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1.3 Illustrations • Consult with the graphic designer in the Audio Visual Department regarding illustrations. Limited clip art is available from the designer. • Use only illustrations that do not have copyright or obtain written permission to use from owner. The Patient Education Coordinator will provide assistance. Submit written copyright permission with draft to the Patient Education Coordinator. • Use simple line drawings. • When using line drawings of anatomy, include body landmarks. • Ensure that illustrations are to up-to-date. • Label diagrams with familiar words. • Try to include pictures that represent various ethnic groups, both men and women equally and avoid stereotypical occupational roles. • To prevent patients from mistaking a “Do Not” drawing for a “Do”, use the familiar heavy slash through the diagram. • Use some illustrations or graphics as they provide relief from dense text.

1.4 Readability • Unless it is necessary for the reader to learn medical words, there is no reason why simple language should not be used. • Define all medical terms. • Target the reading level to grade six or below. • Use a readability formula. SMOG is a good choice (See page 19 & 20). • The first time an acronym is used, it should appear with the words it represents. • Use dark type (navy or black) on white or cream background. • Avoid glossy paper. • Do not use Roman numerals. • Do not use abbreviations. • Do not hyphenate words over two lines. • Ensure that text is not too dense.

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DevelopingPatientMaterials  

1 Keeping Patient/Family Pamphlet Print Materials Updated in Clinical Areas ......... 36 Evaluation of Collaboration with Patient Education...

DevelopingPatientMaterials  

1 Keeping Patient/Family Pamphlet Print Materials Updated in Clinical Areas ......... 36 Evaluation of Collaboration with Patient Education...

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