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More Notes Stewards of the School

February 4, 2010 Issue No. 8

Questions and Answers: Steven Lewers Who helps High Mowing stay on track financially? And what hopes and dreams do they have for the years ahead? More Notes asked these questions of Steve Lewers, President of our Board of Trustees:

Q: How do you see the school evolving in the future? A: Where do I begin? Gazing into the future, I see a school

with 150 students coming from all manner of places and backgrounds. More than half of them are boarders, but many are day students — like our son was — whose families have moved to the area for the unique life they find on “the hill.” High Mowing will become a standard bearer for Waldorf high school teachers and administrators, with its improved and expanded faculty housing, biodynamic kitchen and amazing academic, art, music, and extra-curricular programs. Our new gymnasium and performance space will result in the expansion of our extracurricular activities, not to mention our athletic program. It will be the “center of gravity” for life after school, not Steve Lewers only for Pine Hill and High Mowing families, President, but for other groups as well . . . drawing the Board of Trustees wider community to our campus. Our graduating seniors, well prepared academically and High Mowing School socially, will head off to excellent colleges or well-chosen endeavors. Students arriving on our campus — wondering who they are and what they might become — leave four years later with a sense of purpose and unfolding destiny and a commitment to bring their best efforts to the challenges before them.


More Notes Steve Lewers continued

Q: What is the role of the Board of Trustees at High Mowing? A: The state of New Hampshire requires that every private school elect a board of

trustees, giving them fiduciary responsibility for the operation of the school. Currently, High Mowing’s board is comprised of seventeen members. These include past and present parents, faculty members and alumni/ae. Our primary focus is the long-term sustainability of the school. We work with faculty, administration, parents, and alumni/ae to raise money, build enrollment and do long-range planning. We are a varied group, each of us bringing different skills, professional experience and points-of-view to the task of creating a set of best practices for the school. Simply put, we are the stewards of the school.

Q: What is your specific job as President? A: As President, I oversee the five meetings we hold on campus each year. As

Chair of the Board Development Committee, I also work with a small group of trustees and school staff members to plan these meetings, find skilled volunteers for the board’s committees and delegate tasks in each of these committees. We orient, educate and communicate with fellow trustees — many of whom do not live in this area.

Q: That’s a lot of work. What motivates you to donate so much

What I receive in return is intangible, but important nevertheless — the friendship, the strong sense of community and the knowledge that I am giving back to a place that gave my family so very much.

time to High Mowing?

A: Frankly, it is a lot of work. I do it for a number of reasons.

First, in gratitude for the life-shaping experiences my oldest son Henry LEWERS ‘08 had in his four years here. High Mowing was the perfect place for him and, as far as I can see, for most of the other students who pass through here. Second, I enjoy working with the trustees and members of the faculty and administration. It’s an interesting bunch, to be sure! This kind of collaborative teamwork is very different from the more solitary, entrepreneurial things I do for a living.

Henry is well-launched in his college career, but I still love being part of this community on the hill — attending plays and concerts, dropping in for dinner and interacting with the current students. I give many hours a week to the school .. . but not because it benefits any one child in particular. That would be the wrong reason for me to be here. I need to see the big picture, in order to benefit them all.

More Notes from High Mowing School

— Steve Lewers

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More Notes from the Executive Director

Up and Running Please visit our new website: www.highmowing.org and explore its pages. You’ll immediately be struck by our vibrant new look. A little surfing will introduce you to its enhanced content, as well. And, as mentioned in the last edition of More Notes, there are many expanded features in the new site which we will roll out over time. For now, we invite you to explore the site and let us know what you think. Feedback can be sent directly to Suzan Moffett at

We’re delighted with our new website and hope you are too. Please visit us at:

smoffett@highmowing.org. smoffett@highmowing.org

Of course, you can always reach me via email at

dpowers@highmowing.org

—Doug Powers

www.

highmowing.org

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More Notes from the Guidance Office

moreCongratulations! College Acceptances for Seniors: Brian Schmidt

Williamette University (OR)

Haley Clougherty

Southern Utah University (UT) Unity College (ME) Northern Arizona University (AZ)

Matthew McLean

Massachusetts Maritime Academy (MA)

Abigail Yandell

University of New Hampshire (NH) Plymouth State University (NH) University of Rhode Island (RI)

Ariana Taylor

Mount Ida College (MA)

Michelle Crocetti

Emmanuel College (MA)

Lilianna Susskind

Chester College of New England (NH)

Jazmin Ment

Whittier College (CA)

Helping Haiti

High Mowing students are pitching in to help people in Haiti, which was devastated by an earthquake on January 12. Students are silk screening T-shirts, tank tops and totes with artwork and will sell their wares during Winterfest Weekend. All proceeds will benefit Partners in Health, a non-profit organization that has been working on the ground in Haiti bringing medical care to poor communities for more than 20 years. Be sure to stop by our table in the lobby of the main building during Winterfest Weekend and help us help Haiti!

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More Notes

MY COUNTRY ‘TIS OF THEE

Classroom Updates Original Lyrics: God save our gracious King, Long live our noble King, God save the King: Send him victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us: God save the King. God save great Washington, His worth from every tongue, Demands applause: Ye tuneful powers combine, And each true Whig now join Whose heart did ne’er resign The glorious cause. “America” text: Samuel F. Smith, 1808-1895 My country,’ tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing; Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims’ pride, From every mountainside Let freedom ring!

Celebrating Martin Luther King Day with Music High Mowing celebrated Martin Luther King Day on January 16, with Nick Page, a singer and composer from Boston. During his three-hour workshop with the students, Mr. Page led the students in singing traditional songs that affirm a love of freedom and justice. This wasn’t Mr. Page’s first visit to High Mowing; he returns each year by popular demand. During his workshop, students sang in four-part harmony, created percussive sounds, learned the rudiments of conducting and danced. They also wrote contemporary lyrics to “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,”—a song that dates back several hundred years and has roots in the English song “God Save the King.” SEE SIDEBARS.

Throughout his performance Mr. Page recounted stories about the songs and songwriters. Before learning Duke Ellington’s “Freedom,” the students learned that Ellington’s father was a butler at the White House at a time when black people were not allowed as guests. This changed when Ellington became the guest of a number of American Presidents, beginning with Roosevelt. Songs have been a major force in many social movements. Mr. Page introduced the students to songs from other cultures, as well. They sang in English, Spanish, German, French, Yiddish, Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew and Italian. Nick Page leads workshops and “power sings” in North and South America and Europe. He is the founding director of the Mystic Chorale, a two-hundred member chorus. —Susan Danoff

Student Lyrics: Do I just close my eyes to injustice and lies? Or will I see? Will my thoughts turn to sand? Or will I make a stand? Speak truth in every land. Walk hand in hand. What shall the world become? Safe home for everyone Or filled with hate? We dream of peaceful times World free of boundary lines Look in your heart and find The strength to love

Lay down your swords and speak To fight will make us weak Peace conquers war Listen to those who talk Respect how others walk Don’t build up walls that block. Open the door let us speak words of peace, Let every heart be reached, On wings of doves. Create no enemies, Strive for true harmony, Call out this melody, Peace joy and love.

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I dream of what could be, One world in harmony, A land of peace; Inside the world we find, People of every kind, Aligned by loving minds, Under one sky.

Don’t dwell upon your sorrow, Let’s think about tomorrow. We can all get along There is no right and wrong That’s why we sing this song Our life is not so long We can get along

If you sort through your trash You can makes lots of cash In certain States After you drink your coke Don’t make the seagulls choke Recycle cans and things Let’s save the sea (and whales)

In Haiti hear the cries The tears fall from their eyes From pain we rise Let us be one with them And by our brothers stand Please lend a helping hand Of this we dream

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More Notes Classroom Updates continued

Junior Block Play The juniors are now in their Shakespeare block, a tradition dating back to the earliest days of the school. This year they are studying and performing Measure for Measure, a rarely produced play that has never been presented at High Mowing. Measure for Measure is classified as one of Shakespeare’s “problem plays” — one (like The Merchant of Venice) that combines tragic and difficult themes with comedy, and contains sympathetic main characters with deep flaws who do reprehensible things. The plot is structured around a series of secret identities and substitutions, and its central question is: what happens when we attempt to legislate morality? How does this affect both the leaders who enforce the rules and the people who must submit to them? A related question is whether enforcement of rules should be uniform, or whether (and in what circumstances) enforcement should take into account the circumstances and intentions of the parties. Measure for Measure is set in 16th century Venice, but will be presented in fantasy costume combining elements of 1960’s and Renaissance fashion. The idea behind this is to highlight the timeless nature of the central moral questions presented in the play. We cast our production before the holiday break, and some students were busy learning their lines even before the block began. As with all plays at High Mowing, the students will take the lead in most aspects of the production; they will create the program, do the lighting, manage backstage, find the right music — everything it takes to make it happen!

and this week:

There will be a performance for parents and other community members on February 25 at 7:30 p.m. We hope to see you there! -Wendy Bruneau

Sophomores in the Greek Tragedy Block presented scenes from two parallel plays: The Oresteia

by Aeschylus, and Mourning Becomes Electra by Eugene O’Neill. See the CALENDAR section for information on their final performance at Winterfest on February 5. More Notes from High Mowing School

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More Notes CLASSICAL JAM:

The New York ensemble of classically trained musicians presented a varied and lively performance on January 28. Before the concert, the group conducted a workshop for High Mowing musicians. Here they are shown performing a short set after lunch.

Classroom Updates

Freshman Science Block

continued

Stand still. The trees ahead and the bushes beside you Are not lost. Wherever you are is called Here, And you must treat it as a powerful stranger, Must ask permission to know it and be known. The forest breathes. Listen. It answers, I have made this place around you, If you leave it you may come back again, saying Here. No two trees are the same to Raven. No two branches are the same to Wren. If what a tree or a bush does is lost on you, You are surely lost. Stand still. The forest knows Where you are. You must let it find you.

TRANSFORMATIONS:

Dominique Wright ‘13 collects ethyl alcohol as it exits the condenser.

In 9th grade Organic Chemistry block, we are using David Whyte’s poem as a meditation for our study of the transformations of plant substances. We began with a question: Where does plant material come from, and how can we know? Our search for an answer began with contemplation and discussion, and led to the laboratory where we examined a few phenomena that helped to reveal the inner nature of plants. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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More Notes Classroom Updates continued

Before getting to work in the lab, freshmen became acquainted with laboratory safety and techniques including operating a Bunsen burner and cutting, fire polishing, and bending glass tubing. They learned how to keep a laboratory notebook. Only then were they ready to begin their first investigation, the destructive distillation of wood. Heating wood splints in a test tube transformed the plant material into other substances, including liquids and gases—which were different, but related to, what we started with. We were left with black, hardened charcoal, and a question: Where does the plant get carbon to provide this earthy material?

The forest breathes. Listen… We used the water plant, Elodea, to observe evidence of the assimilation of carbon dioxide in the presence of light. Photosynthesis: the forest breathing, taking in carbon dioxide and water, enlivening these substances into sugar with sunlight, and exhaling oxygen. Where does plant material come from? From water and air and sunlight. During the second half of block, we are investigating transformations of plant sugars. We fermented grape juice, honey and apple cider, discovering that yeast changes sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol. From our fermented juices we distilled a fiery liquid, ethyl alcohol. We travelled to Flag Hill Winery & Distillery (New Hampshire’s only distillery) to learn how fermentation and distillation happen on a larger scale. We will conclude the block by making aromatic, volatile esters— a further transformation of plant sugar that takes place as plants reach for the sky, in the fragrance of buds, flowers and fruit.

If what a tree or a bush does is lost on you, Allison Hill ‘13 fire-polishes glass tubing.

FIERY LIQUIDS:

Fiona Graham ‘13 and Luke Sanchez-Shaw ‘13 monitor their distillation in progress.

You are surely lost.

We are discovering our intimate connection to photosynthesis, and the transformations of plant sugars into food, wood and the many other materials that trace their origin to carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. —Kim McCormick


More Notes Classroom Updates continued

High Mowing Chorus Under the direction of Marybeth Hallinan, the High Mowing Chorus had their first full concert on January 30. Featuring ten singers, the program included two beautiful poems which celebrate midwinter. The first, written by Thomas Hardy — with musical setting by Benjamin Britten — was entitled “The Oxen.” The second, a beautiful hymn to text written by Christina Rosetti, was entitled “In the Bleak Midwinter.” The program was rounded out by contemporary songs which expressed our longing for spring: “Under the Boardwalk” by Kenny Young and Arthur Resnick and the Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun.” The Chorus also sang a hearty rendition of “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn me Round,” an AfricanAmerican Civil Rights song. Featured singers In Woo Son ‘12, Phoebe Bourdon ‘11, Carly Abrahams-Dematte ‘11 and Amber Johnston ‘11 performed solos and duets to the delight of the audience. PJ Friel ‘10 accompanied the chorus on drums, showcasing his versatility and musicianship. —Marybeth Hallinan

WINTER INTO SPRING:

Members of the High Mowing Chorus celebrated midwinter with poetry and song, portraying our inevitable longing for spring.

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More Notes from the Development Office Gifts to the annual campaign benefit every High Mowing School student, providing resources for everything from tuition assistance to teacher salaries. The annual campaign provides vital financial support to High Mowing every year, helping to make up the difference between income from tuition and actual operating expenses.

Tis always the season for giving!

Though 2009 has ended, our annual campaign keeps going! Thank you to everyone who has already given.

To date, 229 donors have given $227,000. Our goal is $260,000 —help us get there!

Every gift counts!

We invite you to join us in giving today.

Molly Geaney & Michael Moore Sabine & Fritz Schuster Yoko & Seiji Takahashi Barbara & Peter Talbot

For more information, call Heather Cochrane at 603 654-2391 ext. 105.

Noticed something new in the Big Room?

–PARENT COMMITTEE OF THE ANNUAL CAMPAIGN

Recently, tiles were installed in the Big Room, next to the single door entrance. The Class of ’63 donated the funds to bring the tiles out of storage, restore them, and install them in their new configuration. Created by Mrs. Emmet’s daughter, “Boo,” these tiles were originally installed in 1943 on either side of the fireplace in the old Big Room. Because many tiles were broken over the years and during the renovation, they could not be installed where there were previously. We are grateful to these generous alumni/ae who have made it possible to continue to enjoy the tiles for years to come.

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More Notes Student News

Done something noteworthy?

tell us! ntichanuk@ highmowing.org

ALL SMILES: The Piccolini Trio, left to right:

The Piccolini Trio debuts at High Mowing The assembly room at High Mowing School in Wilton was transformed into a circus venue on January 16, when The Piccolini Trio presented the premier of “The Circus in a Trunk” to a full house of all ages. The clown trio includes director Joshua Shack of Nashua, Joy Powers of Lexington, MA, and Shea Vaccaro ’12 of Wilton. The three charmed the audience with their physical comedy and zany skits. They were also joined by contortionist/juggler Book Kennison of New York City. Shea, Joy and Joshua have all toured with Circus Smirkus—and Joy and Joshua recently finished a stint with the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus. The three managed to showcase the circus arts while poking fun at them at the same time. At one point, Joshua appeared with two long meat forks and asked the audience, “Does anyone have a potato?” Oddly enough, someone does, and he proceeds to juggle the two forks and the potato. Later, they brought out a seesaw and a table, preparing for the all-too-familiar act where one performer jumps on the high end of the seesaw, sending the performer on the lower end flying through the air to land on someone’s shoulders. But it doesn’t quite happen that way, which make the antics all the more fun. Somehow, in the end, the girl does manage to end up on someone’s shoulders, and once again order is restored to the Piccolini Trio. —Susan Danoff

Shea Vaccaro ’12, Joy Powers, and Joshua Shack

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More Notes from the Registrar

Important Notice to Male Students turning Eighteen Under federal law, men must register with Selective Service within 30 days of their 18th birthday. However, the Selective Service System now accepts early submission of registration information by 17 year-old men. Go to http://www.sss.gov/ for more information or to register for Selective Service. According to their website: “Almost all male U.S. citizens, and male aliens living in the U.S., who are 18 through 25, are required to register with Selective Service. It’s important to know that even though he is registered, a man will not automatically be inducted into the military.” Those who fail to register can be denied student loans, government jobs and a driver’s license in most states.

from the Parent Association

Meeting Notes and News The Parent Association met on January 19 in the Emmet House. Doug Powers gave a school report, which included information on the new FACTS billing system. Heather Cochrane gave a development report, which stated that fundraising is going very well; young alumni/ae are getting involved to make events more attractive to all ages. They are also developing an Alumni/ae Facebook page. Heather also expressed thanks for the parent Holiday Party held in the Emmet House, while students had their Snow Goose party. She thinks it should be an annual event — continuing the tradition of potluck dinner, storytelling and music. The three fundraising activities initiated by attendees are: Premium Ticket sales (for valet parking/dessert/best seats) at the Spring Play in May, the May Day festival itself and a Barn Dance in September. The parents discussed these fundraisers and have made commitments to help with all of them. The Barn Dance family event is tabled until the fall, but the Barn Dance committee will meet to set a September date. Sign ups for these events will be held at the February 6 (Winterfest) meeting at 9:00-10:00 a.m. Please come early for coffee and conversation! If you can’t make it to the meeting in February, please contact Amy Conley with your area of interest: 603 249-9560. We need you!

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More Notes from the Athletic Director

The Courtside View January 20 — Girls vs. Nashua Christian The girls won a hard fought game against Nashua Christian Academy 27 - 23. The victory improved their record to 4 - 0 on the season. The team had a very balanced offensive attack as seven players scored. They were led by Zoë, 7 points, Madeline, Amanda, Fana and Do Young with 4 points apiece, and Jazmin and Mackenzie with 2 points each. The girls ran our fast break to perfection with some beautiful passes that lead to easy hoops. The game was close all the way until Do Young made two critical jumpers down the stretch to extend the lead to 5 points and Zoë iced the game with two free throws— with 10 seconds to play. The girls continue to play good solid defense. Leading the way defensively were Zoë with 10+ rebounds and 7 steals, Madeline with 8 rebounds and several blocks, Amanda with 4 steals and 5+ rebounds. The guards, Jazmin, Fana, Mackenzie, Do Young and Lil, did a good job of pressing their guards and forcing turnovers. January 22 — Girls vs. New Hampton

Girls Basketball Team An, Do Young ‘11 Crocetti, Michelle ‘10 Falk, Zoë ‘10 Graham, Fiona ‘13 Marcial, Stella ‘13

The girls basketball team suffered their first loss of the season, 38 - 15 to New Hampton, revising their record to 4 - 1. They came out strong and were leading 8 - 6 when New Hampton went on a 14 - 0 run and never looked back. Once again, our team was led by Zoë (6 points, 10+ rebounds and several steals). Also chipping in were Michelle with 4 points and several rebounds, Do Young and Ona with 2 points each and Mackenzie with a point. Despite the score, the girls competed very hard on the court, showing a lot of hustle and fight right down to the final buzzer. This type of game builds character and will only help us going forward.

Ment, Jazmin ‘10 Mullen, Amanda ‘10 Oliver, Ona ‘13 Renaud, Mackenzie ‘12 Susskind, Lilliana ‘10 Takahashi, Fana ‘10 Tasoulis, Piper ‘10 Tucker, Madeline ‘10 van Dam, Jessica ‘10

January 30 — Girls vs. Dublin The girls basketball team improved to 5 - 1 on the season with a hard fought 30 - 11 victory over Dublin. This was a very physical game right from the start, and the girls struggled early on with their passing and shooting. At the five minute mark, they found the range as Madeline and Amanda combined for six points en route to a 13 - 4 halftime lead. To beat the man-to-man defense and open up the floor for our guards, the adjustment was made at halftime to set more picks and quicker passes. The girls did a great job of outscoring Dublin 17 - 7 in the second half. Outstanding jobs by Jazmin, Fana and Mackenzie to break down Dublin’s full court press to find Zoë, Madeline,

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More Notes Athletics continued

Boys Basketball Team Badger, Dillon ‘10 Cogswell, Josh ‘12 Conley, Seamus ‘10 Dan McGuire ‘10 Meissner, Gus ‘10 Schmidt, Brian ‘10

and Amanda down low for good shots. Jazmin, Fana, Mackenzie and Do Young did a great job of forcing their point guards to the sideline and not allowing them any room to make plays. Madeline, Zoë, Amanda, Piper and Michelle forced Dublin into very tough shots and did a great job of rebounding. High Mowing was lead by Zoë (11 points, 8 rebounds, and 5+ steals), Madeline (8 points and 6 rebounds) and Amanda (4 points, 12+ rebounds and several steals). Also chipping in were Jazmin ( 2 points, 2 assists and 4+ steals), Mackenzie (2 points, 2 assists and 5+ steals), Michelle (2 points and 5+ rebounds), and Stella (2 points) and Fana (1 point, 4 + steals and 4 offensive rebounds). —Coach Solito January 23 — Boys vs. Cardigan Mountain School The High Mowing Boy’s Team won a nail biter against scrappy Cardigan Mountain. Early three-pointers by Jonah and Tolin gave the boys a first half lead. But a second half let-down saw Cardigan Mountain pull ahead by two points with 12 seconds left. High Mowing broke their full court press and Max was fouled while scoring. He converted the “and one” free throw to give High Mowing a thrilling 62-61 victory. Max led the scorers with 22 points. Always reliable, Brian added 16 points, followed by Tolin’s 9 and Jonah’s 8.

Son, In Woo ‘12 Tolchin, Jonah ‘11

January 27 — Boys vs. Northfield Mount Herman

Wass, Taggert ‘10

The boy’s were soundly defeated 67-51 by a strong Northfield Mount Hermon team. High Mowing was still competitive at half time, trailing by only five points —despite a turnover-plagued first half. But the Northfield Mount Hermon squad went on a 15-2 run to start the second half and the outcome was never in doubt afterward. Dillon dropped in 22 points and Max added 19 more as High Mowing dropped to a 4-2 record on the season.

Wilson, Max ‘11 Wilson, Nick ‘13

January 30 — Boys vs. Dublin High Mowing faced Dublin for the second time this season and came away with a lopsided 50-28 victory to improve to 5-2 overall. The boys jumped out to an early lead and never looked back as Dublin struggled to deal with a smothering “box and one” defense—which stymied their usually highscoring point guard. Seamus scored for the first time this season and the entire team saw playing time, in front of a very supportive “home” crowd. Max had 25 points and Dillon added 10. The boys then joined the fans in the stands to cheer on the High Mowing Girls in the second half of this annual double header.—Coach Wilson

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More Notes Athletics continued

Kimberton Update

WALDORF VARSITY TOURNAMENT — 2010: FRIDAY FEBRUARY 12

Both basketball teams will head to Kimberton, PA on February 12, to

TIME

HOME

AWAY

BOYS/GIRLS

participate in the annual Waldorf

11:00-12:25

Toronto

Steiner

Boys

Basketball Tournament. We will

12:25-1:50

Kimberton

Washington

Girls

leave early Friday morning and

1:50-3:15

Toronto

Steiner

Girls

return late Sunday evening, with

3:15-4:40

Garden City

Washington

Boys

lots of basketball in between.

4:40-6:05

Garden City

Hawthorne V.

Girls

6:05-7:30

Hawthorne V.

High Mowing

Boys

7:30-8:55

Green Meadow

High Mowing

Girls

8:55- 10:20

Kimberton

Green Meadow

Boys

SEE SCHEDULE

Students will travel by charter bus and stay at the Hampton Inn (Exton, PA, 610 363-5555). On Saturday night they will attend a dance. The weekend will culminate on Sunday with the All Star game and 3 point shooting contest.

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 13 9:00-10:25

Hawthorne V.

Steiner

Girls

10:25-11:50

Hawthorne V.

Steiner

Boys

11:50-1:15

Garden City

Toronto

Girls

1:15-2:40

High Mowing

Green Meadow

Boys

2:40-4:05

Garden City

Toronto

Boys

4:05-5:30

Washington

Green Meadow

Girls

5:30-6:55

Kimberton

High Mowing

Girls

6:55- 8:20

Kimberton

Washington

Boys

8:20- 11:00

Dance

Lower School Gym

9th grade and up

Volleyball

High School Gym

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 14 8:45-9:45

All Star Game

Girls

9:45-10:30

3 point contest

Girls and Boys

10:35- 11:35

All Star Game

Boys

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More Notes Naturalist News

The Art and Science of Tracking The students at all levels of the program have been out taking advantage of the wintery conditions to develop their observational skills in tracking. Beginning students are introduced to the ABC’s of tracking by getting familiar with track and trail identification. Upper level students search for greater details in the interpretive realm; not only “who” the track belongs to, but “what” the animal is doing and “why?” Some of these pictures show the advanced level students monitoring bobcat activity on Pack Monadnock (see below for last edition of More Notes’ Tracking Mystery #2). It was a very cold day, but the seniors climbed to the top of Pack and discovered what they could about bobcat behavior, as well as how great it is to be alive!—Keith Badger

TRACKING MYSTERY #3: These tracks were found near Pratt Pond last week. The dusting of snow over ice provided an ideal substrate for capturing the print. CALL OF THE WILD: Above and to the upper left, students in the advanced naturalist program withstand (enjoy?) the elements in search of bobcat tracks. To the right, beginning students track coyote.

THE ANSWER TO TRACKING MYSTERY #2: Bobcat.

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More Notes Upcoming Events Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

February

Sunday

for more calendar items:

www.

Event Details

highmowing.org Sophomore Block Play By the time you read this, students in the Sophomore Greek Tragedy Block will have presented scenes from two parallel plays, directed by Dale Coye. However, on Friday, Feb. 5 at 7:30p.m. scenes from one of the plays — The Oresteia, by Aeschylus — will be presented at Winterfest.

Please join us in the Big Room!

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HIGH MOWING IS OPEN Presidents’ Day February 15, 2010

More Notes Event Details

Memorial Day May 31, 2010

Winterfest F E B R U A R Y

at High Mowing

5 — 7 ,

2 0 1 0

FRIDAY 4:00p.m. Girl’s Basketball game at Proctor Academy 5:00p.m. Reception with faculty and staff, in the Alumni/ae House 5:30p.m. Boy’s Basketball game at New Hampton 6:00p.m. Dinner ($12.00). 7:30p.m. Sophomore Play, “The Oresteia” by Aeschylus, in the Big Room 9:00p.m. Bonfire with drumming. Bring your own drum or percussion instrument. SATURDAY 9:00a.m. Coffee reception, in the Dining Room 9:00a.m. Parent Association Meeting for all Parents, in the Dining Room 10:00a.m.-12:00 Choice of workshops, choose up to 2. Email your workshop preference to parentsweekend@highmowing.org

WINTERFEST NOTES: Student attendance is NOT MANDATORY at Winterfest unless requested.

10:00-10:45a.m.

1 Cedar Oliver will present the senior Optics block and lead a discussion with parents. Student work will be on display, in the Science lab. or: 2 Rachel Johnson will describe the Studio Arts curriculum, in the Studio Arts room, basement of Boys Dorm. 11:00a.m.-12:00

DeCaf Coffee House Winterfest Coffee House is one of the highlights of the year! Parents are encouraged to perform (solo or in groups) at the Coffee House on February 6, 7:30p.m., in the Big room. Sing, dance, play an instrument, tell a joke, read a poem, present a skit… To reserve your spot on the program, please email a description of your act (limit 2 songs or about 5 total minutes) to the Coffee House Emcees in care of Brian Schmidt, daschmidty22@yahoo.com

1 Keith Badger and naturalist students will demonstrate fire-making, shelter building and tracking. Meet on the High Mowing oval. or: 2 Cary Hughes and Model UN students will present a debate with student “ambassadors” presenting the views of different countries on the topic, “Combating Cyber Terrorism,” in the Science Building auditorium. 12:00p.m. Lunch ($12.00) 1:00p.m. Fireside chat with parents and faculty. Robert Sim will lead a discussion on “Sculpting Time”— the role of rhythm, sleep and media, in the Big Room. 2:00p.m. Dorm Meetings for Boarding Parents, in the Girls Dorm living room. 4:00p.m. Boy’s Basketball game at Proctor Academy 6:00p.m. Dinner ($12.00) 7:30p.m. DeCaf Coffee House, in the Big Room—parents encouraged to participate. SUNDAY 11:00a.m. Brunch in the Dining Room ($12.00)

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More Notes

MORE NOTES is published throughout the school year by High Mowing School. If you would like to have an item considered for publication, please submit it to: ntichanuk@highmowing.org

Event Details

Did you know that the most famous composer of the early 1700’s was not Bach? Do you think Baroque music is boring? Regardless of how you answered these questions, you won’t want to miss The Sinfonietta concert February 21 at 4:00 p.m. in the Big Room at High Mowing. Experience the spiritual, melodic and entertaining side of the Baroque musical style in this illuminating concert. The program includes a violin concerto of Handel, Gwyneth Welch soloist, a flute suite of Telemann, Elise MacDonald soloist, two of Bach’s most famous arias, Anni Nelson soloist, and a movement of Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G major (featuring parts for three violins, three violas and three cellos) with musicians from High Mowing School, Monadnock Waldorf School, ConVal, the Keene Chamber Orchestra and the Nashua Chamber Orchestra. Refreshments will be served following the concert. As always, the concert is free but donations are gratefully accepted. — Mark Ferguson

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Valentine’s Dance:

Submission deadlines: February 15 March 22 April 5 April 19 May 24 June 7

Feb 11 7:30 — 10:00 p.m. PICK UP FOR SOPHOMORES AT 11:00p.m. — AFTER CLEAN UP BY THEIR CLASS.

High Mowing School 222 Isaac Frye Highway Wilton, NH 03086 603 654-2391

Sinfonietta Performance on February 21

Community Bulletin Board

www.highmowing.org

Editor and Designer: Nancy Tichanuk Development Director: Heather Cochrane

More Notes from High Mowing School

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http://www.highmowing.org/uploaded/website_documents/More_Notes/10-02-04MoreNotes  

http://www.highmowing.org/uploaded/website_documents/More_Notes/10-02-04MoreNotes.pdf

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