foster, Tyler

Fowler, Kevin

Frazier, Aaron

Fritz, Samuel

Fyffe, Nykesha

Gada, Jessica

Galletto, Monica

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 223 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 3 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 4 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 35 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 217 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 50 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 28 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 222 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 49 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 216 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 114

Computer Science

Fayetteville State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Criminal Justice

Fayetteville State University

Chemistry - Nanoscience

North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences - Botany

North Carolina State University

Psychology

Pfeiffer University

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Physics - General

Appalachian State University

Education

Appalachian State University

Graphic Design and Digital Imaging North Carolina State University

184


Gallimore, Daniel

Garner, Kristin

Garretson, Lauren

Garver, June

Geaney-Moore, Julia

Gerdes, Elizabeth

Gerdes, Elizabeth

Gillespie, Hannah

Giri, Vinay

Gomez, Ismael

Goodes, Benjamin

Gordon, Ahmar

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 39 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 221 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 114 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 223 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 27 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 215 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 215 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 222 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 17 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 41 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 221 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 116

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

Engineering - Biological & Agricultural

North Carolina State University

Philosophy

Elon University

Education

Appalachian State University

Psychology

Guilford College

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Psychology

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Duke University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Nash Community College

Engineering - Biological & Agricultural

North Carolina State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

185


Gordon, Ahmar

Gore, Daniel

Goswami, Arnav

Gray, Zane

Gregory, Richard

Griffin, Julia

Griffith, Kaitlyn

Grimes, Imani

Grinstead, Autumn

Groelke, Ben

Guebert, Erich

Guerrero Nava, Fernando

Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 116 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 218 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 113 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 116 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 43 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 33 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 20 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 116 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 51 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 2 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 48 Slane Student Center

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Economics

Methodist University

Mathematical Economics

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Education

Appalachian State University

Biology

High Point University

Engineering - Industrial & Systems North Carolina State University

Chemistry - General

High Point University

Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences

North Carolina A&T State University

Undecided

Appalachian State University

Biology

Appalachian State University

Psychology

Catawba College

Chemistry

Catawba College

186


Gunther, Crystal

Gurski, Maria

Gustafson, Chelsea

Hackney, David

Hagopian, Bethany

Haldeman, Andrew

Hall, Megan

Hall, Nicholas

Hall, Nicholas

Hannan, Anika

Hansen, Corrie

Harbold, Taylor

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 9 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 216 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 11 Slane Student Center Performance Session 1 (10:30 - 11:30) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 120 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 58 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 113 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 220 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 218 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 5 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 223

Chemistry

Meredith College

Chemistry

Catawba College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Earth Science

Pfeiffer University

Psychology

Pfeiffer University

Sociology

Appalachian State University

English

Appalachian State University

Chemistry

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Public Health

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Public Health

East Carolina University

Statistics

University of North Carolina Wilmington

187


Hardee, Amelia

Harper, George

Harrell, Austin

Harris, Kayla

Hart, Brian

Hartley, Hallie

Hartsook, Theodore

Harvey, Sarah

Hassett, Monica

Hatcher, Jessica

Hatfield, Ronnie

Hawkins, Dianna

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 54 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 9 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 26 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 21 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 55 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 41 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 221 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 54 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 220 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 216 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 217

Engineering - Industrial & Systems North Carolina State University

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

Chemistry

Appalachian State University

Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences

North Carolina A&T State University

Political Science

Wake Forest University

Public Health

North Carolina State University

Environmental Sciences

Queens University of Charlotte

Physics

Appalachian State University

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Education

North Carolina State University

Undecided

Methodist University

Communication

Appalachian State University

188


Hayes, Gabrielle

Helms, Michael

Hemphill, Meredith

Henderson, Cory

Hendricks, Sydney

Henry, Joseph

Hernandez, Nicole

Heslink, Michael

Hild-Ladebauche, Marah

Hill, Daphne

Hill, Heather

Hodges, Ariel

Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 215 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 218 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 55 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 215 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 7 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 220 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 223 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 11 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 23 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 19 Slane Student Center

Biological Sciences - Microbiology High Point University

History

North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences - Botany

North Carolina State University

Anthropology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Health and Physical Education

East Carolina University

Biology

East Carolina University

Exercise Science

Campbell University

English (Literature)

High Point University

Mathematics

Queens University of Charlotte

Psychology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Biological Sciences - Microbiology North Carolina State University

Psychology

High Point University

189


Homer, Seren

Honeycutt, Christina

Horiates, Julia

Horne, Jalisa

Horton, Brianna

Howard, Josiah

Howerton, Clare

Howerton, Victoria

Huff, Sydney

Hughes, Emma

Hughes, Jasmine

Hund, Allanah

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 21 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 18 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Performance Session 2 (1:30 - 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 120 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 41 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 217 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 220 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 53 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 26 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 220

Environmental Sciences

Guilford College

Special Education

High Point University

Biology

East Carolina University

Public Health

University of North Carolina Greensboro

English

East Carolina University

Biology

High Point University

Undecided

East Carolina University

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

English

Appalachian State University

Pharmacy

Appalachian State University

Biomedical Sciences

East Carolina University

English

Appalachian State University

190


Huneycutt, Michael

Idris, Nadia

Inscoe, James

Irby, Lauren

Issa, Mena

Issa, Neveen

Jackson, Kaitlyn

Jang, Chaeyeong

Jenkins, James

Johnson, Zachary

Johnston, Abby

Jones, Addie

Performance Session 1 (10:30 - 11:30) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 120 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 19 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 41 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 113 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 215 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 215 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 215 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 24 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 33 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 8 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 9:45 Poster 0 Slane Student Center

Earth Science

Pfeiffer University

Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences

North Carolina A&T State University

Computer Science

Fayetteville State University

Sociology

Methodist University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Biology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Chemistry - Materials

Salem College

Biology

Davidson College

Biological Sciences -Neurobiology

North Carolina State University

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

191


Jones, Amber

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 220 Jones, Illa Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 14 Slane Student Center Jordan-Steele, Matthew Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 32 Slane Student Center Joseph, Kenya Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 43 Slane Student Center Kalu, Amber Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 114 Kamariza, Christiane

Kamitsuka, Natalie

Kautz, Bethany

Kelley, Mathew

Ketchum, Richard

Kiknadze, Nona

Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 221 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 20 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 21 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 42 Slane Student Center

English

Appalachian State University

Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences

Meredith College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Catawba College

Biology

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Arts - Visual

North Carolina Central University

English (Writing)

Methodist University

Physics

University of North Carolina Asheville

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Engineering - Electrical & Computer

East Carolina University

Pre-Medicine

Duke University

192


King, Alyssa

Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center King, Chelsey Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 34 Slane Student Center Kinger, Komal Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Klemmer, Hannah Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 5 Slane Student Center Klemmer, Hannah Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 6 Slane Student Center Knutson, Kelly Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Kocherga, Margaret Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 216 Kolischak, Chris Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 32 Slane Student Center Konrad, Michael Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 23 Slane Student Center Kristoffersen, Annalisa Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 51 Slane Student Center Kucmierz, Molly Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 220

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Nash Community College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Gaston College

Public Health

Duke University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Research Triangle High School

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Research Triangle High School

Biology

High Point University

Chemistry - Inorganic

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

Business Administration

Appalachian State University

International Relations

North Carolina State University

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

193


Kurr, Richard

Ladner, Samia

LaFargue, Juliette

Lasar, Colleen

Lavendier, Kako

Lee, Evyn

Lemli, Joshua

Leonidas, Marina

Levy, Joseph

Lewis, Ariel

Lim, Hui Yi Grace

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) Psychology 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 113 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Biology Poster 50 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Psychology Poster 56 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 40 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 218 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 32 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 30 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 218 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 18 Slane Student Center

Methodist University

High Point University

Wake Forest University

Chemistry - General

Appalachian State University

History

North Carolina State University

Physics - Biophysics

Appalachian State University

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

Chemistry

Appalachian State University

Public Health

Duke University

Economics

North Carolina A&T State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Duke University

194


Lindeman, Kelsey

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 215 Lins, Ian Performance Session 1 (10:30 - 11:30) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 120 Little, Trenee Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 223 Liu, Frederick Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 39 Slane Student Center Lodaya, Kunal Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 29 Slane Student Center Lohr, James Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Lowry, Austin Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 216 Lowry, Caitlyn Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 218 Lu, John Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Macemore, Calvin Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 16 Slane Student Center Macer, Brandon Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Mandarino, Alexander Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 39 Slane Student Center

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Guilford College

Earth Science

Pfeiffer University

Foreign Languages & Literature

Campbell University

Chemistry

Wake Forest University

Biological Sciences -Neurobiology

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Biological Sciences - Botany

Catawba College

Chemistry - Nanoscience

North Carolina Central University

Pre-Medicine

Appalachian State University

Pre-Medicine

Duke University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Mathematics

Fayetteville State University

Physics - General

Appalachian State University

195


Mantikas, Lauren

Marshall, Jennifer

Martin, Sarah

Masters, Brian

Maurer, Maxwell

McCauslin, Nicholas

McGinn, Mary Clare

McHenry, Matthew

McKinley, Mollie

McNeill, Chauncey

McQuade, Victoria

Medina, Andrea

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 4 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 13 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 15 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 6 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 51 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 56 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 113 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 216 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 220 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 216 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 215 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 220

Biological Sciences - Anatomy &Physiology

High Point University

Chemistry

High Point University

Biological Sciences - Zoology

North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology North Carolina State University

Physics

High Point University

Environmental Sciences

Queens University of Charlotte

Biology

High Point University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

English (Literature)

High Point University

Chemistry - Nanoscience

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Biological Sciences - Microbiology North Carolina State University

English

Appalachian State University

196


Merida, Virginia

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 215 Merwin , Alex Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Migirditch, Benjamin Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 50 Slane Student Center Migirditch, Sam Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 53 Slane Student Center Milburn, Clare Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 222 Minerali, Eni Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 31 Slane Student Center MIrchandani, Indersen Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Mlo, Branda Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Mlo, H'Lois Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Mobley, Jaired Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Modlin, Mitchel Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 25 Slane Student Center

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Catawba College

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Physics - Biophysics

Appalachian State University

Physics - Biophysics

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - General

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Nash Community College

Public Health

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Public Health

Guilford College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Nash Community College

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

197


Moffett, India

Monahan, Erin

Montgomery, Faith

Monts, Alaina

Moore, David

Moore, Tyler

Morales Castellanos, Natasha

Morris, Brianna

Muraski, Marc

Murphy, Michael

Murray, Conner

Murray, Dakota

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 13 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 7 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 114 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 58 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 14 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 216 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 220 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 38 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 116

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

Psychology

High Point University

Physics - Astrophysics

Appalachian State University

Women's and Gender Studies

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Engineering - Electrical & Computer

East Carolina University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Chemistry

Salem College

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Elizabeth City State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Guilford College

English

Appalachian State University

Engineering - Civil, Construction & North Carolina State University Environmental

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

198


Murray, Shanon

Musa, Lauren

Nasrallah, Regina

Neibaur, Raimie

Nicholson, LaTasha

Norris, Nathan

Norton, Sean

O'Campo, Jesse

O'Neill, Moira

Ong, Ruici

Oshita, Emily

Packer, Morgan

Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 220 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 43 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 113 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 217 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 18 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 7 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 113 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 215 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 51 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 221 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 39 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center

English (Literature)

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Mathematics

Fayetteville State University

Sociology

Appalachian State University

Education

Appalachian State University

Textiles - Engineering, Chemistry & North Carolina State University Science

Exercise Science

Campbell University

Political Science

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Biological Sciences - Microbiology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Social Work

Guilford College

Environmental Sciences

Duke University

Chemistry - Analytical

Fayetteville State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Campbell University

199


Pagan, Jose

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 56 Slane Student Center Page, Ashle Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Page, Michelle Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 223 Palekar, Alisha Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 23 Slane Student Center Paolino, Michael Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 47 Slane Student Center Paschall, Anna Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 25 Slane Student Center Pate, Katherine Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 113 Patel, Ravikumar Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 52 Slane Student Center Patel, Shivaliben Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 17 Slane Student Center Pawlyszyn, Christopher Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 223 Pearce, Rachel Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center

Chemistry - Biochemistry

North Carolina State University

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

Statistics

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Biological Sciences - Microbiology North Carolina State University

Physics

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

North Carolina State University

Undecided

Appalachian State University

Physics - Biophysics

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - General

Fayetteville State University

Physics - General

Appalachian State University

Health and Physical Education

East Carolina University

200


Pearson-Moyers, Alex

Pearson-Moyers, Alexander

Peart, Samantha

Peregoy, Madison

Perez, Stephanie

Perez-Jimenez, Kiana

Pernia, Isabel

Petroski, Weston

Piedrahita, Lucas

Pierce, Jessica

Pinheiro, Izzy

Pinkham, Ariel

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 48 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 58 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 113 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 215 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 11 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 15 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 222 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 16 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 221 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 46 Slane Student Center

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Marine Sciences

North Carolina State University

Biology

Greensboro College

Marine Sciences

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Psychology

University of North Carolina Pembroke

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Zoology

Appalachian State University

English

Appalachian State University

Individualized Major Program

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Chemistry - Biochemistry

East Carolina University

201


Pinnix, Brett

Pinnix, Brett

Pinos, Joshua

Plyler, Emma

Powell, Dylan

Powers, Warren

Preston, Lindsay

Price, Allison

Pruitt, Mary

Prunet, Chloe

Puckett, Caroline

Pursifull, Anne

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 48 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 58 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 222 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 223 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 220 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 216 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 40 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 114 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 221 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 222 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 33 Slane Student Center

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Computer Science

Fayetteville State University

Psychology

South Iredell High School

Foreign Languages & Literature

Appalachian State University

English (Literature)

Chowan University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Arts - Visual

High Point University

English

Appalachian State University

International Relations

Appalachian State University

Food, Nutrition, & Bioprocessing Sciences

North Carolina State University

202


Raby, Jonathan

Rader, Loryn

Rager, James

Ramirez Perez, Maria

Ramsey, Jeffrey

Ransom, Tim

Rasmussen, Courtney

Ratzloff, Aleksander

Reinhart, Phil

Riley, Zachary

Rios, Jesus

Roberts, Brooke

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 222 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 221 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 113 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 6 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 59 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 116 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 223 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 217 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 53 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 46 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 33 Slane Student Center

Psychology

Appalachian State University

English

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Anatomy &Physiology

High Point University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Salem College

Pharmacy

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Statistics

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Pre-Medicine

Duke University

Pre-Medicine

Wake Forest University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Nash Community College

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Elizabeth City State University

203


Roberts, Christian

Roberts, Lori

Roberts, Melissa

Robinson, Jasmine

Robinson, Monique

Rogers, Kristen

Rogers, Lauren

Roldan, Luis

Roth, Lindsay

Royalty, Douglas

Rubin, Jay

Rutledge, Emily

Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 113 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 30 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 113 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 1 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 218 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 215 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 16 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 54 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 52 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 221 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 217 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 218

Sociology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Guilford College

Sociology

University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Biology

Fayetteville State University

Economics

North Carolina A&T State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Chemistry - General

Appalachian State University

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

International Relations

North Carolina State University

Engineering - Biological & Agricultural

North Carolina State University

Communication

University of North Carolina Asheville

Economics

Salem College

204


Ryding, Rachel

Sadeghi, Nakisa

Saha, Piyanka

Sakaguchi, Robert

Salman, Talha

Salonia, Nicole

Salvato, Samantha

Sanderford, Madison

Saracino, Patrick

Saunders, Lori

Savas, Melissa

Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 113 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 15 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 54 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 222 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 31 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 5 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 7 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 20 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 29 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 26 Slane Student Center

Sociology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Individualized Major Program

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

Anthropology

Wake Forest University

Psychology

Appalachian State University

Psychology

East Carolina University

Arts - Performing

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Exercise Science

Campbell University

Exercise Science

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Biological Sciences - Toxicology

Fayetteville State University

Exercise Science

High Point University

205


Scanlan, Cailyn

Schmidt, Emily

Schnuck, Jamie

Schoenecker, Johanna

Schomo, Alexander

Scott, Lex

Scruggs, Kathryn

Seddon, Hannah

Shaheen, Hannah

Shannahan, Megan

Shapiro, Hannah

Sharma, Kartik

Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 26 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 216 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 13 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 47 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 29 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 220 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 13 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 2 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 215 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 56 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 28 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 116

Biology

High Point University

Chemistry - Nanoscience

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Chemistry - Biochemistry

High Point University

Exercise Science

Queens University of Charlotte

Biological Sciences -Neurobiology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

English (Writing)

Appalachian State University

Anthropology

North Carolina State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

North Carolina State University

Biology

High Point University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Environmental Sciences

North Carolina State University

Undecided

Methodist University

206


Shaw, William

Shea, Cyrus

Shelton, Terrance

Shuffler, Edward

Shuffler, Edward

Shuffler, Scott

Shuman, Siesa

Shymanovich, Anastasia

Sieber, Karen

Sierra, Bryanna

Silva Cantu, Jose

Sink, Devin

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 10 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:00 - 3:15 Phillips 217 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 61 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 116 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:45 - 2:00 Phillips 116 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 116 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 217 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 113 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:15 - 3:30 Phillips 114 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 14 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 114 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 116

Chemistry - Biochemistry

High Point University

Education

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - General

Winston-Salem State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Education

Appalachian State University

Sociology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Individualized Major Program

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Biology

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Arts - Visual

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

207


Sink , William

Skinner, Brandon

Smith, Cambray

Smith, Christopher

Smith, Christopher

Smith, Natalie

Sommer, Stella

Soto, Natalia

Spencer, Shelby

Spurrier, Erin

Stack, Jordan

Staves, Madison

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 216 Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 114 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 31 Slane Student Center Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 1:30 - 1:45 Phillips 116 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 22 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 23 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 114 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 223 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 34 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 217 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 34 Slane Student Center

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Barton College

Anthropology

North Carolina State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Physical

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Liberal Studies

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Gaston College

Computer Science

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Gaston College

208


Stewart, Courtney

Stidham, Hallie

Stromberg, Viktor

Stutts, William

Sullivan, Abigail

Tabor, Alexandra

Tabor, George

Tai, Carissa

Tart, David

Telzrow, Calla

Thompson, Kelly

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 36 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 25 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 47 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 221 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 30 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 31 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 216 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 9 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 10:45 - 11:00 Phillips 216 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 12 Slane Student Center

Health and Physical Education

East Carolina University

Physics - General

High Point University

Environmental Sciences

Appalachian State University

Exercise Science

Winston-Salem State University

English

Appalachian State University

International Relations

North Carolina State University

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Appalachian State University

Chemistry - Nanoscience

North Carolina Central University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Appalachian State University

Chemistry - General

High Point University

Biological Sciences -Neurobiology

North Carolina State University

209


Tingle, Christina

Tipton, Nicole

Tracy, Samantha

Trujillo, Maria

Tunnell, John

Turner, Emily

Tutterow, Jessica

Tworek, Grace

Ulrich, Rebecca

Urquhart, Derek

Valverde, Maria

Varanasi, Vamsi

Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 50 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 216 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 21 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 8 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 49 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 114 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 215 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 5 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 29 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 221 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 44 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 8 Slane Student Center

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Wake Forest University

Chemistry

Appalachian State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Charlotte

Biology

High Point University

Psychology

Pfeiffer University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology Guilford College

Psychology

Catawba College

Chemistry - Biochemistry

High Point University

Engineering - Biological & Agricultural

North Carolina State University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology High Point University

Engineering - Materials

North Carolina State University

210


Vartanian, Haley

Vasquez Soto, Alan

Velappan, Keerthana

Vickers, Cierra

Vidmar, Michael

Villalon, Gabriella

Wagi, Cheyenne

Walker, Amy

Walker, Raven

Walsh, Fionna

Warner, Anna

Watkins, Joyah

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 48 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 223 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 221 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 2:45 - 3:00 Phillips 215 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 9 Slane Student Center Oral Session 4 (2:45 3:45) 3:30 - 3:45 Phillips 217 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:15 - 2:30 Phillips 223 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 114 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:15 - 11:30 Phillips 222 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 16 Slane Student Center

History

North Carolina State University

Physics - Astrophysics

High Point University

Health and Physical Education

East Carolina University

Sociology

Appalachian State University

Chemistry

University of North Carolina Asheville

Biology

East Carolina University

Anthropology

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Education

Appalachian State University

Liberal Studies

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Psychology

University of North Carolina Greensboro

Marine Sciences

University of North Carolina Charlotte

211


Watson, Hannah

Watson, Whitney

Watters, John

Weaver, Lyndee

Webb, Caroline

Weeks, Samuel

Welborn, Sheila

Wells, Aaron

Wesley, Jaiza

White, Kayla

Wilkinson, Rachel

Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 8 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 2 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 59 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 0 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:15 - 10:30 Phillips 114 Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 37 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 217 Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 221 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:45 - 10:00 Phillips 222 Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 9:30 - 9:45 Phillips 218 Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 61 Slane Student Center

Exercise Science

Pfeiffer University

Criminal Justice

Fayetteville State University

Chemistry - Analytical

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Education

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Individualized Major Program

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Communication

Appalachian State University

Undecided

Appalachian State University

Psychology

Bennett College

Economics

Appalachian State University

Atmospheric Sciences

North Carolina State University

212


Willett, Howard

Williams, Adam

Williams, Adonia

Williams, Alleya

Williams, Joshua

Wilson, Brooke

Wilson, Hillary

Wilson, Tyler

Woolard, Hannah

Wright, John

Wright, Mariah

Wright, Nicole

Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 19 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:00 - 11:15 Phillips 114 Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 1 Slane Student Center Oral Session 2 (10:45 11:45) 11:30 - 11:45 Phillips 222 Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 27 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 16 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 7 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 3 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 27 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 18 Slane Student Center Oral Session 1 (9:30 10:30) 10:00 - 10:15 Phillips 113 Oral Session 3 (1:30 2:30) 2:00 - 2:15 Phillips 215

Chemistry - General

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Appalachian State University

Political Science

Fayetteville State University

Psychology

Appalachian State University

Biological Sciences - Botany

Elizabeth City State University

Chemistry - Analytical

Appalachian State University

Biology

High Point University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology High Point University

Chemistry - Inorganic

East Carolina University

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

Psychology

Methodist University

Biological Sciences - Microbiology High Point University

213


Wu, Sarah

Wu, Zhan

Yim, Sunwoo

Yoo, KyungMin

Zafar, Tasmia

Zeches, Breann

Zerrad, Mounir

Zou, Jennifer

Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 45 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 27 Slane Student Center Poster Session 4 (2:30 3:45) 2:30 - 3:45 Poster 42 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 59 Slane Student Center Poster Session 3 (1:00 2:15) 1:00 - 2:15 Poster 60 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 12 Slane Student Center Poster Session 1 (9:30 10:45) 9:30 - 10:45 Poster 49 Slane Student Center Poster Session 2 (11:00 - 12:15) 11:00 - 12:15 Poster 43 Slane Student Center

Engineering - Civil, Construction & North Carolina School of Science Environmental and Mathematics

Engineering - Biomedical

Duke University

Biological Sciences - Genetics

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

Chemistry - Biochemistry

Wake Forest University

Public Health

Guilford College

Biological Sciences - Genetics

Campbell University

Engineering - Chemical & Biomolecular

North Carolina State University

Chemistry - Materials

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics

214


By The Numbers Total Student Presententers: 504 Total Presentations: 414 Total Institutions Presenting: 40

Appalachian State University

118

NC School of Science and Mathematics

5

Barton College

1

North Carolina A&T State University

6

Bennett College

1

North Carolina Central University

4

Campbell University

6

North Carolina School of Science and 2 Mathematics

Catawba College

11

North Carolina State University

53

Chowan University

1

Pfeiffer University

6

Davidson College

1

Queens University of Charlotte

7

Duke University

8

Research Triangle High School

1

East Carolina University

15

Salem College

4

Elizabeth City State University

3

South Iredell High School

1

Elon University

1

St. Andrews University

2

Fayetteville State University

15

Gaston College

2

Gaston Early College High School

1

Greensboro College

1

Guilford College

9

High Point University

43

Meredith College

2

Methodist University

5

Wake Forest University

14

Nash Community College

2

Winston-Salem State University

2

University of North Carolina Asheville University of North Carolina Chapel Hill University of North Carolina Charlotte University of North Carolina Greensboro University of North Carolina Pembroke University of North Carolina Wilmington University of North Carolina at Charlotte

6 9 12 13 5 14 1

215


Notes!

216


Thank you to our 2015 sponsors!

217


218

SNCURCS 2015 Program Book  
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