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hnh howard nathan hayden b.s. architecture 2012 kent state university

Architecture Portfolio


hnh howard nathan hayden bs architecture 2012 kent state university


Watercolor Abstraction of Piazza Della Signoria, Fall 2012


contents Fourth Year Design Studio 01

Ecological Arts District

Third Year Design Studio 07

Breaking Borders

Second Year Design Studio 13 19

Akron Independent Film Center Biophillic Pavillion

Honors Exploration 29

POD_disaster relief shelter


Ecological Arts District|Hotel + Restaurant Professor Goodman Fall 2011

Oberlin Site Plan

South Elevation


The Oberlin, Ohio arts district provides interconnected relationships of systems to create one cohesive experience on the site. The sustainable strategies of daylighting, natural ventilation, and rainwater catchment were the driving strategies for this project. A series of massing study models provided a format for the hotel which would give maximum daylighting by stepping back floorplates which allows natural light to penetrate into the central corridor. Each floor of the hotel offers a different three dimensional experience. The facades of both buildings have operable shading devices. These give the building a sense of life showing off the interior activity of the building. The restaurant uses brick and glass to respond to the downtown historical turn of the century buildings. As the block processes, the facade of the hotel tranisititions to a more contemporary mix of brick, metal and glass. On site water is recycled through the use of a Living Machine. The greenhouse acts as a feature for the hotel lobby sparking curiosity for guests. The Living Machine is an example of one service which solves multiple problems. It balances hardscape water runoff and integrates it within its own building water supply, in turn reducing the load on storm drains. The development of the public fora gives the citizens of Oberlin a democratic footing in the city, increasing their participation in events and the community gardens.

Program development through massing

01


1

6

A

Third Floor

5 2 1

Second Floor

3

4

2

1

First Floor

1. Hotel Room 2. Living Machine 3. Conference Room 4. Restaurant 5. Kitchen Classroom 6. Rooftop Bar

North Elevation


Section A

03


05


Breaking Borders Florence, Italy

Professor Paola Giaconia Spring 2011 The project seeks to revitalize the Fortezza da Basso by penetrating walls and exposing the microcity that has developed within the fort. As a part of larger scale planning, making the Fortezza da Basso relevant enables a public loop of historically important sites. This path will tie together the city in a continuous heavily trafficked tourist circuit. This benefits Florence’s tourism economy by expanding the area casual visitors see, keeping them within the city longer. The deconstruction of the walls allow the Fortezza to interact with everyday life by providing more public space for people to inhabit. Exhibitions and flea markets may now flex between park and Fortezza, instead of being separate entities. Stretching the program across the site increases the population density in proximity to the Fortezza da Basso by providing for both public and private needs.

Florence Attractions

Typical Weekend

Weekend Market

Proposed Connections

Typical Weekday

Exposition

Pedestrian Loop


A

B

Site Plan

75’ 0’ A. Mediatheque B. Bookstore

225’ 150’

07


4 1 2 A

1

5 Floor -1 1. Lobby 2. Library 3. Offices 4. Reading area 5. Digital Media 6. Conference Room

Section A

1 Floor 0


6 2

6

2 3

6

3 4 Floor 1

Floor 2

Floor 3

The Mediateque is located in the North Eastern Bastion of the Fortezza da Basso. An underground connection is made to circumvent a dangerous street crossing, as well as to provide direct access to the library for residents. The basement and ground levels are open to the public to be utilized during exhibitions, and give direct access inside the Fortezza.

09


B

2 1

Floor 0 1. Bookstore 2. Cafe

Floor 1

The Bookstore and Cafe have been located on the edge of the pedestrian loop, catering to tourist needs. A circular staircase leads visitors to a first floor cafe with hanging vegetation for privacy.

Section B


11


Akron Independent Film Center Professor Sabini Second Year The Akron Independent Film Center is the terminating building of Lock 3 park. The two theatres inside the project are angled on the same axis as the canal in the park. This rotation of these large programmatic elements gives the project its form and circulation pattern. The turn will also act to draw more visitors from the park with a more receptive entrance. The stair wrapping the exterior of the theatre gives the users views over Lock 3 Park as they climb. As the building grows vertical, it steps back away from the streets providing outdoor patio space for the building. The building has multiple entrances on the street elevation and park elevation to take advantage of the topography. A lobby space connects the two linearly across. It opens up into a double height space at the park level with the theatres hanging above that gathering area.

Site Surroundings

Preliminary Sketch

Canal Axis


13


Parkside Elevation


A

6 5

B

1

6

6 6

2

4

8

3

1

4

4

First Floor 1. Lobby 2. Cafe 3, Offices 4. Classrooms 5. Auditorium 6. Video Lab 7. Locker Room 8. Conference Room 9. Library 10. Computer Lab

Second Floor

5

4

7

Third Floor

9

3

10

5

3 8

Fourth Floor

Fifth Floor Floor

Sixth Floor

15


Section A

Section B

Massing Model


The fifth and sixth floors offer rooftop patios with views over Lock 3 Park 17


BIOPHILLIC PAVILLION PROFESSOR JASON TURNIDGE FALL 2009

Graphic Massing

Conceptual Floorplan


The Biophillic Pavillion is a botanical garden for the research and exhibition of plants. The pavillion is intended to display the diversity plant vegetation in the world. This project was developed through a variety of media from sectional models to digital massing as well as hand sketching. A conceptual plan was developed with the intent of creating diverse moments through spaces. As you travel through the site you experience extremes from natural vegetation of Kent, Ohio to site boundaries creating diversity of moments throughout the plan.

3D Exploration

Pathways were drawn from the conceptual plan to form structural tubes that would carry HVAC and dead loads throughout the building. The tubes also cantilever out over the garden landscape providing shading. Spatial environments will also change based on the season. An example of this is the exterior lattice extension. During the summer months it performs as a shade garden. As winter arrives plant life gives way to an ice garden. Large icicles and public ice sculptures inhabit the space during the bitter months, making the landscape still inviting.

Structural bands

19


8

3 A

8

7

4

8

1

3

First Floor Plan 1. Lobby 2. Library 3. Event Space 4. Winter Gardens 5. Office 6. Theatre 7. Greenhouse 8. Classroom

7

5

5

2

6 2 7 5

Second Floor Plan

2

2

6 8 7 3

4

8

1 3

Section A


21


POD Disaster Relief Shelter Concept _

Honors Architectural Exploration Spring 2010

Professor Jonathan Fleming Team: Rebecca Nicholson, Cameron Logan, Ian Jones, Howard Hayden In response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake our Honors class wanted to develop quick response relief shelters. My team wanted to address the most basic human needs in the immediate wake of disaster. To allow for the fastest deployment we chose a modular design based upon the dimensions of a shipping pallet. Five shelters stack onto one pallet allowing them to be airdropped into disaster zones in the event the roads are inaccessible by truck. The shelter is made out of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE), a strong, lightweight, and versatile plastic. This plastic is durable and will allow each unit to be reused in multiple disaster zones.

Stackable Units

Orbis Collapsible Pallet


Disaster Zone Deployment 23


1.

2.

4.

5.

7.

8.

3.

6.

9.


POD Hingepoints

Roof Locking Mechanism

We focused on a lightweight personal shelter to protect from weather. The Pod is able to be a standalone structure as well as a modular unit within a community of pods. The stackability of the units can provide a sense of community for the victims as well as provide thermal comfort when connected. There is a 9 step process to setting up a pod. It intuitively folds out from within itself and the roof snaps into the top. Joints clip into each other and then may be released with pressure. This is an important feature because in disaster zones tools are not readily available and the simpler a system can be more effective it is.

Unloading Pod shelters

25


hhayden1@gmail.com • 511 Marquardt Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114 • 716.860.2403


Howard Hayden Undergraduate Architecture Portfolio