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Issue No. 5

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

THE BEAUTY ISSUE


OUR COVER

BEAUTY NOTES: Face: Teeez Be Radiant Foundation in Porcelain. Eyes: Teeez To Die For Eyeshado w Quad in Cinn amon Revolution. Lips: Teeez Golden Glo w Lipgloss in Desert Lily. Over all glow: Teeez Style Addict Highlighter in Berlin Sunrise. Teeez pr oducts available at thebay.com Styling notes: Hat, House of Flor a. Photogr a phy, Virgile Reboul; Stylist, Margaux Sirejacob, Makeup Artist, Yvane Rocher ; Hair stylist, Sachi Yamashita; Model, Natalia Renken/Supreme Man agement Paris; Art Director, Beatriz Juarez.

FOUNDERS Beatriz Juarez

Luis Zulayhka

Creative Director/ Features & Beauty Editor

Fashion Director

lzulayhka@herringbonemag.com

bjuarez@herringbonemag.com

Design & Production double pgstudio

Copy Editing

Cr aig Mar shall

General Inquiries

info@herringbonemagazine.com

Our Address

HERRINGBONE MAGAZINE CENTRE FOR SOC IAL INNOVATION 215 Spadin a Ave. Suite 400, Tor onto, ON, MT5 2C7


TABLE OF CONTENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE 5| 6| 10 |

EDITOR’S NOTE

THE IMAGE-MAKERS

PROFILE THE ART OF THE CRAFT

16 |

MONOCLE SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF PAPER

22 |

FOCUS

REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

34 |

PAGES OTHERWORDLY

70 |

STOCKISTS

BEAUTY SUPERNOVA

| 40

HEAD FIRST

| 48

UNSCRIPTED

| 56

BEST IN SHOW

| 64

ONES TO HAVE

| 68

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE


HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

A C O N V E RG E N C E P O I N T F O R FA S H I O N, S T Y L E & C O N S U M E R P E RC E P T I O N S .

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TWITTER.COM/HERRINGBONEMAG


I want to apologize to all women I have called you pretty Before I’ve called them intelligent or brave I am so sorry I made it sound as though something as simple as what you are born with is the most you have to be proud of when your spirit has crushed mountains From now on I will say things like You are resilient or you are extraordinary Not because I don’t think you’re pretty but because you are much more than that

— Rupi Kaur

This issue is dedicated to all women, because we are bor n extr aordin ar y.

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE


THE IMAGE MAKERS


“This Study after Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent-X by Fr ancis Bacon (1953) was one of the f ir st paintings I couldn ’t get out of my mind when I was kid. I saw it at Fondation Maegh, and it ’s a good resumé of my a ppr oach to beauty: dark, mysterious, with emotion. I thought the guy was suff ering, but actually he is yelling at someone. The myster y gives r oom to inter pretation, so you can put your f eelings inside. The idea that geometr y can render a vision of beauty it ’s what I’ve ke pt thr oughout the year s”—Virgile Reboul

VIRGILE REBOUL

GIANLUCA ORIENTI

Virgile Reboul is the photographer behind

our cover and cover shoot “Supernova” (p. 40). Having started photography for personal work in the South of France (specifically landscapes and portraiture), Virgile moved to Paris where he became art director and soon, started working as a fashion photographer for international publications. He is known for his sharp portraits and minimalistic yet futuristic aesthetic.

“THE MYSTERY GIVES ROOM TO INTERPRETATION, SO YOU CAN PUT YOUR FEELINGS INSIDE.”

YVANE ROCHER

SACHI YAMASHITA

Makeup Artist Yvane Rocher is fascinated with fashion and makeup. Is not surprising then how her creative approach brings excitement and innovation to our pages. “Every day is different and every assignment makes me feel alive”. For “Supernova” (p. 40) Yvane created the looks based on the idea that “beautiful” could be anything that creates a big emotional response. 7

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Paris based hair designer Sachi Yamashita remembers the first time she went to a hair salon and her life was dramatically changed by a hair cut. That moment she describes as her first and greatest experience with creative hair. “I naturally became a hair stylist in Tokyo as to me it was the only and absolute choice”. Shortly after, she decided to move to London to improve her skills, where she drew inspiration from many sources including music. ”All the current activities I do, including the creative hair and making headpieces, are based on those great experiences I had in London” . For “Supernova” (p. 40,) Yamashita worked with the team in order to achieve the perfect “balance” of beauty. “That’s the exciting moment for team work and I enjoy it a lot. I remember it was raining before we started shooting but got some natural light after the rain was gone. This slight change of weather contributed to inspiring us on a subconscious level”.


GIANLUCA ORIENTI

Italian Hair and Makeup Artist extraordinaire GianLuca Orienti had the very challenging assignment of conceptualizing and making the looks behind “Head First” (p. 48) and “Unscripted” (p. 56). With a natural eye for beauty and originality (besides his great sense of humour), he brought his unique vision once again to our pages. GianLuca has worked with many celebrities and supermodels, such as Coco Rocha, Yasmine Warsame , Feist, Sarah Polley, Karen Kain, Arlene Dickinson, Michael J. Fox, as well as international brands such as Chanel, Dior, Guerlain, YSL, and Burberry. Besides dreaming and creating beautiful looks most of his waking hours, GianLuca also teaches fashion make-up and hair styling at Toronto’s CMU College of Makeup Art & Design.

ANDY LEE

For this issue, multi-talented photographer Andy Lee, captured the images for our hair story "Head First” (p.48). With a neverending and impressive creativity, Andy is that kind of super-photographer, able to conceptualize and create amazing imagery (whether it is fashion, social studies or food) with an impecable and discerning eye.

ONNA CHAN

Makeup Artist Onna Chan was born into a family of artists; her grandparents were Chinese Opera Performers and her Aunt owned a Beauty Spa, where Onna got her first taste of beauty at the age of four. Onna’s background and experience with Make Up For Ever since 2006 has given her the ability to master a variety of styles while always keeping the look current. Whether her assignment is print, advertising, editorial, a music video, or a television interview in HD Onna seamlessly adjusts her technique to the individual and is an experienced team player. Onna brought her infectious enthusiasm and talent to our pages with “Head First” (p. 48).


TRU FERGUSON

Tru Ferguson is a Toronto-based

photographer with a background in high fashion and fine art. Having grown up with few photos of her parents’ lives, she cares deeply about helping others create heirloom images to share with their families. Drawing from her international fashion career and her experience creating stunning fine art images, Tru designs photo shoots that use light, colour, texture, fashion, and emotion in artful combinations to capture the best side of every subject. For this issue, Tru conceptualized and shot “Unscripted” (p. 56) and “Ones to Have” (p. 68). With a keen eye for detail, she drew inspiration from alternative storytelling formats, but mostly from the idea of communicating grief and sorrow in a visually poetic yet dramatic way .

“MY WORK EXAMINES IDENTITY AND STORYTELLING. WHETHER IT IS THE LOSS OF A LOVED ONE OR A RELATIONSHIP, GRIEF IS A CONDITION, A STATE, AN EMOTION AND A PROCESS WE ALL SHARE.” COLLEEN SCHINDLER-LYNCH

Visual Artist Colleen Schindler-Lynch is an Assistant Professor in the School of Fashion at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. She instructs Fashion Illustration (both analogue and digital) as well as Accessory and Textile Design. She studied Fine Art at the University of Windsor and then completed a Master of Fine Art at Louisiana State University. Colleen’s work is autobiographical representing personal narrative in non-linear ways using fashion and textiles as modes of communication. For “Unscripted” (p. 56), she featured her collection Pecadillos (spanish term for little white lies) where she explores how intangible conversations can become physical objects. Colleen also lectures on current trends in illustration and has pre-

sented at numerous conferences. She was featured in Objects—Journal of Applied Arts in conjunction with Illustrative Illustration festivals in Paris and Berlin and was a guest artist for Manolo Blahnik and Jo Malone at Holt Renfrew.


PROFILE

ART OF

CF THE

THE

Ra

T B Y B E AT R I Z J UA R E Z

C E L E B R AT I N G C R A F T M A N S H I P I N A N I N D U S T R I A L I Z E D E R A , E T S Y C A N A D A S U P P O RT S PA S S I O NAT E A RT I S T S W H O S E AWA R E N E S S A N D PA S S I O N F O R Q U A L I T Y B R I N G I N S P I R A T I O N A N D A M A Z I N G VA LU E TO O U R C LO S E T S . H E R E A R E S O M E O F O U R FAVO U R I T E A RT I S T S . . .


Designer : Devlyn van Loon Tor onto, ON Recipient of the 2016 Etsy Award in the Fashion and Accessories category.

The beginning: I’ve had an interest in clothing and design since I was a kid. I graduated from the Ryerson School of Fashion in 2012 and had an opportunity to complete a semester abroad at the Auckland University of Technology which has been very influential on my approach to design. The motto: The Devlyn van Loon brand values a streamlined, sustainable and comfortable design. I try to create pieces that are versatile so they work well as ‘basics’ to expand upon or as focal pieces for smaller wardrobes. A core value of the brand is production accountability. All of our pieces are produced in our studio in Toronto. There is great pride placed in maintaining sustainable practices.

DEVLYN VAN LOON

The process: My design philosophy revolves a lot around figuring out what the women around me, my clients, my dream clients or even myself want to wear. I aim to design clothes that are comfortable and streamlined so that you don’t have to worry about getting dressed in the morning or you don’t have to fret with anything throughout the day. Since comfort is a huge factor for me, I usually try to work with soft, breathable fabrics. Wherever possible, I use deadstock or sustainable materials and apply techniques like hand-dyeing to make them truly unique. I’m a big research nerd so I love looking up dyeing techniques, new methods of pattern drafting, and design details that can influence my work.

A C O R E VA LU E O F T H E B R A N D I S P RO D U C T I O N AC C O U N TA B I L I T Y. A L L O F O U R P I E C E S A R E P RO D U C E D I N O U R S T U D I O I N TO RO N TO A N D T H E R E I S G R E AT P R I D E P L AC E D I N M A I N TA I N I N G S U S TA I NA B L E P R AC T I C E S .

The challenge: The biggest challenge I face as an independent designer is that there never seems to be enough hours in a day. I struggle a lot with work/life balance and finding the time to get outside of the studio. However, being an independent designer means I’m a little bit closer to my customers and clients. If you send us an email or tag (or message us on Instagram) you’ll be connecting directly with me. It’s super gratifying to be able to be so close to people who connect with your brand and while there are a lot of struggles related to being an independent designer (mostly time related for me), it’s definitely worth it.

About Etsy: The Etsy community is great because it allows so many independent makers and people who love them to connect. For many sellers on Etsy it is a great way to turn their hobby into a side gig, or to grow their side gig into a full time job, or even to push their company further than that. It’s so important for creative people to uplift each other and I think Etsy provides a great platform to do that. It was very rewarding to accept the 2016 Etsy Award in the Fashion and Accessories category. We were up against some truly stunning items and feel so honoured to have been chosen.

etsy.com/ca/shop/DevlynvanLoon


STORY HED

Story Dek


THE ART OF THE CRAFT

Celebrating Craftmanship

Designer : Noémie Vaillancourt Montreal, QC

The beginning: I’m a self-taught jewelry designer. I remember having so much fun doing my first photoshoot on my tiny balcony with a friend. It started small. I learned almost everything I know today myself, from craftsmanship to customer service to marketing. The jewelry line paved the way for the creation of clothing and accessories. Few years ago, I decided to take the company further so I started professional studies (tailoring and alterations, pattern drafting), which allowed me to acquire the essential knowledge for quality work. Internships with experienced Montrealbased designers allowed me to improve my skills and gave me strength to launch my first complete collection of prêt-à-porter in March, 2015.

The process: My inspiration is different for each collection. What I think really gets my creativity flowing is the search of a perfect balance between minimal, clean cuts and a feminine/playful touch. My friend [the illustrator Paule T.B] is behind most of the illustrations printed or embroidered. When designing a new collection, we work together very early on a few drafts. Creating co-designed fabrics is one of my favorite parts. The possibilities are endless. I’m proud the line can be that personal. From there, I start sketching and sampling, keeping in mind the general art direction I want for the collection. To stay focused, I do an inspirational collage that includes images and fabric swatches.

What Noémiah stands for: Producing quality garments locally.

NOÉMIAH “ W H AT I T H I N K R E A L LY G E T S M Y C R E AT I V I T Y F LOW I N G I S T H E S E A RC H O F A P E R F E C T B A L A N C E B E T W E E N M I N I M A L , C L E A N C U T S A N D F E M I N I N E A N D P L AY F U L TO U C H . ”

About Etsy: Etsy taught me to be an entrepreneur, to value handmade and quality work. I’m proud to say I frequently collaborate with other artists and artisans in making various projects. I believe this desire to ultimately create something beautiful (and to share a passion) is certainly something I learned by being part of the Etsy community.

etsy.com/ca/shop/noemiah

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THE ART OF THE CRAFT

Celebrating Craftmanship

The beginning: I went to art school in Vancouver and briefly in London. Immediately after graduating, I started working in fashion. I was (and still am) passionate about fabric, patterns and clothing, but working in the corporate world didn’t resonate with my values. I left my job to work on a variety of creative pursuits (one of which was Strathcona.) The first and original iteration of the brand came from my obsession with socks. At the time I was searching compulsively for beautiful hosiery...but not just any hosiery: very specific patterned hosiery. My love for prints and textiles was deep and I was convinced that someone, somewhere in the world, had to be making ornately patterned socks. To my surprise it wasn’t the case. I knew that if I wanted beautiful patterned socks I was going to have to make them myself. So I began a lengthy research and development process—which included a lot of time on the internet, in arts and craft stores and eventually some weeks spent in LA at a luxury textile supplier/manufacturer. Finally, sometime in 2010, Strathcona was launched.

STRATHCONA

Designer : Ryley O’Byr ne Vancouver, BC

The process: Originally one of the things I most enjoyed about Strathcona Stockings was that it couldn’t be placed in the hierarchical structure of fashion or luxury. I make socks­—they are nice looking socks—but they are still just socks. They can’t be pretentious, they are by nature easy... and in our case playful. It speaks a little to my philosophy or ideals. Even though we are moving away from just socks with the new Strathcona Readyto-Wear Collection, we’re working with a similar ethos. I think that fashion should be functional but not serious, ideally existing as a form of expression, art and fantasy. I made this collection for myself inspired by my life and I hope this new project finds a place in the lives of others. We make everything in-house (at our studio in Vancouver) which allows us to be very much on top of quality.

etsy.com/ca/shop/StrathconaStockings

“FASHION SHOULD BE FUNCTIONAL BUT NOT SELF-SERIOUS, IDEALLY EXISTING AS A FORM OF EXPRESSION, ART, AND FANTASY...” The challenges: My own laziness! As much as I love what I do, I often find it challenging to talk it up and to tell people about it or market myself. I think that my audience is wide. I don’t make things for a particular demographic but more for a way of being. Strathcona appeals to people who love patterns, socks, fun and fashion. With the new collection of leisure wear, our market has changed a little, but I like to imagine Strathcona, in many of iterations, as appealing to a wide assortment of people. I like imagining it being worn for nice life activities like flying, dancing, dreaming, lazing.

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About Etsy: I launched my brand on Etsy and I have recommended it to many people. It was important because I didn’t have a following when I started. Like many other new brands, I was starting from scratch, so having my shop on Etsy gave me simple immediate access to an audience that I never would have had otherwise. Etsy gives young brands a community and clientele, which are not only two of the beginning steps in creating a brand but also some of the most important. The reach of the platform is diverse, all sorts of people with all sorts of tastes and styles come to shop on Etsy.


Katelin Reeser is the master mind behind Rock Salt Vintage. Based in Cincinn ati, Ohio, she uses handmade gemstones and metals to create ver y ref ined, str ong architectur al pieces.

In her Dallas, Texas studio, Scout+Lilly ’s Kathleen Kr ueger, designs home and person al accessories with a moder n and unique edge. Each of her pr oducts combines her love of contr ast, bold details, and a mixture of textures (leather, metallics, f elt, linen, and canvas).

rocksaltvintage.etsy.com

scoutandlilly.etsy.com

Everli is a line of handcr afted jewelr y designed by Shuang Everett Li in NYC . The ethos? Nature has a way of speaking tr uths thr ough organic sha pes and materials. everlijewelry.etsy.com

HARP.designs is handmade, artisan jewelr y, designed and f abricated in Oakland, CA. Artist Shelly Har per is influenced by the influx of local street art, 1970’s and 80’s f ashion, industrial hardware, and ancient metal works fr om ar ound the world. Each HARP. piece is made by hand fr om materials of high quality and cultur al signif icance. harpdesigns.etsy.com

ALL YOU NEED IS L❤VE...AND SOME SPARKLE Mere was founded in 2011 by two sister s-inlaw, Courtney & Amanda Schr um, who have a str ong passion for unique accessories. What started out as a pair of earrings created fr om supplies fr om a local cr aft store, tur ned into a world of jewelr y making. ShopMereJewelry.etsy.com

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MONOCLE

SWEET DREAMS ARE

Collage Artist Andrea D’Aquino shares the secret to her f ascin ating career.

MADE OF PAPER B Y B E AT R I Z J UA R E Z

I have a crush on Andrea’s work. Being a life-long fan of artist Robert Motherwell (and anything that reminds me of him for that matter), I’d hoped that maybe (big sigh), one day, I would have the chance to work with a collage artist of that caliber. This finally happened while I was art directing fashion magazines back in 2012. Andrea D’Aquino’s illustrations are playful and painterly compositions. This time, we had the pleasure to talk to her about her approach to work, craftmanship and the secret to her complex and wonderful creations.

What does Collage mean to you? Honestly, I don’t think about “collage”, it actually doesn’t mean

anything to me at all! I just get on with making images. It’s true that I often cut up paper and move it around. It allows for a lot of spontaneity, trial and error....and errors often lead to success. But not always. Its more that I’m not fond of elaborate sketching, planning then executing, which is the typical process for illustration. I prefer to just jump right into the chaos and see what happens.


Anthr opologie,Mor occan Series. Part of a series of per son al pieces f ashion retailer Anthr opologie used for their Mor occo-themed catalog and online campaign.


SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF PAPER

Andrea D’Aquino

How much of your personal life you see reflected in your work? I

guess all of it, however, my work is not obviously literal. The Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland book came to me as an assignment, however, that world view felt completely comfortable and natural to me. I consider that very personal, actually, but hopefully also universal. Nothing is all about me.

I LOVE EVERYTHING FROM MEDIEVAL ART TO NICOLAS DE STAEL, KVETA PACOVSKA, ALICE AND MARTIN PROVENSEN AND MIROCO MACHIKO.

Andrea’s per son al work. What moment defined your professional path? I think my early life environment and my professional path are the

same path. There’s not a separation there. I was born in New York City and grew up in various suburbs around the city. During my formative years especially, I was exposed to everything— ethnicities, races, economic status, and culture—all of it from the very highest to the lowest. Access to both extremes was more available and mixed together than they are now. My parents were also both born in NYC, but all four of my grandparents were Italian, and it was somewhat unusual that we kept a real relationship with a lot of Italian relatives, so I was also exposed to a non-American culture, and I feel certain this is a big advantage. I had a broader perspective. These are all advantages as I see it, and I feel that informs my “professional path” in that I have much richness to draw from. 18

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Winter Series. Per son al explor ation on the theme of Indigenous people of Alaska. How do you evolve as an artist? I simply keep working. My energy flow seems to alternate in waves of active and more quiet.

I try not to fight either state, however, a reasonable amount of discipline to spend the time is always necessary. I happen to believe that down time is also intrinsic to the process as well. I also think it’s important to follow hunches to experiment rather than re-creating past success over and over. That means working through a lot of fear and doubt that nothing is working‌but to keep moving through that is regardless of outcome, I believe that is what fosters growth most directly. 19

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Winter Series. Per son al explor ation on the theme of Indigenous people of Alaska.

What are your favourite kind of projects? I’m probably best with more open-ended ideas. I like expressing abstract thoughts

rather than linear storylines. I actually struggle to keep interested in depicting literal scenes, it’s not really my thing. I’m more absorbed in the landscape of the mind, cerebral areas. That’s actually no more or less real than the tangible physical world, anyway. It’s all here, concurrently. 20

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SWEET DREAMS ARE MADE OF PAPER

Andrea D’Aquino

ANY ART IS AN EXPRESSION AND THEREFORE A POTENTIAL VOICE TO EXPRESS STRONG IDEAS. ONE BENEFIT OF COLLAGE IS THAT EVERYTHING IS CONSTANTLY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS. WE’RE SURROUNDED BY IMAGES–GRAB ONE OR TWO, CHOP THEM UP, AND SEE IF THE JUXTAPOSITION OPENS UP A NEW PERSPECTIVE FROM THE EXPECTED. Anthr opologie,Mor occan Series. Part of a series of per son al pieces f ashion retailer Anthr opologie used for their Mor occo-themed catalog and online campaign.

ANDREA’S MOST RECENT BOOKS.

Andrea has two books in the market, Alice’s Ad ventures in Wonderland, where she illustr ated the f amous children ’s c lassic and Once Upon a Piece of Paper, a playf ul guide on collage making.

A lot of experimentation and random accidents are required in collage. As an illustrator how do you balance this serendipitous process with a client’s expectations? There is definitely a difference when working for a client where I need to fulfill some-

thing quite specific. I try to approach it in a way that feels not obvious—yet totally clear and on target. If possible, to illustrate what is between the lines, rather than the words themselves…or some mix thereof. I do tend to like to jump right in to experimenting with the elements rather than elaborate sketching. It’s a bit of a trick and balancing act. Not sure I’ve quite mastered this conundrum, honestly! 21

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FOCUS

REFASHIONING MASCULINITY U S I N G FA S H I O N A S A V E H I C L E TO E M P OW E R D I F F E R E N C E I N T H E T W E N T Y- F I R S T C E N T U RY. BY BEN AND DANIEL DRAKBARRY

IT’S NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE TODAY NOT TO NOTICE THE WIDESPREAD IMPLICATIONS OF TOXIC MASCULINITY. Masculinity, as we have come to understand it since birth, represents a set of ideals that men are constantly evaluated against. Are we strong? Are we dominant? Are we stoic? These ideals continue to ebb further away from reality. The dissonance between what society expects from us as men and who we actually are can lead to a wealth of problems. Rising rates of mental health issues, suicides and violence against women and other men are only a few of the consequences that result from feeling trapped by a system of rigid, harmful gender norms.

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The clothes we wear reinforce the system of toxic masculinity. Popular menswear has been influenced by masculine tropes including the Ivy Leaguer, jock and blue-collar worker. These styles reject flamboyance and femininity in favour of narrow ideals of masculinity. The suit, and its associations with authority, also maintains a prominent place in menswear. While women have adopted men’s styles to convey power, clothing that is typically worn by women has been avoided by men. Blazers are seen as professional clothing for women but a man in a gown is likely to induce laughter. This hypocritical style exchange reinforces the superiority of men and masculinity and leads men who adopt feminine clothes to be stigmatized. Alongside an inspired team from Ryerson University (such as Stephanie Rotz and Alyksandra Ackerman), we wanted to challenge the associations between toxic masculinity and clothing. Even more, we wanted to use fashion as a vehicle to reconceptualize masculinity for the twenty-first century. We embarked on a two-year project, Refashioning Masculinity, which explored how men construct their identities through clothing and how fashion can be a tool to reimagine masculinity. The first stage of the project consisted of wardrobe interviews with 50 men of diverse ages, backgrounds and bodW H I L E WO M E N H AV E A D O P T E D M E N ’ S S T Y L E S TO ies. Participants provided a tour of their wardrobes C O N V E Y P OW E R , C LOT H I N G T H AT I S T Y P I C A L LY and described the feelWO R N B Y WO M E N H A S B E E N AVO I D E D B Y M E N. T H I S ings and memories they attached to their clothes. H Y P O C R I T I C A L E XC H A N G E R E I N F O R C E S T H E The second stage was a SUPERIORITY OF MEN AND MASCULINITY AND LEADS MEN transmedia fashion show at Ryerson’s Recreation W H O A D O P T F E M I N I N E C LOT H E S TO B E S T I G M AT I Z E D . and Athletics Centre on May 5, 2016. Using a gym as the runway allowed us to subvert a conventional masculine space by juxtaposing it with the feminized sphere of fashion to expand men’s gendered identities. Featuring 23 of the interviewees, the fashion show shared the interview findings. Each participant selected two meaningful outfits from his wardrobe that were discussed during his interview and crafted his runway performance. During the fashion show, quotations from the participant’s interviews were shared. Some quotations were audiorecorded by participants and played during the show while others were posted live on Instagram. Before the show, the audience was told to open Instagram and follow the Refashioning Masculinity account. Whenever they heard a “ding” notification during the show, they were asked to refresh their feed. We hoped to demonstrate that the fashion show is not only a medium to sell clothes but also to share research findings—to advance social and political ideals. Meet a few of the 50 men who opened their wardrobes and took to the runway to share them... Fo r a d d i t i o n a l p r o f i l e s a n d v i d e o s g o t o w w w. r e f a s h i o n i n g m a s c u l i n i t y. c o m 23

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FROM SUITS TO SELF-HACKED CLOTHING, ART INSPIRES US TO THINK MORE DEEPLY ABOUT GENDERED INTERPRETATIONS OF FASHION, WHILE BEING AN ONGOING SOURCE OF FUN AND ENERGY.

FOCUS

THE PARTICIPANTS PHOTOGRAPHY, LAWRENCE CORTEZ

ART Art and Ben met in the way that so many people meet in 2016. Thanks, Twitter. Art’s a professor and the insights that he has into clothing and gender expression are fascinating. He teaches some amazing classes, all the while using clothing as a way to explore masculinity. As a transgender man, these explorations and reconfigurations of gendered binaries are an important part of self-expression. From suits to self-hacked clothing, Art inspires us to think more deeply about gendered interpretations of fashion, while being an ongoing source of fun and energy.

ALKARIM Ben met Alkarim during another research project on men’s responses to fashion advertising, remembering him as being incredibly smart and articulate. When you couple that with an amazing sense of style, you see why Alkarim leaves such an impression. He combines such interesting pieces, from accessories sold in the women’s department to sportswear (despite not being a sports fan), constantly getting us to think about how the future of menswear could truly be more experimental and playful.

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REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

Using Fashion to Empower Difference

PETER Peter was introduced to Ben through his wife, a super cool full-figured fashion blogger. As his wife continued to grow her fashion enterprise, Peter felt that he had to step up his fashion game and started to realize the fun he could have with his clothing. He speaks very openly about the challenges of finding clothes as many companies do not produce garments for plus-size men while simultaneously celebrating how clothing can make him feel like “Superman.”

GEORGY Georgy is one of the coolest and most optimistic people we know. We met Georgy back in 2013 when he participated in Daniel’s thesis fashion show. He took over the runway during that event, showing an enthusiastic crowd what it really looked like to embrace oneself. He refers to clothing as a powerful form of expression, leveraging fashion as a stepping stone towards confidence. Through his positive disposition and work that aims to give back and empower young people, we were so happy to have Georgy be a part of our project to advance social change.

GEORGY REFERS TO CLOTHING AS A POWERFUL FORM OF EXPRESSION, LEVERAGING FASHION AS A STEPPING STONE TOWARDS CONFIDENCE.

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FOCUS

THE WAY THAT RYAN MAKES PEOPLE SMILE, LAUGH AND FEEL AWESTRUCK IS INCOMPARABLE.

RYAN

SHAWN CLEAR SKY

Daniel first encountered Ryan six years ago when he was performing at a theatre off of Church Street in Toronto. His presence, amazing voice and charm tend to fill the room (even if that room is a theatre). It also helps that he tends to wear bolder colours and reflective materials, adorning himself in things like lamé, sequins and sparkles. After so generously participating in one of Daniel’s photoshoots for school, he has been contributing his time to our photoshoots and runways ever since. The way that Ryan makes people smile, laugh and feel awestruck is incomparable. We’re truly lucky to call him a friend and one of our favourite people.

Shawn Clear Sky is an avid runner, so it is no wonder that Ben met him through our friend, Anika, another academic-runner hybrid. Shawn exudes a certain cool positivity that we love. His stories are so fascinating and we always love how his diverse clothing choices interact with his various tattoos. He sometimes covers up his tattoos intentionally to avoid assumptions or judgements, but he will also often leave his tattoos exposed to create a sense of wonder. Shawn is a great person, and it’s always fun to have him model with us— slicked hair and all.

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REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

TRAVIS Travis has a spirit that is hard to miss. Ben met Travis in late 2015 in a local coffee shop, noticing his emerald green skirt that fit perfectly with his sense of humble confidence. He’s an actor in every sense of the word, warming up every room he walks into and drawing smiles on people’s faces. He inspires us so much to see ourselves in exactly the way that we want to be seen and pushes the boundaries of what others might expect him to wear. We’ve never seen skirts look so good on a runway.

TRAVIS INSPIRES US SO MUC H TO SEE OURSELVES IN EXACTLY THE WAY THAT WE WANT TO BE SEEN AND PUSHES THE BOUNDARIES OF WHAT OTHERS MIGHT EXPECT HIM TO WEAR.

Using Fashion to Empower Difference

PARAMBIR Parambir is one of Toronto’s coolest doctors. When he isn’t in his scrubs he is wearing some of the most interesting garments we’ve ever seen—cue wardrobe envy. Ben met Parambir from his awesome wife, Anjli, through their connections at the Toronto Fashion Incubator. Parambir and his wife often share their wardrobes with one another, and he imagines that one day both menswear and womenswear will be sold together in stores. For some amazing garments on the runway, we always turn to Parambir.

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THE FASHION SHOW PHOTOGRAPHY, LAWRENCE CORTEZ & BRODY WHITE IF THE RECENT U.S. ELECTION SHOWED US ANYTHING, IT IS THAT TOXIC MASCULINITY IS AT AN ALL-TIME HIGH. THROUGH SEXISM, RAC ISM AND OTHER FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION, PEOPLE ARE DRAWING ON TOXIC MASCULINITY BECAUSE THEY FEAR DIFFERENCE.

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REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

Using Fashion to Empower Difference

C HOOSING WHAT TO WEAR MIGHT AT FIRST SEEM LIKE A TRIVIAL ACT BUT OUR PROJECT SHOWED US THAT IT IS THE VERY OPPOSITE: OUR CLOTHING CHOICES ARE POWERFUL.

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REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

Using Fashion to Empower Difference

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SPENDING TIME EXPERIMENTING IN CLOTHING AND S E L F - R E P R E S E N TAT I O N CAN ALSO BRING US JOY AND PLEASURE IN-BETWEEN EMOTIONALLY DRAINING P ROT E S T & ACTIVISM.


WE HOPE TO DEMONSTRATE THAT T H E FA S H I O N S H O W IS NOT ONLY A MEDIUM TO SELL CLOTHE S, BUT ALSO TO SHARE RE SEARCH FINDINGS— TO ADVANCE S O C I A L AND P O L I T I C A L IDEALS.


REFASHIONING MASCULINITY

Using Fashion to Empower Difference

WHAT WE WEAR CAN SERVE AS A VISIBLE SIGN OF PROTEST AGAINST TOXIC MASCULINITY AND THE INSTITUTIONS THAT PERPETUATE IT. WE CAN DRESS IN WAYS THAT CELEBRATE THE FEMININE AND REIMAGINE GENDER NORMS.

The men in Refashioning Masculinity serve as models of how we can each individually break toxic masculinity through awareness, dialogue and everyday clothing, as we continue to move towards a future that is increasingly inclusive and celebrates difference. 33

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YOUNG DESIGNERS WHO ARE A WHOLE GALAXY AWAY FROM THE MAINSTREAM.

PRESENTS AVANT-GARDE GARMENTS, STYLING, FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY, AND

UNWEARABLE, SUBVERSIVE, RADICALLY POST-HUMAN, ALIEN. OTHERWORLDLY

PAGES


O THERWORLDLY

OTHER RULES APPLY TO THE FASHION OF THE FUTURE. New technologies and materials make things possible today that couldn’t have even been imagined in the past. High-tech fabrics and melting forms are no longer science fiction but reality. Inspired by the odd, mutant, and deformed, many designers and stylists are now redefining clothing to expand the body and speculate on the evolution of identity—from wearables to the utter transfiguration of the human silhouette. Otherworldly (Gestalten) showcases a fashion avant-garde between futurism and fetish. Featuring work by emerging talents and established designers such as Alexander McQueen, Martin Margiela, Lucy McRae, Peter Popps, Iris van Herpen, and others, it not only 35 explores groundbreaking developments but also their fruitful HERRINGBONE interplay with photography.


TRANSCENDS FASHION —IT IS A COMMITTED WAY OF LIFE.

RESPECTING THEIR LOCAL CULTURAL TRADITIONS. DANDYISM

AROUND THE WORLD, DANDIES EMBRACE STYLE WHILE

PAGES

Tony Maake (center), sees the South African dandy tr adition as a gener ation al continuum and believes that when a man wear s suits in a township, he can inspire his own community (Stellenbosch, South Africa).

YOU ARE SO DANDY Mr. Akir a Fujimori, Tokyo. He is the f ifth gener ation of his f amily to oper ate a sukiyaki restaur ant in the Min ato neighborhood in Tokyo. Mr. Mark Haldeman and Mr. James Aguiar (New York) have built an aesthetically ref ined lif estyle, pr oving that dandyism need not to be a solitar y pur suit.


As a scotch drinking, cigar smoking, joke-telling flirt, Mr. Shimaji (Tokyo) was a perf ect match for Playboy Magazine.

Author s Rose Callahan and Nathaniel “Natty” Adams.

FROM AMERICA TO AFRICA TO ASIA, dandyism is a way of life. It is fashion in the best sense, self-esteem through style. And, in every country, it takes a unique form as dandies draw on the local context and fashion culture to shape their looks. Nathaniel „Natty“ Adams has been involved with the historical and contemporary Dandy phenomenon for many years —it even informs his own wardrobe. A research grant aided the studied journalist in traveling around the world and into the eclectic homes of various Dandies. For photographer and filmaker Rose Callahan, New York is more than her current home, the city is also the site and start of her involvement with the Dandy. In 2008, she created the blog The Dandy Portraits, where she documents the many facets of the modern gentleman. Shortly afterwards, she met Natty Adams and the idea for the project was born.

Mr. Bent Angelo Jensen is the owner and designer of his br and Her r v on Eden (The Man fr om Par adise) in Berlin.

We are Dandy, The Elegant Gentleman Around The World (Gestalten) throws open the doors of the wardrobe and explores the dandy as a global phenomenon. With texts as witty as the subjects are stylish, the book pokes between the folds to let us know these exceptional individuals. For them, their dandy fashion is more than a trend or a phase—it is who they are, the outer expression of their inner selves. The book unfolds with a foreword by the illustrious Dita Von Teese that conveys the authenticity of these aesthetes, their passions, and their bravely curated philosophies.

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Mr.Bar n aba For n asetti, Milan. Heir to his f ather’s iconic design empire, For n asetti is a singularly stylish and flamboyant as you would imagine a man who grew up surr ounded by the mad whimsy of For n asetti designs to be.


THE BEAUTY ISSUE

HERRINGBONE


GET THE LOOK

Face: Teeez Be Radiant Foundation in Porcelain. Eyes: Teeez To Die For Eyeshadow Quad in Cinn amon Revolution. Lips: Teeez Golden Glow Lipgloss in Desert Lily. Over all glow: Teeez Style Addict Highlighter in Berlin Sunrise. Styling notes: Hat, House of Flor a.

STORY HED

Story Dek


STORY HED

Story Dek

SUPER

OVA N

R A D I AT E S T E L L A R E N E RG Y W I T H S M O O T H G LOW I N G S K I N A N D S O M E S E R I O U S LY P L AY F U L S PA R K L E . . . PHOTOGRAPHY, VIRGILE REBOUL

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Radiate Stellar Energy

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GET THE LOOK

Face: Teeez Be Radiant Foundation in Porcelain. Eyes: Teeez To Die For Eyeshadow Quad in Fashion Par agon. Lips: Teeez Golden Glow Lipgloss in Desert Lily. Over all Glow: Teeez Style Addict Highlighter in Berlin Sunrise. Styling notes: earrings, Viveka Bergstr รถm; str a p top, American Apparel; body, Wolford.


GET THE LOOK

Face: Teeez Be Radiant Foundation in Porcelain. Eyes: Teeez Spectr um Of Star s Eyeshadow in Apricot Sheen. Lips: Teeez Material Girl Lipstick in Nude Var nish and Teeez Par adise Perf ect Lipgloss in Sheer Gold. Styling notes: Leather dress, Pellessimo; earrings, Viveka Bergstr รถm.


Stylist, Margaux Sirejacob, Makeup Artist, Yvane Rocher ; Hair stylist, Sachi Yamashita; Model, Natalia Renken @ Supreme Man agement Paris.


SUPER NOVA

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Teeez Cosmetics a vailable at thebay.com Styling notes: Earrings, Hélène Zubeldia; head band (as necklace), House of Flor a; top,H&M.

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BEAUTY NOTES E y e s : A r t i s t S h a d ow Pa l e t t e # 1 , A q u a M a t i c E ye S h a d ow # M E - 5 0 , M a s c a r a i n S m o ky E x t r av a g a n t . B r o w s : P r o S c u l p t i n g B r ow # 3 0 . F a c e : Wa t e r B l e n d Fo u n d a t i o n #Y210 and #Y245, Ultra HD Concealer #R22 and #Y23, Pro Bronze #10m, Pro Light Fusion #1 and #2. Lips: Aqua L i p # 8 c a n d A r t i s t Ro u ge # C 4 0 3 ; all, MAKE UP FOR EVER.


HEAD FIRST

HAIR & MAKEUP ARTIST GIANLUCA ORIENTI

C O N F I R M S T HAT W H E N I T C O M E S T O M A K I N G A N E N T R A N C E , I T A L L S T A R T S A T T H E T O P.

P H O TO G R A P H Y, A N DY L E E


BEAUTY NOTES

E y e s : F l a s h Pa l e t t e # 1 , A q u a M a t i c E ye S h a d ow # D - 1 0 .

Face: Ultra HD#245 and Ultra HD Concealer #Y23, Pro Bronze

#10m; all, MAKE UP FOR EVER.

H a i r To o l s : C ONA I R I n f i n i t i P r o B r u s h l e s s D r ye r a n d C ONA I R E l i t e C o l l e c t i o n I n f i n i t i P r o ( t i t a n i u m - c o a t e d ) F l a t I r o n .


BEAUTY NOTES E y e s : Aqua Black Gel Liner, Artist Shadow #M534 and Lash #C708. B r o w s : Pr o Sculpting Br ow #20. F a c e : Pr o Br onze #10m, Pr o Light Fusion #1, Water Blend Foundation #y245 and Ultr a HD#245. L i p s : Artist Rouge #C404, #M101; a l l , M A K E U P F O R E V E R . H a i r To o l : C ONA I R I n f i n i t y P r o B r u s h l e s s D r ye r.


BEAUTY NOTES

E y e s : Aqua XL #M-10, Artist Shadow #102 and #622. F a c e : Ultr a HD#245 Fo u n d a t i o n , Pr o Br onze #10m and Artist Shadow #742. L i p s :

Artist Rouge #C103 and #C600; a l l , M A K E U P F O R E V E R .

H a i r To o l s : C ONA I R I n f i n i t i P r o, D i a m o n d B r i l l i a n c e â„¢ I o n i c S t r a i g h t e n i n g B r u s h a n d C ONA I R Fa s h i o n C u r l .


BEAUTY NOTES

E y e s : F l a s h Pa l e t t e # 1 , I n k L i n e r. B r o w s : P r o S c u l p t i n g B r ow # 1 0 . F a c e : Wa t e r B l e n d Fo u n d a t i o n

#Y245, Ultra HD Concealer #Y23, Pro Bronze #10m and Pro Light Fusion #1; all, MAKE UP FOR EVER. M o d e l s, G a r n e t / S p o t 6 M a n a ge m e n t & Ti l l i e / P l u t i n o G r o u p. A s s i s t a n t M a ke u p A r t i s t s, O n n a C h a n & C a s s i d y E dw a r d s. A r t D i r e c t o r, B e a t r i z Ju a r e z .


U NS C R I P T E D

FA S H I ON P H OTO G R A P H E R T RU F E RG U S ON & V I S UA L A RT I S T C O L L E E N S C H I N D L E R - LY N C H C A P T U R E T H E I N H E R E N T B E AU T Y T H AT L I E S I N O U R S TO R I E S O F LO S S & A DV E R S I T Y.


STORY HED

Story Dek

In WELL WORN /WORN WELL , [laser-cut acr ylic necklace] SchindlerLynch tells a stor y in fr agments, ref erencing to vulner ability and a sense of pr otection [a breastplate-like layer].


HIDING IN PLA IN SIGHT

Colleen Schindler-Lynch’s work examines identity and storytelling. The title of this collection, Pecadillos refers to “little white lies” — small seemingly insignificant things we tell ourselves to help cope with adversity. Whether it is the loss of a loved one or a relationship, grief is a condition, a state, an emotion and a process we all share. The written material relays a personal narrative, cataloguing a span of time, along with events and emotions. This personal story of identity and circumstance, utilizes isolated words. Strung together, yet separate from the normal structure of sentences or paragraphs, they collectively communicate emotion, time, and place. Intangible conversations become tactile experiences. Memories and stories of grief and loss are told in beautiful poetic ways, laser cut words are joined like jewellery and worn, excerpts are burned into wool garments referring to scars that never go away and yet are worn every day.

MODERN MOURNING [br acelets, opposite page] ref erences Victorian mour ning jeweller y, commemor ating a loved one and wearing a part of them.


BEAUTY NOTES: Skin: M.A.C

PREP+PRIME Essential Oil Stick and M.A.C Glitter in Reflects Turquatic.


BEAUTY NOTES: Skin: M.A.C PREP+

PRIME ESSENTIAL OIL in Gr a pefr uit & Chamomile. Eyes: M.A.C Eye Shadow in I’m into it and M.A.C Extended Play Lash Mascar a in Endlessly Black. Face: M.A.C Studio Face and Body Foundation in C1, M.A.C Pr o Longwear Blush in Fleeting Romance. Lips: M.A.C Matte Lipstick in Chili.


Hair & Makeup, GianLuca Orienti/Judy Inc. Model, KC/Angie ’s AMTI. Art Director, Beatriz Juarez.


In I CARRY THEM WITH ME , the n arr ative is bur nt into the wool gar ment forever scarring the f abric. Ref erring to the physical, emotion al and psychological scar s that never go away. The gar ment ref erences the automatic r outine of daily dress, composed—but still bearing the scar s on the back.


BEST IN SHOW LUSH Br azened Honey Fresh Face Mask lush.ca

PRETTY Rose & Ger anium Radiance Facial Ser um prettycosmetics.ca

OUR FAVOURITE SKIN SAVERS I T ’ S N E V E R TO O LAT E TO G I V E YO U R S K I N T H E ROYA L T R E AT M E N T.

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VIC HY Miner alizing Ther mal Water 150g vichy.ca


OUR FAVOURITE SKIN SAVERS

Give your Skin the Royal Treatment

VIC HY Ideal Body Ser um-Milk vichy.ca

CONSONANT Ultr a Moisturizing Organic Face Cream

ANTHONY Facial Scr ub anthony.com

Conson antSkincare.com

Saje Natur al Wellness Skin So Clean Exfoliating Cleanser saje.com/ca

LISE WATIER CC CREME SPF 25 Colour Corrector Multi-Perf ecting Moisturizer lisewatier.com 65

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CONSONANT HydrExtreme Ser um Extreme Hydr ation Booster Conson antSkincare.com


KENZO SS17

HAIDER ACKERMANN SS17

BEST IN SHOW

Ellie Mae BILLY Botanical Jacquard Bomber elliemaestudios.com

SPRING

2017

MOOD BOARD

LISE WATIER Rouge Intense Suprême in Mar y. lisewatier.com


MAX MARA SS17

DKNY SS17

Uniqlo Women ’s EFC over sized long Sleeve long shirt. uniqlo.com

Ted Baker London ALBEE Pop Handle Tote Bag in Taupe.

MOSC HINO SS17

tedbaker.com

ECCO Soft 3 hig-top ca.shop.ecco.com

LISE WATIER 24 HRS GLAM EYESHADOW in Urban Velour s. lisewatier.com.


M T ·A· H C EI C R R M EA O TE ST S IC SI O XN N IC EW LI P PS ER T F IC U K ME SH S A IN D SP ES I . RE D

BY

ON TO e Ha S VE EPILOGUE

P H O TO G R A P H Y, T RU F E RG U S O N

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STOCKISTS ANTHONY anthony.com CONAIR con air.com CONSONANT Conson antSkincare.com ECCO CANADA ca.shop.ecco.com ELLIE MAE elliemaestudios.com ETSY CANADA etsycan ada.com GESTALTEN shop.gestalten.com LUSH lush.ca LISE WATIER lisewatier.com M.A.C COSMETICS maccosmetics.ca MAKE UP FOR EVER makeupforever.com PRETTY prettycosmetics.ca SAJE NATURAL WELLNESS CANADA saje.com/ca TEEEZ COSMETICS thebay.com TED BAKER tedbaker.com UNIQLO uniqlo.com VIC HY vichy.ca

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

Herringbone Magazine Issue no 5  

A convergence point for fashion, style & consumer perceptions.

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