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Installation Design

Creative Ideas and Application of New Tech Material

Installation Design Creative Ideas and Application of New Technical Materials

HI-DESIGN PUBLISHING


VIP Lounge Experience at Art Basel 2013 Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lounge Design by Marc & Chantal for Swire Properties at Art Basel Hong Kong Hong Kong's famous density and intimidating crowded streets open themselves for a different perspective when traveling along its hidden corridors. Behind the imposing walled entrances, neighbourhoods are linked by bridges, courtyards, tunnels and walkways that form rich networks in the daily life of the metropolis. These connections reveal vibrant flashes of life and allow the ceaseless pedestrian energy to permeate the boundary of public and private spaces. The installation Marc & Chantal created at Art Basel invites visitors to discover the colours and textures found in communities across Hong Kong. The open rest-spaces are a welcome respite from the compact blocks of architecture so particular to this city. In this space, visitors are invited to discover, or rediscover, the impact of these essential public connections within Hong Kong. The visual poetry found in the collage of materials, colours and shapes of these connections is seen in the 170 blocks that feature photos of the architecture and people of Hong Kong. The overhead timber framework symbolises the intertwined grids of the streets and is obtained from sustainable sources, as is the felt carpet and case board models. When combined, the rectangular wooden supports are enlivened by the vivid photography to create a snapshot of this unique urban experience.


VIP Lounge Experience at Art Basel 2013 Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lounge Design by Marc & Chantal for Swire Properties at Art Basel Hong Kong Hong Kong's famous density and intimidating crowded streets open themselves for a different perspective when traveling along its hidden corridors. Behind the imposing walled entrances, neighbourhoods are linked by bridges, courtyards, tunnels and walkways that form rich networks in the daily life of the metropolis. These connections reveal vibrant flashes of life and allow the ceaseless pedestrian energy to permeate the boundary of public and private spaces. The installation Marc & Chantal created at Art Basel invites visitors to discover the colours and textures found in communities across Hong Kong. The open rest-spaces are a welcome respite from the compact blocks of architecture so particular to this city. In this space, visitors are invited to discover, or rediscover, the impact of these essential public connections within Hong Kong. The visual poetry found in the collage of materials, colours and shapes of these connections is seen in the 170 blocks that feature photos of the architecture and people of Hong Kong. The overhead timber framework symbolises the intertwined grids of the streets and is obtained from sustainable sources, as is the felt carpet and case board models. When combined, the rectangular wooden supports are enlivened by the vivid photography to create a snapshot of this unique urban experience.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译


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Art Installation for Swire Properties at Art Basel 2014

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Art Installation by Marc & Chantal for Swire Properties at their Corporate Lounge at Art Basel Hong Kong 2014 Marc & Chantal tackled the opportunity of designing the Swire Properties Corporate Lounge at Art Basel for a third straight year with a goal to make it the most ambitious installation yet. The aim was to create a design that would be an engaging and meaningful lounge experience, then become a beautiful and playful semi-permanent installation at Taikoo Hui in Guangzhou By expanding on the central idea of the impromptu encounters that happen in cosmopolitan communities, Marc & Chantal created visual connections and surprising links throughout the space. The installation is an optical maze that catches viewers off guard with filtered views, sound and around-the-corner vantage points. It brings people together, whether they are strangers or old friends through mirrored

walls that bounce reflections from around the installation and transmit secret glances and lively expressions between viewers in all corners of the space. To enhance the feeling of the disjointed, but very real connections, the installation is linked by the continuous thread of a graphic yellow line. The 115 square meters of the lounge, overlooking Victoria Harbour and the Hong Kong skyline, is animated with 10 glass and mirror panels that create a myriad of visual perspectives, engaging visitors in a playful and fun manner. The 2.4 metre tall panels are made of 5 colours of glass that refract and tint views from throughout the lounge space. With precise positioning, the mirrored angles bounce reflections throughout the installation and visually link people standing on the continuous yellow pathway. Visitors are invited to take photos, hide amongst the maze and otherwise interact with the panels.


Art Installation for Swire Properties at Art Basel 2014

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Art Installation by Marc & Chantal for Swire Properties at their Corporate Lounge at Art Basel Hong Kong 2014 Marc & Chantal tackled the opportunity of designing the Swire Properties Corporate Lounge at Art Basel for a third straight year with a goal to make it the most ambitious installation yet. The aim was to create a design that would be an engaging and meaningful lounge experience, then become a beautiful and playful semi-permanent installation at Taikoo Hui in Guangzhou By expanding on the central idea of the impromptu encounters that happen in cosmopolitan communities, Marc & Chantal created visual connections and surprising links throughout the space. The installation is an optical maze that catches viewers off guard with filtered views, sound and around-the-corner vantage points. It brings people together, whether they are strangers or old friends through mirrored

walls that bounce reflections from around the installation and transmit secret glances and lively expressions between viewers in all corners of the space. To enhance the feeling of the disjointed, but very real connections, the installation is linked by the continuous thread of a graphic yellow line. The 115 square meters of the lounge, overlooking Victoria Harbour and the Hong Kong skyline, is animated with 10 glass and mirror panels that create a myriad of visual perspectives, engaging visitors in a playful and fun manner. The 2.4 metre tall panels are made of 5 colours of glass that refract and tint views from throughout the lounge space. With precise positioning, the mirrored angles bounce reflections throughout the installation and visually link people standing on the continuous yellow pathway. Visitors are invited to take photos, hide amongst the maze and otherwise interact with the panels.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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For RestIDETA Installation in the Atrium of the New Building, 2014

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In 2012, The architecture office ETAU commissioned Nathalie Dewez to set up a permanent Lighting installation in the Atrium of the new building. The project is a 'Mobile Reflector’. This big 'shoal of fish' is a multiplication of small pendant reflectors of fithteen centimeters long. The metal stamped elements are lit by lightings fixtures all around the Atrium. They catch and reflect the light thanks to their spoon shape and texture finishes.


For RestIDETA Installation in the Atrium of the New Building, 2014

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In 2012, The architecture office ETAU commissioned Nathalie Dewez to set up a permanent Lighting installation in the Atrium of the new building. The project is a 'Mobile Reflector’. This big 'shoal of fish' is a multiplication of small pendant reflectors of fithteen centimeters long. The metal stamped elements are lit by lightings fixtures all around the Atrium. They catch and reflect the light thanks to their spoon shape and texture finishes.


Infuse

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Our installation at the Milan Salon used OLED panels. The goal was not to illuminate an object or display a light source, but to create an environment defined by an intermediate condition of light. The exhibition area was not simply an interior, but an environment like a landform where the soft light of many OLED panels infused the space, forming a 'light-scape'. Using a detailed light control program, a space with shifting changes was created. We hoped that moving through a landscape permeated with light could provide a new experience of lighting that is richer than a purely visual one. OLED is still an emerging lighting technology so more than exhibiting a completed product we thought it was important to show the possibility of a new condition brought about by OLED technology through the creation of a shifting light environment. Instead of exhibiting everything clearly at once, we thought it was important to create a new relationship between installation and guests by creating a sequential experience of space through the movement of the body and changes in the surrounding conditions. In order to achieve this, we made single undulating exhibition space, where the landscape visible from each place is different. We created the impression of a space infused with light by also using fog and super-organdie, materials that seem to blend with the space itself. Creating a large sloped path, it became not so much an exhibition space, but more an environment like a landform. The fog created is heavier than air, flowing down the slope like water to settle at the bottom. As visitors walk through the installation, the fog at their feet shifts and the super-organdie above their heads quietly trembles; contrary to the image of a new technology, the shimmering light seems to be a natural phenomenon.


Infuse

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Our installation at the Milan Salon used OLED panels. The goal was not to illuminate an object or display a light source, but to create an environment defined by an intermediate condition of light. The exhibition area was not simply an interior, but an environment like a landform where the soft light of many OLED panels infused the space, forming a 'light-scape'. Using a detailed light control program, a space with shifting changes was created. We hoped that moving through a landscape permeated with light could provide a new experience of lighting that is richer than a purely visual one. OLED is still an emerging lighting technology so more than exhibiting a completed product we thought it was important to show the possibility of a new condition brought about by OLED technology through the creation of a shifting light environment. Instead of exhibiting everything clearly at once, we thought it was important to create a new relationship between installation and guests by creating a sequential experience of space through the movement of the body and changes in the surrounding conditions. In order to achieve this, we made single undulating exhibition space, where the landscape visible from each place is different. We created the impression of a space infused with light by also using fog and super-organdie, materials that seem to blend with the space itself. Creating a large sloped path, it became not so much an exhibition space, but more an environment like a landform. The fog created is heavier than air, flowing down the slope like water to settle at the bottom. As visitors walk through the installation, the fog at their feet shifts and the super-organdie above their heads quietly trembles; contrary to the image of a new technology, the shimmering light seems to be a natural phenomenon.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译


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Kitty Cloud

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Hello Kitty, who has many fans all over the world, is a representation of Japanese culture. Cloud of small ribbons, which are her symbol and also often use for wrapping as a symbol of gratitude, make Hello kitty silhouette in a large void space. When you are close to the cloud the silhouette are not able to see. But once you get distance from the cloud, the silhouette appeared to you. "Kitty Cloud" will call multiple impression to your mind.

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Kitty Cloud

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Hello Kitty, who has many fans all over the world, is a representation of Japanese culture. Cloud of small ribbons, which are her symbol and also often use for wrapping as a symbol of gratitude, make Hello kitty silhouette in a large void space. When you are close to the cloud the silhouette are not able to see. But once you get distance from the cloud, the silhouette appeared to you. "Kitty Cloud" will call multiple impression to your mind.

中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译


LIANES

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Sang-Hoon Degeimbre met Quentin de Coster at a conference in March of 2013. During this event, they presented their work and noted many common points between their respective artistic worlds. A year later, the chef San invited Quentin to create an atmosphere aligned with his culinary expertise. Quentin eagerly agreed to design an installation for the two-star Michelin restaurant L'Air du Temps. San’s cooking artistry embodies nature, so Quentin de Coster incorporated this inspiration in his permanent installation piece. LIANES is an abstract reproduction of the random character of vegetation. This organic piece of art installs a unique atmosphere between the outdoor and indoor environment. Beyond its aesthetics, this project includes a sound insulation function to reduce noise disturbances in the restaurant at large gatherings.


LIANES

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Sang-Hoon Degeimbre met Quentin de Coster at a conference in March of 2013. During this event, they presented their work and noted many common points between their respective artistic worlds. A year later, the chef San invited Quentin to create an atmosphere aligned with his culinary expertise. Quentin eagerly agreed to design an installation for the two-star Michelin restaurant L'Air du Temps. San’s cooking artistry embodies nature, so Quentin de Coster incorporated this inspiration in his permanent installation piece. LIANES is an abstract reproduction of the random character of vegetation. This organic piece of art installs a unique atmosphere between the outdoor and indoor environment. Beyond its aesthetics, this project includes a sound insulation function to reduce noise disturbances in the restaurant at large gatherings.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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LINES with Color

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

This project is actually an addition to our previous installation ‘Lines’, in which we created a space using only an outline. Starting from the idea of ‘coloring-in’ the middles of the existing frames, by inlaying the existing frames with color glass backed with mirror we could increase the amount of surface area of the space. The shape of each surface is an isoceles triangle derived from the existing corner angle of each frame. Of course, by adding color and surface the impression of the installation changed; however, more than anything the multitude of localized perspective resulting from the many triangles gives each place a strong directionality, resulting in a space where one senses a geometry totally different than before. As well, following from the fact that the amount of reflection varies according to the color of the glass, the noticeable difference in the depth of the reflections promotes the randomness of the place.


LINES with Color

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

This project is actually an addition to our previous installation ‘Lines’, in which we created a space using only an outline. Starting from the idea of ‘coloring-in’ the middles of the existing frames, by inlaying the existing frames with color glass backed with mirror we could increase the amount of surface area of the space. The shape of each surface is an isoceles triangle derived from the existing corner angle of each frame. Of course, by adding color and surface the impression of the installation changed; however, more than anything the multitude of localized perspective resulting from the many triangles gives each place a strong directionality, resulting in a space where one senses a geometry totally different than before. As well, following from the fact that the amount of reflection varies according to the color of the glass, the noticeable difference in the depth of the reflections promotes the randomness of the place.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译


Meissen

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In the Netherlands, Meissen porcelain is often regarded as ‘high-class kitsch.’ Its sumptuous, often narrative style of decoration puts it at odds with the minimal and conceptual traditions of Modernism.SO–IL was commissioned by Kunsthal KAdEto design an ideal contemporary three-dimensional setting in which to present the porcelain such that it would challenge this prejudice and focus attention on the great sculptural, artistic and technical strengths of Meissen. In response, SO–IL designed 32 modern, prismatic cases in bright colors. Our exhibition design unravels assumptions of gallery objectivity, and instead suggests new ways of looking at the delicate artifacts. Rather than interfering with views of the objects, the colored acrylic panels serve as filters, highlighting specific colors in the pieces’ ornamentation. Each multi-faceted case offers multiple unique views of each object. The strategy triggers the visitor to literally ‘revisit’ their initial understanding of the objects in the exhibition. By designing vitrines that do not merely display, but actually dissect the conventional viewing of the object, visitors are forced to redefine their relationship to the work. The organization of color, shape and material reduces the individuality of pieces and their object-like character to create a more fluid and visceral experience. It is a transition from object to experience, and shows architecture’s potential to act as a mediator in this process. The porcelain on display was courtesy of the collection Von Klemperer, the Meissen factory and several private collections in England and Germany.


Meissen

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In the Netherlands, Meissen porcelain is often regarded as ‘high-class kitsch.’ Its sumptuous, often narrative style of decoration puts it at odds with the minimal and conceptual traditions of Modernism.SO–IL was commissioned by Kunsthal KAdEto design an ideal contemporary three-dimensional setting in which to present the porcelain such that it would challenge this prejudice and focus attention on the great sculptural, artistic and technical strengths of Meissen. In response, SO–IL designed 32 modern, prismatic cases in bright colors. Our exhibition design unravels assumptions of gallery objectivity, and instead suggests new ways of looking at the delicate artifacts. Rather than interfering with views of the objects, the colored acrylic panels serve as filters, highlighting specific colors in the pieces’ ornamentation. Each multi-faceted case offers multiple unique views of each object. The strategy triggers the visitor to literally ‘revisit’ their initial understanding of the objects in the exhibition. By designing vitrines that do not merely display, but actually dissect the conventional viewing of the object, visitors are forced to redefine their relationship to the work. The organization of color, shape and material reduces the individuality of pieces and their object-like character to create a more fluid and visceral experience. It is a transition from object to experience, and shows architecture’s potential to act as a mediator in this process. The porcelain on display was courtesy of the collection Von Klemperer, the Meissen factory and several private collections in England and Germany.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译


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Meissen

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In the Netherlands, Meissen porcelain is often regarded as ‘high-class kitsch.’ Its sumptuous, often narrative style of decoration puts it at odds with the minimal and conceptual traditions of Modernism.SO–IL was commissioned by Kunsthal KAdEto design an ideal contemporary three-dimensional setting in which to present the porcelain such that it would challenge this prejudice and focus attention on the great sculptural, artistic and technical strengths of Meissen. In response, SO–IL designed 32 modern, prismatic cases in bright colors. Our exhibition design unravels assumptions of gallery objectivity, and instead suggests new ways of looking at the delicate artifacts. Rather than interfering with views of the objects, the colored acrylic panels serve as filters, highlighting specific colors in the pieces’ ornamentation. Each multi-faceted case offers multiple unique views of each object. The strategy triggers the visitor to literally ‘revisit’ their initial understanding of the objects in the exhibition. By designing vitrines that do not merely display, but actually dissect the conventional viewing of the object, visitors are forced to redefine their relationship to the work. The organization of color, shape and material reduces the individuality of pieces and their object-like character to create a more fluid and visceral experience. It is a transition from object to experience, and shows architecture’s potential to act as a mediator in this process.


Meissen

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

In the Netherlands, Meissen porcelain is often regarded as ‘high-class kitsch.’ Its sumptuous, often narrative style of decoration puts it at odds with the minimal and conceptual traditions of Modernism.SO–IL was commissioned by Kunsthal KAdEto design an ideal contemporary three-dimensional setting in which to present the porcelain such that it would challenge this prejudice and focus attention on the great sculptural, artistic and technical strengths of Meissen. In response, SO–IL designed 32 modern, prismatic cases in bright colors. Our exhibition design unravels assumptions of gallery objectivity, and instead suggests new ways of looking at the delicate artifacts. Rather than interfering with views of the objects, the colored acrylic panels serve as filters, highlighting specific colors in the pieces’ ornamentation. Each multi-faceted case offers multiple unique views of each object. The strategy triggers the visitor to literally ‘revisit’ their initial understanding of the objects in the exhibition. By designing vitrines that do not merely display, but actually dissect the conventional viewing of the object, visitors are forced to redefine their relationship to the work. The organization of color, shape and material reduces the individuality of pieces and their object-like character to create a more fluid and visceral experience. It is a transition from object to experience, and shows architecture’s potential to act as a mediator in this process.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译


Mood Map

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Mood map visualizes the moods of Korean people in color and light through textual analysis of their Tweets on Twitter. We create a custom software program in Processing that searches and analyzes Tweets in Korean language through the Twitter API. Tweets are analyzed using a text analysis library that searches for specific strings of Korean characters that describe certain moods or feelings. There are 6 main categories of feelings or moods we will search and visualize: joy/pride, love, fear/ shame, anger, pity, and sadness/ frustration. Mood Map cycles through 3 visualization sequences. The first sequence displays occurrences of tweets in real time. The second sequence is showing collective data of two moods in past one hour. And the third is collective data of one mood in a day. This sequence control the intensity of color associated with each mood/feeling. The 6 mood/ feeling categories are associated with 6 fiber optic illuminators, each with a specific color. Each illuminator will be paired to two other illuminators through the connection of fiber optic cables. So as the intensity of certain moods changes over time, visitors can witness the relative expression of all the moods compared to each other, changing dynamically over time every 30 seconds. The overall composition will express a flux of mood, feeling, intensity and time transmitted to a spatial 3D body. Mood map is built and exhibited at “Data Curation� in Museum of Art at Seoul National University.


Mood Map

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Mood map visualizes the moods of Korean people in color and light through textual analysis of their Tweets on Twitter. We create a custom software program in Processing that searches and analyzes Tweets in Korean language through the Twitter API. Tweets are analyzed using a text analysis library that searches for specific strings of Korean characters that describe certain moods or feelings. There are 6 main categories of feelings or moods we will search and visualize: joy/pride, love, fear/ shame, anger, pity, and sadness/ frustration. Mood Map cycles through 3 visualization sequences. The first sequence displays occurrences of tweets in real time. The second sequence is showing collective data of two moods in past one hour. And the third is collective data of one mood in a day. This sequence control the intensity of color associated with each mood/feeling. The 6 mood/ feeling categories are associated with 6 fiber optic illuminators, each with a specific color. Each illuminator will be paired to two other illuminators through the connection of fiber optic cables. So as the intensity of certain moods changes over time, visitors can witness the relative expression of all the moods compared to each other, changing dynamically over time every 30 seconds. The overall composition will express a flux of mood, feeling, intensity and time transmitted to a spatial 3D body. Mood map is built and exhibited at “Data Curation� in Museum of Art at Seoul National University.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


Waste Landscape # 4 Kunsthalle / Hall of Art Kosice – White Night 2014 Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Waste Landscape is a 500 square meters artificial undulating landscape covered by an armor of 60 000 unsold or collected CDs, which have been sorted and hand-sewn. It is well known that CDs are condemned to gradually disappear from our daily life, and to later participate in the construction of immense open-air, floating or buried toxic waste reception centers. Made of petroleum, this reflecting slick of CDs forms a still sea of metallic dunes: the monumental scale of the art work reveals the precious aspect of a small daily object. Waste Landscape will be displayed in locations coherent with the stakes of the project: the role of art in society, the sensitization to environmental problems through culture, the alternative mode of production and the valuation of district associative work and professional rehabilitation. Over the course of multiple exhibitions, Waste Landscape will go through quite a few transformations before being entirely recycled into polycarbonate. The roaming will allow artist to pursue new awareness-raising activities. Social aspect The Waste Landscape installation was the fourth collaboration between Elise Morin and curator Zuzana Pacáková within the international festival of contemporary art, WHITE NIGHT KOŠICE. The Festival aims to interlink artistic genres, working in public space, popularising contemporary art and education. Apart from artistic borders, it also shifts borders in social areas. It is not afraid to involve handicapped or other disadvantaged persons in the preparation of the works. For such a technically demanding project as WL, it was necessary to bring together a considerable team of people to install several thousand CDs. We therefore decided to approach ten Košice prisoners who became part of the production team for one month. It was a totally new experience for them, meeting contemporary art and Elise Morin for the first time, and it was a very enriching experience for both sides which brought a strong social dimension to the project.


Waste Landscape # 4 Kunsthalle / Hall of Art Kosice – White Night 2014 Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Waste Landscape is a 500 square meters artificial undulating landscape covered by an armor of 60 000 unsold or collected CDs, which have been sorted and hand-sewn. It is well known that CDs are condemned to gradually disappear from our daily life, and to later participate in the construction of immense open-air, floating or buried toxic waste reception centers. Made of petroleum, this reflecting slick of CDs forms a still sea of metallic dunes: the monumental scale of the art work reveals the precious aspect of a small daily object. Waste Landscape will be displayed in locations coherent with the stakes of the project: the role of art in society, the sensitization to environmental problems through culture, the alternative mode of production and the valuation of district associative work and professional rehabilitation. Over the course of multiple exhibitions, Waste Landscape will go through quite a few transformations before being entirely recycled into polycarbonate. The roaming will allow artist to pursue new awareness-raising activities. Social aspect The Waste Landscape installation was the fourth collaboration between Elise Morin and curator Zuzana Pacáková within the international festival of contemporary art, WHITE NIGHT KOŠICE. The Festival aims to interlink artistic genres, working in public space, popularising contemporary art and education. Apart from artistic borders, it also shifts borders in social areas. It is not afraid to involve handicapped or other disadvantaged persons in the preparation of the works. For such a technically demanding project as WL, it was necessary to bring together a considerable team of people to install several thousand CDs. We therefore decided to approach ten Košice prisoners who became part of the production team for one month. It was a totally new experience for them, meeting contemporary art and Elise Morin for the first time, and it was a very enriching experience for both sides which brought a strong social dimension to the project.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


Net Linz

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Net Linz is an inhabitable/climable social sculpture serving as an experimental staircase in the exhibition space. The structure of vertical, interconnected nets was developed for a specific corridor space within the OK Center for Contemporary Art in Linz. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. Although the system from previous Net installations remained the same, the vertical orientation results in a specific, canyon-like appearance and different sensation while visiting the structure. Instead of balancing over the elastic floor of horizontal nets, in "moved spaces" in Linz, the visitors gently swing as they climb along the steep path.


Net Linz

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Net Linz is an inhabitable/climable social sculpture serving as an experimental staircase in the exhibition space. The structure of vertical, interconnected nets was developed for a specific corridor space within the OK Center for Contemporary Art in Linz. The nets are suspended from the ceiling and stretched with the weight of sand bags attached to their base. Although the system from previous Net installations remained the same, the vertical orientation results in a specific, canyon-like appearance and different sensation while visiting the structure. Instead of balancing over the elastic floor of horizontal nets, in "moved spaces" in Linz, the visitors gently swing as they climb along the steep path.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译


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Cloud(e)scape Ephemeral Exhibition Design for International Fair Lighting and design

Lighting and design

Location

Location

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Cloud(e)scape is a temporary stand created for exhibiting Skypro Shoes at the World Travel Catering Expo in Hamburg, Germany. The structure was developed to personify the values and culture of Skypro, a leading Airline Shoes company from Portugal, being distinctive from the other companies’ stands. Under the motto Walk in Heaven, the design adduce to the experience of being surrounded by clouds – raising the feeling of transporting visitors to the sky. The stand is set by the combination of hundreds of foam pool noodles at different levels, which materialized a continuous topography under two separated volumes that creates exhibition shelves, storage, a table and a continuous soft seat. Fun and dynamic, the predominance of different kinds of blue colour also adds a sense of tranquillity and serenity, associating to the company’s mission of advocating well-being and a positive work life-style.


Cloud(e)scape Ephemeral Exhibition Design for International Fair Lighting and design

Lighting and design

Location

Location

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Cloud(e)scape is a temporary stand created for exhibiting Skypro Shoes at the World Travel Catering Expo in Hamburg, Germany. The structure was developed to personify the values and culture of Skypro, a leading Airline Shoes company from Portugal, being distinctive from the other companies’ stands. Under the motto Walk in Heaven, the design adduce to the experience of being surrounded by clouds – raising the feeling of transporting visitors to the sky. The stand is set by the combination of hundreds of foam pool noodles at different levels, which materialized a continuous topography under two separated volumes that creates exhibition shelves, storage, a table and a continuous soft seat. Fun and dynamic, the predominance of different kinds of blue colour also adds a sense of tranquillity and serenity, associating to the company’s mission of advocating well-being and a positive work life-style.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


The Revision of Optics Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Utilising a natural rainbow to explore ceremony and ritual in different cultures, TIFFANY SINGH’s latest installation, "The Revision of Optics" gathers materials from around Singapore that have relationships to healing the body and mind. It is currently on exhibition at the Esplanade in Singapore from 3 October 2014 - 4 January 2015. Floor component includes ribbons and handmade fair trade Indika bells as well as a collaborative component with artist Milan Rai that involves butterflies as a symbol of transformation and change. Goddesses Lalitha and Kali link to Singh’s recent exhibition at the Siddharta Art Gallery in Nepal, located in the centre of the installation surrounded by chrysanthemums, roses, lavender and globe flowers with scents of chilli, turmeric and jasmine. "The Revision of Optics" manifests once again Singh’s signature colour spectrum with a new alteration: the disappearance of indigo and the addition of magenta. Singh’s fascination with rainbows dates back to her installation "Newton & the Piece Bomb" as part of "Knowing Me Knowing You: New Artists Show" at Artspace Auckland in 2010. According to Singh rainbows teach her to see things differently: “It’s a creative practice to take time and see the beauty in the flowers, spices and nature that I am so grateful for. Colour is a gift and a joy to work with, making natural rainbows is a therapy unto itself.”


The Revision of Optics Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Utilising a natural rainbow to explore ceremony and ritual in different cultures, TIFFANY SINGH’s latest installation, "The Revision of Optics" gathers materials from around Singapore that have relationships to healing the body and mind. It is currently on exhibition at the Esplanade in Singapore from 3 October 2014 - 4 January 2015. Floor component includes ribbons and handmade fair trade Indika bells as well as a collaborative component with artist Milan Rai that involves butterflies as a symbol of transformation and change. Goddesses Lalitha and Kali link to Singh’s recent exhibition at the Siddharta Art Gallery in Nepal, located in the centre of the installation surrounded by chrysanthemums, roses, lavender and globe flowers with scents of chilli, turmeric and jasmine. "The Revision of Optics" manifests once again Singh’s signature colour spectrum with a new alteration: the disappearance of indigo and the addition of magenta. Singh’s fascination with rainbows dates back to her installation "Newton & the Piece Bomb" as part of "Knowing Me Knowing You: New Artists Show" at Artspace Auckland in 2010. According to Singh rainbows teach her to see things differently: “It’s a creative practice to take time and see the beauty in the flowers, spices and nature that I am so grateful for. Colour is a gift and a joy to work with, making natural rainbows is a therapy unto itself.”


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


wonderWALL Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

wonderWALL is an exhibition space designed to receive the masterpiece The Pool by Jen Lewin in Colombo Shopping Mall, in Lisbon, Portugal, built with approximately 20,000 strips of white and black fabric. It is a structure suspended from the skylight on the central square, with about 14 meters in diameter and 4 meters tall, which defines space - exterior and interior - by the (des) multiplication of numerous strips of fabric. Never touching the floor of the mall itself - which exposes the artist's work – it allows to see, from the outside, a continuous line of coloured light coming from the inside, and, from the inside, to see an unbroken line of light from outside. The temporary museum presents an abstract skin, a textile facade built in black fabric, completely apprehensible by visitors and continuing throughout its surface, which oscillates with airflows. The cylindrical space seeks to emphasize the centrality of the exposed artwork, which has assumed a critical importance in the design space, enhanced by the abdication of a main entrance in favour of a fully permeable facade that dissolves the entrance along the entire periphery of the installation space. For brightness control issues, the work of Jen Lewin is not visible from the outside. Unlike the previous year, the interior of the exhibition space is also not noticeable from the upper galleries of the mall. Instead, the coverage presents itself as a large circular weaving screen that highlights the manual process that characterizes the construction of this dome space, bringing out a unique textile texture. wonderWALL was sought to create an immersive space, which raises awareness of the act of entrance through the will in finding a space that is not completely visible from the outside. At the same time, the absence of physical barriers to free movement demand from visitors in the appropriation of space, preparing them for interaction with the work of Jen Lewin. Protected from the bright light from the shopping, the interior of the exhibition space is a totally white dome created to make stand out The Pool, by reflecting, in its immense surface, the chromatic variations that characterize the interactive light artwork. At the same time, the material continuity and the absence of spatial references helped to make visitors getting lost, even if just for a moment, in that colourful wonder space.


wonderWALL Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

wonderWALL is an exhibition space designed to receive the masterpiece The Pool by Jen Lewin in Colombo Shopping Mall, in Lisbon, Portugal, built with approximately 20,000 strips of white and black fabric. It is a structure suspended from the skylight on the central square, with about 14 meters in diameter and 4 meters tall, which defines space - exterior and interior - by the (des) multiplication of numerous strips of fabric. Never touching the floor of the mall itself - which exposes the artist's work – it allows to see, from the outside, a continuous line of coloured light coming from the inside, and, from the inside, to see an unbroken line of light from outside. The temporary museum presents an abstract skin, a textile facade built in black fabric, completely apprehensible by visitors and continuing throughout its surface, which oscillates with airflows. The cylindrical space seeks to emphasize the centrality of the exposed artwork, which has assumed a critical importance in the design space, enhanced by the abdication of a main entrance in favour of a fully permeable facade that dissolves the entrance along the entire periphery of the installation space. For brightness control issues, the work of Jen Lewin is not visible from the outside. Unlike the previous year, the interior of the exhibition space is also not noticeable from the upper galleries of the mall. Instead, the coverage presents itself as a large circular weaving screen that highlights the manual process that characterizes the construction of this dome space, bringing out a unique textile texture. wonderWALL was sought to create an immersive space, which raises awareness of the act of entrance through the will in finding a space that is not completely visible from the outside. At the same time, the absence of physical barriers to free movement demand from visitors in the appropriation of space, preparing them for interaction with the work of Jen Lewin. Protected from the bright light from the shopping, the interior of the exhibition space is a totally white dome created to make stand out The Pool, by reflecting, in its immense surface, the chromatic variations that characterize the interactive light artwork. At the same time, the material continuity and the absence of spatial references helped to make visitors getting lost, even if just for a moment, in that colourful wonder space.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译


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Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Bekkering Adams architects took part in the Architecture Biennale di Venezia 2014. For this occasion an installation was developed: Fundamentals: Form-ContraForm. The installation FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm reflects on the concept and definition of Time, Space and Existence. The essence of FUNDAMENTALS is conceived as the elementary space that every person needs. Architecture is fundamentally created by the definition of co-ordinates in space. The installation FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm deals with the experience of mass versus the cavity. The intention was to provide an experience that is not only shaped by the physical boundaries of space, but is extended beyond the tangible. Within the exhibition room a homogeneous volume in the shape of a cube of 2,4 x 2,4 meters is defined. It is formed by 14.000 balls hanging from wires on a grid of 10 by 10 cm. The cube defines a mass within the room. Inside the cube a cavity is created where visitors can enter. The cube does not fill the whole space between floor and ceiling, thus creating the effect of a floating form. When the visitors stand inside the cavity, wrapped in a cloud of small hanging objects, they will experience the boundary as well as the perception of the endlessness of space. The cavity is enveloped, but due to reflections also the perception of an infinite space is created. The reflective surfaces offer a view into a space that does not exist, suggesting unexpected new vistas. With light projections, designed by BeersNielsen, the perception of the cube is influenced. These light projections change the cavities colour, shape and size, thus offering a different appearance each time. From the outside the cavity can be seen as a changing illuminated shape between the light reflections of the cube.


Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Bekkering Adams architects took part in the Architecture Biennale di Venezia 2014. For this occasion an installation was developed: Fundamentals: Form-ContraForm. The installation FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm reflects on the concept and definition of Time, Space and Existence. The essence of FUNDAMENTALS is conceived as the elementary space that every person needs. Architecture is fundamentally created by the definition of co-ordinates in space. The installation FUNDAMENTALS: Form-ContraForm deals with the experience of mass versus the cavity. The intention was to provide an experience that is not only shaped by the physical boundaries of space, but is extended beyond the tangible. Within the exhibition room a homogeneous volume in the shape of a cube of 2,4 x 2,4 meters is defined. It is formed by 14.000 balls hanging from wires on a grid of 10 by 10 cm. The cube defines a mass within the room. Inside the cube a cavity is created where visitors can enter. The cube does not fill the whole space between floor and ceiling, thus creating the effect of a floating form. When the visitors stand inside the cavity, wrapped in a cloud of small hanging objects, they will experience the boundary as well as the perception of the endlessness of space. The cavity is enveloped, but due to reflections also the perception of an infinite space is created. The reflective surfaces offer a view into a space that does not exist, suggesting unexpected new vistas. With light projections, designed by BeersNielsen, the perception of the cube is influenced. These light projections change the cavities colour, shape and size, thus offering a different appearance each time. From the outside the cavity can be seen as a changing illuminated shape between the light reflections of the cube.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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Live, Love & Let Die

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

‘We don’t know when, where and with whom we will love or be loved. But, isn’t it because our emotions are uncontrollable that our lives are so sensational? To love more or to love less, to take or to give, to own or to belong, to hold on or to let go…to make the most of life, enjoy life or confront life – it is our decision. Life can be hard but beautiful, delicate and fragile – as are love and death. Each of us can decide to face them, to be afraid of them or embrace them. My work says what I think about life, love and death - they are beautiful things to explore and I am ready to grasp them,’ In ‘Live, Love & Let Die’ we see a series of bums, a wall of 71 hearts and hanging illuminated skulls. Connecting them are 5,000 butterflies linking the glories of life, love & death.


Live, Love & Let Die

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

‘We don’t know when, where and with whom we will love or be loved. But, isn’t it because our emotions are uncontrollable that our lives are so sensational? To love more or to love less, to take or to give, to own or to belong, to hold on or to let go…to make the most of life, enjoy life or confront life – it is our decision. Life can be hard but beautiful, delicate and fragile – as are love and death. Each of us can decide to face them, to be afraid of them or embrace them. My work says what I think about life, love and death - they are beautiful things to explore and I am ready to grasp them,’ In ‘Live, Love & Let Die’ we see a series of bums, a wall of 71 hearts and hanging illuminated skulls. Connecting them are 5,000 butterflies linking the glories of life, love & death.


8 ½ Installation Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

8 1⁄2 is a mobile theatre, a machine to experience public space. It investigates the dual nature of public space, as the place of intimacy and elective relationships and in the meantime the preferential territory of event and spectacle. The installation intends to be a reflection about the transition that changes public space from being the background of private encounters and individual moments to being the scene of public events and collective representations. 8 1⁄2 consists of two complementary elements: the wall and the arena 1. The wall: 8 and 1⁄2 meters high, is built with modular timber frames covered with upcycled beer kegs. It transforms the surrounding space laying down a principal direction and creates a threshold effect dividing the “front” from the “back”. An opening in the structure can be used as access point to the interior space and as stage alternatively facing one side or the

other. During the plays, the wall works as scaenae frons, backdrop or technical infrastructure for machines and equipment. A path climbing to an upper level can be used during the shows as a part of the stage or, in the everyday life, as a new point of view over the area. The LED lighting system works as a display that can show geometrical drawings, graphics, typographic fonts. 2. The arena: it consists in four “relational objects” and a canopy that goes from the wall to a linear system composed by six blocks. The arena is both a theatre, a place addressed to public events and plays, and a square, an architectural device for the daily use of the common space. An accurate shadow study of the canopy allows both shaded and sunny areas during summertime. The wall and the arena work together creating an intimate relational space, an “urban room” where you can enjoy the space together, play, chill or simply stay.


8 ½ Installation Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

8 1⁄2 is a mobile theatre, a machine to experience public space. It investigates the dual nature of public space, as the place of intimacy and elective relationships and in the meantime the preferential territory of event and spectacle. The installation intends to be a reflection about the transition that changes public space from being the background of private encounters and individual moments to being the scene of public events and collective representations. 8 1⁄2 consists of two complementary elements: the wall and the arena 1. The wall: 8 and 1⁄2 meters high, is built with modular timber frames covered with upcycled beer kegs. It transforms the surrounding space laying down a principal direction and creates a threshold effect dividing the “front” from the “back”. An opening in the structure can be used as access point to the interior space and as stage alternatively facing one side or the

other. During the plays, the wall works as scaenae frons, backdrop or technical infrastructure for machines and equipment. A path climbing to an upper level can be used during the shows as a part of the stage or, in the everyday life, as a new point of view over the area. The LED lighting system works as a display that can show geometrical drawings, graphics, typographic fonts. 2. The arena: it consists in four “relational objects” and a canopy that goes from the wall to a linear system composed by six blocks. The arena is both a theatre, a place addressed to public events and plays, and a square, an architectural device for the daily use of the common space. An accurate shadow study of the canopy allows both shaded and sunny areas during summertime. The wall and the arena work together creating an intimate relational space, an “urban room” where you can enjoy the space together, play, chill or simply stay.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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BVLGARI Pavilion Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

The BVLGARI Pavilion is an installation commissioned by the prestigious luxury jewellery brand for Abu Dhabi Art 2012. The project was required to be both representative of BVLGARI’s style and its creative ideologies, whilst being emblematic of a “modern mythology”. The reapproriation of something mundane and transforming it into something magnificent became the starting point for our design concept. In this sense a certain brutal honesty was desired in the final outcome so that the form was a self supporting entity in itself without the need for a separate internal structure; therefore the form was not merely a decorative veil. A design based upon the packing of acrylic tubes was devised. Acrylic tubes are an “off-the-shelf” product that comes in set lengths and diameters. Although they have a diverse range of uses they are rarely used as principal architectural elements. By packing them close together not only do they begin to form mass but also provide structural rigidity. Much like the rough gemstone the concept was to slice and cut, smooth and polish the form to result in new spaces and environmental conditions, to reinvent the material as something extraordinary and unique. Whilst attempting to create a wholly new spatial experience the team was also keen for it to simultaneously be something completely familiar, evocative of BVLGARI’s heritage. In this way it was decided to form arches, arcades and cupolas through the excavation and sculpting. As well as being exposed and translucent this method provided a recognizable enclosure and intimacy all be it an ethereal sensation of it. In total the design consists of 2272 tubes with approximately 10,000 individual connections between them with a final weight of nearly 6 tones. During the day the pavilion plays and manipulates the changing conditions of the sunlight however at night the aim was to provide an alternative experience in which the light flowed through the structure like water constantly hiding and revealing different parts of the pavilion.


BVLGARI Pavilion Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

The BVLGARI Pavilion is an installation commissioned by the prestigious luxury jewellery brand for Abu Dhabi Art 2012. The project was required to be both representative of BVLGARI’s style and its creative ideologies, whilst being emblematic of a “modern mythology”. The reapproriation of something mundane and transforming it into something magnificent became the starting point for our design concept. In this sense a certain brutal honesty was desired in the final outcome so that the form was a self supporting entity in itself without the need for a separate internal structure; therefore the form was not merely a decorative veil. A design based upon the packing of acrylic tubes was devised. Acrylic tubes are an “off-the-shelf” product that comes in set lengths and diameters. Although they have a diverse range of uses they are rarely used as principal architectural elements. By packing them close together not only do they begin to form mass but also provide structural rigidity. Much like the rough gemstone the concept was to slice and cut, smooth and polish the form to result in new spaces and environmental conditions, to reinvent the material as something extraordinary and unique. Whilst attempting to create a wholly new spatial experience the team was also keen for it to simultaneously be something completely familiar, evocative of BVLGARI’s heritage. In this way it was decided to form arches, arcades and cupolas through the excavation and sculpting. As well as being exposed and translucent this method provided a recognizable enclosure and intimacy all be it an ethereal sensation of it. In total the design consists of 2272 tubes with approximately 10,000 individual connections between them with a final weight of nearly 6 tones. During the day the pavilion plays and manipulates the changing conditions of the sunlight however at night the aim was to provide an alternative experience in which the light flowed through the structure like water constantly hiding and revealing different parts of the pavilion.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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Ban

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Ban is the latest pavilion by architects Orproject which has been constructed for the Beijing Design Week 2012. The Chinese title refers to floral petals, and similar to the way that the shape of a flower is created by its bent petals, Ban is constructed from bent polymer sheets which form the structure, shapes and volume from a multitude of leaves. “A flat sheet of a flexible or thin material tends to be soft and easily deformable. However as soon as the sheet is bent into a curve and held in this position, it becomes very strong in its vertical direction.” explains Orproject partner Rajat Sodhi. “This principle can be seen in many flowers, where the petals are bent so that they can form the shape of the corolla, and this principle has also been used for the construction of Ban.” Orproject then designed the pavilion by creating columns, arches and vaults - all based on these anisotropic geometries. The plan of the pavilion is organized around four centers. The thin PETG sheets are CNC cut into their designed profiles and each pieces is imprinted with an identification number. This describes a piece's location on the plan and its relationship with the adjoining pieces. Each piece is cold bent into its curvature and when attached to other pieces using simple nuts and bolts, the geometry gains resistance to vertical forces and the structure begins to act as a self-supporting system.

The field of the polymer sheets now results in a field of curved edges along the outside of the pavilion shape. Those lines are seemingly continuous across the different sheets and form a flowing network of curves. They are iteratively developing from each sheet to the one behind, and they take the viewer’s eyes across the structure and into the sky. Orproject are experimental architects with offices in London, New Delhi and Beijing. Similar geometries have been explored with the installation Anisotropia, which was constructed for the National Museum of China in Beijing, and with Orproject’s proposal for Busan Opera House. Anisotropia is based on a composition for piano. A basic unit of two curved sheets is repeated and modulated in a similar way, in which a basic twelve-tone row was transformed in the composition. The hanging surface of bamboo lamella forms the prototype of a performative wall system, which can control the view, light and shading properties across the system. For the design of Busan Opera House, this system was used for a series of walls which enclose the building and which form the inner partitions between the main spaces. The wall system can here act to allow light into the atrium and views out onto the sea, whereas the system closes in front of the performance spaces and helps to concentrate the activities onto the inside of the building.


Ban

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Ban is the latest pavilion by architects Orproject which has been constructed for the Beijing Design Week 2012. The Chinese title refers to floral petals, and similar to the way that the shape of a flower is created by its bent petals, Ban is constructed from bent polymer sheets which form the structure, shapes and volume from a multitude of leaves. “A flat sheet of a flexible or thin material tends to be soft and easily deformable. However as soon as the sheet is bent into a curve and held in this position, it becomes very strong in its vertical direction.” explains Orproject partner Rajat Sodhi. “This principle can be seen in many flowers, where the petals are bent so that they can form the shape of the corolla, and this principle has also been used for the construction of Ban.” Orproject then designed the pavilion by creating columns, arches and vaults - all based on these anisotropic geometries. The plan of the pavilion is organized around four centers. The thin PETG sheets are CNC cut into their designed profiles and each pieces is imprinted with an identification number. This describes a piece's location on the plan and its relationship with the adjoining pieces. Each piece is cold bent into its curvature and when attached to other pieces using simple nuts and bolts, the geometry gains resistance to vertical forces and the structure begins to act as a self-supporting system.

The field of the polymer sheets now results in a field of curved edges along the outside of the pavilion shape. Those lines are seemingly continuous across the different sheets and form a flowing network of curves. They are iteratively developing from each sheet to the one behind, and they take the viewer’s eyes across the structure and into the sky. Orproject are experimental architects with offices in London, New Delhi and Beijing. Similar geometries have been explored with the installation Anisotropia, which was constructed for the National Museum of China in Beijing, and with Orproject’s proposal for Busan Opera House. Anisotropia is based on a composition for piano. A basic unit of two curved sheets is repeated and modulated in a similar way, in which a basic twelve-tone row was transformed in the composition. The hanging surface of bamboo lamella forms the prototype of a performative wall system, which can control the view, light and shading properties across the system. For the design of Busan Opera House, this system was used for a series of walls which enclose the building and which form the inner partitions between the main spaces. The wall system can here act to allow light into the atrium and views out onto the sea, whereas the system closes in front of the performance spaces and helps to concentrate the activities onto the inside of the building.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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Coca Cola Beatbox Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Ban is the latest pavilion by architects Orproject which has been constructed for the Beijing Design Week 2012. The Chinese title refers to floral petals, and similar to the way that the shape of a flower is created by its bent petals, Ban is constructed from bent polymer sheets which form the structure, shapes and volume from a multitude of leaves. “A flat sheet of a flexible or thin material tends to be soft and easily deformable. However as soon as the sheet is bent into a curve and held in this position, it becomes very strong in its vertical direction.” explains Orproject partner Rajat Sodhi. “This principle can be seen in many flowers, where the petals are bent so that they can form the shape of the corolla, and this principle has also been used for the construction of Ban.” Orproject then designed the pavilion by creating columns, arches and vaults - all based on these anisotropic geometries.


Coca Cola Beatbox Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Ban is the latest pavilion by architects Orproject which has been constructed for the Beijing Design Week 2012. The Chinese title refers to floral petals, and similar to the way that the shape of a flower is created by its bent petals, Ban is constructed from bent polymer sheets which form the structure, shapes and volume from a multitude of leaves. “A flat sheet of a flexible or thin material tends to be soft and easily deformable. However as soon as the sheet is bent into a curve and held in this position, it becomes very strong in its vertical direction.” explains Orproject partner Rajat Sodhi. “This principle can be seen in many flowers, where the petals are bent so that they can form the shape of the corolla, and this principle has also been used for the construction of Ban.” Orproject then designed the pavilion by creating columns, arches and vaults - all based on these anisotropic geometries.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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Los Angeles Opens It Heart of Compassion Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Los Angeles Opens Its Heart of Compassion is located at the busy intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue at the heart of Koreatown in Los Angeles, California. The suspended sculpture is comprised of a 175 foot diaphanous, undulating metal screen, etched with an abstracted lotus motif developed by Cliff Garten Studio. Centered in front is a 20 foot tall, three dimensional lotus blossom made of 100 petallike sections laser cut from aluminum and affixed to a stainless steel rib structure that disperse LED light throughout the plaza. Both structures are illuminated with full color changing LED lights that invigorate the plaza below the sculpture with refracted swells of color that deepen in relation to the amount of natural daylight. The motif of the lotus is carried through the plaza in glass etched panels that line the public staircase leading from the plaza to the second floor balcony overlooking Wilshire Boulevard, a central thoroughfare of Los Angeles. The abstracted lotus blossom references the unique history of the Koreatown neighborhood articulated in modern materials. This installation invigorates a public plaza created by this new development in a highly active urban corridor. The public space responds to the revitalization of the Koreatown neighborhood by identifying as a public gathering space, offering a sense of community and community identity. The iconic sculpture has become synonymous with The Vermont towers; the sculpture covers the floors 2-6 of the parking structure situated between the two towers of The Vermont, a mixeduse development featuring new retail and residential spaces. The two residential towers, 23 stories and 29 stories, and their 464 units, are joined by the illuminated sculpture, Los Angeles Opens Its Heart of Compassion.


Los Angeles Opens It Heart of Compassion Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda Los Angeles Opens Its Heart of Compassion is located at the busy intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue at the heart of Koreatown in Los Angeles, California. The suspended sculpture is comprised of a 175 foot diaphanous, undulating metal screen, etched with an abstracted lotus motif developed by Cliff Garten Studio. Centered in front is a 20 foot tall, three dimensional lotus blossom made of 100 petallike sections laser cut from aluminum and affixed to a stainless steel rib structure that disperse LED light throughout the plaza. Both structures are illuminated with full color changing LED lights that invigorate the plaza below the sculpture with refracted swells of color that deepen in relation to the amount of natural daylight. The motif of the lotus is carried through the plaza in glass etched panels that line the public staircase leading from the plaza to the second floor balcony overlooking Wilshire Boulevard, a central thoroughfare of Los Angeles. The abstracted lotus blossom references the unique history of the Koreatown neighborhood articulated in modern materials. This installation invigorates a public plaza created by this new development in a highly active urban corridor. The public space responds to the revitalization of the Koreatown neighborhood by identifying as a public gathering space, offering a sense of community and community identity. The iconic sculpture has become synonymous with The Vermont towers; the sculpture covers the floors 2-6 of the parking structure situated between the two towers of The Vermont, a mixeduse development featuring new retail and residential spaces. The two residential towers, 23 stories and 29 stories, and their 464 units, are joined by the illuminated sculpture, Los Angeles Opens Its Heart of Compassion.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译


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ANEMONE Oyler Wu Collaborative Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Anemone is an art/architectural installation aimed at weaving together aesthetic experience and tactile engagementa combination generally considered off limits within the world of contemporary art. All too often, art installations are considered precious, almost sacred objects; while they are meant to be appreciated for their aesthetic beauty, they offer little in terms of human interaction. In other words, they are meant to be seen, not felt. Recognizing that human engagement is one of the key factors in creating a rich experience, Anemone has been designed with the idea of interaction as one of its key design objectives. Upon first glance, the piece is meant to be viewed as a relatively simple, elegant object, with subtle undulations that wrap its walls and smooth bent corners. Given a closer look, however, one discovers that, like the bristling tentacles of its namesake, the sea anemone, the surface is actually a build-up of thousands of transparent flexible rods. Each of the rods is inserted to gradually changing depths, creating the undulating effect. This undulation is meant to evoke a sense of curiosity about its construction, use, tactility, and materially, encouraging different forms of interaction. Elements are designed with that interaction in mind, incorporating a simple wall that might be brushed, and benches used for seating. At the center of the installation is a table/bed like element that sits below a cantilevered canopy of bristles.


ANEMONE Oyler Wu Collaborative Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda

Anemone is an art/architectural installation aimed at weaving together aesthetic experience and tactile engagementa combination generally considered off limits within the world of contemporary art. All too often, art installations are considered precious, almost sacred objects; while they are meant to be appreciated for their aesthetic beauty, they offer little in terms of human interaction. In other words, they are meant to be seen, not felt. Recognizing that human engagement is one of the key factors in creating a rich experience, Anemone has been designed with the idea of interaction as one of its key design objectives. Upon first glance, the piece is meant to be viewed as a relatively simple, elegant object, with subtle undulations that wrap its walls and smooth bent corners. Given a closer look, however, one discovers that, like the bristling tentacles of its namesake, the sea anemone, the surface is actually a build-up of thousands of transparent flexible rods. Each of the rods is inserted to gradually changing depths, creating the undulating effect. This undulation is meant to evoke a sense of curiosity about its construction, use, tactility, and materially, encouraging different forms of interaction. Elements are designed with that interaction in mind, incorporating a simple wall that might be brushed, and benches used for seating. At the center of the installation is a table/bed like element that sits below a cantilevered canopy of bristles.


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻���中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文


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Golden Moon Designer

Kristof Crolla, Sebastien Delagrange, Dannes Kok, Kenneth Cheung and Yi Sa Chan Competition Design: Kristof Crolla of LEAD & Adam Fingrut

Project Management Team

Kristof Crolla, Sebastien Delagrange, Dannes Kok, Kenneth Cheung and Yi Sa Chan of LEAD, and Nicholas Benner, Chris Lee (Anthropods Associates Ltd.), Paulina Lau (APT Engineering Consultant Ltd.)

Project Management

Laboratory for Explorative Architecture & Design Ltd. G/F 1 Tai On Terrace, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong S.A.R.

Construction

Free Form Construction Co. Ltd. (Main Contractor), Fonkwang Development Ltd. & Guangzhou Shipyard Company Ltd. (Steel), Wing Yick Scaffolders (Bamboo), Wings Design Production Ltd. (Fabric), LED Artist (LED)

Location

Hong Kong, China

Photographer

Kevin Ng, Grandy Lui and Pano Kalogeropoulos The Golden Moon is a temporary architectural structure that explores how Hong Kong’s unique building traditions and craftsmanship can be combined with digital design techniques in the creation of a highly expressive and captivating public event space. It was built for the 2012 Mid-Autumn Festival Lantern Wonderland and was on display for 6 days in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park. The Golden Moon revisits the concept of a Chinese lantern and makes a direct link to the Mid-Autumn Festival legend of Moon Goddess Chang’e who can only meet her husband Houyi on the night of the Mid-Autumn Festival, when the moon is at its fullest and most beautiful. To symbolise the passionate love burning between them, the 6-storey-high, spherical moon lantern is clad with abstracted flames in fiery colours and patterns. Traditional materials for making lanterns, such as translucent fabric, metal wire and bamboo, have been translated to a large scale. A light-weight steel geodesic dome forms the pavilion’s primary structure and is the basis for a computer-generated grid wrapped around it. This grid is materialised through a secondary structure from 2km of bamboo sticks. For this, Hong Kong’s traditional bamboo scaffolding techniques were used – a high-speed, instinctive way of building scaffoldings for e.g. the city’s many skyscrapers. This highly intuitive and imprecise craft was merged with exact digital design technology to accurately install and bend the bamboo sticks into a grid wrapping the steel dome. This grid was then clad with stretch fabric flames, all lit up by animated LED lights. All materials were recycled upon demolition. Built in only 11 days, the Golden Moon shows how, through a combination of state-of-the-art digital design technology and traditional hand craftsmanship, complex geometry can be built at high speed and low cost. The project rethinks the premise of digital design by anchoring the paradigm in a strong materiality. With over 400,000 visitors during its 6-day lifespan, the pavilion used its dynamic space, structure, colour, texture and light to trigger a sensuous response from its visitors.


Golden Moon Designer

Kristof Crolla, Sebastien Delagrange, Dannes Kok, Kenneth Cheung and Yi Sa Chan Competition Design: Kristof Crolla of LEAD & Adam Fingrut

Project Management Team

Kristof Crolla, Sebastien Delagrange, Dannes Kok, Kenneth Cheung and Yi Sa Chan of LEAD, and Nicholas Benner, Chris Lee (Anthropods Associates Ltd.), Paulina Lau (APT Engineering Consultant Ltd.)

Project Management

Laboratory for Explorative Architecture & Design Ltd. G/F 1 Tai On Terrace, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong S.A.R.

Construction

Free Form Construction Co. Ltd. (Main Contractor), Fonkwang Development Ltd. & Guangzhou Shipyard Company Ltd. (Steel), Wing Yick Scaffolders (Bamboo), Wings Design Production Ltd. (Fabric), LED Artist (LED)

Location

Hong Kong, China

Photographer

Kevin Ng, Grandy Lui and Pano Kalogeropoulos The Golden Moon is a temporary architectural structure that explores how Hong Kong’s unique building traditions and craftsmanship can be combined with digital design techniques in the creation of a highly expressive and captivating public event space. It was built for the 2012 Mid-Autumn Festival Lantern Wonderland and was on display for 6 days in Hong Kong’s Victoria Park. The Golden Moon revisits the concept of a Chinese lantern and makes a direct link to the Mid-Autumn Festival legend of Moon Goddess Chang’e who can only meet her husband Houyi on the night of the Mid-Autumn Festival, when the moon is at its fullest and most beautiful. To symbolise the passionate love burning between them, the 6-storey-high, spherical moon lantern is clad with abstracted flames in fiery colours and patterns. Traditional materials for making lanterns, such as translucent fabric, metal wire and bamboo, have been translated to a large scale. A light-weight steel geodesic dome forms the pavilion’s primary structure and is the basis for a computer-generated grid wrapped around it. This grid is materialised through a secondary structure from 2km of bamboo sticks. For this, Hong Kong’s traditional bamboo scaffolding techniques were used – a high-speed, instinctive way of building scaffoldings for e.g. the city’s many skyscrapers. This highly intuitive and imprecise craft was merged with exact digital design technology to accurately install and bend the bamboo sticks into a grid wrapping the steel dome. This grid was then clad with stretch fabric flames, all lit up by animated LED lights. All materials were recycled upon demolition. Built in only 11 days, the Golden Moon shows how, through a combination of state-of-the-art digital design technology and traditional hand craftsmanship, complex geometry can be built at high speed and low cost. The project rethinks the premise of digital design by anchoring the paradigm in a strong materiality. With over 400,000 visitors during its 6-day lifespan, the pavilion used its dynamic space, structure, colour, texture and light to trigger a sensuous response from its visitors.


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"The Dome is an experimentation that goes beyond traditional architectural form and composition to foresee fundamental aspects for Chinese architectural space." The workshop is based on the experience of self-construction took place in Shenzhen in 2009, which at that time had created an installation, small, spontaneous and illegal for residential and social club use. It was a place to host meetings, exhibitions, series of conferences and debates to divulge the concepts of Biourbanism and Urban Acupuncture supported by Hsieh Ying Chun, Weak! Architects designer, with Marco Casagrande, and Roan ChingYueh of the Cocoon Project in 2009. 14th International Architecture Exhibition - Fundamentals. The Parasite Installation is the outcome of the cooperation between the architect Hsieh Ying Chun and TCA Think Tank, led by Pier Alessio Rizzardi and Zhang Hankun, together with students from Europe, Australia and China. The intensive five day’s workshop had created the installation of what has been renamed as Parasite Pavilion of the exhibition in Biennale. The parasite pavilion Workshop is organized to create the installation for the Synergy & Symbiosis event, which is realized on the vacuum in the garden outside the Chinese Pavilion to attract the visitors arriving from Giardini and Arsenale exhibition. The Dome offers shade, protection, a place where to escape from the great content of Absorbing Modernity exhibition, allowing direct experience to elements of architecture. The interior is the result of 4 systems shaped by a single element as curved mesh, creating different elements of the architecture. The entrance shows itself, inviting visitors to be adsorbed from the surrounding, hiding the main room and creating expectation, pushing the inside exploration. The corridor opens to the main space, where the scale gets wider as the texture of the ground gets bigger, changing the equilibrium and the sound of the experience. The space recompresses next to the exit outlining the view of the Arsenale watchtower on the other side of the canal and bringing back the visitors to the Venice Biennale environment.

Parasite Pavilion Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart


"The Dome is an experimentation that goes beyond traditional architectural form and composition to foresee fundamental aspects for Chinese architectural space." The workshop is based on the experience of self-construction took place in Shenzhen in 2009, which at that time had created an installation, small, spontaneous and illegal for residential and social club use. It was a place to host meetings, exhibitions, series of conferences and debates to divulge the concepts of Biourbanism and Urban Acupuncture supported by Hsieh Ying Chun, Weak! Architects designer, with Marco Casagrande, and Roan ChingYueh of the Cocoon Project in 2009. 14th International Architecture Exhibition - Fundamentals. The Parasite Installation is the outcome of the cooperation between the architect Hsieh Ying Chun and TCA Think Tank, led by Pier Alessio Rizzardi and Zhang Hankun, together with students from Europe, Australia and China. The intensive five day’s workshop had created the installation of what has been renamed as Parasite Pavilion of the exhibition in Biennale. The parasite pavilion Workshop is organized to create the installation for the Synergy & Symbiosis event, which is realized on the vacuum in the garden outside the Chinese Pavilion to attract the visitors arriving from Giardini and Arsenale exhibition. The Dome offers shade, protection, a place where to escape from the great content of Absorbing Modernity exhibition, allowing direct experience to elements of architecture. The interior is the result of 4 systems shaped by a single element as curved mesh, creating different elements of the architecture. The entrance shows itself, inviting visitors to be adsorbed from the surrounding, hiding the main room and creating expectation, pushing the inside exploration. The corridor opens to the main space, where the scale gets wider as the texture of the ground gets bigger, changing the equilibrium and the sound of the experience. The space recompresses next to the exit outlining the view of the Arsenale watchtower on the other side of the canal and bringing back the visitors to the Venice Biennale environment.

Parasite Pavilion Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart


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Radiant Lines Deisnger Asif Khan

Radiant Lines was commissioned by Federation Square as the centerpiece of the “Light in Winter Festival 2014” at Federation Square, Melbourne. Radiant Lines is an exploration of line, rhythm, velocity and volume. Forty rings of raw aluminum are super-imposed in space creating a visually dynamic layering effect- animating the public space around it. A giant moire pattern appears, as a result of visitors shifting viewpoints of the structure when circulating Federation Square. As dusk approached the Radiant Lines are illuminated in a rhythm of light that mimics the pulsing natural phenomenon of bioluminescence. Individual visitors trigger orbits of light as they cross over invisible concentric thresholds stretching out into the square. Visitors are able to pass under the rings into a central space, an immersive environment of light and energy. 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


Radiant Lines Deisnger Asif Khan

Radiant Lines was commissioned by Federation Square as the centerpiece of the “Light in Winter Festival 2014” at Federation Square, Melbourne. Radiant Lines is an exploration of line, rhythm, velocity and volume. Forty rings of raw aluminum are super-imposed in space creating a visually dynamic layering effect- animating the public space around it. A giant moire pattern appears, as a result of visitors shifting viewpoints of the structure when circulating Federation Square. As dusk approached the Radiant Lines are illuminated in a rhythm of light that mimics the pulsing natural phenomenon of bioluminescence. Individual visitors trigger orbits of light as they cross over invisible concentric thresholds stretching out into the square. Visitors are able to pass under the rings into a central space, an immersive environment of light and energy. 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


The Wonderful and Brilliant Light Maze Parcours Selfie Park

Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The site is an artificial park on the rooftop of New Town Plaza Shopping Centre in Sha Tin, New Territories, in Hong Kong. The park is located on the eighth floor constituting an artificial landscape that spreads over three blocks and is used for recreation and circulation, whilst at the same time connecting several high rise dwellings, hotels, office buildings and community facilities sitting on top of the shopping centre. We were commissioned to design a series of light installations for a ludic parcours with altering maze concepts as the common leitmotif for the different designs that could be walked through as an attraction by part of the daily 350.000 New Town Plaza visitors. Instead of typical light motives that are looked at only from the outside and perceived as objects, we created a series of installations that can be walked through focusing on the atmosphere perceived inside. The parcours starts with an artificial jungle of pink and white coloured flower motives suspended in an apparent random order. Surrounding the existing trees on site, the light installation evokes a dazzling atmosphere of a luminescent blooming tropical garden at night. The following ambient is constituted by a maze build of transparent Plexiglas panels with the same flower motive carved in the material and illuminated in varied colours from top and bottom. The interaction of both transparency and reflections create and an apparent infinite space of geometric order with the flower motive acting as luminescent and never ending wallpaper. The maze layout was specifically designed for NTP by maze designer Adrian Fisher. The parcours finishing atmosphere is constituted by a maze of blue coloured geometric flashes apparently floating in the sky and creating a groined vault, built just out of light.


The Wonderful and Brilliant Light Maze Parcours Selfie Park

Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The site is an artificial park on the rooftop of New Town Plaza Shopping Centre in Sha Tin, New Territories, in Hong Kong. The park is located on the eighth floor constituting an artificial landscape that spreads over three blocks and is used for recreation and circulation, whilst at the same time connecting several high rise dwellings, hotels, office buildings and community facilities sitting on top of the shopping centre. We were commissioned to design a series of light installations for a ludic parcours with altering maze concepts as the common leitmotif for the different designs that could be walked through as an attraction by part of the daily 350.000 New Town Plaza visitors. Instead of typical light motives that are looked at only from the outside and perceived as objects, we created a series of installations that can be walked through focusing on the atmosphere perceived inside. The parcours starts with an artificial jungle of pink and white coloured flower motives suspended in an apparent random order. Surrounding the existing trees on site, the light installation evokes a dazzling atmosphere of a luminescent blooming tropical garden at night. The following ambient is constituted by a maze build of transparent Plexiglas panels with the same flower motive carved in the material and illuminated in varied colours from top and bottom. The interaction of both transparency and reflections create and an apparent infinite space of geometric order with the flower motive acting as luminescent and never ending wallpaper. The maze layout was specifically designed for NTP by maze designer Adrian Fisher. The parcours finishing atmosphere is constituted by a maze of blue coloured geometric flashes apparently floating in the sky and creating a groined vault, built just out of light.


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Tape Paris Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Tape Paris is a part of an extensive group exhibition titled "Inside", which has taken up residence in the Parisian Palais de Tokyo until January 2015. The curatorial concept delves into the murky territory of both physical and psychological interiority, thematising immersion, introspection and probing of the depths of self. The main idea was to transform the whole building into a convulsive mind/body organism whose slippery inner limits a motivated explorer has yet to trace and confront. The stretched biomorphic skin of Tape Paris is marking the entry point to the whole experience, being a literal incarnation of an inner-directed, regressive environment - the sense of descent into the primordial always lingering around its openings. It took twelve people ten days to wrap-up the concrete pillars in the great entrance hall of Palais de Tokyo into a maze of accessible translucent passageways, which coil 50 meters through the gallery space and reach the total height of 6 meters.

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda


Tape Paris Design

Studio Echelman

Materials

Tenara fiber, braided polyester with a Spectra core, and colored lighting

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Tape Paris is a part of an extensive group exhibition titled "Inside", which has taken up residence in the Parisian Palais de Tokyo until January 2015. The curatorial concept delves into the murky territory of both physical and psychological interiority, thematising immersion, introspection and probing of the depths of self. The main idea was to transform the whole building into a convulsive mind/body organism whose slippery inner limits a motivated explorer has yet to trace and confront. The stretched biomorphic skin of Tape Paris is marking the entry point to the whole experience, being a literal incarnation of an inner-directed, regressive environment - the sense of descent into the primordial always lingering around its openings. It took twelve people ten days to wrap-up the concrete pillars in the great entrance hall of Palais de Tokyo into a maze of accessible translucent passageways, which coil 50 meters through the gallery space and reach the total height of 6 meters.

Designer Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe, Adrian Fisher Team Philip Baumann, Elisa Luda


中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中 文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译 中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻 译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文 翻译中文翻译中文翻译中文翻译


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Net Blow up Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Net Blow up is a further development of the Net project both in means of construction and appearance. The object is inflated till the outer surface reaches adequate tension for stretching the nets connected on the inner side of the object. This construction excludes any use of additional structure. The result is a soft object which deforms and mutates with every movement of its temporary habitants. The outer membrane acts both like a "soft box" diffuser of the outside light, or a projection screen in case of inner illumination of the installation. Projected shadows of visitors entraped in the internal net structure resemble shadow theatre performances from East Asia.


Net Blow up Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Net Blow up is a further development of the Net project both in means of construction and appearance. The object is inflated till the outer surface reaches adequate tension for stretching the nets connected on the inner side of the object. This construction excludes any use of additional structure. The result is a soft object which deforms and mutates with every movement of its temporary habitants. The outer membrane acts both like a "soft box" diffuser of the outside light, or a projection screen in case of inner illumination of the installation. Projected shadows of visitors entraped in the internal net structure resemble shadow theatre performances from East Asia.


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Frozen Trees II

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Frozen Trees, the lighting installation that devises an illuminated, frozen and fractal Christmas landscape built from daily objects, had travelled to London’s Victory Park in East Village. Originally displayed on Lisbon’s D. Pedro IV Square, the installation brightened the holiday period in one of London’s sizzling public spaces, on the site of the former Olympic Village. Composed by hundreds of plastic bag dispensers from IKEA organized in fourteen “trees”, it gently glows through the night and originates a fanciful world that involves and alters the paths of pedestrians, building a walk-through experience. Taking advantage of the module’s unique shape and also of its materiality - translucent plastic - that has the ability to potentiate the transmittance of light, either natural or artificial, Frozen Trees stand out as an otherworldly landscape. In order to create a festive crystalline glow, the “trees” are lit from inside by white monochromatic LED, which is characterized by its low voltage and energy consumption and also allows to adjust the light’s intensity, amplifying the impact of the installation. Being its second edition, Frozen Trees II underlined that this lighting installation was conceived to be assembled as a pre-fabricated light structure, simplifying the transportation and his assemblage, facilitating to pop-up in one place and disappear from the site without destroying or damaging anything.


Frozen Trees II

Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

Frozen Trees, the lighting installation that devises an illuminated, frozen and fractal Christmas landscape built from daily objects, had travelled to London’s Victory Park in East Village. Originally displayed on Lisbon’s D. Pedro IV Square, the installation brightened the holiday period in one of London’s sizzling public spaces, on the site of the former Olympic Village. Composed by hundreds of plastic bag dispensers from IKEA organized in fourteen “trees”, it gently glows through the night and originates a fanciful world that involves and alters the paths of pedestrians, building a walk-through experience. Taking advantage of the module’s unique shape and also of its materiality - translucent plastic - that has the ability to potentiate the transmittance of light, either natural or artificial, Frozen Trees stand out as an otherworldly landscape. In order to create a festive crystalline glow, the “trees” are lit from inside by white monochromatic LED, which is characterized by its low voltage and energy consumption and also allows to adjust the light’s intensity, amplifying the impact of the installation. Being its second edition, Frozen Trees II underlined that this lighting installation was conceived to be assembled as a pre-fabricated light structure, simplifying the transportation and his assemblage, facilitating to pop-up in one place and disappear from the site without destroying or damaging anything.


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JT Smokeless Area & Smoking Area Lighting and design

Lighting and design

Location

Location

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

When you are not able to find something that should have been there, your standard idea may renew. Smokeless tobacco does not make smoke which should have made. We designed the space for smokeless tobacco in a manner of the same idea with such smokeless tobacco. The architecture has less presence of pillars and seems like a gas or mist. When we have a doubts of standard shape, new idea will appear. We hope that such a incongruity make visitors surprise and fun.


JT Smokeless Area & Smoking Area Lighting and design

Lighting and design

Location

Location

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

ARUP Lighting Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

When you are not able to find something that should have been there, your standard idea may renew. Smokeless tobacco does not make smoke which should have made. We designed the space for smokeless tobacco in a manner of the same idea with such smokeless tobacco. The architecture has less presence of pillars and seems like a gas or mist. When we have a doubts of standard shape, new idea will appear. We hope that such a incongruity make visitors surprise and fun.


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Music Terrace Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean AirhartLighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The changes of nature, like restless waves or swinging grasses. The curves shown by gravity is like a track of the star or the waxing and waning of the moon. By reinterpreting elements of beauty in nature, we designed the territory of abstracted forest in urban life. Glass fiber pipe has strong and tough but light property, and the property enable to design "evanescence" of swing and "ductility" of strength together in large arches. There, visitors are able to be relax and feel coolness by seeing the swinging object. We designed the cool and fantastic space where complete by using human imagination.


Music Terrace Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean AirhartLighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The changes of nature, like restless waves or swinging grasses. The curves shown by gravity is like a track of the star or the waxing and waning of the moon. By reinterpreting elements of beauty in nature, we designed the territory of abstracted forest in urban life. Glass fiber pipe has strong and tough but light property, and the property enable to design "evanescence" of swing and "ductility" of strength together in large arches. There, visitors are able to be relax and feel coolness by seeing the swinging object. We designed the cool and fantastic space where complete by using human imagination.


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S達o Paulo Fashion Week Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The idea of this space is to highlight and question the relationship between the body, space and movement. "Using basic geometry, colours and volumes and basic colors, the installation takes the existing space and transforms it into a more sensory experience. It was inspired by Oscar Schlemmer's Bauhaus theater where the Gestalt (forms or shapes) defines that: the whole is greater (than) the sum of the participating parties," says the architect, Marko Brajovic. "The proposed set design/scenography for the next edition of Fashion Week by Atelier Marko Brajovic finds inspiration in the experimental play" says Triadisches Ballett "costume designer and Oscar Schlemmer choreographer developed in 1923 at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. The study of the relationship of the basic forms in motion with the volumetric Gestalt chromatisms generated the basic concepts of visual and performing arts of contemporaneity. The Bauhaus studies, Bauhaus theatre and Gestalt theory were applied strategically in our set design to receive, conduct, and expose a multi-sensory to the public/people attending this event. Coloured ribbons emerge from the new edition logo and are "sewn" into the existing architecture, entering into the front door where they then disperse, creating facilities of geometric bodies that interact with lights and sound. With a single, strong gesture, the sensorial installation creates a chromatic and volumetric intervention which assumes and transforms the space in an exceptional and unique experience, allowing the public, in a psychological and spiritual "Gestalt," to receive the whole body of the new shows of Fashion Week 2014! "


S達o Paulo Fashion Week Lighting and design ARUP Lighting

Location

Seattle, WA

Photographer Sean Airhart

The idea of this space is to highlight and question the relationship between the body, space and movement. "Using basic geometry, colours and volumes and basic colors, the installation takes the existing space and transforms it into a more sensory experience. It was inspired by Oscar Schlemmer's Bauhaus theater where the Gestalt (forms or shapes) defines that: the whole is greater (than) the sum of the participating parties," says the architect, Marko Brajovic. "The proposed set design/scenography for the next edition of Fashion Week by Atelier Marko Brajovic finds inspiration in the experimental play" says Triadisches Ballett "costume designer and Oscar Schlemmer choreographer developed in 1923 at the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany. The study of the relationship of the basic forms in motion with the volumetric Gestalt chromatisms generated the basic concepts of visual and performing arts of contemporaneity. The Bauhaus studies, Bauhaus theatre and Gestalt theory were applied strategically in our set design to receive, conduct, and expose a multi-sensory to the public/people attending this event. Coloured ribbons emerge from the new edition logo and are "sewn" into the existing architecture, entering into the front door where they then disperse, creating facilities of geometric bodies that interact with lights and sound. With a single, strong gesture, the sensorial installation creates a chromatic and volumetric intervention which assumes and transforms the space in an exceptional and unique experience, allowing the public, in a psychological and spiritual "Gestalt," to receive the whole body of the new shows of Fashion Week 2014! "


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Installation Design - Creative Ideas and Applications of New Technical Materials