Page 1

More Notes Science Class with Kim Kim McCormick Science Teacher High Mowing School

October 15, 2009 Issue No. 3

Questions and Answers: Kim McCormick Kim doesn’t mind getting her hands dirty, or at least getting them wet — especially if it’s in a New England tidal pool. It’s here that her background as a Naturalist (Mass. Dept. of Environmental Management and the Appalachian Mountain Club) and Environmental Educator (Horizons for Youth, Otter Lake Conservation School and Camp Echo Lake) come into play. As our newest science teacher, More Notes wondered how she found her way to High Mowing, and what she had to say about her role in the class room:

Q: What drew you to our school? A: I’ve known about High Mowing for over 20 years, since I was a graduate student at Antioch New England. Three summers ago I visited High Mowing and took a tour.

I was drawn to the beauty of the campus and the unique history of the school. There was a tangible sense of deep community in everything I saw, from the Christmas Books to the dining hall. On that first visit to High Mowing three years ago I set my intention to become part of this community one day.

Q: What do you teach at High Mowing? A: I will be teaching six blocks this year: Grade 9’s Organic Chemistry

and Anatomy and Physiology, Grade 10’s Acids and Bases, Grade 11’s Botany, and Grade 12’s Zoology and Evolution and Biochemistry classes.


More Notes Kim McCormick continued

Q: What other responsibilities do you have here? A: This year I am working half-time as a Girls’ Dorm Counselor, along with

teaching science.

Q: What are your goals for the coming year? A: I want to find opportunities for High Mowing students to excel in the sciences

as well as the arts. Toward that end, I hope to coach teams for the New Hampshire Science Olympiad and the Envirothon this spring. I would also like to encourage students to pursue independent research projects. This year I will be taking students to the New England Science Symposium and the New Hampshire Science and Engineering EXPO. Both of these high school events will give our students an opportunity to put their science knowledge and skills to work, as well as meet other students with an interest in science.

—Kim McCormick

a DAY at thE ocean On October 12, the seniors went on a field trip to the Seacoast Science Center as part of their Zoology block

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

|

October 15, 2009

|

2


More Notes from the Athletic Director

Soccer Update The men and women’s soccer teams continue to impress all teams they come up against in competition. As of More Notes’ press time, both teams were undefeated. Unfortunately the women’s Small School Soccer Tournament was rained out for the second year in a row on October 3, as was the men’s game against Holderness. Game Scores: Men 10/2 HMS vs. White Mountain School: HMS 6, WMS 1 10/7 HMS vs. Tilton: HMS 9, TA 1 10/10 HMS vs. Brewster: HMS 9, BA 1 Game Scores: Women 10/7 HMS vs. Kimball Union Academy: HMS 5, KUA 0 10/10 HMS vs. Brewster: HMS 1, BA 0

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

3


More Notes Naturalist News

Naturalist students have been busy on all fronts this fall. New students have been practicing their navigation skills in the High Mowing woods, and Intermediate and Advanced students have been applying skills learned in the past to new challenges. The weather has been cooperative to all our endeavors, allowing students the time and freedom to explore the season’s splendor! PRACTICING PRIMITIVE: Senior Matthias Fuell shapes a tree limb for the construction of the wigwam doorway. He wears a tie in anticipation of the afternoon’s soccer game.

Classroom Updates CAMPUS MOMENTS: Chloe PITTMAN `09, in her first year at Smith College, greets junior Amber Johnston during a visit to campus this week

The Divine Comedy – A look at the current junior block Monday, October 5 was the start of a new set of blocks. For the juniors this meant a transition from medieval history to a study of Dante’s great work, The Divine Comedy. We will spend three weeks with Dante on his journey through hell, purgatory and paradise. In the Inferno, we will meet 128 sinners by name (including Plato, Pope Celestine V and Mohammed), encounter monsters—such as Cerberus, the ravenous three-headed dog of hell—and be subjected to the most foul odors that one could imagine. Fortunately, we will emerge from this darkness to travel through purgatory and on to the light of the Empyrean, where we are able to experience the bliss of oneness with God. Whenever I prepare a course I begin with the question: Why am I teaching this subject? In the case of The Divine Comedy one could argue that students should be introduced to great works of literature in their own right. Dante’s masterpiece would certainly find a place alongside Shakespeare and Milton in any course of study. If this were the primary reason for studying The Divine Comedy, then it would not matter whether we did so in the junior or senior year. However, at High Mowing and other Waldorf schools we teach this course quite consciously in the junior year and not one year later. We do so because there is a relationship between Dante’s work and the questions that junior’s begin to ask themselves. The study of this work with students

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

4


More Notes Classroom Updates continued

gives the teacher an opportunity to create an environment in which these questions find expression. When one discusses questions of morality and ethics with a group of juniors, intense and heated conversations ensue and one knows why the choice of The Divine Comedy is right. —Robert Sim

Freshman Block Class The freshmen are now settled into their second block, History Through Art. This block was taught in the earliest years of our school by our founder, Mrs. Emmet. In my office, I have an old photograph of her teaching this class. She holds an art book on her lap, showing it to students who gather around her. Now I project digital images of the artwork through my laptop, but the lessons this block holds are much the same as they were then. It is important to note that the title of the course is History Through Art, not History of Art. The emphasis is not on the evolution of technique or the development of style, but on the way in which cultural, economic, political and even literary history are reflected in art.

FROM THE PAST: Mrs. Emmet , right, teaches History Through Art. The exact year is unknown. If any of our readers can identify the date and student, we will publish it in the next issue of More Notes.

For example, we see that in ancient Egypt, a long succession of all-powerful rulers held sway over an isolationist culture that remained little changed for thousands of years. In Egyptian art, we see a uniform style reproduced over and over again by artists who had little freedom to vary the one official “approved” style. Bodies are stiff and formal; there are only a few permissible poses. The exceptions prove the rule – bodies shown moving or posed in a nonstandard way are those of workers or of the pitiful enemy. In sharp contrast, there is ancient Greece. Here we see not one all-powerful ruler of a long-lasting dynasty, but a collection of competing city-states. This was a sea-faring culture with contacts all over the Mediterranean. In this competitive, outward-looking context, we see rapid change in artistic style and lots of room for the individual artist to express his creativity. We see creative flexibility within a distinctly Greek form. On our whirlwind tour from Paleolithic times to the 20th century, we see again and again the way in which history and art parallel each other.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

5


More Notes Classroom Updates continued

from the Faculty Co-Chairs

As a part of the course, alumnus Timothy SMITH ’64 comes in to build arches of stone and foam blocks. The students build various types of arches, learning which types can be built higher and wider. We make lots of sketches and write creatively in response to the art. We will also take a field trip to visit the Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, which has an excellent education program for high school students and a comprehensive collection. —Wendy Bruneau

AWSNA Conference A key to good teaching? Never stop learning. Teachers in Waldorf Schools are fortunate to have support in continuing professional development through conferences and workshops that address vital questions in the lives of young people today. One such conference, organized by AWSNA (Association of Waldorf Schools of North America) for high school and upper grade teachers in the Northeast, Quebec and Mid Atlantic states will take place on the weekend of October 16 in Great Barrington, MA. The theme of this weekend is “The Awakening Self: Sleeping and Breathing in Adolescence.” High Mowing teacher and Academic Dean, Robert Sim will present a keynote address entitled, “Ennobling the Adolescent Mind, Embracing the Ideals Within.” He will also lead a workshop on the teaching of foreign languages. AWSNA is an organization founded in 1968 “to assist Waldorf schools and institutes in working together to nurture Waldorf education so that it can manifest more widely in the world.” Regional conferences are held twice yearly as well as a national conference in the summer. Bev Boyer and Heather Cochrane are High Mowing’s AWSNA delegates; they attend special sessions to exchange information with delegates from all Waldorf schools in the Northeastern region and to keep people abreast of what is happening on our campus. Keith Badger will also be participating in this conference; Heather, Bev, Robert and Keith will share the fruits of this conference with faculty upon their return. —Judy Wachler

dean of students report

H1N1 Flu update We continue to monitor the health of our students and find that we have not encountered any symptoms of this flu through the publication date of this edition of More Notes. The State of New Hampshire issues health bulletins every two weeks and we stay up-to-date with their recommendations. There may be vaccinations available in Milford for students later this month if parents are interested in that option. Many institutions are experiencing delays in receiving hand sanitizer units; our units are still back-ordered. The estimated date for delivery is October 19.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

6


More Notes Student News Done something noteworthy?

tell us! ntichanuk@ highmowing.org

STUDENT COUNCIL: Newly elected 2009-10 Representatives, from left to right: Fiona Graham `13, Allison Hill `13, Abby Yandell`10, Taggart Wass `10, Tolin Vaccaro `12, Lillie Durnan `12, Nellie Schläefereit`11, Shea Vaccaro `10. Not pictured is Brynna Golden `11.

Jonah Tolchin, junior at High Mowing, performed a half-hour opening set for Cambridge-based blues artist Brendan Hogan on Friday, October 9 at Studio 99 in Nashua, NH. Jonah’s set consisted of both blues standards and originals. Featuring guitar, voice and harmonica, he held the audience in absolute thrall. Tolchin has performed at Studio 99 several times, but opening for a prestigious blues artist like Hogan represents a new watermark for him. When he’s not on the touring circuit, Hogan is Blues DJ for WGBH FM in Boston. Gathering no moss, the next morning, Jonah and his classmates Shea Vaccaro, senior, and Seamus Conley, junior — collectively known as Uncle Fran’s Breakfast — performed an hour-long set of blues and rock at the Milford Pumpkin Festival on the Milford Oval.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

7


More Notes PROJECTS BLOCK MAY 3–14, 2010

Timeline for Selection of Projects October 5

Projects presented to students

October 24

Projects presented to parents at Parents Weekend

November 1 Students submit 1st, 2nd, 3rd choice for Projects November 9 Projects Assigned

INDEPENDENT PROJECTS: juniors and seniors only Forms are available in the Guidance Office. Parental permission required. Proposals must be submitted to the Academic and Educational Support Committee by Nov 1. KAYAK MAKING WITH KILIII YU

On-Campus (supervised by Jonathan Northrop)

Estimated Cost: $1,350-1,400 (not including meal charges) This project will be led by a nationally-known naturalist named Kiliii Yu. Each student will be building his or her own kayak. The final product will be made of all natural materials, using traditional methods of construction. This project will be campus-based. Each student will end up with his or her own sea/river kayak.

FILMMAKING

Cedar Oliver

Estimated Cost: $500 to $600 if off-campus, potentially half that or less if we stay locally with a larger group. Location: To be determined. If it is a large group, we will probably stay locally. We will work together as a production team to learn the organizational, creative and practical skills needed to follow a major project from writing to final editing. Each student will have a specific job or acting role. By the end of the project, we will have a completed five- to ten-minute movie. Anyone interested in composing and recording a musical score for the film is also welcome. More details will be worked out with the group prior to project launch.

JEWELRY FABRICATION AND DESIGN On-campus

Michael Noer

Estimated Cost: $350-400 (not including meal charges) Students will explore a variety of jewelry making techniques. We will learn to work in copper and sterling silver, using basic cutting, bending, hammering and soldering techniques. We will also work with ‘found’ or ‘recycled’ objects, learning to think artistically about objects we normally see as useless, turning them into wearable ‘artistic statements.’ Students will develop a small portfolio of their work, including drawings through finished pieces, which will be

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

8


More Notes Projects Block continued

displayed for the school in a formal exhibition. Students will be able to offer some of their work for sale to benefit a worthy cause of their choice.

BRITISH ISLES LONGWALKING ADVENTURE Keith & Andrea Badger Estimated cost : $1000 +/- (Cost depends upon price of airfare and ground transportation. Some use of YHA hostels will depend upon the group size and food costs will vary according to individual needs.) Longwalking is a rite-of-passage adventure to test oneself in unanticipated ways. It is the best way to get to know the land and its people. This trip will immerse students into some of the most spectacular backcountry in the British Isles. Some YHA hostels will be used, but we will wild camp for the most part. Participants need to be in fit condition and serious about walking long distances.

FROM WILTON TO MOUGINS: FRANCE EXCHANGE PROGRAM

Judy Wachler

Estimated Cost: $1500 Students will have the opportunity to improve their spoken French and get to know a French family. We will begin correspondence with students in a school in southern France. In March or April of this year, High Mowing students will welcome their French correspondents into their homes and our school campus for two weeks. During Projects Block we will travel to Mougins, where our students will stay with their French families, attend some classes and visit outstanding attractions, art galleries and medieval towns in the South of France.

ENVIROTHON 2010

On-campus/field trips

Kim McCormick

Estimated Cost: $50 (not including meal charges) Be part of team and compete in the NH Envirothon competition in May. The goals are to promote stewardship of natural resources and to encourage the development of critical thinking, cooperative problem-solving, and decision-making skills required to achieve and maintain a natural balance between the quality of life and the quality of the environment. Have fun and meet students from around NH who are interested in environmental science! High school students will work in teams to solve real-life, natural resources problems. Students will learn about five natural resource categories: soils and land use, aquatic ecology, forestry, wildlife, and current environmental issues. This year’s theme is Protection of Groundwater through Urban, Agricultural, and Environmental Planning. Upon completion, teams will give an oral presentation on a topic.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

9


More Notes Projects Block continued

IN THE STEPS OF THOMAS HARDY

Robert Sim

Estimated Cost: $1,200 + The location is Dorset, England. We will walk in Thomas Hardy’s Wessex, discovering the villages, town, byways and landscapes that he describes in his novels. The goals are: to deepen our understanding of Hardy the novelist and poet, to become acquainted with the countryside in Dorset, to look at the effect people have had on the environment since 1880, to understand an agricultural culture of the late 19th century and investigate what has been lost/gained since that time.

ART IN THE MODERN WORLD: SUPERMAN’S WORKSHOP On-campus/field trips Mark Salwasser Estimated Cost: approximately $250 (not including meal charges) This project will be an immersion into the world of modern art. We will study the life, times and work of the some of the major figures in modern art—and some of the minor figures, too! We will begin our survey with Marcel Duchamp’s “Fountain,” take an in-depth look at Joseph Beuys and his concept of “social sculptures” and choose from some of the most exciting art makers of our times. We will make art as contemporary artists. Our focus will be primarily on three dimensional works but all media will be considered. We will spend approximately 1/3 of our time looking at art and artists and 2/3 of our time creating work. Field trips could include Mass MoCA, the Decordova, The Rose Art Museum, the ICA, the DIA Center and Storm King Art Center in New York. The goal of this block is to introduce a new language of art making and flex our muscles making pieces that can leap tall buildings in a single bound.

ON THE GROUND WITH HISTORY Cary Hughes Estimated cost: $1,000 (New England area focus) or $2,200 (Long range project) This project involves travel to key historic sites to study and experience what occurred there in order to gain a deeper insight into the significance of those events. The project may be limited to New England and eastern New York State or may be able to expand to include sites as far south as Virginia.

MODEL UN (Offered only if “On the Ground with History” does not go) Estimated cost: $225 (not including meal charges) Participants will prepare for the Model United Nations Conference at Bentley University scheduled for Memorial Day weekend. Preparation will include research, writing position papers, and practicing debates. A field trip to the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston will be included.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

10


More Notes Projects Block continued

ROCK CLIMBING/COMMUNITY SERVICE

Mike Wisniewski

Estimated cost: $700 This year’s trip will be in West Virginia, where we will camp and climb in the New River Gorge. West Virginia has world-class rock climbing and world-class white water; we will also take a white water rafting trip. On our drive to West Virginia we may stop in New York (New Paltz) for some climbing at the Gunks. Community service with the national park service will be an important component of our expedition. Each student will need his or her own camping gear, mess kit and other personal items. All rock gear will be provided.

SERVING AND LEARNING IN SANTO DOMINGO: THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Marguy Nelson/Bev Boyer Estimated cost: $1500 The group will stay and work in an orphanage, teaching students of all of ages. High Mowing students will spend their days and evenings engaged with the children: the younger ones during the morning and the older students later in the day and evening.

High Mowing Welcomes New Faculty Members The Music Department welcomes Marybeth Hallinan as the new chorus teacher this fall. A seasoned vocalist, musician, teacher, pianist, singer/songwriter, Marybeth has operated a teaching studio for 20 years in the Monadnock Region. She was the music/choir director and organist of the Federated Church of Marlborough, NH for 10 years and is the founder/director of the Two Rivers Community Choir, a mixed choir for ages 17 and over. Marybeth has also directed for Conval High School, Andy’s Summer Playhouse, Small Pond Productions and provided assistant musical direction for Raylynmor Opera. Welcome MaryBeth! The Language Department at High Mowing School is pleased to welcome a new part time-teacher to the Spanish Department. Ramon Santos teaches the Intermediate Spanish II class. Ramon is a native Spanish speaker, originally from Puerto Rico. He received a BA in Journalism from Bayamon Central University in Puerto Rico. He has taught Spanish to students from Kindergarten through eighth grade for the past several years.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

11


UPCOMING WEBINARS AT NHHEAF NETWORK

More Notes

CENTER FOR COLLEGE PLANNING Free college information webinars designed for students and parents. Registration is required. Go to http://www.nhheaf.org and click on information for students or parents. Early College Planning Monday, October 19 6:00- 7:30 p.m. College Costs and Funding Strategies Thursday, October 22 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. Filing the FAFSA/CSS Profile Wednesday, November 11 3:00-4:30 p.m. The Write Stuff (essay) Wednesday, November 11 5:00- 6:30 p.m. College Costs and Funding Strategies Monday November 23 6:00-7:30 p.m. Junior families are encouraged to attend as well.

from the Guidance Office

Early Applications

As the class of 2010 prepares applications to various colleges, deadlines become a very important part of the process. Some seniors have sent in early applications already this year and many more are planning to. A limited number of colleges do have very early deadlines (The University of California, for example, only accepts applications between Nov. 1 and 30). Colleges have several types of early applications. Deadlines which do not ask applicants to commit to attending if they are accepted are generally known as Early Action (EA) programs. They give students the benefits of early notification without the obligations of early decision. Even if accepted, students are free to apply to other schools and to compare financial aid offers. Early application programs can be a very good option, but for students who need time to retake standardized tests or to improve senior year grades, they may not be the best option. Early Decision is not an obligation to be taken lightly, since schools honor one another’s binding decisions. This option is available to seniors who have a clear first choice school where they plan to attend if offered admission. Students can seek release from an early decision obligation on the grounds of financial hardship, if the financial aid package they are offered is genuinely inadequate; however, the burden of proof in these cases is on the student. An important drawback to early decision admissions is that they leave applicants with no leverage to negotiate a better financial aid package — the school knows you can’t go anywhere else. Early decision applicants are expected to submit only one early decision application to one school. They can submit applications to other schools under normal application procedures, but agree that they will withdraw all those applications if they are accepted to the early decision school. College Overview A session on college admissions will be offered on October 24, during Parents Weekend at

for more college events:

www.

highmowing.org

4:00p.m. in the Science Auditorium. The College Overview for junior and senior students and their parents (sophomores welcome as well) will be presented by a representative from the NHHEAF Network. Guidance counselor Andrea Badger will be on hand as well. Selecting colleges and applying for admission can be overwhelming. There are applications to be completed, deadlines to meet, essays to write and policies to understand. This session is intended to educate the student and family about the college admission process. Topics include: narrowing your list, questions to ask on a college tour, college essay pointers, the application timeline and the basics of financial aid. RSVP to Andrea Badger if you plan to attend; guidance@highmowing.org

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

12


More Notes from the Admissions Office

Share the Wealth! Bring Your Friends to These Public Programs If you know parents of a middle or high school student who might be interested in High Mowing, please tell them about the programs listed below. Or, if you would like to learn more about High Mowing and its curriculum, please come to our “inquiring parent” series to find out how our teachers engage and inspire teenagers. Contact Kim Govoni, Admissions Assistant, at 603-654-2391 ext. 103 or email her at kgovoni@highmowing.org by the school day before the event to let us know you are coming. OCTOBER 20 Tuesday, 7:45a.m. to 9:15a.m. Developing the Capacities of Thinking, Feeling & Willing Judy Wachler, Faculty Co-Chair When the capacity for thinking in the high school years builds upon feelings nurtured in the grade-school years, the result is a mind characterized by creative imagination, coupled with a strong wish to bring ideas into practical reality. Find out how these capacities are consciously developed at High Mowing.

OCTOBER 29 Thursday, 7:00p.m. to 8:30p.m. Open House for Inquiring Parents with Presentation on the Sciences Kim McCormick, Science Teacher In the high school years, cognitive and intellectual thinking awaken strongly, and students work with teachers who are specialists in their subjects. Science students observe phenomena so they can formulate their own conclusions and learn to explain them. By working with diverse points of view, students learn to look at questions from a number of sides and appreciate the differences that are uncovered. Find out more about the development of scientific thought at this Open House.

NOVEMBER 12 Thursday, 7:45a.m. to 9:15a.m. The Importance of Physical Activity in High School Keith Badger, Athletics Director, and Cedar Oliver, Spatial Dynamics practitioner CAMPUS MOMENTS: Mica Low, senior, in the science lab.

What do sports programs and other forms of movement—including Spatial Dynamics and Eurythmy—do to support the healthy development of the adolescent? Find out at this lively discussion.

November 17 Tuesday, 7:00p.m. to 8:30p.m. Open House for Inquiring Parents with Presentation on the Naturalist Program Keith Badger, Naturalist/Science Teacher The Naturalist Program combines natural history, field ecology, and experimental archaeology with elements of wilderness adventure. This popular elective reinforces a student’s understanding of nature, and supports the student’s physical, mental and emotional development. Find out how.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

13


More Notes Update: PARENTS WEEKEND

High Mowing Parents Are Invited to Attend Morning Classes Friday, October 23 As part of Parents Weekend, High Mowing’s faculty cordially invites you to join us for Morning Assembly, Block Class and the first two Track Classes of the day on October 23. If you would like to attend classes, please come to campus in time for Morning Assembly—which begins promptly at 8:00a.m. Parents Weekend at High Mowing School

Parents Weekend begins at 8:00a.m. on Friday, October 23, and ends with brunch on Sunday, October 25.

0 0 : 9 a.m.

Parent Association

reception AND meeting in the Dining Room, Saturday, Oct. 24

8:00a.m. - Noon 12:00p.m. 1:00p.m. - 4:00p.m. 4:00p.m. 5:00p.m. - 6:00p.m. 5:00p.m. 6:00p.m. 7:30p.m.

Friday, October 23 Parents Attend Morning Assembly and Classes Lunch ($12.00) Pre-scheduled Parent/Teacher Conferences Class Receptions for Parents and Mentors 9th grade / 10th grade / 11th grade / 12th grade: Locations to be assigned Pre-scheduled Parent/Teacher Conferences Jazz Performance and Eurythmy in the Big Room Dinner begins ($12.00) Chorus and Chamber Music in the Big Room

Saturday, October 24 8:00a.m. - 9:00a.m. Pre-scheduled Parent/Teacher Conferences 9:00a.m. Parent Association Reception and Meeting in the Dining Room 10:00a.m. Meeting of Parents and Teachers in the Big Room

11:30a.m. 1:00p.m. 2:00p.m.-6:00p.m. 2:30p.m. 3:00p.m. 3:00p.m. 4:00p.m. 5:00p.m. 6:00p.m. 7:30p.m.

Lunch begins ($12.00) Class Meetings for Parents and Mentors Prospective Parents Math Room in Science Building 9th grade Digital Arts Room 10th grade Center Room 11th grade Auditorium (Science Building) 12th grade Library Pre-scheduled Parent/Teacher Conferences Ultimate Frisbee Game (Parents too!) Boys’ Soccer with Holderness Girls’ Soccer with Brewster Academy College Workshop: Guidance Counselor Andrea Badger in the Library Chorus and Sinfonietta in the Big Room Dinner begins ($12.00) Jazz Performance and Eurythmy in the Big Room

Sunday, October 25 10:00a.m. – 12:30p.m. Brunch ($12.00)

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

14


More Notes Parents Weekend continued

! y r r u H There is still time To sign up for

Parent/Teacher

Conferences Follow these instructions to email your conference request. Please note the deadlines!

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

How to schedule Individual Parent/Teacher Conferences

As previously published, the deadline for receiving priority scheduling for conferences during Parents Weekend was Wednesday, October 14. Requests received from this point on will be scheduled in remaining openings. Conference schedules will be sent to all parents on Wednesday, October 21. Faculty will receive their schedules on Thursday, October 22. It will not be possible to schedule conferences at the last minute on Friday, October 23, or Saturday, October 24. The deadline for receiving priority scheduling for conferences during the weekend of October 30—31, is 8:00 a.m., Monday, October 26.

To arrange appointments for parent/teacher conferences: Note the slots for conferences: • Friday afternoon, October 23, between 1:00p.m. and 5:00p.m. • Saturday morning, October 24, between 8:00a.m. and 9:00a.m • Saturday afternoon, October 24, between 2:00p.m. and 6:00p.m. • Friday afternoon, October 30, between 4:00p.m. and 6:00p.m. • Saturday morning, October 31, between 8:00a.m and 12:00a.m Determine the times during those slots that you are available for conferences. If you want to go to performances at 5:00p.m. on Friday or Saturday, watch the soccer or Ultimate Frisbee games on Saturday afternoon, or attend the College Prep Workshop at 4:00p.m. on Saturday, please do not request a conference during those times. See the Parents Weekend Program on the previous page. Make a list of the teachers (including advisor, dorm counselors and guidance counselor) that you would like to see, and prioritize it: 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. Communicate your priorities to us when you request your conference. E-mail Dianna Normanton, parentsweekend@highmowing.org with your list of teachers, which day(s) and times you are available for conferences, or call our receptionist, Lori Way (603-654-2391). Dianna will reply to all emails within 24 hours to indicate receipt of your request. If you do not get a reply, please email her again. Be specific as to which weekend you are requesting (and please, do not call Dianna). Dianna will collate all of the information from you (and the teachers) and will schedule all parent teacher conferences (a rather monumental task as you can see!). You will be emailed and/or called with your schedule a few days before your appointment. (If you don’t receive an email by Thursday afternoon, October 22, let Dianna know by email.) Please know that every effort will be made to meet as many requests as possible, but compromises will inevitably have to happen!

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

15


More Notes

from the Development Office The Annual Campaign benefits each and every High Mowing student, providing everything from tuition assistance to up-to-date operating software in the digital arts lab. The Annual Campaign is the most

Annual Campaign at High Mowing Our Annual Campaign kicks off during Parents Weekend, when parents are invited to meet the challenge put forth by the Parent Committee: to exceed their giving, which totals $16,000. Be sure to come to the Big Room on Saturday at

your gift makes a difference! Opportunities 10:00 a.m. to find out more about why

to make gifts and pledges will be available throughout the

important giving opportunity

weekend in the lobby of the Main Building. Pledge cards

provided by the School each

will be in your weekend packet.

year, bridging the gap between tuition and the actual cost of a

Questions? Call Heather Cochrane at 603-654-2391 ext. 105.

High Mowing education.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

16


More Notes

November October

Upcoming Events

Sunday

Monday

Event Details for more calendar items:

www.

highmowing.org

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

The High Mowing Music Fund Scholarship: Applications DUE! This fund was established in memory of David Anderson ’96. David was a lover of music, a gifted cellist, and a remarkable member of our community. We are pleased to announce the availability of funds to assist young musicians in financing music lessons, summer music camp fees and music festival application fees. To apply for a scholarship, please complete the linked form and return it to Heather Carver in the Development Office. Scholarship awards will be announced on October 30, 2009. Forms are due by October 16, 2009.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| October 15, 2009

|

17


High Mowing

More Notes

Is OPEN on these Holidays Veterans Day November 11, 2009 Martin Luther King Day January 18, 2010 Presidents’ Day February 15, 2010 Memorial Day May 31, 2010

Event Details continued

The Performing and Visual Arts (PVA) College Fair: Boston, November 2

The Performing and Visual Arts (PVA) College Fairs sponsored by the National Association of College Admission Counselors (NACAC) are designed for students interested in pursuing undergraduate and graduate study in the areas of music, dance, theater, visual arts, graphic design and other related disciplines. Held each fall, attendees learn about educational opportunities, admission and financial aid, portfolio days, audition and entrance requirements and more by meeting with representatives from colleges, universities, conservatories, festivals and other educational institutions with specialized programs in the visual and performing arts. The Boston event is scheduled for Monday, November 2, 7:00 – 9:00p.m. at the Boston Center for the Arts, Cyclorama. For more information or to see a list of participating colleges go to http://www.nacacnet.org/ EventsTraining/CollegeFairs/pva/Pages/09PBos.aspx

Basketball Season is coming: Tentative Schedule Below (NOT FINAL) Girls Bus Boys Bus Fri 12/4 Tourney @ VT Academy (Pending) Sat 12/5 Tourney @ VT Academy Wed 12/9 Brewster @ Brewster 2:30 11:30 Holderness @ Holderness 2:30 12:00 Mon 12/14 Proctor @ Proctor 4:30 2:30 Wed 12/16 Dublin @ 2:30 1:30 Winter Break: Fri — Sun, 12/18 — 1/10 Wed 1/13 Holderness @ Holderness 5:00 3:00 Dublin @ 3:30 2:30 Sat 1/16 Dublin @ 2:30 Tilton @ Tilton 1:00 11:00 Fri 1/22 New Hampton @ NHS 1:30 11:45 Proctor Academy @ Proctor 4:30 2:30 Sat 1/23 Cardigan Mountain @2:00 11:30 Tues 1/26 Dublin Christian @ 5:00 3:30 Dublin Christian @ 6:30 5:00 Sat 1/30 Dublin @ 2:30 Dublin @1:00 12:00 Wed 2/3 Kimball Union Academy @ KUA 2:30 12:00 Phillips Exeter @ PE 4:00 2:00 Fri 2/5 Proctor Academy @ Proctor 4:00 2:00 New Hampton @ NHS 5:30 3:30 Wed 2/10 Phillips Exeter @ PE 3:30 1:30 Vermont Academy @ VA 2:00 12:00 Kimberton Tournament in PA: Fri — Sun, 2/12 —2/14 Wed 2/17 New Hampton @ NHS 2:30 12:30 Holderness @ Holderness 5:00 3:00 Fri 2/19 Cardigan Mountain @ CMS 5:00 2:30 Sat 2/20 Proctor Academy @ Proctor 3:00 1:00 Kimball Union Academy @ KUA 1:30 11:00 Wed 2/24 Holderness @ Holderness 2:00 12:00 Vermont Academy @ VA 4:00 2:00 Sat 2/27 Boys JV Tournament @ New Hampton

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

|

October 15, 2009

|

18


More Notes Seana CULLINAN `85, alumna and new Trustee, recently spent a few days on campus making our grounds more

More Notes is published every other week throughout the school year by High Mowing School. If you would like to have an item considered for publication, please submit it via email to: ntichanuk@highmowing.org

beautiful

with new plantings. Mike Wisniewski Emilie Dark and Jeff Parker also contributed their time and effort.

Submission deadlines: Oct 26 Nov 9 Nov 23 Dec 7 Dec 21 Jan 4 Jan 18 Feb 1 Feb 15 Mar 15 Mar 29 Apr 12 Apr 26 May 10 May 24

Community Bulletin Board High Mowing School 222 Isaac Frye Highway Wilton, NH 03086 603.654.2391

www.highmowing.org

Editor and Designer: Nancy Tichanuk Development Director: Heather Cochrane

Delicious, Organic, Grass Fed Beef Know where your food comes from! Local farmer Steve Normanton, High Mowing School parent, raises various breeds of cattle; Scottish Highlander, Hereford, Angus and Galloway, on certified organic pasture in Litchfield, NH. This is pure grass fed beef, meaning the cattle are never finished on grain as other “grass fed” cattle often are. Hormones, and antibiotics are also never used. All cuts of beef are available: hamburger, stew beef, roasts, steaks, organ meats, and bones. You can order individually by the cut, or purchase ¼, ½ and whole sides. To receive a price list and other information contact Steve at 320-1169, or send an email to him at steve@normanton.com. Local delivery and pick up is available. Need a helping hand? I am Melanie Grubman, the new dorm counselor at High Mowing. I am presently working towards a masters in Integrated Education as well as a Waldorf Teaching Certificate, while working with the students in residential life. I have more than 12 years of experience working with youth of all ages. I am seeking additional employment, working with the next generation.  I love taking kids outside, working with them on projects and providing parents with their well-deserved date nights and time alone.  I am available most evenings and days, excluding Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights. I start at $15 an hour for two children. You can email me at: bikingmelanie@ gmail.com I look forward to getting to know this community better!

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

|

October 15, 2009

|

19

http://www.highmowing.org/uploaded/website_documents/More_Notes/More_Notes_101509  

http://www.highmowing.org/uploaded/website_documents/More_Notes/More_Notes_101509.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you