Hicuity Health | Leaders Lead eBook

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Leaders Lead Celebrating the Extraordinary Force of Those Leading the Next Era of Inpatient Telemedicine

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A Letter From Our CEO

LOU SILVERMAN Chairman and CEO

Having moved into the early weeks of 2021, I am hopeful that we will all be hearing a lot less of understandably over-exercised COVID-19-related 2020 terms such as “unprecedented” and “new normal.” Patience will be required to get to a point where we can retire these terms, but our hope remains and our optimism is intact.


For our organization, our progress during 2020 and our transition into 2021 brought us: • A new name. We’ve traded Advanced ICU Care for Hicuity HealthTM. If you look carefully, you will see that our new name – Hicuity – honors the foundational elements of our past (ICU and IT) while enabling us to continue our expansion into a growing number of new service lines. • A new ICU-related service line. We engaged multiple clients with our new shared services offering, in which we collaborate with large health systems in the provision of clinical services, leveraging our established clinical teams, our operational teams, our proprietary purpose-built HUB workflow management software, and our high-reliability network of 10 clinical operations centers (with more coming online soon). • The launch of skilled nursing facility (SNF) patient monitoring, our first venture in the post-acute environment. • The deployment of our technical, clinical, and operational remote patient monitoring platforms to serve smart-device manufacturers as they seek to convert device-generated patient data into enlightened clinical action benefitting monitored patients. • The continued maturation of our existing tele-ICU and telemetry service lines such that we are now delivering service to more than 110 hospitals. • The mainstreaming of telemedicine across the entire healthcare ecosystem, outpatient and inpatient alike. Telemedicine is medicine. Period. For me, the transition from 2020 to 2021 reaffirmed: • That the opportunity to serve patients in need, like-minded hospital partners, and dedicated bedside teams continues to be a privilege and an honor. • That while the term “heroic” may be overused by too many people, it is a sorely inadequate description of the work that has been done by so very many providers, nurses, respiratory therapists, techs, and others in our centers and at the bedside. • That faced with challenges, unknowns, and the realization that “failure is not an option,” clinical teams – ours and our clients’ – summoned inspiring creativity and resourcefulness to deliver daily miracles. This eBook chronicles our year, as seen through the eyes of our partner hospitals and team members. I hope that the good and important work described puts faces, names, and context to everything good about healthcare. As we do every year, we enter 2021 confident, determined, and excited to leverage the learnings of prior years, while seeking out new opportunities that others have not yet contemplated. In fact, this is our precedent; this is our normal.

Lou Silverman, Chairman and CEO HicuityHealth.com

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The Leadership Ambitions of 2020 Carry into 2021 Leading the Way for Advanced Inpatient Care in 2021 and Beyond

Solving New, High-Complexity Challenges As an organization, we thrive on tackling tough challenges when success means improved outcomes for the patients we care for and the client clinical teams that we partner with. This aim demands continued innovation and growth within our tele-ICU and inpatient telemetry service lines as well as the expansion of our skills in new directions. In 2020, we added monitoring services in skilled nursing facilities and also initiated patient monitoring services in partnership with smart-device developers. In the coming year, we anticipate continued evolution within these service line areas. And while we are continuing to shape our existing service lines, we maintain an active R+D focus on adding new, technology-enabled remote patient monitoring offerings in 2021 and beyond.


Further Expansion of Our Shared Services Model In 2020, Hicuity Health established our initial cohort of large-scale shared services relationships with leading healthcare systems, relationships in which we share clinical and operational responsibilities to deliver a range of state-of-theart telemedicine services. In 2021, Hicuity Health will further expand our shared services relationships to include additional system partners. This new type of relationship can benefit large systems that have intensivist (and other healthcare specialist) staffing available that they aim to deploy more efficiently. This shared approach leverages the combination of Hicuity Health’s highly flexible HUB technology, extensive investment in our “always-on” high-reliability infrastructure which utilizes multiple data centers and redundant network connections, and the capacity for clinical staffing to enable our hospital system partnerships to deliver clinical support with confidence across multiple care venues.

Significant Reinvestment We remain committed to significantly investing and reinvesting in the ongoing development of our clinical team and our proprietary HUB platform technology. This combination of skilled clinical resources and a purpose-built, proprietary workflow platform enables a range of highly complex care and monitoring services that can be adapted to the specific setting and needs of each client hospital. World-class healthcare demands world-class clinical teams supported with industry-leading technology solutions. We are privileged to have both and are equally privileged to continue our commitment to making significant and sustained investments in each going forward.

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2020: The Year That Telemedicine Became Medicine Hicuity Health Leaders Highlight the Power of Technology-Enabled Care to Elevate Care Delivery While Improving Patient Outcomes Care Leadership During the Pandemic In a year that required agile guidance and direction on so many levels, the Hicuity Health team shares what healthcare leadership looked like during a pandemic. ▶ HEAR FROM: Isabelle Kopec, MD, VP, Medical Affairs and Co-Founder S. Ram Srinivasan, MD, Chief Medical Officer

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Marcia Murphy, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, NE-BC, CCRN, VP, Clinical Operations and Nursing

How Tele-ICU and Telemetry Improved Patient Outcomes Hicuity Health is actively engaged in offering expert clinical support to our partner hospitals to improve patient outcomes. Our team members reflect on noteworthy impacts and successful encounters of 2020. ▶ HEAR FROM: Jennifer Cunningham, MD, Intensivist Iman Hassan, MD, Intensivist Chris Miller, RN, Nurse Manager Cherlon Bell, RN, Clinical Supervisor

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A Year of Exceptional Care Delivering exceptional care in the face of exceptional need – hear from our team about how both our people and our clinical processes addressed COVID-19. ▶ HEAR FROM: Isabelle Kopec, MD, VP, Medical Affairs and Co-Founder S. Ram Srinivasan, MD, Chief Medical Officer

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Marcia Murphy, MSN, RN, ANP-BC, NE-BC, CCRN, VP, Clinical Operations and Nursing

Benefits to the Bedside Team We know acute care. Hear how Hicuity Health team members act as a true extension of the hospital’s bedside team to provide an added layer of support and care 24 x 7 x 365. ▶ HEAR FROM: Iman Hassan, MD, Intensivist Chris Miller, RN, Nurse Manager

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Cherlon Bell, RN, Clinical Supervisor

Looking Ahead In a year of rapid and dramatic telemedicine adoption, hear from our providers about what we can expect next for inpatient telemedicine. ▶ HEAR FROM: Iman Hassan, MD, Intensivist Jennifer Cunningham, MD, Intensivist

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Care Delivery Lessons Learned During the Pandemic Hicuity Health’s CMO Shares Clinical Leadership Perspectives on the Valuable Role Inpatient Telemedicine is Playing in the Fight Against COVID-19 Last summer, Hicuity Health’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. S. Ram Srinivasan, shared his clinical leadership perspectives on what healthcare, and more specifically critical care, lessons were learned since the advent of COVID-19 in early 2020. As we enter a new year and a new stage of the pandemic, he returns to the topic, sharing advanced viewpoints on the evolution of care standards, protocols, and outcomes since last February and how inpatient telemedicine has been successfully challenged to meet these changing needs.

DR. S. RAM SRINIVASAN

Critical care treatment in the United States has undergone a rapid learning process since the COVID-19 pandemic first challenged ICUs in regional hotspots in February 2020. Proven care standards have been challenged and adapted, while new protocols have been developed, tested, and refined quickly to deal with the ongoing spread of the coronavirus. Through it all, providers have learned a lot about this viral threat and have developed effective treatments that were not available at the pandemic’s outset. Lots can be drawn from the learning driven by the rapid development model that was forced on healthcare professionals worldwide. I’d like to take the opportunity to distill five critical lessons.


1. Hospitals are as innovative, resilient, and agile as we had hoped. It doesn’t take much digging to find stories highlighting the innovation of hospitals facing the rush of COVID-19 patients. There were highly-visible approaches: hospitals that converted under-used floors or their parking garages for patient care or who tasked supply chain teams early in the crisis to self-manufacture masks to offset growing PPE shortages. But beyond the news cameras were the hospitals that more quietly adapted care to capture the latest best practices. The dogged doctors and nurses that relentlessly cared for patients despite the uncertainty and obstacles. And the care leaders who pivoted quickly and repeatedly, improvising to find enough ventilators to address the early crisis and then adapting to replace intubation with graded non-invasive oxygenation strategies, including awake proning, as results were measured and new approaches proved more successful. 2. You cannot stockpile clinical resources as you might PPE or hospital supplies. Clinical expertise requires flexibility, not inventory. Few hospitals can afford to overstaff their ICU. The clinical resources are simply too costly and, even if affordable, too scarce to inventory in this way.

Since the outbreak of the pandemic, I’ve been approached by a number of hospitals, looking for ways to address a rapidly-rising ICU census, relieve overworked specialists, or support nonspecialists who have been forced into duty in an area in which they have limited exposure. These hospitals might frequently turn to a locum tenens solution in the normal course of events. However, locums are not available when the entire nation is facing the same critical care challenge. When they are, they are accompanied with a complete unfamiliarity with the specific hospital, forcing the strapped bedside team to extend further to enable their relief team to become productive locally. Telemedicine support of an ICU provides the critical care staffing flexibility that is so important in addressing the undulating census that has accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic. Tele-ICU intensivists provide an ongoing relationship with the hospital, lending important familiarity and continuity to care efforts. Further, they bring expertise in key areas relevant to COVID-19 treatment, such as ventilation management. 3. Telemedicine access to external expert resources is a powerful force multiplier, especially during crisis. Telemedicine grew up during the COVID-19 crisis. For many providers early on, it was

As the Chief Medical Officer of Hicuity Health, I couldn’t be prouder in leading a clinical team that met every challenge in a year full of trials that could not possibly be envisioned at its outset. Reflecting on 2020, the flexibility and resilience of our clinical team – including intensivists, advanced practice providers, nurses, and respiratory therapists – stands out, as we addressed not only unanticipated patient volumes but also the challenge of implementing new facilities, modifying protocols, and enabling surge capabilities on very short notice.

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the only way to see patients during the early lockdowns. For patients, it was suddenly a preferred way to access care because it decreased the communicable disease risk associated with COVID-19. For specialties such as critical care, telemedicine (in the form of tele-ICU) has always served to transport intensive care expertise from where it was available to where it was needed. In addition, the extensive monitoring and alerting capabilities enable specialists, supported by a specialized team, to care for more patients than they could if they were inperson at the bedside. This leverage of skills proved especially powerful in

...one of our partner hospitals was able to transform unused rooms to a dedicated COVID-19 treatment ward in a matter of hours, rather than days or weeks. This was only possible because of the flexibility of telemedicine to provide expert care coverage to this new facility, without relying on adding shifts to the burden of already-exhausted staff or looking to source additional clinical personnel from out of the area.

hours, rather than days or weeks. This was only possible because of the flexibility of telemedicine to provide expert care coverage to this new facility, without relying on adding shifts to the burden of already-exhausted staff or looking to source additional clinical personnel from out of the area. The telemedicine leverage of critical care skills presented itself in at least two other examples. As generalists were deployed to care for the rising number of critically ill patients, they looked to subspecialists for consultative advice. Tele-intensivists were able to provide this expertise consistently and conveniently. And while PPE took on a bigger role than ever in critical care, requiring doctors and nurses to team up in pairs to don the gear before visiting a patient and doff the gear after exiting, a quick video visit from a telemedicine nurse or provider could easily check on a patient or address an issue, freeing the bedside team from the PPE routine and maintaining their efficiency in caring for other patients. 4. The benefits of tele-ICU during the pandemic extend beyond outstanding clinical care and include staff benefits, human connection, reduced infection spread, and reduced PPE usage.

addressing the pandemic. As was widely reported, COVID-19 patients have a much higher incidence of ICU admissions relative to those suffering from other viral respiratory illnesses.

Relatively early in the pandemic, we were asked by partner hospitals to adjust our nursing practices to visit patients via video more regularly. The motivation was two-fold: to keep the patient engaged and comforted at a particularly stressful, lonely time and to reduce the need for bedside nurses to visit each patient regularly and risk spreading infection.

In one example of telemedicine leverage, one of our partner hospitals was able to transform unused rooms to a dedicated COVID-19 treatment ward in a matter of

During the summer months, we fielded additional requests to evolve our care protocols by having our tele-intensivist providers assess patients rather than


defer to the bedside provider for an initial assessment. The reason? Whereas providers in the hospital typically visit the most critically ill patients first, they were adjusting their processes to visit COVID-19 patients last in an effort to avoid further transmitting the virus. They could do this only because they had tele-ICU support that maintained care for the COVID-19 patients. This telemedicine support provided flexibility, reduced infection, and increased staff support. It also supported improved care by facilitating a triage to alert a bedside doctor of a COVID-19 patient that might need attention more expediently. 5. COVID-19 drove rapid collaboration to improve patient outcomes. COVID-19 was a new disease when it was identified in the United States early in 2020, with similarities to previous outbreaks but without a proven set of treatments. Hospitals and providers scrambled to provide care, looking to reports on early actions in Wuhan, China. Collaboration arose quickly and organically as providers looked to capitalize on the latest information and to benefit from early results among peers. National sharing of information reached a new level and protocols were on display, to be critiqued and emulated. In my own experience, we fielded a roundtable among our physicians and those from partner hospitals in mid-March and had multiple respondents eager to participate and to learn. This flexible collaboration yielded tremendous practical benefits. Early suggestions to ventilate at-risk patients

before significant deterioration occurred were found to have poor results, while alternative oxygenation methods proved more successful. Proning – turning patients onto their stomachs for a long period of time – was tested and proven as a means of utilizing more lung capacity. Other examples of improved treatments resulting from increased collaboration include appropriate use of steroids and fluids and optimization of ventilator settings. The challenges of, and learning about, COVID-19 will certainly not simply come to an end as we turn to a new year or anticipate widespread vaccine deployment. The coronavirus is expected to be an ongoing threat with recurring outbreaks. What we have learned in the past 11 months, and what we have available to us with telemedicine, heartens me as I anticipate those challenges.

Whereas providers in the hospital typically visit the most critically ill patients first, they were adjusting their processes to visit COVID-19 patients last in an effort to avoid further transmitting the virus. They could do this only because they had tele-ICU support that maintained care for the COVID-19 patients. This telemedicine support provided flexibility, reduced infection, and increased staff support. It also supported improved care by facilitating a triage to alert a bedside doctor of a COVID-19 patient that might need attention more expediently.

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2020 Acute Care Milestones and Achievements The Nation’s Leading Provider of Inpatient Telemedicine Over the past year, Hicuity Health has continued to support our partner hospitals in delivering the gold standard of patient care leveraging a combination of deep clinical, operational, and technical expertise. The company’s collaborative model of technologyenabled care provides much-needed support for the frontline clinicians at the bedside during these challenging times.

NUMBER OF PATIENTS:

NUMBER OF PATIENT INTERACTIONS:

110,000

1.2M

BEDS (CARED/MONITORED):

2,400+


PERCENT BED GROWTH:

NUMBER OF EMERGENCY ALERTS:

+ 40%

Nearly 11,000

Served 110 Hospitals in 27 States

TREATED MORE THAN

14,000 SUSPECTED OR CONFIRMED COVID-19 PATIENTS

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St. Elizabeth Healthcare Shares Remote Inpatient Telemetry Success Story Off-Site Telemetry Services Provide 24 x 7 Oversight of Health System’s At-Risk Cardiac Patients St. Elizabeth Healthcare Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer, Benita Anderson, and Director of System TCUs, Jennifer Yost, share the healthcare system’s experience partnering with Hicuity Health for 24 x 7 continuous cardiac monitoring. They detail how their bedside teams and patients have benefited from the constant and consistent surveillance of at-risk patients anywhere in the hospital. Building on a successful five-year tele-ICU partnership with Hicuity Health, St. Elizabeth Healthcare, which serves six facilities across the Greater Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky, and Southeastern Indiana regions, implemented the company’s remote telemetry monitoring (RTM) service in 2018. St. Elizabeth Healthcare chose to integrate Hicuity Health’s RTM service in order to ease the burden on internal resources, particularly on the nursing staff; improve hospital workflow management; and enhance care delivery within the hospital system. This also allowed St. Elizabeth Healthcare to ease the workload for the recruiting, hiring, training, and productivity management of personnel. Benita Anderson noted, “It’s difficult to find quality individuals who can do that job right now. It involves so much training, variability, and experience that it was problematic for us to find staff.”

In addition, the Hicuity Health solution offered the opportunity for the healthcare system to reduce its overall costs. It is expensive to pay for monitor watchers as well as extra management resources to coordinate scheduling and shift changes. “We looked at the cost of trying to keep a monitor watcher on every unit and being able to cover for all the downtime and PTO with a nurse. Especially today with a shortage of nurses, having a nurse at the monitor is not where our people resources needed to focus,” said Anderson. Hicuity Health’s RTM service is a protocolized solution for providing continuous cardiac monitoring. The telemetry service is delivered by trained and certified telemetry technicians located in remote care centers that are operationally equipped to monitor patient data. This approach provides hospitals with 24 x 7 monitoring to continuously track the heart rhythms of their at-risk cardiac patient


“We looked at the cost of trying to keep a monitor watcher on every unit and being able to cover for all the downtime and PTO with a nurse. Especially today with a shortage of nurses, having a nurse at the monitor is not where our people resources needed to focus,” said Benita Anderson.

population. When patient cardiac data is transmitted via waveforms to the care operation center, the technicians are responsible for real-time interpretation of that data and immediate notification to clinical personnel when changes or abnormalities are noted. Once the real-time notification is sent and received by the hospital, the bedside team takes the lead on all patient care-related decisions. Integrating RTM at St. Elizabeth Healthcare With the introduction of RTM at St. Elizabeth Healthcare’s Edgewood campus (the first St. Elizabeth hospital to roll out the service), it was important to create synergy among all stakeholders. As an initial step, internal communication was created to educate clinicians on the solution and reinforce the message of how the telemetry process would add an additional layer of support for the bedside care team. To integrate the technology, Hicuity Health built the telemetry service model to complement the hospital’s existing technology infrastructure. This included arranging for the hospital’s patient monitors

to add a second destination to the data feed, which is monitored by telemetry technicians in Hicuity Health’s care operation centers. “Knowing that you have a safety net, a group of people receiving the same information and oversight is key. There is no downtime in the telemetry monitoring process,” explained Anderson. Yost elaborated, “When you have a person in the nurses’ station, they can easily be distracted by phones, nurses, doctors, or whatever else may be happening at that moment. With telemetry, we are able to 100 percent guarantee that they are focused. When they can focus all attention on something little that is altered, like a rhythm or rate change, we are able to dig back into what is really happening.” As St. Elizabeth began experiencing enhanced patient outcomes, acceptance among stakeholders grew. Yost noted, “We had one cardiologist who was not fully onboard with telemetry at that time and was concerned about communication with an off-site location. When a care event happened in the middle of the night, we were able to go back to the Hicuity Health telemetry technician. They were able to say, ‘Yes, we called this clinician at this

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time and then again at this time.’ Having that documentation and reassurance that the process is working definitely helped win over the bedside team.” Enhancing Patient Outcomes and Optimizing Bedside Team Care Delivery Since the integration of RTM services, Hicuity Health’s remote telemetry technicians now manage all cardiac monitor alarms on a 24 x 7 basis. This partnership allows St. Elizabeth Healthcare to rely on a standardized process for reading cardiac waveform data in a central place without tapping into internal staff resources. This allows bedside teams to maximize the care and treatment plan for patients and minimize alarm fatigue. Yost explained, “The important piece is the standardization. There is a workflow, and when there is a big event and communication may have been fragmented, telemetry provides detailed records of activity so we can then go back through to ensure all items were addressed.” Anderson added, “We are in a new age of innovation. Creating a standard workflow with somebody that can provide the right service at the right level of care with the right education to identify a population of people is a hard sell. But to be able to standardize that and know you will get standardized outcomes means you can identify and improve care outcomes. For example, previously, we used a paper-based system that was managed on the unit level, so as a full system, we were unable to know the full scope of our care events, which made it difficult to then improve processes on a broader level. Now, with an automated solution, we have seen a simultaneous improvement in quality.” In addition to the workflow standardization, St. Elizabeth Healthcare now has access to robust telemetry data. This data has been used for

root cause analysis (RCA), which in turn leads to internal process improvement. By implementing RTM services, the healthcare system is able to more easily improve its workflow and identify areas for improvement because Hicuity Health provides streamlined, readily-available, and trackable data not available with the previous paper-based system. Anderson emphasized, “We are able to identify internal workflow issues that we need to strengthen, opportunities which were previously unknown. Now, with telemetry, we know that by following a strict workflow, we can expect certain outcomes. That consistency did not exist before.” Continued Partnership Success Impressed by the enhanced workflow capabilities and patient and process outcomes, St. Elizabeth Healthcare has continued to expand the telemetry services offering to support bedside teams across the system. To date, they have quadrupled the number of remotely monitored telemetry beds spread out across three of the system’s six hospitals. Successes at St. Elizabeth Edgewood, St. Elizabeth Florence, and St. Elizabeth Ft. Thomas have paved the way for potential expansion to St. Elizabeth Covington, St. Elizabeth Grant, and St. Elizabeth Dearborn. Yost explained how St. Elizabeth Healthcare, with the technology infrastructure already in place and amid the COVID-19 pandemic this past year, was able to add telemetry monitoring of transitional care unit (TCU) beds with one phone call. “Normally, it could be difficult to find staff on short notice. Now, it is a simple phone call to Hicuity Health asking, ‘can you make this work?’ Recently, we asked, and within two days we were getting the beds taken care of. From a personnel perspective, we have had a lot of flexibility.”


The cornerstone of the successful partnership is the trusted relationship between Hicuity Health and St. Elizabeth Healthcare, which has allowed the healthcare organization to feel secure that its patients will receive timely, accurate cardiac monitoring in the newly covered TCU beds and as they move forward in RTM services partnership. Anderson concluded, “The communication and collegiality between all team members has been phenomenal. If you asked any of our hospital leaders about any of our service contracts, this is probably one of the best services with one of the best outcomes.”

In recognition of outstanding telemedicine collaboration, St. Elizabeth Healthcare has been honored with the We See You Care Award for each of the past three years, including nursing accolades in 2018 and recognition of IT and clinical engineering accomplishment in 2019. In each of the past two years, Benita Anderson, Vice President/Chief Nursing Officer, was recognized personally for her specific telemedicine leadership and clinical collaboration on the implementation and expansion of the remote telemetry partnership.

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A Look Back at 2020 Hospital Partnership News, Industry Recognition, and Clinical Achievements You will notice in the coverage highlighted below that much of our attention was earned under our original company name – Advanced ICU Care. We are proud of this history and look forward to what we will accomplish under our new name Hicuity Health. S P OTL I G HT COVERAGE

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Managed Healthcare Executive: Hicuity Health (formerly Advanced ICU Care) CMO Honored as 2020 Emerging Healthcare Leader


C LI NI C AL EXC EL L ENC E: H I C UI T Y H E A LT H I N T H E N E WS

Advanced ICU Care Recognized for Innovation for Third Consecutive Year ⊲ READ STORY

Advanced ICU Care CMO Leads Telehealth Discussion at ATA 2020 ⊲ READ STORY

Advanced ICU Care Honored with MedTech Breakthrough Award ⊲ READ STORY

Advanced ICU Care Addresses Telemetry Management at AONL 2020 ⊲ READ STORY

The Joint Commission Extends Advanced ICU Care Accreditation to 15 Consecutive Years ⊲ READ STORY

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I N PAT I E N T T E L E M E DICINE S ERVICES : HIC U I TY H EALTH I N T H E N E WS

Advanced ICU Care Fast-Tracks Tele-ICU Implementations to Support COVID-19 Care ⊲ READ STORY

“Advanced ICU Care is proud to serve in these challenging times and to deliver for partner hospitals and hospital systems looking to begin or expand their tele-ICU based critical care services for the communities they serve,” said Lou Silverman. “Our ongoing commitment to innovate has never been more evident than at the present time.”

CentraState Medical Center Launches Tele-ICU Services ⊲ READ STORY

Becker’s Hospital Review: MUSC Health launches virtual care services for critical care patients ⊲ READ STORY

HIT Consultant: UAB Medicine, Advanced ICU Care to Develop Tele-ICU Care Operations Center ⊲ READ STORY

mHealth Times: Advanced ICU Care Launches High-Acuity Telemedicine Care with Salem Regional Medical Center ⊲ READ STORY


As we do every year, we enter 2021 confident, determined, and excited to leverage the learnings of prior years, while seeking out new opportunities that others have not yet contemplated. In fact, this is our precedent; this is our normal. LOU SILVERMAN Chairman and CEO

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For more than 15 years, Hicuity Health (the new name for Advanced ICU Care) has pioneered telemedicine innovations. Serving a diverse range of clients and care venues – including health systems, hospitals, and post-acute care facilities – with an expanding line of services that includes tele-ICU, tele-ICU platform shared services, remote inpatient cardiac telemetry, and wearable smart device monitoring, the company is the leader in enabling expert care on a 24 x 7 x 365 basis to high-acuity patients in high-acuity environments. Our innovation is highlighted by our proprietary HUB workflow management technology platform, which enables seamless care delivery and informs patient management across our 10 clinical care centers that serve our more than 110 hospital partners located in 27 states nationwide. Hicuity Health cares for more than 100,000 patients per year, delivering enhanced patient outcomes, tangible ROI, and expert clinical support for the bedside teams at our partner hospitals. To learn more about us, visit www.HicuityHealth.com.