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2018

ANNUAL IMPACT REPORT


CONTENTS

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Our Culture + Leadership Our Financial Status Our Impact Our Services Our Year in Review Our Supporters Our Locations


OUR MISSION Highlands Community Services is committed to “improving lives and discovering possibilities” by providing the highest quality continuum of behavioral health, creating a center of excellence for all individuals seeking mental health, substance use, or developmental services.

OUR VISION Highlands Community Services is dedicated to discovering, implementing, and sustaining valuable services that improve lives. We will continue to operate with efficiency, financial viability, and innovation.

OUR VALUES Highlands Community Services’ core values are integrity, respect, teamwork, empowerment, and transparency. These values guide all that we do.

improving lives, discovering possibilities.


FROM THE DESK OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR During the past year, we had our share of successes, challenges, joys, sorrows, and change. As we enter the new year, we find ourselves at a unique spot in our organization’s development. It is not due to the continued financial growth during Fiscal Year 2018, or that we enjoy the fruits of a high quality clinical program. Nor is it due to having a successful first year under our belt at the Children’s Campus. I believe what is most significant is that we, as a professional healthcare entity, are well on our way to genuinely embracing a unique and special practice as part of our professional experience that so many organizations strive for, but very few achieve. Despite numerous external stressors being thrown upon our organization, we are genuinely developing a progressive corporate culture rooted in character and integrity. At the core of our mission is an appreciation of servant leadership and synergy. The continued commitment demonstrated by staff this past year to embrace and advance the philosophical tenets of a trauma-informed environment is taking hold and will do us proud over the years to come. HCS continued to grow over the past year, not only with regards to programs, but as a collective whole committed to further enhancing our organization’s reputation that remains second to none within the VA CSB system. Our staff remains dedicated to promoting the well-being of each other, as well as those we serve in the community. I cannot find a more compelling example of our commitment to the well-being of the community (more specifically, the children) than our continued support of the Children’s Advocacy Center, Children’s Case Management at our Oakview Office, or the services provided at the Children’s Campus. I am very proud that we can continue to preserve the integrity of all our clinical services despite significant financial challenges in various programs. All are extremely vital community programs that our community should be very proud of. As we move into the next year, it is my hope that all staff continue to feel valued and view themselves as an integral part to the overall success of our program. Every position plays a key role in our ability to move forward and grow. We remain committed to being the employer of choice in our area for those seeking a career in the behavioral health arena.

Jeff Fox HCS | Executive Director


OUR CULTURE + LEADERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIR William “Bill” Hartley VICE CHAIR Nancy Brown SECRETARY/TREASURER Angie Cullop WASHINGTON COUNTY Judy Carrier Angie Cullop Randy Pennington Lisa Seaborn Phillip Sprinkle CITY OF BRISTOL

WHO WE ARE Highlands Community Services was founded as a Virginia Community Services Board (CSB) in 1972. We provide behavioral health care to all individuals seeking mental health, substance use, and developmental services in Washington County and Bristol, Virginia. Since then, HCS has become a leader in the region, providing cutting edge intervention and treatment programs in 8 locations between Bristol and Abingdon, through a comprehensive system of care for children, adolescents, and adults.

OUR LEADERS We are made up of a team of over 420 employees that work in 14 departments ranging from clinical to administrative services. HCS is led by a Senior Leadership Team of 16 members of Executive and Departmental leadership. Together they help guide the direction of the organization, and provide leadership for each area’s Department Directors, Program Directors, Department Managers, Program Managers, and Individual Staff.

Nancy Brown William “Bill” Hartley Emily Lee LaRue “Carter” Miles David Trotter

THE HCS TEAM 335 Average Active Full-Time Employees Working Each Month 46

Average Active Part-Time Employees Working Each Month

AVERAGE TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES WORKING EACH MONTH = 381

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FY18 | JULY 2017 - JUNE 2018

ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,693,852.46 Accounts Receivable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,172,516.59 Fixed Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,770,702.13 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23,637,071.18

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,046,872.66 Notes Payable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,063,438.09 Accrued PTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,022,912.12 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,133,222.12

NET POSITION Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,503,848.31

The year ending June 30, 2018 was an extremely productive, yet challenging year financially. The organization’s revenue growth was strong at just over 5.8%, reaching total income of $25.6 million by fiscal year-end. Personnel expenditures (staff wages and fringe benefits) remained the largest portion of HCS operational expenses at $19.4 million, while all other operating expenses totaled $5.7 million. The resulting surplus of $427,634 ($441,983 of which was restricted funds) amounted to 1.7% of the budget. Despite significant financial challenges created by continual changes in the behavioral healthcare environment, net position increased by 3% during FY18. Thanks to the dedication and commitment of HCS staff and management, as well as the support of the Board of Directors, HCS continues to grow and adapt to better serve our community.

KATHY SIMPSON Chief Financial Officer


REVENUE

2.65% 15.03%

8.25%

State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . 3,849,572.25

2.91%

Local Funds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 743,384.21 Fees for Services . . . . . 18,215,036.56 Federal Funds. . . . . . . . . . . 2,112,527.18

State Funds

Other Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678,132.65

Local Funds

Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,598,652.85

Fees for Services Federal Funds

71.16%

Other Funds

EXPENDITURES Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . .. 19,411,830.99

9.73% 1.4%

2% 7.90%

1.50% 0.36%

Staff Development . . . . . .. 351,418.54 Facilities/Vehicles . . . . . ..2,450,384.21

Personnel

Equipment/Supplies. . . . . 495,805.20

Staff Development

Consult/Contracts. . . . . . 1,993,937.16

Facilities/Vehicles

Program Operations. . . . . . 376,907.97

Equipment/Supplies

Other Expenses. . . . . . . . . . 90,733.84 Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,171,018.68

77.11%

Consult/Contracts Program Operations Other Expenses

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SUCCESS IS NOT FINAL, FAILURE IS NOT FATAL. IT IS THE COURAGE TO CONTINUE THAT COUNTS.” WINSTON CHURCHILL


OUR IMPACT

FY18 | JULY 2017 - JUNE 2018

$25,171,018.68 TOTAL VALUE OF SERVICES during FY18 at HCS.

42

NEW EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

provided at HCS in FY18.

$19,411,830.99 STAFF SALARIES AND BENEFITS earned by total workforce.

49.6% of employees have

WORKED AT HCS FOR 5+ YEARS. And 25.7% of those have worked at

HCS for 10+ years.

4565

UNDUPLICATED TOTAL CONSUMERS

served agency wide.

97.9% average service satisfaction HCS CONSUMERS GAVE ALL A’S on the annual FY18 Satisfaction Survey.


ADULT RECOVERY SERVICES HCS Adult Recovery Services provide a comprehensive community support system for people in mental health and substance use recovery. These individuals require guidance, training, considerable support in preventing hospitalizations, help accessing needed resources and in maintaining a natural support system through meaningful relationships.

The Holiday Lunch is a Stepping Stones’ tradition. Each year the team serves lunch, gives gifts, and leads holiday activities. This year the choir sang Christmas carols too!

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ADULT RECOVERY SERVICES ■ Mental Health Case Management ■ Mental Health Skill Building ■ Peer Support Services (WRAP) ■ Psychosocial Rehabilitation at Stepping Stones ■ Restoration to Competency Services ■ Substance Use Disorder Case Management

ADULT RECOVERY SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF ONE THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND NINETY-FIVE ADULTS THIS YEAR .


CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES HCS Children and Family Services serve families, children, and adolescents in multiple settings including local schools, homes, in the community, and at HCS clinical office locations. Services are comprised of several different departments and are specifically designed to meet the needs of at risk children and their families.

CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES ■ Behavior Intervention ■ Case Management ■ DREAMS After-School

Program ■ EMBRACE Sponsor Homes ■ Intensive Case Management ■ Intensive In-Home

■ Prevention & Education ■ Student Assistance

Program ■ The Interchange

School & Summer Programs ■ Therapeutic Day

Treatment ■ Transition Coordination

CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF ONE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-THREE CHILDREN AND FAMILIES THIS YEAR .

My favorite thing about working at HCS is feeling that I make a small difference in the lives of students . When students thank me for supporting and listening to them, I feel encouraged .“

LAURA LINKE

Student Assistance Counselor John S . Battle High School & Wallace Middle School 8 Years of Service

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THE CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER The Children’s Advocacy Center of Highlands Community Services leverages the efforts of law enforcement, prosecutors, medical and mental health providers, social workers, and others to provide a seamless, comprehensive system of support for child victims of sexual and physical abuse, and neglect.

CAC SERVICES ■ Forensic Interviews ■ Community Education ■ Court Preparation ■ Multidisciplinary Team

Coordination ■ Specialized Treatment & Counseling ■ Trauma Assessments ■ Victim & Family Advocacy

TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE NEW CASES WERE OPENED AT THE CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER THIS YEAR . 162 FORENSIC INTERVIEWS WERE COMPLETED . 143 KIDS RECEIVED COUNSELING . 155 CAREGIVERS RECEIVED FAMILY ADVOCACY AND SUPPORT SERVICES . 140 CHILD VICTIMS AND 114 CARETAKERS WERE PROVIDED WITH VICTIM SUPPORT & NAVIGATION SERVICES .

Nomad, the CAC facility dog, is an integral member of the CAC Team. He supports everyone that comes through the doors – even our Multidisciplinary Team members during their meetings.

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Each April, the CAC Team, along with the Multidisciplinary Team Partners, “plant” a pinwheel garden to raise awareness for the prevention of child abuse. According to the National Children’s Alliance, Nearly 700,000 children are abused in the U.S. annually.


CRISIS SERVICES HCS Crisis Services are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They provide attentive, emergent care to consumers and families who need immediate assistance. Crisis Services staff can be found providing crisis stabilization services to children at The Safety Zone, providing crisis stabilization services to adults at Crisis Resolution Center, as well as providing emergency services evaluations at HCS locations and the emergency department at our local hospital.

CRISIS SERVICES ■ Crisis Consultation & Triage ■ Crisis Stabilization for Adults ■ Crisis Stabilization for Children ■ Emergency Services & Pre-admission Screenings

CRISIS SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF ONE THOUSAND AND SEVENTY-EIGHT ADULTS AND CHILDREN THIS YEAR .

Our Crisis Services Team works closely with local law enforcement officers on a daily basis. During National Police Week, they honored their colleagues by “going blue” in support.

12 | Highlands Community Services


DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES HCS Developmental Services provide a detailed Person-Centered Plan to individuals with significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior, originating before the age of 18. Our organization believes that within every disability is ability, and that a good life is possible for all individuals served.

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES ■ Horizons Day Support ■ Sponsor Home Residential Program ■ Support Coordinator Services ■ Infant & Toddler Connection

of the Highlands

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF FOUR HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THREE ADULTS AND CHILDREN THIS YEAR .

I’ve enjoyed being a part of a company that promotes growth not just in staff, but in the individuals we serve . I’ve watched HCS expand in economic development and provide an enormous amount of support and options for the people in our community to overcome obstacles .”

DEBRA ROWE

Direct Support Services Program Manager 20 Years of Service

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OUTPATIENT SERVICES OUTPATIENT SERVICES ■ Comprehensive

Diagnostic Assessments ■ Consultation Services ■ Drug Court Services ■ NAVIGATE First

Episode Psychosis Services Program ■ Individual, Group, & Family Therapy ■ Project Jane Domestic Violence Services

■ Clinical Supervision ■ ■

■ ■

Services Specialized Trauma Treatment Services Substance Use Intensive Outpatient Program Gender Specific Services Department of Juvenile Justice Treatment Services

HCS Outpatient Services provide short-term interventions that have long-term impact. Services are designed to meet the needs of children, adolescents, and adults whose substance use and/or emotional challenges have become significant, but do not warrant hospitalization. OUTPATIENT SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF TWO THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND FORTYONE ADULTS, CHILDREN AND FAMILIES THIS YEAR .

I truly feel honored to have the opportunity to work alongside passionate, committed clinicians who support each other and never hesitate to offer assistance . They make me laugh, give me encouragement, and push me to be a better clinician .”

CORY SCOTT Outpatient Therapist 1.5 Years of Service

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PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES Psychiatric clinic services provide appropriate medication services for qualifying HCS consumers. HCS psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and licensed practical nurses work together as a team to serve both children and adults.

PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES SERVED AN UNDUPLICATED TOTAL OF ONE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED AND FORTY-EIGHT ADULTS AND CHILDREN THIS YEAR .

■ Psychiatric Assessment ■ Medication Management

The agency has changed so much over the years . The technology we have available to us as a staff is something I wouldn’t have even thought about 29 years ago . I look at change as giving you a chance to grow and make a difference to the consumers we serve .

SHERRY HAMILTON

Support Specialist - Discharge Coordinator 29.5 Years of Service

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She just kind of stopped and she said, ‘Wait a minute, I have to pet Nomad and get my thoughts together,’ she jumped down off the chair to pet Nomad and she got back in the chair and was able to go on with her testimony .”

Nomad, has been working at the Children’s Advocacy Center since 2014. He is a trained facility dog who provides support to all those who enter the doors at Preston’s Grove. Nomad works alongside his handler and Outpatient Therapist Donna Callis. Nomad sits with children during their forensic interviews and therapy sessions. He attends Multidisciplinary Team meetings, and even accompanies people to court.

DONNA CALLIS

Nomad is an expert when it comes to being in the courtroom. Before attending a hearing, Donna and

Outpatient Therapist

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Bristol Herald Courier

Canine Compassion


Richmond Times Dispatch

Nomad go to the courthouse and practice, so he knows exactly where to go and what to do. When Nomad accompanies someone to the courtroom, he lays in one spot right next to the witness – staying alert but not moving or making a noise. Nomad provides a calming presence to all those he meets, especially those in the courtroom. And now it will be easier for facility dogs all across the Commonwealth to accompany witnesses to the courtroom. Prior to this year, no statute existed in Virginia regarding the use of a courthouse dog, so local prosecutors would have to file motions to allow dogs like Nomad at the witness box. Assistant Commonwealth

Kim Ramey

Attorney Sarah Nokes wanted to see that change. With assistance from the Children’s Advocacy Center, Nokes worked with the Courthouse Dogs Foundation, the National Association to Protect Children and legislators to develop Virginia House Bill 482 and Virginia Senate Bill 420. The bills were sponsored by Senator Ryan McDougle of Hanover and Delegate Rob Bell of Albemarle. Nomad and a group from the CAC accompanied Nokes to Richmond to help demonstrate what it would be like having a facility dog in the courthouse – he sat quietly through meetings with the press and both votes. The legislation fondly known as “Nomad’s Law” was approved and added to Virginia Code § 18.2-67.9:1.

Kim Ramey

Kim Ramey

Top Left: Sen. Ryan McDougle looks down at Nomad while Del. Rob B. Bell addresses the media. Top Right: Nomad and Donna pose for a photo at the Capital with Camille Cooper, left, of the National Association to Protect Children and Assistant Commonwealth Attorney Sarah Nokes, center. Center: Nomad waits patiently with Donna for a bill hearing to begin. Bottom: Nomad successfully demonstrated to all those who met him just what it’s like to have a facility dog included in official proceedings.

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PEERS SUPPORTING PEERS In May 2017, the Substance Use and Mental Health Services Administration announced funding to fight the opioid crisis. Virginia was awarded just shy of $10 million. Highlands Community Services was identified as needing support for prevention, treatment, and recovery and received a grant. Teresa Viers, Development Director for Substance Use Disorder Services knew just what to do with the funds – a Peer Support Program. Other Community Service Boards have utilized peer support for years. But HCS simply didn’t have the funding or interest from qualified participants 18 | Highlands Community Services

until now. In August 2017, Viers brought on Logan Horne to be the first Peer-Support Specialist in the agency. They met through the Appalachian Substance Abuse Coalition years ago and Viers knew there was something special about Logan. “There’s a whole level of connection that is happening that we didn’t have an ability to make happen before,” says Viers. Prior to Logan coming on board at HCS, no mothers who were referred had ever enrolled in services, since then more


than half she meets with follow through and complete an assessment with several enrolling in services. Instead of sending in a therapist, we now send in Logan — who was in active addiction for 18 years and credits role models for her recovery. In February 2018, Jason Phillips also joined the Peer-Support Team. He works primarily with Bristol and Washington County Drug Court participants – he graduated from drug court himself. Jason had nearly a 25-year history of substance use in one form or another. The fact that Logan and Jason have firsthand experience with substance use brings an important perspective to the agency. They make it easier for us to connect with those we serve. Peer Support Specialists undergo specialized training developed by the Department of Behavioral and Developmental Services. “You open your mouth and start to tell a little bit of your story, they stop chattering and they start listening,” says Phillips. “It’s a cool thing. It’s good. You’re able to connect with them. The biggest reason I do it is to just help somebody not go down that road or take a different path.” Information, excerpts and photos courtesy of the Bristol Herald Courier article by Alyssa Oursler

People in active addiction are GOOD PEOPLE, too . And they need people to ADVOCATE FOR THEM. And they need people to BELIEVE IN THEM . I feel like that’s been my call in life .” LOGAN HORNE

Recovery Coordinator – Substance Use Disorder

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HCS Developmental Services put on a variety show that took everyone back to the good ol’ days of “Kornfield Kounty .” Each year the Developmental Services Team works with our consumers in the program to produce a show for their families, friends, and our community members.

into the performance, everyone who came out to see the show, and to John S. Battle High School for providing us with the auditorium, which gave us our first-ever stage to perform on.

The Hee Haw Variety show is the largest production to date that allowed everyone to play a roll. From jokes to songs, the audience was laughing non-stop as the consumers performed their skits. A huge thanks goes out to the HCS Staff for the hard work and dedication they put

“Hee Haw gave opportunities for each individual to display a layer of authenticity and talent. The hard work and the humorous side of each person in this play captivated the audience with each line performed,” said Debra Rowe, Direct Support Services Program Manager

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We are so grateful for the support of our community members, local businesses, and civic and faith-based organizations.

INDIVIDUAL DONORS

Steve Fisher & Nancy Garretson

Jack McCarthy

Katherine Baker-Forester

Jeff Fox

LaRue Carter Miles

Dwayne Ball

Elmer & Lois Fuller

Brianna Morris

Ricky Barre

Harry Harding

Barbara Niemczak

Linda Brittle

John Harty

Donna Pennington

Kristin Brown

Lorie Horton

Christopher Qualls

Nancy Brown

Joan Jamison

Kathi Roark

Pat Brunty

Charles Jones

Cindy Samuel

Vanessa Camperlengo

Donald Lay

Kathryne Simpson

Robert Carlson

Suzanne Lay

Phillip & Sherri Sprinkle

Jerry Culberson

David Ledgerwood

Shelia Tuggle

Angela Cullop

Emily Lee

Alexandra Veatch

The HCS Team had some fun of their own fundraising for the playground. Thanks to the Crisis Services Team over $4,000 was raised through their old fashioned Pie In The Face contest. Folks paid to have members of the Senior Management Team “pied� at the Fall Festival.

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After years of planning and the generous donations of community members, the Children’s Campus got its playground! Our team installed the equipment over several weeks throughout the summer of 2018. There’s more to come, so kids can just be kids both inside and outside!

BUSINESS & ORGANIZATIONS

Contura Energy Services

128 Pecan

First Community Bank

Abingdon Olive Oil Company

FM 94!

Abingdon United Methodist Women of Wesley Group

Food City

Abingdon Winery

Glenrochie Country Club

Acorn Electrical Specialists, Inc.

J.A. Street & Associates

Appalachian Electric Power

Jerry’s Signs, Inc

Apple Ridge Photography

Johnston Memorial Hospital

Borderline

JR’s Auto Repair

Bradford Photography

Just for Men Barber Shop, LLC

Branded.

Ladybug Cafe & Cakery

Breaks Interstate Park

Lively Entertainment

Bristol Herald Courier

Mark & Deanne Weatherly

Bristol Station Brewery

Maurices | Bristol, VA

Chocolate Elegance

Parkway Wine & Liquor

Clinch Valley Printing

Precious Jewels

State Street United Methodist Church That Cookie Dough The Polished Diamond

Four Seasons Bakery

The Wayne C. Henderson School for Appalachian Arts Uncle Sam’s Loan Universal Companies Virginia High Beta Club Voice Magazine Washington County Moose Lodge No. 1966 Wild Orchid Design Studio Wise Recycling West I, LLC Wolf Hills Quilters

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THE CAMPUS

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CHILDREN’S ADVOCACY CENTER

Administration & Clinical Services 610 Campus Drive | Abingdon, VA

Children’s Services 102 Oakview Avenue | Bristol, VA

Case Management & Clinical Services 1969 Lee Highway | Bristol, VA

of Highlands Community Services 21451 Sugar Hollow Road | Bristol, VA

Hwy

5

THE ANNEX

6

STEPPING STONES

7

CHILDREN’S CAMPUS

8

CRISIS RESOLUTION CENTER

Developmental Services 608 Campus Drive | Abingdon, VA

Psychosocial Rehabilitation 414 Ivy Street | Abingdon, VA

Children’s & Crisis Services 383 Baugh Lane | Abingdon, VA

Adult Crisis Services 802 Hillman Highway | Abingdon, VA


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Profile for Highlands Community Services

HCS | 2018 Annual Impact Report  

HCS | 2018 Annual Impact Report  

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