Issuu on Google+

���� ���

�����������

���������� ����������

�������

���������������� �����������������

�������������������� ��������������������

���������������� ��������������������

����������������� ����������������� ����������

���������������� ��������������������� ����������������� ��������������������

����������

��������������� ���������������������� �������������������� ������������������

������������������

������������������������������


IT’S NOT JUST CABINETRY . . . . IT’S A LIFESTYLE

The

HOME Monthly

KITCHEN OFFICE BATH BUILT-INS COUNTERTOPS Visit Our Showroom

���������������������������� �����������������

�������������������� �����������������

FEATURES Reap what you sow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5 It’s a pleasure in Riverside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 Tour of treasured homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 A Waccabuc classic with sweeping views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13 Hammocks still have a place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19 A garden of the gods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39 DEPARTMENTS Homebodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15 Home of the Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21 Into the Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-23 Window on Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-27 Home Moaner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Interior Insights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Cover: Home of the Month in Ridgefield.

���������������� ���������� ��������� �������� ��������� �������������������� ������������������ ������ ��������� ���������������

�������

���������

��������

��������������������� ������������������������������ ����������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������

2

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


� � � �

� � � � � �

���� ������

� � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �

�� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ������������������������� ��������������������

� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � ��� � � � � � � � � �

� � �� � � � � � � � � � � � �� � � �

April 2008

����������������������������� ���

������� ���������� ������� ��

�������������

�������������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

3


GARDENS AND KIDS

��������������

�������������

Reap what you sow

�����������������

by Nancy Fornasiero

A family vegetable garden is a great idea for so many reasons, but the best of them is that it exponentially increases the chances of your children eating their veggies! Are you tired of concocting inventive ways to sneak those all-important, vitaminrich vegetables into the kids? Trust me, planting a garden together is way more fun than secretly puréeing carrots at midnight and hiding them in the morning oatmeal. As soon as our older boys were past the toddler stage, my husband and I decided to plant a kitchen garden. He and I were always huge veggie lovers, as was my oldest son. But even my other children are now on board the veggie train. Since they feel ownership of their home-grown vegetables, they’ve become much more excited about eating them or (as with my über-finicky 6-year-old) at least giving them a try. Besides sparking an interest in the green stuff, our garden provides many other benefits. There’s the family bonding that happens during the planning, planting, tending, and harvesting. The boys spend more time outdoors and are less tempted by the mesmerizing Wii. We have pesticide-free, organic fresh foods at our fingertips. And the kids have learned a lot about science and ecology: how seeds grow, how weather affects what we eat, how the earth gets nourished. All “good things,” as Martha would say.

�����������������

������������

�����������������������������

Nancy Fornasiero photos

������������������� ������������������������������������������������

Plants chosen, Peter, Sam and Robbie head to the car.

4

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


Each year, we get a little smarter about how and what to plant and wiser about keeping the kids interested. Here are a few tips to get your family started.

A for this approach, but I know of families who assign each child his or her own plot and then just let them run with it!

Best-Laid Plans

Wet ’n’ Wild

Kids are always more excited about a project if they, at least partly, direct it. Over the winter, share your ideas: Discuss what to plant and plan how to arrange everything. Although junior might suggest something unrealistic (we once had a request for avocados), try to incorporate as many of the kids’ ideas as possible. During the planning, remember that children who like to draw will enjoy sketching out a detailed map for your garden.

Who says a garden must be watered with a hose? How about water guns? Let the kids get into their swimsuits and go for it. I know it sounds wacky, but it’s fun. They cool each other off during the dog days of summer, and the job (more or less) gets done. Let Them Graze

Once the long-awaited bounty appears, let the kids have free rein. Allow them to pick and sample whatever they’re in the mood to munch on. This may seem like a no-

Less Can Be More

See Family garden page 17

Overestimating what you can manage will quickly turn your fun little family pastime into a major burden. Remember, a garden – even a low-maintenance one – needs to be watered, weeded and harvested regularly. Think about your vacation plans and how much free time you generally have when determining the scale of your project. Give ’Em What They Want

At the first sign of the spring thaw, go on a seed-shopping excursion and have everyone choose their favorites. If spinach makes your son gag, it isn’t likely that he’ll love it even if it’s planted with his own little green thumbs. Better to start with the family’s old standbys, and then have each kid choose something a little outside the box, just to expand their horizons a bit. For example, if your daughter loves green beans, she might want to branch out and try snap peas. Keep Everyone Busy

With a little imagination, you’ll find a task for children of any age. Most kids love planting seeds and watching them sprout. Little ones adore digging. Think of your garden as a gigantic sandbox and let them do their thing. (Turning over the soil to prep the garden is by far my youngest’s favorite job!) Have a kid who hates to get dirty? Someone needs to water and make labels to identify the crops. At my house, we’re a bit too typeSmall seedlings are now lush plants and ready to harvest.

D Dra ke Dra rraake Roossss--D R D De e ss ig ig n n ll ll cc

�����������������������������������

Phone: 203981-8018 203-981-

Susan D Drake ckd

����������������������������� �������������������������������� ���������������������� �������������������������������

BA Interior Design Certified Kitchen Designer Serving Fairfield Cty since 1987

April 2008

����������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ���������������������������������� �������������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ���������� ���������� ��������������������� ��������������������� ��������������������� ��������������������� �������������������� �������������������� �������������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������ ���������������������������������� ����������������������������������

forfor50years years

50

� �� ��� � �� �� �� � � �� �� � �� ����� � � �� �

��� ����� �

���������

������������������������������� ������������������������ The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

5


SHOP LOCAL

It’s a pleasure in Riverside by Isabelle Ghaneh

Control. Convenience . Luxur y.

David Ames photos

Riverside Commons is the go-to shopping mart for residents of this Greenwich neighborhood. There is a post office, deli, CVS, Jiffy Cleaners, and large Food Emporium. You can get your hair and nails done, buy a cappuccino and a pastry, and take home some Asian or Italian food for dinner, thanks to Hunan Café and Pomodoro Pizzeria. In addition, there is plenty of parking in both the front and the back of the Commons. Owner James Preterotti of J. Pierre Hair Designer has just installed new chairs for his customer; and that is typical of the personal attention you can count on here. You feel at home the moment you walk in. Ellen, one of the stylists, has a lovely Scottish accent, and her “Hello dear, can I help you” is a lovely intro to the salon. The salon serves men, women and children. Coco Nail Spa is much more than just an attractive place to get your nails done. Manicures and pedicures are highlighted at Coco, and they also offer waxing and eyelash/eyebrow tinting. The shop is large, with separate rooms for facials and massages. Coco’s offers facials for men, women and teens, masks, special facial treatment for problem skin, and anti-aging remedies. Coco’s massage services run the gamut from Swedish to shiatsu to deep tissue, along with aromatherapy and hot stone massages. Chair massages are also available. “We like to give good value for our services,” Joanne, the manager said. “Each

Stuffed with childhood delights, Ada’s Variety Stop is sure to have your favorite candy.

�����������������������������������������

����������������

����

������������� Hallmarks of a HomeTronics Lifestyle. HOMETRONICS

Lifestyles

Home Theater

6

Distributed Audio/Video

www.hometronicslifestyles.com 800.468.9418

Lighting Control

Home Automation

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

Structured Wiring

�������������������� �������������������

����������������� ��������������� ����������������� ������������������������������������ ������������������������ April 2008


patron receives his or her own sterilized utensils in a separate package when they have a manicure or pedicure. “We offer parties for bridal showers, mother-to-be showers, and mom’s day parties,” Joanne said. “Just call for an appointment and let us know how many people are coming. We can stay open past our normal 7 closing time to 9 for a booked party.” Step into the DiMare Pastry Shop and your senses are instantly tantalized with the aroma of delicious baked goodies. DiMare has been in business for over 25 years and is a full-service bakery. Asonia, stationed behind the counter, recommends the strawberry shortcake and chocolate mousse cakes, and the marbled cheesecake calls out, “Try me, too.” The DiMare Pastry Shop has a wedding-cake guide booklet available, and it’s an informative read, even if you are not planning to enter the matrimonial state. The booklet lists three pages of cake types, and that’s very helpful, since not everyone knows that a tiramisù is a “mascarpone cheese filling with shaved chocolate that sits between two layers of golden cake soaked with espresso and Kahlua,” or that a raspberry chambord is a “thin layer of pure raspberry jam with a light Chantilly cream in between a vanilla sponge cake.” This guide is a great take-home pamphlet to browse, since the descriptions will help you to choose the perfect cake for any occasion. Estate Treasures of Greenwich is down the street from Riverside Commons, and it is a true treasure trove of furnishings and home decorative accessories. Harriet Roughan has owned Estate Treasures for over 30 years, and it’s a great place to browse for antiques and collectibles. Just one peek into Harriet’s store and you will be amazed at her extremely large inventory. Harriet offers an array of items, including fine china, silverware, furniture, artwork, jewelry, and books. Her wares come in every shape and style imaginable. An exquisite English Yerwood desk shared the floor with a polished Italian walnut

Harriet Roughan has filled Estate Treasures with a glittering array of collectibles and antiques.

desk, and a five-volume set of the Dialogues of Plato, perfect for the philosophically inclined, was off in the corner. In addition to her store, Harriet is in the home-staging business. She uses her knowledge of home décor, along with her stylish and classic furniture, artwork and home accessories to stage homes that are for sale. “I recently staged houses at Stillman Lane, Mooreland Road and 32 Reynolds Place in Greenwich,” Harriet said. See Riverside page 24

��������������� ������������������

��������������������������������

�������������

��������������� ����������������

����������

���������� ��������� ��������� �������� �������������� �������� �� �������

����������� ���������� �������� ���������

������������������������������������

�������������������� �������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������

����� ������������ ��� ��������� ��� ������������ ����� �� ����� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ��������������������������������������

�� �����������������������������������������������������

� � � �

� � �

������������������������

����������� ��� ����� ���� ����� ���� �������� ����� ������� ����� ����� ������� ��� ����� �������� ����������� ���������� ��� ��������� ������������ ������� ����� ��� ������������� ���� ����� ��� ����������� ���� ������� ��������� ����������� ������ �������� ���������� � ������������������������

���������������������������������������� �������� April 2008

��� ���� ���� ������ ��� ������ ������� ������� ��� �������

������������������������� ��������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

7


THE SILVERMINE LODE

Tour of treasured homes by Sue Cruikshank

See Silvermine page 10

������������������������������������������������

���������� ������������������������

���������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������

������������������������������������ ��������������������������������������� ������������������������������������ �����������������������������������

� � � � � �� ��� � � ����

���������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������

8

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

Megan Ferrell

As fall nears and “sticker shock” prevails at local gas pumps, area residents need not venture far to enjoy the best that autumn has to offer. Silvermine, a long-term mecca for artists and artisans, offers breathtaking river views, homes dating back to the 1700s and one of the most picturesque inns in New England. If this isn’t enough, on Saturday, Sept. 13, the third Historic Silvermine House Tour will offer tours of five outstanding homes and two artists’ studios. The tour, sponsored by the Norwalk Association of Silvermine Homeowners (NASH) and by the Silvermine Community Association (SCA), is scheduled from 10 to 4. One of the many tour highlights will be the Hyatt-Byard/Gates Moore Estate, originally an 18th-Century saltbox. The Byards purchased it in 1919 and added both a replica of a Metropolitan Museum of Art ballroom and sleeping porches. Byard’s cousin, the artisan Gates Moore, designed handmade traditional lighting, which is sought-after to this day. The current owners, one of whom is a decorator specializing in antiques, have lovingly restored the home, making it into a significant Silvermine landmark. Nearby is the Hamilton Hamilton House, built in 1832. Hamilton Hamilton, born in England in 1847, became a renowned American landscape and portrait painter and illustrator. As a member of the National Academy of Design, Hamilton brought

Little Orchard was designed and built by landscape artist Richardson Wright.

STONE.

The Natural Choice. Flagstone, Wallstones, Belgium Block, Cobblestones, Decorative Gravels, Drainage Products, Stone Flooring, Fireplace Materials, Brick, Cements, Mulch, Sweet Peet, Garden Path Stone, Pool Decking, Large Stepping Stone, Veneer Stone, Concrete Block, Thin Veneer Stone, Tools, Stonedust, Topsoil

SINCE 1925

284 Adams Street, Bedford Hills, New York 10507 Phone: 914-666-6404 www.bedfordstone.com April 2008


���������������������

���� ����

����������������������������

����������������������������������

������������������������� ����������������������������������������� ������������������� �����������������

������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������� �����������

�����������������������

�������������

������������

������������������������������������������������������������������������

��� ����� ����� ��� ������������������������� ����������������������� �������������������������� ������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������ ������������������� ����������� ������������������� ����������������������� ������������������

������������� ������������ ��������

��������������������������� �������������� �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������� April 2008

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

9


Silvermine continued from page 8

Megan Ferrell

artistic substance to the Silvermine Group of Artists. One of Hamilton’s daughters, Helen Hamilton, became a recognized post-impressionist landscape painter. This lovely Federal-style two-story farmhouse had many later additions, and its gardens provided subject matter for many of Hamilton’s paintings. Its owner, an antiques expert, has carefully chosen furnishings reflective of the era. Also dating to the 1800s is the Bell and Lockwood Mill. This charming structure, which has the thick walls of a very old European cottage, was originally a mill, and was featured on the 1851 map of Norwalk. As such, it is clearly situated on a millrace that parallels the road. The Silvermine River was dotted with mills during the 1800s, and this property offers a glimpse into another integral aspect of Silvermine’s past. Willowgreen offers house tour participants a marvelous view of the Silvermine River and its wildlife. This structure was built by George Wood, a local blacksmith, who

The Hyatt-Byard Gates Moore house has a replica of the ballroom at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. ������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������� ������������������ ����������������������������� �������������������������������� �������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ����������������������������� ������������������������������� �������������������������

��� � ��� � �� � ��� ��� �� �� �� �� � � ��� � �� � � � � �� �� � � �� � �� � � � ��� � � �� � ��� �

���������������������� ������������ ������������������������������������������ �������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������� ����������������������������� ������������������������������

����������������������������

�� � ���� � � � � � � � � �� � �� ��� � � � � � � � �� � �� ��� � ��� � � ����� ��� � � � �� � � � �� � � �� � �� �� �� � � � � � �� � � ����� ��� � ���� �� � � �� ������ ��

���������������������������������

���� � �� � ���� � �� � � ��� ����� � � ������������ � � � � ��� �������� �

���������������������������������������

�����������������

The perfect enhancement for the extraordinary home

� � ������������������������

Visit Our New Showroom at: 136 Water Street, Norwalk, CT 06851

Sales

Installation

Service

Since 1972

203 847 1284

www.edsgarage doors.com

����������������������������������������

���������

�������������������� ������������������ ����������������������������������������

���������

�����������

���������������������� ����������������

�������������� ���������

������������ ��������� ������������

��������������� ���������������

��������������������� ���������������������������������� ��������������� �����������������

����������� ������������������������

���������������������� ������������

���������������������������������

Discover one of Fairfield County’s premium suppliers of quality garage doors and electronic door openers. Featuring a full line of wood, steel and vinyl garage doors, we can offer the perfect complement to any architectural design and lifestyle — from traditional manor homes to sophisticated contemporaries.

���������������������������

���������������������������������������

���������������������������������� �����������������

���������������������������������������

10

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


the trademark of the “New York people” in Silvermine. One of the current owners, an architect, recently restored this home, which has an Arts and Crafts focus. House-tour tickets are limited, and advance reservations are required. Tax deductible tickets include a box lunch at the Silvermine Tavern and a silent auction. Ticket prices are $85 for the general public and $75 for NASH and SCA members. This will be part walking tour, with some jitney transportation provided. To request a ticket reservation form, please call Molly at 203-846-0722 or e-mail silver minehousetour@yahoo.com. ■

Megan Ferrell

bought chestnut logs at the height of the blight and built this barn on Christmas Day in the early 1900s. The barn was converted to a delightful antique house in the 1920s, and the exposed chestnut beams still remain prominent. The early 1900s also marked the beginning of a vibrant Silvermine artists’ community, which still continues today. Drawn by the beauty of the river and a unique quality of life, numerous artists visited, then later returned to settle in Silvermine. Carl Schmitt, a key Silvermine artist, was an early settler, and participants will be treated to a visit to the Carl Schmitt Studios. A member of the Silvermine Artists Group, which preceded the present Silvermine Guild, Carl Schmitt studied at the (William Merritt) Chase School with Robert Henri and later with Emil Carlsen. He joined Solon Borglum’s famous Knockers Club in Silvermine, an artists’ group dedicated to critiquing each other’s work. Carl built many structures along Borglum Road, including three studios, two of which will be included on the tour. One is a brick structure with a loft and tiled roof, which was recently moved and restored. The second, more modern version, situated by its side, holds a marvelous collection of Schmitt’s works. Silvermine not only attracted artists but also provided a home to others engaged in various creative endeavors. The Little Orchard, designed and built in 1925 by Richardson Wright, highlights this aspect of Silvermine’s history. Richardson Wright, a well-known writer of garden books, also had an extensive background in landscape design. He added distinctive plantings to his bungalow, including an apple orchard that gave the house its name. The house later passed to John Vassos, pre-eminent industrial designer, artist, inventor, writer, and American spy. Prior to World War II, Vassos made his own changes to the house, including a wrap-around porch and a studio. These changes supported the lifestyle of an artist and bon vivant at a time when the arts, drinking and parties were

The owner of the Hamilton Hamilton house was a renowned landscape and portrait artist.

�������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������ ���������������������� �������������������������������������� ��� ���������������������������������������

Williamsburg, Virginia

����������������������������������������������������������

������������� ������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������

������������������������������������ ������������������������������������ ����������������������

����������������� �������� ��������� ���� ���� ��������� ������ ����� �������������������������������������������� �������������������� ������������������������������������������ �������� �������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������� �������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������� ���������������������������

������������������ �������� ���������� ������ ������ �������� ������ ��� ����������� ���������� ��������� ��������� ���������������� ����������������������������������������� �������� �������������������������������������������� ����������������� ��������������������� ��������������������������������������������� ��������� �������������������� ���������������������������������� ����������������� ���������������������������

������������������������� �������� ������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ������������������������ �������������������������������������������� ���������� ��� ������ �������� ���� ������� ������ ��������� �������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ��������� �������������������������� �������������������������������������� ����������� ���������������������������

�������������������� �������� ������������ ������ ������ ����� ��� ���� ��� ������������������������������������������� ���������������� ������������������������������������������� ���������� ��������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������������������� ����� ��������� �������� ���� ����� �������� ��������������������������� �������������������

������������������ ��������

������������ ������������������������� �������� ���������������������� ���������������� ���������������������������

������������������������ ���������� ������������ ���������� ���� ������� ��� ����� ����������������������������������������� ��������������������� ������������������������������������������� ������������ �������������� ��� ������������ ����������� ������������������������������������������ ���� ��� ������� ����� ������� ������ ����� �������������������������� ��� ����� ������ ���� ���� �� ��������� ���� ����� ������������������ �����

��������

������������������������� ������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������� ����� ��������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������ ���� �������������������� ������������������������������������������������������ �������������������������������������������������������������� �������� ������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ����������� ������������������������������������������

���������������������������

�������������������������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������� ��������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������� �������������������������� ������������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� April 2008

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

11


A Waccabuc classic with sweeping views by Jane K. Dove

Backed by the rolling golf greens of the Waccabuc Country Club and with a tall, Hamptons-style clipped privet hedge and stately U-shaped gravel driveway in front, this majestic, totally renovated antique Colonial on Post Office Road in Waccabuc combines vintage charm with the highest standards of luxury craftsmanship. Built in 1910, the house has its original clapboards and is trimmed in white brick with double chimneys, all of which have been carefully restored by local master craftsman Henry Donaldson. Its historic beauty is now complemented by a host of modern amenities and special features. From a large slate patio, the classic 12-room, 5,500-square-foot home has sweeping views of the landmark golf course. The one-acre property is beautifully landscaped with towering trees, including maples, evergreens and a large specimen chestnut tree. A Gunite pool completes the exterior. The property contains parking for four cars, two in an attached garage and two more in a detached structure. “This is a truly classic home,” says Adam Hade, listing broker at Houlihan Lawrence Real Estate. “Mr. Donaldson, well known for the quality of his construction work, has spared no attention to craftsmanship, the highest quality materials and wonderful aesthetics. The result is a beautiful home that captures all the grace of an earlier era combined with the features sought in today’s new construction.”

We’ll keep the lights on for you.u. When the power goes out, depend on GUARDIAN Home Standby generators for automatic back-up power 24 hours a day. • • • •

The library is a fine example of the detailed craftsmanship found throughout the home.

������������������

���������������������������������

epend y ack-up

Fully automatic 24/7 blackout protection Permanently installed More practical than a portable generator

Call for a free estimate (203) 438-2661

���������������������

����������������������������� 385 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT

������������������������������������������� ������������������������ �������������� � ��� � ���� ��������������������������������������������� � � ������������������������

12

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


An extra attraction is a spacious and legal four-room accessory apartment, complete with separate front and rear entrances and its own private deck overlooking the golf course. Gracious Living

Entering the home via a columned front portico flanked with bright green holly bushes, visitors will find themselves in a two-story entry hall with raised-panel walls and a graceful, open staircase with a hand-carved mahogany handrail. The formal living room on the left demonstrates Mr. Donaldson’s attention to quality details, with built-in bookshelves, window seats and French doors opening to a small slate terrace. There are deep moldings and wide-plank oak flooring throughout the house, and large windows let in ample sunlight on both floors. The library/study at the rear of the entry hall features cherry paneling, custom cherry shelving, a coffered ceiling, and an attached powder room. The dining room to the right of the entry has a traditional marble fireplace, crown moldings, a custom-built buffet, and French doors that open to the rear patio. Moving into the kitchen, Mr. Donaldson has installed black honed-granite countertops, custom cabinetry and Viking appliances. The kitchen boasts a large family dining area in the rear with oversized windows that take in the sweeping exterior views. A second mahogany-railed staircase leads from the kitchen to the rear portion of the second floor. A home office with a granite-top desk and built-in file drawers, a mudroom with custom cabinetry and raised-panel walls and a second powder room complete the first floor.

Adam says the extensive and carefully executed detail throughout the home is what sets it apart. “There are many homes that are larger, but most do not contain this type of quality design and materials,” he says. “Everything here has been planned and executed to the highest standards. The owner prides himself on being an artist first and a builder second, and that attitude shows in the results.” Adam says he believes the listing price, $2,645,000, is very fair for the location, quality and classic “look” of the gracious structure, combined with its wealth of fine interior detail. And if you are golfer, you need look no further. For details, call Adam Hade at 914-804-1754 or e-mail ahade@houlihanlawrence. com. ■

Private Quarters

Moving upstairs, the front staircase leads to a large windowed landing providing access to five bedrooms and four full baths. “One of the bedrooms can function as a possible au pair, in-law or guest suite,” says Adam. “It has a sitting room and loads of built-ins, including cabinetry, a dresser and window seats. The partially pitched roof adds a feeling of warmth and the white Black honed-granite countertops, custom cabinetry and Viking appliances add to the kitchen’s ambiance. marble bathroom has been done to perfection.” Another cheerful bedroom has large windows on three sides, its own private bath and a built-in custom workstation. Two more bedrooms share a white marble ����������������������� Jack and Jill bathroom. �������������������� The light-filled master suite is accessed ������������� via its own hand-rubbed cherry foyer and features his-and-her bathrooms. The suite ������������������������� overlooks the golf course, which can also �������������� be viewed from a Juliet balcony. A large, windowed walk-in closet has ample builtins for wardrobe storage needs. � ����������� � The large and luxurious master bath ������������ has a marble floor, two corner country ������������������� cupboards for additional storage and a ��������������� large soaking tub. ���������������������������� The spacious accessory apartment located at the far end of the first floor ��������� ����������������������������������� � ���������������������������������������������������������� can either be rented or used for a family ��������������������� member or as a guest suite. The apart������������� ment features a living room, den, full kitchen, bedroom with walk-in closet, � and full bath. The same attention to detail that marks the rest of the house can be seen in the apartment, with its wide� board floors and deep moldings. �������������������

��������������������������������������������

����������������������������� ������������������������������� ������������������������������

�������

������� �������

April 2008

�������������������������������������������

������������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

13


HOMEBODIES ■

Street smarts by G. Lisa Sullivan I often write about neighbors and neighborhoods (one of my favorite topics), and a recent episode of HGTV’s “Divine Design” inspired me to address the subject once again. For this particular episode, the show’s host, Candice Olson, had been hired by a couple to renovate the main living space of their home. “We needed more room, and had in fact contemplated moving to a larger house,” one half of the couple explained, “but all of our wonderful neighbors wanted us to stay so badly that they chipped in and bought us a beautiful leaded-glass window as a bribe to keep us here! We knew we would all miss each other too much, and that we couldn’t leave, so we decided that rather than sell, we would make the space bigger.”

CLASSIC NEW ENGLAND BARNS PRE-CUT WITH

AUTHENTIC MORTISE & TENON JOINERY (860) 350-5544

GAYLORDSVILLE, CT

HANDCRAFTED TIMBER FRAMES

www.newenglandbarn.com

�������������� ������������� ������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������

��������������������������

�����������������������

� � � �

��������������������������������������������� �������������������������������� ��������������������������� ���������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������

������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������

14

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

�������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������� �������������������������������������������

������������

����������������������������������������������

April 2008


During a portion of the show, the audience was treated to home video clips of the couple organizing and attending neighborhood block parties, barbecues, poker games, Easter egg hunts, and other activities that no one in my neighborhood would ever even consider planning. While I know and like most of the people on my street, we’re just not that close, and you can be sure no one would ever bribe us to keep us from moving away. I can’t even imagine how it would be to live in a close-knit neighborhood, like the one featured on the show. And here’s the best part. Not only did the couple, so obviously adored by their neighbors, receive the beautiful window, but they were also invited to live with one of the nearby families while the home underwent its extensive renovations. The two families would be living under one roof for several months until the house was done. Would you do that for your neighbors? And would they do that for you?

Good Fences Make Good Neighbors

It took us a long time to get to know our neighbors, but there are several with whom we’ve become quite friendly, mostly because of our kids. We talk about school and vacations and local politics while the children play together, but they’re still rather formal friendships, and I would never think of just casually dropping in without calling first, unless we happen to be walking or biking down the street and see them in their yard. In the winter, we really see our neighbors only in their cars; I’m usually walking the dog and they’ll pass by with a wave. Come spring and summer, however, more people are outside, so things get a little chummier. We’re more apt to stop and chat, comparing notes on our dogs, our kids and our homes (usually in that order), while I try and glean landscaping and home improvement ideas for my own house. There are one or two couples I especially like, and I’ve often considered asking them over for a cookout. “What would you think about having Bob and Joan See Homebodies page 16

�������������������������

���������������������������� � ��������������������������������������������������������

��������������������� �������������������������������������

��������������������� ���������������������� ����������������������� ���������������������� ����������������������

�����������������������������

����������������� ����������

�������� ���������������

��������������������������������� ����������������� ���������������� �������������������� ������������������������������� ������������������������������� ������������� �����������������������������

����

������������������������� ���������������������

�������������

������������������

��������������

�������������� ��������������

��������������� �������������������

����������������������������������������� ��������������������� ���������������������������

�������� ������������ ���������

�������� ���������

������������ �������������������������������� ���������������������

��������������������������������� ���������������������������������

�������� ���� �������� ���� �������������������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������� ������������ ����������������������

���������������������������������������������� ���� ������ ��� ������� ���� ���� ��������� � ������������

���������������������������������

April 2008

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

15


Homebodies continued from page 15 over for dinner one night?” I asked my husband. “We could also ask Michelle and Steve.” “We’ve been living on the same street with them for 14 years,” he replied. “I guess now would be as good a time as any,” but it’s a couple of months later, and I have yet to extend the invitation. I don’t know what’s holding me back. Joan, Michelle and I have often joked about the lack of friendship on the street, but we attribute the distance to our busy lives, and promise to plan block parties and gettogethers and such, but nothing has ever come to fruition. When Life Gives You Lemons ...

There’s nothing like a little entrepreneurial spirit to bring people together, I always say. Last summer, for instance, my daughter and her neighborhood friend

wanted to have a lemonade stand. The friend’s mom, Sandy, spent the morning making lemonade, and we put together a makeshift stand on their front lawn and posted signs at the end of the street. As the day wore on, a few more neighborhood kids and their parents joined us, but business was a little slow, to put it mildly, and the only customers we had (besides ourselves) were a couple of landscapers and the sweet old lady who lived across the street from Sandy. She took pity on the kids and bought two cups of lemonade for herself, insisting on paying thrice what we were charging, explaining that she was extremely thirsty. At one point, Sandy’s elderly, widowed, somewhat annoying next door neighbor drove right by us. “I can’t believe Mr. Jeffries didn’t buy any lemonade!” Sandy complained. “How could he ignore the kids like that?” “Maybe he didn’t notice the stand,” I suggested, giving the man the benefit of the doubt. See Homebodies page 32

C A R P E T I N G • N AT U R A L S T O N E Beauty for your home…

��������������������������������������������

200 Danbury Road, Wilton, CT 203.762.0169

CERAMIC TILE • LAMINATES • VINYL

������������������������

���������������������������������� ����������������� ������������������� ������������������������������ ��������������������� �� ������������� �� ���������������������������� �� ����������������

��������������������������������� ����������������������������� ���������������������� ��������������������� ���������������������������

�� ���������������������������� �� �������������������������������

������������������������������������� �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

16

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

������������������������ ������������������� ������������������������

��������

����������������� April 2008


Family garden continued from page 5 brainer, but I assure you, many a serious gardener (my own grandfather comes to mind) would never tolerate picking a veggie from the vine before its time! One of my boys loves to invite his pals into the garden to pick goodies – especially the crunchy baby cucumbers. I love that he feels proud enough of his efforts to show off what he’s grown, and that he’s snacking on something super-healthy in the meantime. Vegetables you might not consider eating raw right off the plant – like wax beans and broccolini sprouts – are some of my kids’ favorites. And let’s get real: Does anything taste better than a fresh-off-the-vine, juicy, ripe tomato warmed from the summer sun?

All that said, I shouldn’t leave you with the impression that my backyard is the second coming of the Garden of Eden. We’ve had brotherly scuffles resulting in fertilizer shoved down each other’s shorts. Toddler tears have been shed over stubborn carrots that simply refused to grow. The occasional sunburn and whiny refusal to help with the weeding have also been part of the mix. Overall, though, our garden has been an extremely worthwhile endeavor. From tilling in the spring to composting the spent vines in the fall, it’s a joy to watch it – and my children – flourish and grow. ■

The

HOME Monthly

Vol.XII, Number 8 is a special section to: Greenwich Post, The Darien Times, New Canaan Advertiser, The Ridgefield Press, The Wilton Bulletin, The Redding Pilot and The Weston Forum in Connecticut, and The Lewisboro Ledger in New York • 52,000 copies published monthly • Jackie Perry, editor Jessica Perlinski, designer • Thomas B. Nash, publisher • For advertising information, call 203-438-6544 • For information on editorial submissions, call 203-894-3380 E-mail: home@acorn-online.com • Extra copies are available free at the Hersam Acorn office, 16 Bailey Avenue, Ridgefield, Conn. (behind the town hall) Copyright 2008, Hersam Acorn Newspapers, LLC

Box 1019 Ridgefield, Conn 06877 203-438-6544 April 2008

����������������������������������������������� � ����� ���� ���������� ������������ ��������� ���� ����� ���� ������������ ������� �����

������� � ���������� � ������

����������������������������������������������������

������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������� The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

17


FAST-TRACK LIFESTYLES

Hammocks still have a place by Tim Murphy If Darwin had expanded his theories to include lawn furniture, he may not have held out much hope for the hammock’s survival. It’s difficult to eat or drink while swinging in a hammock, and using a laptop requires the balance of the Flying Wallendas. Reach too quickly for the ringing cell phone in your pocket and you may be a man overboard, tumbling onto the lawn below. Yet nearly 1,000 years after its birth in Central America, the hammock remains a popular and iconic summertime image in North America – with annual sales topping 500,000 – and a more practical application (often as a bed) in other parts of the world. That more practical side was behind the hammock’s creation, when the Mayan Indians used the bark of the hamak tree and wove it into a hanging bed to rise above

snakes and insects. In the late 1400s, Columbus brought hammocks back to Europe, where they caught on with sailors and eventually the British prison system, which used them as a standard sleeping apparatus for inmates – at least until the inmates found other uses for the brass rings that held the hammocks aloft. It wasn’t until the early 1900s that hammocks morphed into their now familiar role as a backyard symbol of rest and relaxation for Americans, providing an idyllic place for summertime reading or napping. “They have a timeless appeal,” said Stuart Lilian, one of the owners of the At Home Design Center in Greenwich, which sells a variety of hammocks. “It’s hard to think of them ever going out of style.” A rope hammock swinging between two trees remains the classic American version of the sleeping swing. But there are also a number of other styles and methods of hanging. “There are more options, and they keep increasing all the time,” Stuart said. “Every year there seems to be something new.” Rope hammocks in traditional white cotton are still strong sellers, although similar models made of synthetic material such as DuraCord are gaining in popularity because

A Hatteras Hammock made of Duracord rope is hung from a handsome cypress stand.

Give Your Home A New Look ~ MURALS ~ ~ TROMPE L’OEIL ~ ~ WALL TECHNIQUES ~ ~ FAUX FINISHES ~

This center kitchen island was a DRAB WHITE before being DECORATIVELY PAINTED by:

LIOTTA STUDIOS

203-938-3302

Fine Decorative Painting

18

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

LLC

Visit us at our website at www.LiottaStudios.com and get a glimpse of what Liotta Studios is all about Liotta Studios is a Green company... Doing what we can to help the environment.

April 2008


�����������������������������������

The Hatteras Hammock cushioned, single swing is fun for one.

they are less susceptible to mildew and rotting. “I find that the cotton rope hammocks rot out after about three years or so, while the DuraCord lasts about five years,” Stuart said. The synthetic versions come in various colors and cost about $100 more. Quilted hammocks are similar to rope hammocks but consist of two layers of fabric with a fiberfill between the layers. These hammocks are reversible and often feature a pattern on one side and a solid color on the other. “That’s probably the most comfortable of all the hammocks,” he said. Both rope and quilted hammocks come with spreader bars, which are located at either end and partition the hammock bed from the end strings. The spreader bars, also known as staves, provide support and create a flatter surface to lie on. There are also several types of woven hammocks, including Mayan, Brazilian and Nicaraguan, which are crafted from cotton and available in eye-catching colors and designs. Unlike rope and quilted hammocks, the woven varieties usually don’t come with spreader bars, and occupants must lie across the hammock rather than lengthwise. Many purists claim that the woven varieties are more comfortable than their rope counterparts – producing a cocoonlike ambiance – but durability can be a concern. And since spreader bars are commonly absent, the woven hammocks require more dexterity when entering and exiting. See Hammocks page 33 April 2008

�������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �����������������������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������ ����������������������������� The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

19


On The Waterfront LOCATION: Set high above a lake in Ridgefield, this home looks out into a sea of cooling greenery. PROPERTY: On less than an acre, here is a home to enjoy for both the privacy of its setting and its attractive, low-maintenance landscaping. HOUSE: Scenic views and an open floor plan make this house ideal for entertaining and family gatherings. Handsome hardwood floors predominate throughout, and the living room with fireplace opens to a balcony/deck. There’s a fireplace in the family room, the up-to-date kitchen has a pantry and dining area, and the den has a full bath adjoining it. The master bedroom has a fireplace and bath, and there are two more bedrooms: one with fireplace and bath and the other with a vaulted ceiling. Add to this a wine cellar, a home theater, and an outdoor patio with kitchen. GARAGE: Three-car attached. PRICE: $2,490,000. REALTY: Neumann. Agents: Nancy Ollinger, Mark Travaglini, 203-438-0455. Photography: David Ames.


Contributed photo


INTO I THE I GARDEN ■

Pest control ... straight from the cupboard by Donna Clark

Donna Clark photos

Rocket Cherry snapdragon for dramatic color.

������������������� �������������������� ����������������������������

������������� ���������������������������� �������������������������������� ����������������������������� ������������������������������������

���������������������� ��������������������������������

22

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

It’s August, and I hope that most of your plants have done well through the first months of summer. You have a couple more months to enjoy, so I thought I’d pass on a few tips for keeping the pests away. The first pest that comes to mind is the deer. Fencing is the best way to keep them out, but there are many of you who just can’t do that. The next best thing is deer spray and I find the best results come from Deer Solution or Deer Stopper. You need to spray the tips of the plants, the buds and open flowers every three or four days. It’s best to keep a calendar so you remember when to spray. As the season winds down, you need to spray only the plants that are yet to bloom. The deer don’t seem interested in a plant once it’s done blooming. The best sprayer is Hudson Sprayer Model #69142, available from Territorial Seed Company, 541-942-9547. This is a pump sprayer that is a handy size, and best of all – it does not clog. It sprays a fine mist that covers about four feet of garden, and you just pump it up. No more sore hands from pushing that trigger. If you make it easier to spray, it won’t be such a chore and you’ll get results. Woodchucks and rabbits can also be big eaters in the garden. Calling a trapper is the best answer, but this summer I’m trying something else. I sprinkle crushed red pepper flakes on the foliage of the plants they are eating, and if you find their hole, sprinkle some around it. They will get one on their paw and lick it off. Pam says we’ll see lots of woodchucks by the roadside, dead from the hot pepper. I rather doubt that, but they may move out of the neighborhood.

������������������������������ �������������������������������� ����������������������������������� ���������� ����������������������������������� ������������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ������������������������������������ ������������������

������������ ������������������������������ ������������������ ���������������� �������������������������������� ���������� ���������������

�������������� ��������� ��������������������

April 2008


Voles are another pest that need patience to control. Right now I have a large nest of them, and peanut butter on a mousetrap is not catching them. They seem to be pretty smart. Linda had a problem with large holes appearing in the leaves of her shade plants. Ligularia was one of the most attacked. A friend said nematodes in the ground were doing the eating, and told her to sprinkle sugar around the plants. It worked. There is a small worm or caterpillar that attacks roses in the spring, leaving the leaves looking pretty bad. The new growth in June doesn’t get eaten, so that means the worm as moved on to another part of its life cycle. Then in mid-July, there is another small, green worm that eats the flower buds of the petunias and monarda. You don’t see it unless you look really closely, but if your petunias stop flowering, check it out. The buds have been chewed on. This worm hits all petunias, including the small calibrachoa. I use a small spritz on the top of the plant of Bayer Advanced Rose & Flower Killer. Yes, it is a pesticide but you use only a small amount right where it is needed. Snails and slugs can eat your plant completely in one day. They do live through the winter, so if you have a large number of them, you may need one of the slug baits that can be used around pets and wildlife. The environmental thing to do is cut the slug in half, sprinkle it with salt or just step on it. Snails are more of a problem,

A wildflower meadow, nature as it used to be.

�������������������������������������� ������������������������������� ���������������������� ���������������������������������� �������������������������������

See Into the Garden page 25

Deer Problems?

DEER FENCING!

������������������������������������������

����������������������������������������������� �����������4��������������4���������

���������������������������������������������

������������������������� �������������������������������� ��������������������������� ������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������

Call Dan at Young’s of Ridgefield where we specialize in ALL types of deer fencing

���������������������

������������������������ • SAVE PLANTS & SHRUBS • EXPERIENCE FEWER TICKS

YOUNG’S OF RIDGEFIELD

91 DANBURY RD., RIDGEFIELD, CT

(203) 438-6760 April 2008

��������������������������������� ������������������������������� ���������������������������������� ������������������������������������ ����������������������������� �������������������������������� ������������������������������� ���������������������������� ���������������������������������� �������������������������������� ����������������������������

����������������� � ����������

�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

����������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

23


Riverside continued from page 7 After your excursion at Estate Treasures you may be hungry, so luckily Balducci’s “food lover’s market” is across the street. Balducci’s has an aromatic bakery, oodles of fresh fruits and vegetables, domestic and imported cheeses and their own brand of freshly ground coffee in a variety of flavors. Balducci’s India Monsoon Malabar promises to produce a “musty, pungent cup of coffee with a caramel finish.” It certainly sounds as if your taste buds will pop once you take a sip!

��������

��������������

Anthony, the purchasing manager of Balducci’s, said they also offer fresh olives, a wide selection of olive oils and an array of gourmet foods. Anthony, who said he feels as if he lives at Balducci’s, is always available to help customers find the right food and beverage for any occasion, including just sitting at home and relaxing over a delicious meal. Shopping in Riverside is not complete unless you stop at Ada’s on Riverside Avenue. Although Ada passed away recently, her family plans to keep the store going, and Kelly Romaniello, Ada Cantavero’s nephew, thanks everyone for the outpouring of affection, flowers and cards the family has received. Ada, who was a spry and lively 88-year-old, had been in business for more than 57 years. Her small white house is a refuge for candy lovers, and Riverside children have been stopping after school for candy at Ada’s since 1951. Every day they would find Ada there to welcome them. “Tell me the type of candy you want and I will know it,” Ada used to say. “I have every candy you could think of: red laces, malted balls, smarties, Mary Janes, button candy, necklaces, and Gummi Bears.” Ada’s Variety Shop carries some candies that are five cents each, and there are still a few penny candies. If you want to sample a candy from your childhood, stop by Ada’s to satisfy your sweet treat nostalgia. Riverside has an abundance of retail establishments, and it’s a great place to spend the day. ■

�����

DETAILS J. Pierre Hair Designers 1267 E. Putnam Ave. 203-637-4331 Mon. to Sat. 9 to 5 Coco Nail Spa 1263 E. Putnam Ave. 203-698-2220 Mon. to Sun. 9 to 7 DiMare Pastry Shop 1245 E. Putnam Ave. 203-637-4781 Mon. to Sat. 8 to 6:30, Sun. 8 to 3 Estate Treasures of Greenwich, LLC 1162 E. Putnam Ave. 203-637-4200 Mon. to Sat. 10 to 5:30, Sun. 1 2 to 5:30 Balducci’s Market I050 East Putnam Ave. 203-637-7600 Mon. to Sat. 8 to 8, Sun. 8 to 7 Ada’s Variety Shop 112 Riverside Ave. 203-637-0305 Mon. to Fri. 7:30 to 5, Sat. & Sun. 7:30 to 2

24

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


Into the Garden continued from page 23

and hand picking (then drowning them in soapy water) is the method one of my clients uses. The best advice I can give to a gardener is keep your cool. There will always be holes in the foliage, yellowing foliage, etc. After all, this is outside gardening. Pam and I had a private tour of a wonderful wildflower meadow in North Salem. It is the Perrin Garden that was on the Garden Conservancy tour June 8. The meadow was planted by Larry Weaner Landscape Design Associates. This is not your ordinary meadow since the seeds were sown with drifts in mind, and it will be controlled to keep that look. As we walked the mowed paths through the meadow, it was a reminder of my childhood, playing in the fields around our house in Minnesota. This is nature as it used to be, and not the mulched shrub beds we have today. I hope with the green movement that we can get back to a natural look in our yards. In July, the first rocket snapdragons open, and I remember why I plant them in all the beds. The large flowers remind you of an English garden. I plant four six-packs in a line, which is two rows wide. When they are about 10 inches or so, it’s time to stake. A row of bamboo stakes (about 2 feet tall) should be placed around the group, and then weave string should be woven between each ��������������������������� ������� �������� ������� stem. As they grow taller, you need to raise the string. It is lots of work, but what a reward! Enjoy these last weeks of summer, and don’t let the pests������� get you down. �������������������������������������� ������� �������� �������������������������������������� ������� �������� Questions or comments: donnaclark@ix.netcom.com. ■ �������

�������������������������������������

����������������� ���� �����������

����� ���� � �� �� �

������������ ��������

����� ����� ����� ���� ����� ��������

����������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������

��������������� ��������������� ��������������� ����������������������������� ����������������������������� ���������������������������� �� �� �����������

������������������������������������������ ���������������� �������������������������������������������������������

����������������������������� �����

�����������

����� �� ��������� ��������� ������� ��

��� ����������� ����� ��������� ������

���������� ������������������ ���� ������������� ��������� ������������������������������������

��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������

� � � � � �

��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� � �������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������� ����� ���������� ������� ������� �������������� ���� ����������� ������� ����� � ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� � ������������ ���������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� � ������� ����� ���������� ������� ������� �������������� ���� ����������� ������� ����� � ����������������� �������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������ � ����������� ���������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� � �������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������� ����� ���������� ������� ������� �������������� ���� ����������� ������� ����� � � ������������ �������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� � ������������ ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ����������� ���������������������������������������� � ������������� ����������������������� �������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� � ������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� � ����������� ���������������������������������������� ������������� ����������������������� �������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������� � ������������ �������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������� � ������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������� �������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������� ����� ������������������������������������

����������� April 2008 �������� ���

��������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������� ��������������������� ����������������������������� ����� ���������� ������� ������� �������������� ���� ����������� ������� ����� � �������������������������� �������������������������������������������� ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������ ��������� �������������������� �������� ��������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������� ��������������������� ���������� ����������������� ������������ ���� ��������������������������

������ �������������� �������� ��������� ���� ���������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

25


WINDOW I ON I REAL I ESTATE ■

Logging on to a fast commute by Jane K. Dove Many employers once warily viewed “working from home” as a way for employees to put in a couple of hours of paperwork and then turn on the TV – on company time. But the advent of professionally planned and structured approaches to telecommuting in the computer age has dramatically altered that somewhat jaundiced assessment. Today, more and more workers are using their home phones, PCs and laptops to log in to the office and put in a full and productive day, or days, of working from home. With gas prices on the rise and the stress of the daily commute well documented, many employers are taking advantage of high-speed Internet connections to set up successful telecommuting programs for their employees.

VIVONA

“Telecommuting has definitely become a mainstream phenomenon, especially in Fairfield County,” said Jean Taylor Stimolo, program manager for the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s popular “Telecommute Connecticut!” program. Established in 1998, Telecommute Connecticut! provides free assistance to employers and employees, helping businesses both small and large with the design, development and implementation of individually tailored telecommuting programs. Goals include decreasing traffic congestion, energy consumption and air pollution while improving worker productivity by reducing absenteeism, building employee retention and loyalty, and fostering a healthy balance between work and home.

�� �� ������������������� ������������������� ��������������� ��������������� ���������������

CONSTRUCTION. LLC HOME IMPROVEMENT CONTRACTORS (No job too big or too small)

Kitchen & Bathroom Specialists! Carpentry (all phases)

� � ����������������� �����������������

��������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������

Windows/Doors/Moldings/Oak Flooring Masonry Tile Installation Painting (Interior/Exterior) Basement Remodeling/Flood Repair Electrical Plumbing

Over 20 years experience, 3rd generation Craftsman Owner Operated with full staff

NICK VIVONA (203) 975-9048 Your one stop company for ALL your home improvement needs! Free Estimates References Fully Licensed & Insured HIC# 0578655

26

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

A reputation built barn by barn, for nearly 30 years. Custom barns and sheds built on your site. Complimentary site inspection. Hand built by our craftsmen.

Yes, practicality can be beautiful. Call Bill Hurley: 203.405.1555 Better Barns Visit our Model Center today. Bethlehem, CT www.BarnsBuilt.com

April 2008


In addition, telecommuting helps companies maximize their office space by cutting overhead expenses and increasing their labor pool without “brick and mortar” expansion or leasing of additional square footage. “The end result of all of this is that employees can realize a more positive work/life balance while companies attract and retain the highest quality of employees,” said Ms. Stimolo. Custom Tailored

Ms. Stimolo said the Telecommute Connecticut! staff uses core principles and adjusts them to fit the needs of companies seeking assistance with program set-up. “We have developed programs for very small two- or three-person businesses on up to corporations employing thousands,” she said. “We can do a single department, a section of a department or go company-wide. It’s very customized.” Telecommute Connecticut! has set up programs for corporations, hospitals and other health-service providers, and educational institutions, among others. “We are also flexible about how the telecommuting time is structured,” she said. “Some companies or employers might want four days in the office and one telecommuting. “Others might want a totally different balance. The key is designing a program that works for everyone involved.”

Working Smart

Ms. Stimolo said employers have come on board with telecommuting because they see it as a way to practice good management. “It’s working smart,” she said. “Some employees really do not need to come into an office because of the nature of their work. But high-speed Internet connections have dramatically altered the way all of us work and opened up a whole new realm of possibilities for telecommuting.” Ms. Stimolo said employers that have adopted telecommuting for a significant portion of their employees enjoy substantial savings. “They may be able to avoid renting or building additional office space if they switch some employees to telecommuting,” she said. “Telecommuting frees up square footage and even improves possibilities for getting a good parking space when you come in.” Many misconceptions about telecommuting have now been removed. “It has become an accepted practice and certainly is no longer viewed as a way to enjoy some free time at home,” Ms. Stimolo said. “Managers are used to it as are employees. It’s a natural outgrowth of the digital age, where most people are already working remotely, even when they are physically in their offices.” Rise In Productivity

“All of our surveys show that the primary reason it is so appealing to managers is that their employees are more productive when they telecommute,” she said. “The See Window on Real Estate page 31

������������� ����������� ����������������� Duette® ArchitellaTM Honeycomb Shades feature a patented cell-within-a-cell construction to help lower energy costs, increase insulation, and maintain a comfortable temperature in your home year-round. ������ ������������ ������������������

��������������� ��������� ����������� ����������������� �

���������������������������� ������������������������� ������������������������������������������������� �����������������������������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������

������������������������� ������������������������ �����������������������������������

�������������������������

������������������������������������� Laurasdraperies.hdwfg.com

������������������ April 2008

�������������������������

��������������������������������������������� ������������������������������� ����������������������� ���������������������������������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

27


HOME I MOANER ■

Extras by Ben Guerrero One of the things we like about our old house on Rusty Hinge Road is that it has two full baths. One of the things we dislike about our house is that the bathrooms are horrible. So, the economy being what it is, we decided to throw all our surplus money into our greatest investment: the house. We met with my old pal Elbow (Home Moaner, “Getting Plastered,” Feb. 2003) and told him what we had in mind. Free In Home Appointment & Written Quote

203-888-5566

Oxford

www. StairRunnerStore .com

Specializing in Hall & Stair Runners Largest Sample Selection Owner Sales & Installations Area Rugs

Ben Guerrero

1-888-590-5566 Toll Free

SINCE

1996

KITCHENS • BATHROOMS NEWLY REMODELED Starting from$8,490

NEW!

Expanded Website

Please Visit Today

����������������������������������������������������������������������������������s SEARCH OUR SAMPLE SELECTION: Select & Save Your Favorites

J.V. LOMBARDI BUILDERS

203.331.0287 LIC# 544869

Request An Appointment Online To See Samples At Home

������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������

�������������� ������������������ ��������������������� ��������������������������

������������ ��������������������������������� ����������������

����������������������� ���������������������������������

����������������������������������������������������

�������

��������������������������������� �����������������������������������������������

������������

28

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

������������

������������� April 2008


show that will take place in our back yard on hot summer nights. Just remember There isn’t much good to say about the current state of our bathrooms: bad tilthere’s a two-drink minimum. ing, leaks, ugly fixtures, no storage. So Elbow crunched some numbers and agreed In about a week, we’ll be ready for some tiles, which means a trip to our new to take on the job. We put it off and put it off until many of our end-of-spring obligations had evaporated. Finally I made the call, and one morning Elbow’s crew favorite place: the tile store. Again, Elbow’s got connections, and there is absolutely showed up in the back yard, tore the horrible metal back door off the house and no shortage of possibilities on that front. We have discovered there is an endless array of shockingly ugly tiles at extraordinarily affordable prices. The good news is opened a can of worms. there are also just as many wonderfully beautiful tiles available for heaping shovelNothing was level or plumb, and we quickly found out why the commode had fuls of money. For once, our tile needs are just like our bathrooms – small and rocked from side to side with discomforting ease: There was nothing but tile grout modest – so we have agreed on some very tasteful selections, which shouldn’t damkeeping it from falling through the four rotting layers of floor boards. What was a simple remodel had, in one day, become a complete rebuild. age our mortally wounded budget too badly, unless we get crazy and decide to tile The bathroom wing was constructed using the armature of an old porch. There the lawn or the cat box with tumbled, Turkish marble. When the dust settles, we’ll have two new bathrooms, bookshelves in the parlor, was plenty of archaeological evidence to support this hypothesis: The floor was a new chromium fridge, and more closet space to store our ever-expanding pile of sloped due to the weather, and once stripped, the walls had clearly been hastily and – how do I put this politely? – stuff. rudimentarily constructed using techniques of jaw-dropping ineptitude. As always, there was ample evidence that in a previous life, I must have insulted the former Instead of spending money to put gas in the car, we are doing the smart thing owner of this property, for there was absolutely nothing salvageable in any part of and investing in the house, ever mindful that the numbers on Elbow’s invoice are the downstairs bathroom. It was constructed almost vindictively, as if anticipating spinning faster than the numbers on the gas pump. Gas pump? Maybe we could put one of those in, too. Should we tile it? the day I would get my comeuppance. Go ahead, talk me out of it. ben.guerrero@sbcglobal.net. ■ Elbow’s crew, which the last time we visited him, consisted of Elbow, his slobbery dog and occasionally, me, has now grown to include a manly crew of skilled laborers with trucks full of nifty tools and cigarette butts. Keeping them busy enough once they got started was the hard part. So, as quickly as Elbow’s workforce could load the festering house parts into the dump truck, we began adding “extras” onto the project. Extras are those things neither predicted nor imagined during the casual, preliminary, vague discussions over iced Fogbuster coffee in our debris-strewn FROM DESIGN TO INSTALLATION parlor. Things like the modern, FrenchKITCHENS, LIBRARIES, FAMILY ROOMS looking toilet at the lush porcelain and chrome showroom, where Elbow is 25 YEARS OF LOCAL EXPERIENCE known on a first name basis with the sales weasels. It is here that wonderful bargains are implied if not actually offered. Melissa and I fairly cooed over this otherwise mundane convenience, our nostalgia glands hyper-secreting with Joe Rizzo, Proprietor - Country Road Associates LTD. fond memories of our recent trip to “We’re the only makers of 19th Paris. This toilet was so continental; Century style furniture to use you could almost see the designer’s 19th C. barnwood.” Gauloises-stained fingers clutching a Shown here: FARM TABLE. Farm tables pencil at the Parisian drawing board. bring to mind families enjoying a bounty And it cost three times more than your of good eating. That’s why we have average Home Depot model. adapted it for contemporary living or And, since the plumber was down in traditional settings. This simple, yet the dirt replacing all the pipes anyway, uniquely beautiful dining table is 72” L x 36” W x 30” H, and comfortably seats 8. why not install an outdoor shower? Indeed why not? It’ll never be cheaper Also custom cabinetry, chairs, mirrors, benches, and, at the same time, a dream come Oriental rugs and more “I sell barnwood very reasonably. Call me for a price quote.” true, and what with gas being what it is • Traditional hand craftsmanship • Each piece individually signed, • FLOORING in rare chestnut, wide-board white pine, oak, heart pine, and all, why not create the illusion that dated & numbered by joiner • Hand-rubbed wax finish for hemlock, cherry, walnut & more our semi-urban Victorian is in fact an a mellow satin patina • Send $5 for our color brochure • Random widths from 3" to 20" old family beach house on the Vineyard? • Barnsiding in different natural colors, faded red, Open Tues.–Sat. 10am-4pm, Sunday & Monday by appointment Never mind the fact that the second silver gray, and brown COUNTRY ROAD ASSOCIATES, LTD., floor boarding house window next door • Large Quantities available • Deliveries throughout the USA 63 Front Street, P.O. Box 885, Millbrook, NY 12545 serves as a perfect balcony seat for the • HAND-HEWN BEAMS up to 13" wide, random -lengths 845-677-6041 FAX 845-677-6532

WILLIAM F. VERRILL

CABINETMAKER

FINE INTERIOR WOODWORKING

BY APPT 203-761-9109

“19th CENTURY BARNWOOD IS MY BUSINESS”

www.countryroadassociates.com

April 2008

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

29


SIXTH ANNUAL

GARDENING FAIR

Calling all gardeners (or those who would like to be)! Set aside Saturday, Aug. 16, from 12:30 to 5 to attend the sixth annual Gardening Fair presented by the UConn Fairfield County Master Gardeners and the Connecticut Master Gardener Association. It’s a free event that requires no preregistration and offers an array of gardening activities sure to please everyone. There will be multiple presentations by gardening experts and a variety of information booths. Master gardeners

will be on hand to answer questions and to test soil samples. Free refreshments, demonstrations, a free plant raffle, the sale of gently used gardening books, and other garden-related activities are planned. The fair will be held at the Fairfield County Extension Center, 67 Stony Hill Road in Bethel, less than a mile from Exit 8 on I-84. Call the Master Gardener office with questions, 203-207-3262.

ECO-SYSTEMS INC. Lawn Sprinkler & Outdoor Lighting Systems

�����������������������������

����������������������� ������������������������ �

� ������������������������ ������� � ����������� � ������

������������������������������

Andy Coleman Over 30 Years Experience Located in Ridgefield, CT Serving Fairfield & Westchester Counties Ct Lic #208694

�������� ��������������

203-438-9152

������������������������������������������ ������������

ECO-SYSTEMSONLINE.COM

��������������������������������� � ������������������������

�����������������������������������

AUTOMATED GATE SYSTEMS

*Shown with optional attachments

CUB CADET 2007 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR 21 HP KOHLER CUB CADET 2007 HEAVY-DUTY GARD 21 HP1 KOHLER® COMMAND® V-TWIN OHV ENGINE

NORWALK OFFICE (203)

MAIN OFFICE (203)

838-5971

407-8913

2

SAVINGS OF $200

CUB CADET 2007 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR Cub Cadet Commercial Products For Commercial Use O V-TWIN OHV ENGINE

3,499

FORMAL AND GARDEN STYLES INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED ADVANCED & RELIABLE SYSTEMS OF AUTOMATION, COMMUNICATION, VIDEO AND CONTROL ON-CALL SERVICE.

DESIGN ASSOCIATES, INC. 60 CONNOLLY PARKWAY HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT 06514

30

Sale Price Only

3,499

$

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

GT 2544

• 44” heavy-duty triple blade cutting deck • Heavy-duty steel Shaft Drive • Cast-iron front axle with grease fittings ZERO INTEREST ZERO PAYMENTS FOR 12 MONTHS3 See details below

Cub Cadet Commercial Products For Commercial Use Only

*Shown with optional attachments

CUB CADET 2007 HEAVY-DUTY GARDEN TRACTOR ��������������������������������������������������� NEWTOWN POWER EQUIPT �������������������������� ���������������������������������� ��������������

as rated by engine manufacturer 2 Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability. 3 *12 MONTHS NO PAYMENTS & NO INTEREST IF PAID WITHIN 12 MONTHS - *Valid on purchases of $999 or more made by 5/31/07 on Power Credit Card account. On promo purchase, no monthly payments required & no finance charges assessed if (1) promo purchase paid in full in 12 months, (2) any minimum monthly payments on account paid when due, and (3) account balance does not exceed credit limit. Ot herwise, promo may be terminated & finance charges assessed from purchase date. Standard terms apply to non-promo purchas es, optional charges & existing accounts. As of 3/23/07, variable APR’s: 18.99% & on all accounts in default, 23.99%. Minimum Finance Charge $1. Subject to approval by GE Money Bank. 1

April 2008


Window on Real Estate continued from page 27 second reason is attraction and retention of high-quality employees. Telecommuting has definitely entered the mainstream, with some companies using it for as much as 40% of their workforce.” Setting up a successful telecommuting program involves identifying the “right employees doing the right work,” Ms. Stimolo said. “If you do this, you can have a seamless transition. We find that once a company gets going with a telecommuting program, they tend to keep it going and expand as time goes by. And don’t forget, you can try it out without making any kind of permanent commitment.” It takes Telecommute Connecticut! professionals about three months to set up a program. “We always do a human resources, company policy, technology, connectivity, and security review as part of the assistance we provide,” she said. Current statistics on telecommuting show that about 9% of Connecticut residents now work remotely for at least part of the time. “We have seen an 86% increase in the past five years, and the recent increase in gas prices has sharply increased the number of people now reaching out to us. This is a concept that has truly come of age.” The increased popularity of telecommuting has helped with exploding some myths. “Most people realize that telecommuters work just as hard as their co-workers in the office and are able to easily ‘stay in the loop’ of communications,” she said.

CCL CA S T E L L I

CONSTRUCTION & LANDSCAPE, INC.

(203) 834-9859 Free Estimates & Consultations

– Complete Excavation Services – Drainage Systems – Driveways – Lawn Installation – Masonry/Stonewalls – Walkways/Patios – Material Delivery – Trees/Shrubs – Complete Landscape Services

�������������������

Although telecommuting has many positives, Ms. Stimolo said it is not suited to all employees. “Telecommuters have to work to stay organized, be diligent with their schedules and some even have to learn to take work breaks at home. Employees that cannot do these things, or want or need a lot of personal interaction might prefer to work out of an office.” “Telecommute Connecticut! exists to help employers establish a structure and concrete goals for their employees working from home,” Ms. Stimolo said. “They will know what is expected of them and employers will know the work is getting done. It’s a great solution to many of the issues facing today’s workplace and will only grow more popular in the future.” For information on Telecommute Connecticut!, visit their Web site at telecommuteCT. com, or call 1-800-255-7433. ■

Your Yard, Garden

& Pet Place

• Lawn & Garden Equipment • Complete Lawn Maintenance • Sales & Service • Pet Food & Supplies • Landscaping • Rentals

Deer Fencing

Young’s of Ridgefield 438-6760

Copps Hill Plaza, 91 Danbury Road Ridgefield (Rte 35) Open Monday-Saturday 8:00-5:30

* Design to Completion * We do the whole project so you don’t have to do anything! Visit one of our showrooms and talk to the people that know what they are talking about.

We are kitchen and bath professionals.

On your job every day till it’s complete...guaranteed Design Center Hours: M-F 9am-4:30pm • Sat. 9:30am-3:30pm ��������������������������������������������� �����������������������������������������������

������������������� �����������������������������������������

������������������������������������������

������������

�����������������������������������������������

����������������������������������������������������

April 2008

19 Old Doansburg Rd • Brewster, NY 10509 Phone: 845.278.0070 Fax: 845.278.6913 594 Route 6 • Mahopac, NY 10541 Phone: 845.628.2288 Fax: 845.628.6988 www.southeastkitchens.net The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

31


Homebodies continued from page 16 “Of course he saw it!” she said. “He couldn’t miss the children and the balloons and the lemonade. It wouldn’t have killed him to stop and buy a glass.” (I don’t think Mr. Jeffries would be invited to live with Sandy and her family should his home ever undergo any renovations.) Shop Around The Block

Tag sales are another event that seems to bring neighbors together. They’re kind of like block parties, only without the food. Our neighbors Bob and Joan held one recently, and my daughter and I stumbled upon it while we were out walking one beautiful summer morning.

������������������������

����������������� ����������������������������

I would have felt rude just passing by, so we ambled up the driveway, casually admiring their “junk,” and stopped to say hi. One of their grown son’s old skateboards caught my daughter’s eye, and when I asked Joan how much it cost, she said, “Please, just take it!” Bob also offered to give us an old computer, and Joan told me to take anything else I liked, but I declined (we’re trying to declutter our own house), and we went on our way. For their generosity, I decided to bake Bob and Joan some brownies. “You didn’t have to do that!” Joan said, when I dropped the plate off the next day. But I was happy to have made the gesture, and I consider it a prelude, a first step, to that cookout I’m going to have someday. ■

������������������ �����������������

�������������� ��������� ��������������

American Hardwoods Custom Millwork and Flooring “Green Building” Wood Products Responsible Forest Management 1996 Forest Stewardship Council A.C. FSC Supplier SCS-COC-001435

©

For Prices & Information: www. cwghardwoodoutlet.com ��������������������������������������������

Models On Display

����������������������������������

�����������������������������������

��������������������������������

LAWTON ADAMS CONSTRUCTION CORP. Serving Contractors & Homeowners since 1939

Complete Site Work and Excavating Drainage & Septic Systems • Driveways • Grading

Riding Rings are our Speciality! Prompt Delivery or Pick-up at our Supply Yard

Sand • Gravel • Fill • Top Soil • Bank Run • Drainage Pipe Wallstone • Belgian Block • Flagstone • Pavers • Portland Cement Helping people build beautiful country places since 1974!

326 Gilead Street, Hebron, CT 06248 860-228-2276 catalog $4 www.countrycarpenters.com

32

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

Route 100, Somers, NY 10589 (914) 232-3275 License #(WC 2139-H89) www.lawtonadams.com April 2008


Hammocks continued from page 19 Relatively new are poolside or quick-dry hammocks, which are made of mold-resistant fabrics that are fade-resistant and extremely durable – if less comfortable. “You can use one of those right after it rains,” Stuart said. “There is no wait for the hammock to dry off.” All of the above hammocks can be attached between two trees or hung from a stand. “It’s nearly 50-50 in terms of whether people use trees or go with the stand,” Stuart said. “The stands offer greater flexibility because you can place the hammock wherever you want it. But there is also something classic about having the hammock hanging between two trees.” For those opting for the latter, Stuart recommends finding two trees that are 13 to 15 feet apart. “Less than 13 feet is not enough room,” he said. “But once you go past 15 feet the hammock can be prone to more tipping.”

Love to cook or know someone who does?

Single-person hammocks should be 45 inches wide and at least 78 inches long. For double occupancy, the measurements stretch to 54 inches wide and 84 inches long. Family-size hammocks (60 inches wide, 84 inches long) are also available. Stands, which are sold separately, come in metal, stainless steel and wood. The Roman Arc wood stand, made of cypress, is highly durable and gaining in popularity despite its relatively high price (around $500). “You can leave it out in the yard all year,” Stuart said. “And it also blends in nicely with trees in the yard.” Unlike boats, indoor pools and weekends in the Hamptons, hammocks remain an inexpensive summer symbol of leisure, usually selling for between $50 and $250. “It’s a way to unwind without spending a fortune,” he said. And for those worried about slowing down too much, there are ways around it. Among the many accessories available is the hammock caddy, which is perfect for holding cell phone, iPod and BlackBerry. Just in case. At Home Design Center is at 428 W. Putnam Ave., Greenwich, 203-622-4696. ■

Your Choice For Tile Tile

Natural Stone

Mosaic

Metal

Glass

If you or someone you know would like to be featured in our Food & Drink column, please contact Jeannette Ross at jross@acorn-online.com

�����������������������������������

������������������������ � ������������������������������������������������ ���������������������������������������������������������

�������� ���� ���

� ��

���� ������

�������� �����������

����������

������ Visit Your Local Showrooms:

Stamford, CT

63 Harbor View Avenue 203.323.5922

�����������������

Brookfield, CT

�����

1-800-360-

� ���������

���������������

� � ����������������������

April 2008

���������������� ��������������������������

�������������������� ����������������

Fairfield 203.367.6449

www.tileamerica.com

Manchester 860.649.8222

New Haven 203.777.3637

West Hartford 860.236.1931

487-D Federal Road 203.740.8858 We’re Always Close to Home

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

33


INTERIOR I INSIGHTS ■

Creating an efficient workspace at home by Olga Adler Do you know the feeling of rolling out of bed in the morning for a cup of coffee from your own kitchen, then getting right to work without having to comb your hair or put on makeup and decide what to wear? I do. It’s called a home office, and I love it! More and more people work out of their homes these days, at least a couple of days a week, and with current gas prices, this trend makes more sense than ever before. But it is not just corporate types who choose to cut their commute costs and time. Many small business owners work from home permanently, as do some independent professionals, writers and artists. Who else needs a well-functioning home office? Stay-athome moms definitely do, as they are the CEOs of their households, responsible not only for taking care of the kids and all their countless activities, but also for managing all the house- and property-related tasks. Everybody who works out of the house, full- or part-time, needs a home office. Whether it’s a section of the kitchen for a bill-paying mom or dad or a full-blown office for a corporate executive, there are certain principles that apply to both. For every home office, the goal is to create a stress-free, well-organized work environment without sacrificing the style of your home. Perfect balance of form and function can be achieved by making smart choices: choosing the right space, picking a desk shape that complements your personal work style (U-shape or L-shape?), investing in ergonomic seating, assuring the right task lighting, and creating a good organization system for paper and data management. Evaluating your specific needs is the first step. Here are some of the questions you need to ask yourself when it comes to function and form:

��������

��������

���������

�������������������

�������������������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������������������������� ������������������ ��������������������������������

34

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

1. How much time will you be spending in your home office? 2. What tasks will you do there? 3. What furniture and equipment is essential? 4. How much space do you need? 5. Will the space be private or are you going to receive clients or vendors? 6. Do you prefer a plain space or one that is more visually sophisticated? 7. What level of privacy suits your needs best? 8. What color scheme would work best for your office? Some additional elements you might want to consider are a sound system and TV screen, a small fridge or mini kitchenette with coffee machine and microwave, and exercise equipment. Flooring choices range from hardwood to wall-to-wall carpeting. Whatever your choice, the office flooring should be durable enough to accommodate not only foot traffic (your own and that of potential visitors coming in from all kinds of weather), but also your desk chair on casters, your mobile file cabinets and the occasional coffee spills. Hardwood flooring always works well in office spaces, but low-pile, commercialgrade carpeting is great, too. Every office requires both general and task lighting. Recessed or track lighting is best in the first role, and traditional desk lamps serve the task lighting purpose just fine. If your space has a window, make sure the natural light is controlled properly, especially if your desk will be placed next to a window. Natural woven shades are my favorSee Interior Insights page 37

����������������� ����������������������������� ������� ����������

��������������������� ������������������

�������������������� ����������������������������� ������������������

�������

������������������������ ����������� ����������

������������� ����������������������������

��������������������� ���������������������� �������������������

� � � ���� ����� April 2008


��������

��������

���������

������������� � �������� �������������� ������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������

��������������������

��������������������������������� �����������������

����������������������������������������

���������������� ��������� ���

��������������� ���������������� ��������������� ���������������

��������������������������������� ��������������������� ����������������������

������������

���������������������������������

�������������� �����������

���������������� ������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������

������������ ������������������

������ �����

���������

����������������� ���������� �����������������

�����������

���

������������������������������� ������������ ������������� ����������

�������������� � �

��

��������������������� ������������������������

���������������� ◆������������������������������

������������������������ ◆��������������������

�����������

������������������������ ������������ ��������������� ������������ April 2008

◆�������������������������

���������� � �������������������

�������������������������������������������������������

��������������������������������� ���������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������

�������������������

�������������������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������������������������� ������������������ �������������������������������� The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

35


������������������������� � � ��� �

�� � � � �

�� � � � �

������������ ��������� �������� ������ ������ �� ��������� ������ ��� ����� ���� ������ �������������� ����������� ��������� �� ���������� ���� ������������ ��� ���� ��� ��������� ����� ������������ ��������� ����������� ����� ������� ��������� ������ ��� �������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������ ��������� �� ������ �������� ������ ������������ ����� ����� ������ ����� �� �� ������ ��������������� ����������

��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������� ����������

����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ � ������� �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

�������������

����������������������������

��������������

������������������

���������������

��������������

�������������������

����������������������������

������������������������� �����������������������������

� � ��� �

� � ��� �

� � ��� �

���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������� ����� �������� ������������ ������������� ����������������� ������ ����� �������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ �������������������������� ���������� ��������������������������

������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ��� ������������� ������� ����� ��������� ��������� ���������� �������� ��������� �� ��� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������� ���� ���� ����������� ���������� ����� ����������� ������������� ����� ������ ����� �������������� �������� ���������������������������������

���������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������� ���������� �������������������������������������

����������������������������������

����������������������������������

��������������

��������������

��������������������������������

��������������

� � �� � � ��

� � �� � � ��

� � ��� �

�������������������������������������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������� ���������� ��������������������������

������������ ������� ����������� �������� ����� ��������� ��� ���� ���������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ���������������� ���������� ����������������������������

��������� ������������ �� ��������� ������ ��� ����� ������� ����������� �������� ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������������������������������������� ����������� �������� ����������������������������������

����������������������������������

��������������

36

���������������������������������

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

����������������������������������

��������������

����������������������������������

��������������

April 2008


Interior Insights continued from page 34

Olga Adler

ite for both aesthetic and practical reasons, as they fit almost any décor and they let you control light by gently filtering it. When placing a desk lamp, remember to put it to your left if you are right-handed and to your right if you are left-handed so you don’t block the light when you’re writing by hand. (Does anybody still do that, or did technology eliminate that task-lighting principle forever?) Speaking of technology, the days of tons of office equipment are gone. All-in-one printers/copiers/fax machines are a must. More and more of my clients use laptops rather than desktop computers, which is great when you deal with smaller spaces. When it comes to furniture, some of the elements my clients often request are lockable file drawers, flip-down keyboard shelves, printer and CD storage, docking stations for cell phones and iPods, paper-management systems – including custom-designed filing solutions and a sorting system for bills, letters, menus – as well as office wasterecycling systems. If you would like to learn more about how to make your home office work, please join me and Jill McKean, professional organizer and owner of Organize-It, for a seminar on home office design and organization. The class takes place at East Ridge Middle School in Ridgefield on October 15 at 7 p.m. Call Ridgefield Continuing Education at 203-431-9995 for more information and to reserve your spot. Olga Adler is an interior decorator with a design studio, Olga Adler Interiors, in Ridgefield. Call 203-438-4743; e-mail olga@olgaadlerinteriors.com; Web site, olgaadlerinteriors.com/DesignTips.html. ■

The goal of a home office is to create a stress-free, well-organized work environment. ������ ������������

��������������������

��������������������������������������� ������������������������������������� �����������������������������

�������������

������������������������������������������������ ����������������������������������������� ����������������������������������

���������������������������������������

����������� �������������

��������������������� ���������������� � ����������������� ����������������

�������������������� ����������������������������������

�������������� ��������������

�������������� ������������

������������������������������

T.O.N. Custom Carpentry The finest workmanship on Building/remodeling/custom trim & millwork Remodeling Kitchens Baths Mantels

Call JOHN 203-948-6679

Additions Cabinets/Built Ins Windows/Doors Stairs/Rails Licensed & Insured

860-210-0662

����������������������������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������ �����������������������������������

�����������������

ASPHALT PAVING SPECIALISTS Parking Lots • Roads • Driveways • Tennis Courts

�����������������������

203-324-0311 CT. Lic. #536273 www.rocciesasphalt.com April 2008

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

37


A garden of the gods by Jeannette Ross

The White Garden in Lewisboro is so impressive it would be easy for visitors to take it too seriously. But as you wander the pathways admiring the massive plantings and its splendid structure, you are suddenly confronted with Zeus and Julius Caesar, who are communing with Tolstoy and the Duke of Wellington. Further along you’ll run into a pair of marble lions, a bronze goat, and a giant chessboard. It’s all intended to make you smile. And smile you will if you visit the garden when it is open to the public from 10 to 3 on Sunday, Sept. 7, as part of The Garden Conservancy’s Open Days Program. Admission is $5, which benefits the conservancy. The garden is at 199 Elmwood Road. For details, call 845-2655384 or visit online at gardenconservancy.org. Upon arriving, there will be signs for parking and guests will walk along the gravel driveway designed to look like a dirt road. Maps are available at the ticket table so you can be sure to visit everything. Most of the perennials and many of the annuals are white, hence the garden’s name, but visitors next month will see a mature garden, lush with greenery and getting ready for fall, its spring blooms long gone. (The garden, home to thousands of tulips and daffodils, is also open each spring.) This is at least the second incarnation for the 45-acre estate. More than a decade ago, the original ranch-style house was razed and replaced with a Greek revival structure. In addition, the grounds were completely redesigned by landscape architect Patrick Chasse, and the new gardens were completed in 1999. The result is a classical garden to complement the home, whose owner is a connoisseur of ancient Greek culture and an avid collector of antiquities. Encompassing 10 to 15 acres, the White Garden is actually a series of garden rooms, and after their walk along the driveway, visitors will come to a set of bluestone steps leading up to a circular court made of Belgium block. This is the Circle Garden, and it is at the main Katie Ross photos

38

The White Garden in Lewisboro, open to the public on Sept. 7, is a series of garden rooms surrounded by lush greenery, with paths to meander and surprises to make you smile.

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

April 2008


entrance to the house. First you will notice the fabulous 16th-Century Italian wellhead in the middle, but if you feel like you’re being watched, look to the side and you will see, in amongst the greenery, the busts of those historical figures I was talking about, and more. It’s a little unnerving at first, but also very cool. Nearby is the lush Conservatory Garden, brimming with canna, bananas, bamboo, and fountain grasses. “The idea was to make a garden with a tropical feel with water plants,” said Eric Schmidt, who has overseen the property for the past 27 years. That tropical feel also comes across in the size and dramatic impact of these imposing plants. Back across the Circle Garden you will find the Perennial Garden, overseen by statues of the four maidens, one for each season. They are looking over the oak leaf hydrangea, gooseneck loosestrife, lady’s mantle, astilbe, day lilies, sweet pea, and peonies. Perennials give way to annuals, and then you are at another of the garden’s features: the swimming pool and grotto. At the foot of the swimming pool is a round reflecting pool. As you gaze through its six inches of water you find another surprise, garden furniture. The reflecting pool acts as a skylight for a grotto beneath. To get there, follow the path and make your way along the stepping stones through the koi pond. Inside you will find a pebbled floor with sea-themed mosaics and an ethereal glow caused by the reflection of the swimming pool through a porthole. Touch the walls and you will be surprised once more. They are made of fiberglass formed by casts of real rocks. From here you may venture to the more natural areas of the property along a boardwalk that skims a marsh to the Asian-inspired moss garden. The walk back is along a wildflower path. Here you will find 50 varieties of ferns that are planted with thousands of daffodils.

Or, you may choose to visit the main pond with its island Temple d’Amour guarded by a pair of graceful swans. The 19th-Century French temple is made of carved marble columns and benches with round wrought-iron backs, accessible by stepping stones. Here, too, are the main lawn and a rock garden with a display of red and green Japanese maples. Around the back of the house is the labyrinth leading to the oversized chess set. “The gardens are always evolving,” said Eric, as affable as he is knowledgeable. He will be at the garden for the Open Day. “We are always expanding and coming up with new ideas for our collection of creatures and people.” ■

� ���������������������������

������������������������������� ����������������������������� ������������������������ ��������������������������������� ���������������������� ������������������������������

Chess anyone? An unusual feature of the White Garden are individual ‘rooms.’

April 2008

� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �� � �

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

� � � � � � � � � � � �� � � � � � �� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �

39


������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������������

������������������������������������������������� �� ���� ���� ���� ��������������� ��������� ��������� �������������� ��������� ���������� ������������������������ ����������

�������������������������������������������� �� ���� ���� ���� �������� ��������� ��������� ������� ������� ��������� �������� ������������ ������������������������������ ����������

����������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� ��������� ���� ������� ��������� ����� ���� ������ ������������������������������ ����������

��������������������������������������������� �� ����� ���� �� ����� ���� ��������� �������������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ����������

������ ���� ����� ������� �� ��� ����� ������ ������ ����������������������������������������������� ���� � ������ ������� ��������� ��� ������������� ������������������������� ��������

������ ��� ����� ����� ������ ��� ��������� ������� ����������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������������������������ ��������

�������������������������������������������� ����� ������� ������ ���� �� ���� �� ���� ���� ������ ���������������������������������� ��������

�� ��� ����� ����� ������ �������� ������ ����� ��������������������������������������������� ��������� ����� ��������� ���������� ������ ��� ������������������� ���������

������������������������������������������� ��������������������������������������������� �������� ��������� ��������� ������ ������ ��� ����������� ��������

�������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������� ����������������������������������������������� � ��������

����������������������������������������������� ��� ����� ���� ������ �������� ���� ���� �������� ����������������������������������������������� ������������ ��������

�������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������ ������� ������ ������� ����������� ������� ����� �������� ��������

������� ����� ��� �������� ������� ������� ����� ����� ���� ������� ������ �� ��� ����� ����� ��������������������������������������������� �������������������� ��������

����������� �� ��� ����� ��������� ���� ���� ���� ��� ������ ���� ������ ������� ��������� ������� ����� ������ �������� ���� ��������� ������������� ���������

����� �������� ������� �� ��� ������ ������ �������� ���� ���� �������� ������ ������ ���������������������������������������������� �������������������������������������������

�������������������������������������������� ������� ����� ������ ������ ������ ���� ��� ���� ����������������������������������������������� ��������������� ���������

��������������� ����������������� ���������������������������

40

The HOME Monthly, a Hersam Acorn special section, Ridgefield, Conn.

������������� � � � � � �

���������������������������� ���������������������� �������������������������� �����������������������������������������

April 2008


The HOME Monthly North/South Edition