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ISSUE NO. 4

EXPOSED SKIN,THE BEST ACCESSORY OF THE SEASON

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

THE NEW FORMAL

A STYLE GUIDE FOR THE MODERN MAN

THE ART OF DRAG

TRANSGRESSING THE BOUNDARIES OF FASHION

DIVERSITY ON THE RUNWAY HOW FAR HAVE WE COME?

WE ❤ WINTER! A SELECTION OF CHEERFUL ESSENTIALS


OUR COVER

Model Ashtyn(Sutherland Models) wear s a PINK TARTAN Pleated cuff blouse and multi-colour vest and BCBGMAXAZRIA Studded belt. Left,THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul pendant, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul Large Zigzag Cocktail ring, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring; Right, THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Black Zirconia Rebel at heart ring, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Unity br acelet, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Mar ahani bangle, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart The Rebel bangle, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu br acelet. BEAUTY NOTES: Face: Light Wonder Foundation in #3, #5; the Retouches Concealer in #3, Film Star Bronze and Glo w in Light to Medium; Cheek to Chic in Love glow. Eyes: Eyes to Mesmerise in Bette; Luxury Palette, The Golden Goddess, Rock’n’ Kohl in Bedr oom Black, Bro w Lift in Br ooke S, Full Fat lashes. Lips: Lip Cheat in Pink Venus, K.I.S.S.I.N.G in Stoned Rose & Coachella Cor al. All, Charlotte Tilbur y. HAIR: Materialiste, Laque Couture and Volume in powder, Ker astase.

Photogr a phy, Tess Feuilhade; Fashion Direction, Luis Zulayhka; Hair and Makeup, Onn a Chan/Push Man agement; Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.

FOUNDERS Luis Zulayhka

Beatriz Juarez

Fashion Director

lzulayhka@herringbonemag.com

Creative Director

bjuarez@herringbonemag.com

Design & Production double pgstudio

Editorial Interns

Claire Sommerf elt, Ver onica Hardy

Copy Editing

Kevin McGowan, Cr aig Mar shall

General Inquiries

info@herringbonemagazine.com

Our Address

HERRINGBONE MAGAZINE CENTRE FOR SOC IAL INNOVATION 215 Spadin a Ave. Suite 400, Tor onto, ON, MT5 2C7


TABLE OF CONTENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

8| 14 |

6|

CONTRIBUTORS

PROFILE 100% CANADIAN

FOCUS FASHION IS A DRAG

28 | 32 |

FOCUS SEE NO EVIL...

MONOCLE ALAN BELC HER/10.5

40 |

FOCUS LIFELONGING

PAGES EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

48 | 52 |

EDITOR’S NOTE

PROFILE THE EYEWEAR SOC IETY

16 |

42 |

5|

VIEWPOINT THE HARD WORK OF BEING OURSELVES

SPECIAL FEATURE FASHION ECCENTRICS

120 |

STOCKISTS

FASHION LIKE A SECOND SKIN THE NEW FORMAL A+

| 66

| 80

| 98

WE LOVE WINTER BEST IN SHOW

| 108

| 116

ONES TO WATC H

| 118

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE


HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

A C O N V E RG E N C E P O I N T F O R FA S H I O N, S T Y L E & C O N S U M E R P E RC E P T I O N S .

H E R R I N G B O N E M AG . C O M

FACEBOOK.COM/HERRINGBONEMAGAZINE

INSTAGRAM.COM/HERRINGBONEMAG

TWITTER.COM/HERRINGBONEMAG


EDITORS NOTE A year older, a year wiser! It ’s been 2 year s since we started this wondef ul jour ney. Fr om the ver y beginning, we ’ve always looked at the f uture as an open door to create, reinvent and gr ow creatively. With four issues under our belt, we believe ever y blank page is an opportunity to engage in fr ank conver sations about what excites us the most: f ashion, lif estyle, art and consumer perce ptions. The pr oduction of our latest edition has particularly served us as a reminder of who we are and what we stand for. We ’d like to thank ever yone who made this issue possible: contributor s and reader s who have nurtured us with their talent and inspir ation. We ’ ll continue to bring pages that wake up your curiosity and engage your creativity.

Enjoy the read!

LUIS ZULAYHKA

BEATRIZ JUAREZ

FASHION DIRECTOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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TESS FEUILHADE ANDY LEE

We had the pleasure to have our cover story “Like a Second Skin” (p. 66) shot by Paris-based photographer Tess Feuilhade. Tess earned a degree in Graphic arts from L’Ecole Superieure d’Arts Graphiques University (E.S.A.G.) in Paris in 1999. Later, moved to New York where he began assisting photographers and studios. In 2005, began an independent photographer’s career in New York, Milan and Tokyo. In 2007, Tess returned to Paris and continued growing his career in fashion. You can admire his work in editorials for Vogue, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, Grazia, First, Cosmopolitan and Collezioni magazines. Feuilhade is also immersed in the digital world, while still shooting traditional film on location.

For this issue, multi-talented photographer Andy Lee, captured the images for our feature story "Fashion is a Drag” (p. 16). From the very beginning, Andy was involved in all steps of the process, refining concepts and helping us create props and costumes. Andy is that kind of super-photographer, able to shoot fashion, social studies, food (you name it!) with impecable taste. Now, that is what we called a Renaissance man.

THE IMAGE MAKERS

Virgile Reboul is a photographer mainly

focused on fashion imagery. Having started photography for personal work in the South of France (specifically landscapes and portraiture), he moved to Paris where he became art director and soon, started working as a fashion photographer for international publications. He is known for his sharp portraits, minimalistic aesthetic and futuristic imagery. For this issue, Virgile perfectly captured the urban nature of our men’s editorial “The New Formal” (p. 80). VIRGILE REBOUL

MICHAEL KAI YOUNG

International fashion and beauty photo-grapher, Michael Kai Young, splits his time between Toronto and New York City. As an ever-evolving artist, his work shows influence from his additional experience as an art director, set & prop designer and from his talented peers and collaborators. For this issue, he brought his sophisticated vision to our “A+” story (p. 98).

RYAN PAYNE

Ryan Payne, a specialist and researcher on consumer engagement, brought his witty insight to our pages. Ryan talks to us about the blurring line between nude art and pornography in "See No Evil" (p. 28) and makes us reflect how tech-nology can be improving— or ruining—our joy for life in “Lifelonging” (p. 40).


GIANLUCA ORIENTI

We had the pleasure to work (once again) with Italian Makeup and Hair artist GianLuca Orienti. For this issue he brought a unique talent to the table: fashion designer. Orienti not only helped conceptualize a lot of aspects of the assignment, but he actually made all the props and gowns for our “Fashion is a Drag” story (p.16). With an original vision and a natural eye for beauty, he brings something unique to all his assignments (besides his great sense of humour). GianLuca has worked with many celebrities and supermodels, such as Feist, Sarah Polley, Karen Kain, Arlene Dickinson, Tamara Taylor, Michael J. Fox, Coco Rocha, and Yasmine Warsame, as well as international brands such as Chanel, Dior, Guerlain, YSL, and Burberry. GianLuca also teaches fashion make-up and hair styling at Toronto’s CMU College of Makeup Art & Design.

DEN TEMIN

Den is a passionate board-certified sexologist and the founder of Sexplore with Den Temin, an organization that provides healthy sex-positive environments in order to sexually empower folks. Curiosity has fueled Den’s craving to live and sexplore the ways in which people experience intimacy, connection, vulnerability, desire, and pleasure. For the past sixteen years, Temin has lived in five different countries and travelled extensively throughout diverse corners of the world studying and working in the fields of gender and human sexuality.  For our fourth issue, they helped us plan and write “Fashion is a Drag” (p.16), which explores the art of Drag as a transgressive and rebellious way of expression. Visit www.sexplorewithdentemin.com Editor’s Note: During our last edition of Herringbone magazine we misgendered Den Temin, the author of the article Beyond the Binary. In our contributors space, Den Temin had submitted a biography where the pronoun Den used was they-them. Den is genderqueer trans* sexologist who uses the pronoun they -them to identify their gender. We made the mistake of thinking we were doing a grammar correction and changed the pronoun to the feminine she-her. Every day is an opportunity to be reminded that our journey towards learning about gender identity is an on going process. We would like to apologize for changing Den’s original contribution and misgendering our contributor.

ONNA CHAN

Makeup Artist Onna Chan was born into a family of artists;her grandparents were Chinese Opera Performers and her Aunt owned a Beauty Spa, where Onna got her first taste of beauty at the age of four. Onna’s background and experience with Make up Forever since 2006 has given her the ability to master a variety of styles while always keeping the look current. Whether her

LAURA GULSHANI

Considered on of the best fashion illustrators in Canada, Laura Gulshani explored a different facet of her career in our “Fashion Eccentrics” feature (p. 52). Gulshani chose a more candid and raw style to portray our selection of eccentrics, creating a very dramatic final result. When not painting to the sound of all the Rush Hour movies, you will find her roaming around Reddit and Instagram, looking for the best memes the internet has to offer. Laura’s work can be admired in several fashion magazines such as The Kit and Canadian Living and in fashion retail campaigns.

asignment is print, advertising, editorial, a music video, or a television interview in HD Onna seamlessly adjusts her technique to the individual and is an experienced team player. We were lucky to have her work gracing our pages in our cover story “Like a Second Skin” (p. 66).

BRODINE

Makeup Artist Brodine’s career includes working with international makeup artist Pat McGrath. Under the direction of Pat, she works on numerous runway shows and clients in Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Japan… including Gucci, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, and McQueen. For this issue Brodine worked her magic in “The New Formal” (p. 80) and “A+” (p. 98).


100% CANADIAN

Fashion with a Conscience

PROFILE

DIVERSITY, Innovation and social conscience IS WHAT DEFINES THE NEXT GENERATION OF CANADIAN FASHION DESIGNERS AND INLAND (THE CANADIAN PLATFORM FOUNDED IN 2014 BY SARAH POWER) IS HELPING THEM CONNECT WITH THEIR SAVVY AUDIENCES.

MEET SOME OF THESE AMAZING DESIGNERS... BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ

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T R A V I S TA D E O Design Philosophy: Minimalistic Edge. Main Fashion Influence: Individuality. Your contribution to make fashion a force for social change Offering originality and quality in a world of fast fashion. PHOTO TRAVIS TADEO, ANTONY JAMES.

“BEING A CANADIAN DESIGNER IS TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES OF THE EVERY DAY....”

Designer Tr avis Tadeo

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#MADEINLand...


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100% CANADIAN

Fashion with a Conscience

H ay l e y E l s a e s s e r Design philosophy For me it is incredibly important to make special and expressive clothes that are also entirely wearable. Too often it’s one or the other so that is my main priority. Just because a person looks good doesn’t mean they can’t also be comfortable. I achieve this through the use of vibrant colours and bold prints, meaning the clothes are guaranteed to turn heads, yet using fabrics like soft cotton knits, stretch denim, and neoprenes so the comfort factor isn’t compromised. When designing my Designer Hayley Elsaesser

prints I love to have a story behind each season. The current Autumn Winter season is called “Midnight Cowboy” which was inspired by traditional Western imagery and movies but turned on it’s head. I used Uma Thurman’s Kill Bill character as the muse, it is western with a really tough, almost samurai edge.

Main fashion influence I am very much inspired by pop culture of the past like movies, celebrities, art and street style. It is really inspiring to see how people give their own unique personality and spin to fashion. I love to mix and match prints when designing, which I think has a very street style sensibility to it.

Your contribution to make fashion a force for social change This is something I am conscious of at the moment and try to do to the best of my ability. I am still a small fish in a big pond so I can’t make as

“I AM CONSCIOUS WHEN CHOOSING MODELS IN TERMS OF DIVERSITY, SIZE AND VARIETY. FOR ME, IS MUCH MORE FUN AND RELATABLE TO SEE MODELS OF DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS, SIZING, AND PERSONALITIES IN MY CLOTHES, BECAUSE IN REALITY ALL KIND OF PEOPLE BUY MY STUFF.”

big of a splash as I’d like. However, I am conscious when choosing models in terms of diversity, size and variety. It isn’t fun to see the same model 20 times on a runway­—which is often the case at fashion week. I think it is much more fun and relatable to see models of different backgrounds, sizing and personalities in my clothes, because in reality, all kind of people buy my stuff. Eventually, I would love to have two sets of samples, one in traditional sample size, and the other in a large size so I can have a good representation of different sizes on the runway.

To be a Canadian Designer is Is actually challenging at times, especially on a global scale. I think Canadian fashion isn’t taken as seriously as other places like the US, UK and Asia. It has actually helped me make my start in Australia as it adds a but of something extra for press and buyers to be interested in. However, the industry here is tight knit and has been very supportive which is great.

The customer you design for I design for people who are looking to stand out in some way. It could be a huge way by wearing my designs from head to toe, or just a little with a

sweater worn with basics. The clothes are a great tool to make a great impression before the wearer needs to say anything. It’s also for people who want to have a bit of fun with what they are wearing. There is far too much black clothing in the world and it feels amazing to wear colour; it instantly puts you in a great mood.

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ValÉrie Dumaine “MY PHILOSOPHY IS: WEARABLE, ACCESSIBLE ...AND TO DO WHAT I LIKE!” Being a Canadian Designer is To work hard to enlarge our clientele, because the Canadian market is very small. It’s quite a challenge to establish a market abroad. It also means that sourcing is very limited!

The woman you design for A woman that has a way to personalize her outfits. I like when I see a dress on someone and it looks totally different on someone else. I like that my cus-

Designer Valérie Dumaine

tomers wearing my clothes their own way, rather than trying to imitate that

Design philosophy I do what i want to wear or would wear. I try to blend basics with interesting and subtle details. My philosophy is wearable, accessible and to do what I like!

Main fashion influence Art movements, such as Suprematism, Constructivism, Bauhaus...I like the clean lines, the simplicity and the construction of these, which is what I like the most in clothing.

Your contribution to make fashion a force for social change Producing locally and ethically, using as much as possible eco products (certainly no animal bi-products such as fur and leather) while raising awareness to some of these issues with customers and the larger public. And each year I support non-profit organizations such as Mercy for Animals, Wishing Well Farm Sanctuary, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, and the Pediatric Oncology Group or Ontario (POGO). 12

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get-the-look you see in magazines.


100% CANADIAN

Fashion with a Conscience

“WE HAVE A RESPONSIBILITY TO DEVELOP AND ENSURE THE QUALITY, CREATIVITY AND COMPETITIVITY OF LOCAL FASHION COMPANIES”

M at i è r e N o i r Design philosophy Material is 90% of the design. Main fashion influence I create moodboards from images I collect from Instagram, tumblr , Pinterest, so I would say it’s diverse.

Your contribution to make fashion a force for social change By concrete actions like creating an ethical production system, or by lowering the proportion of marketing costs compared to the fabric and production in the final price of the products.

Being a Canadian Designer is It means that we have a responsibility to develop and ensure the quality, creativity and competitivity of local fashion companies.

The woman you design for An active woman who wants to invest in contemporary Designer Cécile Raizonville

clothes that can last several seasons.

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PROFILE

THE EYEWEAR SOCIETY A CLOSER LOOK INTO ONE OF CANADA’S MOST INNOVATIVE COMPANIES, GUILD EYEWEAR. We sat down with Founder, Rod Fitzsimmons Frey and Creative director, Savi Pannu the creative minds behind the new concept of customizable eyewear.

In terms of craftsmanship, what are the main stages of the production process? Rod: We have a custom-designed and built software package that we use to design the glasses. We brainstorm design ideas, spending a lot of time with the design tool, we have more software that converts the design into proper specification which is then distributed to our shop to the various machines that will be used during manufacturing. The first stage is the mill out the raw shape which is done on a high-speed cutting tool that traces and cuts the outline of the glasses. What we end up with is a very two dimensional, rough item that begins to resemble a pair of glasses. From there, we go to the finishing stage where the product goes through several stages of abrasive tumbling in a set of 4 spinning barrels for a long period of time—4 days to be exact. The first stages rounds the edges and makes it soft to the touch while the finish is still rough. After that there is more buffing and smooth everything out. We hand-buff the glasses to bring out the lustre of the finish. At this point, the glasses are not yet finished but are stunning pieces of jewellery. They really are quite stunning to look at. The glasses go through various shaping steps to create the curves to match the lens (and for esthetic reasons). We shape the glasses into a gentle curve to fit the temple behind the ear. The final step is the hinges; they are riveted on by hand to ensure a proper fit. We put the frames together, and them we set them on the table and admire them for a while before giving them to the client.

HERRINGBONE: How did Guild Eyewear come to be a brand? Savi: Rod and I are old friends. He had started developing the (manufacturing) software back in 2013. I was over for dinner one night and he showed me what he was doing; then asked me if I would like to get involved with the styling, marketing and branding side of the business. I thought it was fascinating so I said yes immediately and it went from there. It started in his garage really. How do you describe your esthetic? Savi: Well, that’s interesting. We were interested in a clean, modern look while also referencing modern constructivism—the art movement from the early part of the 20th century. It works in step with our manufacturing process. We are small-scale and we know that anybody else can do what we do but, we want to make fashion through eyewear accessible to everyone. We want our brand to be affordable and available to all. What are your influences and inspirations? Savi: They come from the music industry, mainly. We were obsessed with british rock and mod fashion (Jarvis Cocker from Pulp and David Bowie). I am into super bold and graphic eyewear to accent the cheekbones, eyes, etc. Vivid colours help make a bold and individualized statement. The team agrees that if you’re going to wear glasses, you may as well go all out.

From start to finish, how long is the entire process? Rod: It takes about 1 week to make a pair. A lot of that time is not necessarily hands-on. The finishing process alone takes 4 days (in-

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cludes the templing and achieving a highgloss finish).

pair of glasses on a photograph of their face. It takes 3-4 visits to fully complete the design. We’ve found that the people who are interested in bespoke glasses already know what looks good on them and what styles and materials interest them.

How important is it for Guild Eyewear to remain a Canadian-made product? Rod: Extremely! I don’t think the idea of “Canadian-made” is as important as “locally sourced”. Wherever the glasses are made, we have a vision of an artisanal collective that could rubber stamp itself in different communities. Instead of our brand expanding into mass production, we would rather train other small factories in other communities such as in Montreal and New York and have them engage local artists to make things locally and keep the focus in that market. For now, as long as we are selling in Toronto, it is essential to make sure we source locally and produce locally. We have tried to make the company adaptable to wherever it takes us. I think our vision is essentially Canadian. The glasses that we sell in Canada will always be made in Canada. What is important is what people are making for their neighbours, should remain part of the community. Ethical business practices is what we strive for at every level.

‘‘

WE MIGHT BE THE ONLY HAND-MADE, LOCALLY SOURCED EYEWEAR MAKERS IN TORONTO AND POSSIBLY CANADA. WE’VE HAD GREAT EXPOSURE TO HELP US STAND OUT AMONG OTHER MANUFACTURERS. THERE’S NOBODY ELSE WHO DOES WHAT WE DO AT THE PRICE POINT WE OFFER.

‘‘

Fashion changes rapidly from season to season. Should eyewear styles change as quickly? Savi: We want to be on top of the fashion trends. In terms of the design, research shows there tends to be six quintessential frame styles that stand the test of time. Most eyewear companies will produce models based of the 6 standard designs (us included), but we tend to focus on the colour stories and details to separate our brand from others. We offer 2-colour lamination, blue-toned tortoise frames, etc. to help stay on trend.

What are some advantages to owning a pair of Guild Eyewear? Rod: The frames are guaranteed forever. We really care that the glasses stand the test of time. If there is something wrong with the fit, we will do whatever we can to correct the situation. It is similar to having a bespoke suit made. Because we manufacture the glasses, we are able to make any alterations necessary to ensure the customer is completely satisfied. For out of town customers, we also offer complimentary shipping back to our production facility if there is something wrong with the pair they have ordered.

Do you offer different levels of customization? Rod: Since our glasses are made one pair at a time, we are able to implement different tiers of customization. We’ve found that selling optimized glasses that are mass-produced tend to be fit to one size and shape of head. Optometrists have complained that it can be difficult to find properly fitting glasses for many of their patients. One level of customization we offer to optometrists is that we can make our glasses in any size. We can also customize pairs to be completely unique in terms of colour and frame. We can also make a fully bespoke pair of glasses. We interview the client about their tastes and style. We sit with them at the design tool software we have to create a completely one-of-a-kind

There seems to be a disconnect between online shoppers and eyewear. Do you see that changing in the future? Rod: Absolutely. We are currently working on a software that will allow online clients to virtually “try on” a pair of eyewear. We are expecting to launch this component amongst other exciting features in our newly renovated website; We really want to look into a strategic protocol to make sure our customer is able to try and play with palettes and customization options. For instance, Joker’s Closet’s (custom footwear designer) website was a huge inspiration for us. We loved the way the client is able to see the shoe fully designed so they know exactly what they are getting.

A visit to their Tor onto studio allows to a ppreciate all the ste ps fr om their design and pr oduction pr ocess. With ver y rigor ous quality standards, their glasses are initially priced at $250. For the customized options, GUILD Eyewear off er s an add-on service for $100. The bespoke package sells for $800 (which inc ludes complete, hands-on service and design). guildeyewear.com

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DR g! THE LIGHTS ARE DIMMED AND T H E AU D I E N C E QU I E T S D OW N. T H E A N T I C I PAT I ON I S PA L PA B L E , A N D YO U C A N S T I L L H E A R S O M E W H I S P E R S A RO U N D T H E RO O M “ W H AT W I L L S H E D O T H I S T I M E ? ! ”

FOCUS

T H E M U S I C S TA RT S B LA R I N G, S H E T U R N S A RO U N D TO FAC E U S, A N D T H E S P OT L I G H T I S F O C U S E D D I R E C T LY ON H E R . H A I L T H E QU E E N …

A FASHION IS A

BY DEN TEMIN

PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY LEE


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FASHION IS A DRAG!

Transgressing through Performance Art

D

rag queens have been transgressing norms as a form of transfor mation using fashion as a vehicle of express ion. Their bodies become canvases that are transformed through rituals that culminate in the stage. The art of drag is a political act of layers and textures to critique the normative in our society. It is not known for its subtlety. This art form is presented through an exaggerated gender performance, it is loud, and in your face.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

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FASHION IS A DRAG!

Transgressing through Performance Art

Through performance art, drag forces the audience to reflect the way we attach meanings to the body. Fashion then becomes part of the ritual, a visual political tool that weaves the deconstruction of concepts. Herringbone wanted to explore the manner in which drag queens relate to fashion. I had the honour of meeting, and interviewing Helena Poison who is part of the Toronto drag queen community. Her interview is an opportunity for us to take a peek into the art of drag. Although drag collectively represents a revolutionary culture that reminds us of the “constructedness� of assumed categories in our identities, every drag queen as well as her message is unique. We cannot and should not assume that the life experience of one drag queen speaks for the whole community.

What message do you want to convey with your drag name and how did you choose it? Helena Poison is an inspiration from the music that moves me. My name is the combination of title songs from my favourite band, My Chemical Romance. As a drag queen I want to convey a message that is polarizing. I am both pretty and edgy. My sensuality is hard to predict. I like to give everyone a boner and kill it right away! How and why was Helena Poison created? I was feeling frustrated and needed a canvas that was an outlet for my ideas. I am a make up artist so my inclination was to use my own body as a means of expression. My face and body would convey my messages. I would use make up to give life to my ideas on my face. I used to photograph myself and post the images on the internet. I was not attracted to the idea of drag as an art until I saw a drag queen that was more alternative and using shock art to communicate. In that moment, I felt like drag could be a vehicle to do performance art.

I thoroughly enjoy having a piece of clothing that I can tear off ... What does drag mean to you? It is a process that I am still figuring out. I feel it will always be a creative process for me. Drag is your own creation, an art form, it is performance art. I am always trying to do something different than what everybody else is doing. My performances usually have a raw edge to them, with elements that I consider to be a little bit dirty and not completely perfect. I never think of Helena Poison as a woman. She presents female but I just think more of her like a creature. Helena is a reflection of my personality; I have always enjoyed the dark. There is always an element of surprise and shock both in how I create my drag persona as well as how I plan my performance. How does fashion become part of your art form? I plan the outfit to go with the song but most importantly I like a good reveal. The reveal is what adds a unique shock value to my message. I thoroughly enjoy having a piece of clothing that I can tear off. I like to show off my body and I do this by stripping or better yet by ripping off and revealing a part of my costume to the specific song I have chosen. For example, I have a performance where I play the song Cannibal by Kasha. My outfit is a body suit leotard that I made. I wear it with my leather jacket, which gives it a punk edge. My reveal is choreographed to the cannibal part of the song. When I tear down my clothes I have red sequins and glitter so that it looks like I am soaked in blood. I then pull out a mask that I use as a gag. It looks like a torn off face, and when I put it on I can stick my tongue out to shock people.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

‘‘

I find it very

rebellious, as

‘‘

a gay man whose sexuality is also political, drag is an extra layer to that rebellion

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...


‘‘ FASHION IS A DRAG!

Transgressing through Performance Art

Every drag queen is good at one aspect of drag, because in order to be successful you need to have an array of talents. Usually you are really good at one of them. Since I am a makeup artist my drag centers on my face. The rest: my style, how to interact with the audience, how to add humour and dance in heels, I’ve had to learn ...

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STORY HED

Story Dek

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FASHION IS A DRAG!

Transgressing through Performance Art

‘‘

‘‘

After all the powder, I do my eyes, put on my contacts, and finally lashes...


STORY HED

Story Dek

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FASHION IS A DRAG!

Transgressing through Performance Art

I like to make visible what people want to make invisible. People usually do not expect drag to have a grotesque shock value to it. Drag is exaggerated but it tends to focus more on the pretty, and the high femme. I use fashion to focus on the twisting of concepts to create double entendre. What is the ritual behind the process of creating Helena Poison? Time is the essence of my ritual. I need at least four hours to prepare. If I am starting my process of transformation less than four hours before I perform then I feel like I am rushing. It has a rhythm to it, and apart from time it is usually makeup that takes the focus of my ritualistic process of creating Helena Poison. Every drag queen is good at one aspect of drag, because in order to be successful you need to have an array of talents. Usually you are really good at one of them. Since I am a makeup artist my drag centers on my face. The rest: my style, how to interact with the audience, how to add humour, and dance in heels, I’ve had to learn. Another part of my ritual is to always try to portray a different message with my face. I am methodical when applying my makeup. I always use the same routine: put my brows, cover my beard, finish my brows, do foundation, contour, highlight my whole face, and right before I get dressed (even if it doesn’t make sense) I concentrate on my breasts! After all the powder, I do my eyes, put on my contacts, and finally lashes. My face is completely different and through the process I give birth to Helena Poison. How does drag relate to your identity? I don’t think drag is an extension of my identity at all. I don’t really relate my drag to my identity. I think of it more as an extension of my creativity. It is a character that I have created. She is a cluster of everything that I have ever been inspired by. Drag has been regarded as a political act, is your drag political? Definitely! My drag performance is a political act. I have always looked at drag as a big FUCK YOU to everything. It can be so obscene and obnoxious, which is a really exciting part for me. I find it very rebellious, as a gay man whose sexuality is also political, drag is an extra layer to that rebellion. Coming out meant that I existed in society, that people could not pretend that my sexual orientation was something to be lived in a corner, in the shadows. Drag is out there and in your face, it goes back to that idea of being visible and existing. Of not being cast off, invisible. When I’m performing, everybody has to see me. I make sure that I am shocking so that people will remember me not for being pretty and poised, but that my message comes across and hits people with surprise. My rebellious political act is to always be very celebrated. Do you feel you face discrimination? My drag is not an attempt to look pretty, or to do high femme. That is not exciting to me. I am inspired by progression, by rebellion. People have a very fixed idea of what a drag queen looks like and if you are not wearing earrings, eyebrows, or jewelry then you are not seen as one. You get labeled or people are dismissive because people feel like you are creepy and scary. So your style of drag transcends the gender binary? I would say so. I am actually transcending the gender binary through my drag. Helena Poison is aggressive progression. My favourite thing about drag is seeing people’s reactions, especially people who have never seen drag. Making people uncomfortable in a way that will transport them outside of their box. I think that providing them a space where they can feel challenged is important and healthy. We need to be able to question normative constructions of society. I also want to add that I do not speak for the drag community. I am only speaking from my own experience, my own self. This is what I have experienced. Drag is an avenue for my creative expression, it is my art. Helena Poison is like painting on a canvas, sketching a drawing and sculpting.

My fashion is shock art. MAKEUP ARTIST, HELENA POISON; HAIR ARTIST & GOWN/PROP DESIGNER, GIANLUCA ORIENTI/JUDYINC .COM; CREATIVE DIRECTION & PRODUCTION, BEATRIZ JUAREZ.

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‘‘

My favourite thing about drag is seeing people’s reactions, especially people who have never seen it. I think that providing them a space where they can feel challenged is important and healthy. We need to be able to question normative constructions of society.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

FOCUS

SEE

NO

What was once taboo, today is found in your local de partment store, pulsed digitally ever y micr on of a second. Sex doesn ’t just sell, it is a a lif estyle that is slowly blurring the boundaries of what is sexual and what is simply ’now’ in society.

EVIL TEXT BY RYAN PAYNE

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SEE NO EVIL

The Blurring Boundaries of Sexual Imagery

FOR MANY YEARS MEN HAVE BEEN BEHIND the camera creating what is considered pornographic content for their fellow man; and while the female and LGBT communities gain ground towards acceptance and equality, the ideas around sexual imagery have changed; in a sexualized world traditionally geared towards men, women are making great strides towards equality and starting to see more men being used to sell objects for the female gaze (have you ever noticed underwear packaged for men no longer shows just the underwear but typically a man’s chest too?). With the rise of this female gaze comes the movement to female-lead sexualized male imagery and—not so silently— a change in the way we perceive and create sexual content; which also poses a new question, what is nude art and what is pornography? This year marks the ten year anniversary of the Feminist Porn Awards, an awards program “based upon erotica of marginalized people” according to their website. Pornography made by women for men or women (they are conscious not to be reverse sexist, however, recognize that what a man and a women want to see are two different things.) Women directing pornographic films has added a new range of concepts being explored in ways men could never conceive. One such stream is Erika Lyst, an emerging talent among a group of female-lead pornography creators. In her upcoming film called XConfessions she explores how people are engulfed everyday by sex and erotica (she directs short erotic films based upon anonymous submissions from her TEDX talk audience). In her view, taking pornography to the limits of classical art and cinematography is showing the most intimate moments people share while being explicit and not romanticizing the actual moment. “I like the concept of shooting beautiful, aesthetic, cinematographic pieces and still allowing them to be explicit” she says. Which seems an advancement and progression from films like the 1978 classic Debbie does Dallas­—where young women were portrayed as being only smart enough to perform sexual acts upon men to prevent their parents from finding out that women too enjoy sexual encounters. Where in the past gay men would dash into discrete back sections of select bookstores, today online artistic and pornographic imagery is widely available— with even the CEO of Tumblr admitting it has a strong homosexual component to their business, having to block filters such as #gay due to its returning high volumes of Adult appropriate content. On Tumblr you can find a focus towards any fetish or fantasy ‘curated’ by somebody sharing your fascination: fit, shirtless redheads posing after their gym workouts (which I am told are completely different than seeing a blonde or brown haired man do the exact same thing). And while amongst our sexual society the intention of the person alone (man or woman) taking a gym selfie might not be for pornographic or sexual reasons (P90X, the revolutionary fitness program, recommends to take a photo daily to motivate yourself to see fitness progression), it has become a rite of passage to post a gym workout photo and admire one’s and other’s progression. Sheer vanity might have compelled somebody to take the bathroom selfie­—so highly common today—from a private moment to a public context. So as images get mixed around and regrouped together faster than two clicks of the eye how does a person draw the line between, what is pornography and what is simple nudity and going further, what is artistic nudity? Or to phrase this differently when is a selfie at the gym pornography and when it is simply a progress photo? Seeing gymstars striking a pose and smiling, or sexy-dressed girls in another group selfie barely holds our gaze, as these images (in our sexualized society) are highly common compared to the idea of somebody alone sneaking a quick photo privately—which you are now viewing too. It is this hidden gem that fascinates us and makes the image itself feel special (which is the intimacy Lyst is attempting to

CREATIVE COMMONS

WOMEN DIRECTING PORNOGRAPHIC FILMS HAS ADDED A NEW RANGE OF CONCEPTS BEING EXPLORED IN WAYS MEN COULD NEVER CONCEIVE.

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create inside her work). This feeling of exclusive access to a very unique thing, something the rage of speakeasy restaurants popping up capitalizes upon. It was this allure of being able to take a photo privately and then alone see it—not sharing the moment with the 16 year-old who developed the film at the local camera store­­, which spurred the polaroid camera after WWI, so it is no surprise that today, in the times of cellphone cameras, we are again, fascinated with private photos and seeing others at their most intimate moments. In 1994 (pre-cellphone cameras times), contemporary artist Ed Templeton went so far as to stage intimate moments taking photographs of teens kissing to capture the sheer lust and desire strangers (teens) had towards each other. However, a few years later in a Dove campaign for real beauty, strangers are asked to hug and kiss each other and we are told this is an act of love not lust. Did none of these people think their partner was good looking? The intention might have for one, purpose, but the final result was people being intimate with each other (which is what a pornographer is doing). Just as a gym selfie can change in purpose, the intention of the photograph is not what can determine what is nude art and what is pornography. To define the categories, my mind tries to define the tropes of each one;


SEE NO EVIL

the hallmarks and rules which make you think what category an image belongs too: artistic or pornographic. However, one can not list them as for each rule there is an abundance of exceptions. Debra W. Soh, a sex research expert at York University in Toronto, articulated it best, saying, “Every object or behaviour can, to some extent, become sexualized.” In her research, Soh researches paraphilias (or kinks), therefore has seen a wide gambit of sexual interests, and says many fetishes are unique to the individual. Rules then cannot be thought to exist to define nude art from pornography, as so many define to themselves what is sexual and what not. The painter Paul Cadmus painted beautiful watercolour images of sailors dancing with women for the galleries and salons of his time, but it was the gentlemen’s eyes looking to each other over their female dates shoulders which made the images to many, homoerotic. A watercolour painting of people fully clothed dancing was pornographic, yet to many Justin Bieber or Mark Wahlberg having their Calvins pulled down by a puppy flashing their bums on the beach is simply advertising (the sexual nature lost in today’s sexualized nation). Yet, a Robert Mapplethorpe’s ‘Man in Polyester Suit’ is still art as it is a Mapplethorpe. Or to remove the commercial message as part of the medium, we can see a Valentino dress, sheer and exotic, but when draped upon a person it is simply a gown covering the body, or the opposite, the dress as simply a piece of clothing until given life upon a person where it becomes employed to create an allure. Francisco de Goya’s ‘The Clothed Maja’ painting portrayed this idea best way back in the 1800s. Goya painted a nude woman and was told it was thought sexual, however, upon painting a second portrait where the woman was clothed, was informed this last portrait was more sexual than the original nude piece. Sculptor Edmonia Lewis, painter Georgia O’Keeffe and modern performance artist Marina Abramovic, all push the boundaries between themselves, the artist, and the sexual nature the audience views/consumes/engages with their work. In Abramovic’s performance at the Museum of Modern Art, she sat still in a chair for 7 hours a day, for 3 months as people came and sat across from her, stared into her eyes, yet no words were spoken. It was a highly moving expression of intimacy, strength and privacy, yet not pornographic. But what happens when you blind these barriers with porn stars who actually perform for the camera and treat their body as a tool to convey their artistic work like a painter utilizes a brush? Or modern performance artist, Brent Ray Fraser who molds and uses his penis as a paintbrush to perform making art? Abramovic was naked in many of her performance pieces and often naked with other performance artists. How do we know they are performing compared to those who are simply engaging in sexual acts? Or is everything an act, and Shakespeare’s sound byte quote “The whole world is a stage” never more true than now in the context of artistic nudity blurred with pornography? For with every Abramovic creating performance nude art to capture the imagination of the viewer there is a Rogan Richards (Australian Gay porn star) acting to perform nude work for the act itself. When asked about how he approaches making films Richards replied, “There is definitely a performance to making studio porn. I am always aware of how I look in front of the camera, but I am like this in my personal life as well. I never do anything to maintain my image as a porn star, I’m just me and a porn star happens to be part of who I am”. A very similar answer to Abramovic, who has previously commented she performs to be real; to bring out the raw emotions underneath the covered­—and often curated—exterior surfaces people project. Are they both using art to express their true selves or hiding behind the mystery of art to hide themselves? This we’ll never know. It is this intimacy art holds, a private exchange between each viewer, that fascinates and keeps us coming back for more. It is also why the question of what is art is painful, joyful, quick and long. It can be answered by our gut feelings, but never fully explained as to each person the ideas are different, leaving us with a feeling of non-closure. As with each gym selfie, we’ll never know the intention to why the photo was taken. If a dress was designed to be sexy or simple a sexy person is wearing it. Rather, all we can do is be the viewer. There is content which we love and content which is not our cup of tea. Either way, it can not be universally labelled as art for beauty is in the eye of the beholder. As society becomes even more sexual in nature and the female gaze stronger...will we become nudity numb? Already we don’t question shirtless men, and women in many places are able to finally go topless…will pants soon to be a thing of the past too? ‘Underoos only’ not just for sorority sleepovers and gay pride? Connect to continue the discussion @herringbonemag

CREATIVE COMMONS

The Blurring Boundaries of Sexual Imagery


STORY HED

Story Dek

“EVERY OBJECT OR BEHAVIOUR CAN, TO SOME EXTENT, BECOME SEXUALIZED”

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10.5

Immortalizing Nike’s Limited- Brand Collaborations

MONOCLE

“Nike Special Edition Zoom DK Quick Strike Double Tongue Boot”, 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 18” x 15 inches 45.7cm x 38cm

Developed in a special edition colab with pr o rider Danny Kass, this snowsport boot f eatures a nifty double tongue system. The distinctive motivation al artwork is inspired fr om c lassic American WWII er a bomber f ighter planes. An engorged Nike Swoosh adds to this snowboard boot ’s exager ated style. Released in November 2012.


“Nike SB Dunk Low —Red Lobster”, 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

10.5 We live in a world of irony and contradiction, constantly playing with both ends of globalization, trying to push our creative boundaries and promote consumption, while trying to create awareness on how mass-production changes our perceptions on high-end products. The art world is no different. With 10.5 (referring to the artist’s shoe size) Alan Belcher shows us how this voraceous appetite runs amok in mostly all of us.

INTERVIEW BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ

THE AVERAGE PERSON OWNS TWELVE TO FIFTEEN PAIRS OF SHOES. THE AVERAGE SNEAKER HEAD (ENTHUSIAST),HOWEVER, HAS OVER ONE HUNDRED. TELL US WHAT ARE THE IDEOLOGIES AND VALUES BEHIND 10.5?

I have a dozen pairs of sneakers, of which 6 are in rotation. I wear Vans, Puma, Adidas, Diadoro, Mizuno, Babolat—it’s probably interesting to note that I have no Nike’s. I did however chose Nike for these oil-on-canvas portraits because it’s the ultimate sneaker brand for collecting. This series aims to metaphor the art world’s recent appetite for art fair marketing and its hype-beastiality towards the new youthful abstract product. I refer to my oil paintings as objects, they are shrink-wrapped for handling, and their want & value is prime. Being strictly oil-on-canvas stressed the aim of collectability. These works are painted to the exact scale of my foot, and the series title “10.5” refers to my shoe size.

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“Nike KD V Hulk” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

“Nike Shox R4” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

TELL US ABOUT THE CREATIVE PROCESS FOR 10.5

“Nike Air Jordan V Retr o Tokyo” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

“Supreme X Nike Foamposite” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

Once I decided to launch into the 10.5 production, I investigated the sneaker blogs daily to get a crash education studying the Nike timeline of technical advancement, the history of more notorious past releases and the buzz surrounding upcoming releases, colabs, and colourways. I designed every portrait in a similar self-branded style with the outside of the shoes facing right, then art-directed and managed the actual painting in China. I manually stretched the finished canvases and once the series was complete, had them all shrink-wrapped for the stocking of shelves. The actual gallery installation at Marlborough in New York’s LES mimicked that of a sneaker storefront and yet echoed the aura of an art fair booth. Towards the third week of the exhibition, we arranged a “drop” similar to the hyped sneaker pre-releases and announced the arrival of five new available paintings to the shelves.

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10.5

Immortalizing Nike’s Limited- Brand Collaborations

“Nike Air Jordan Red/Black” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

The Air Jordan 1 was f ir st released in 1985, in a red and black colourway to match the unifor m of the Chicago Bulls, the team for which Michael Jordan played. This red and black colourway was later outlawed by NBA Commissioner Favid Ster n for not f eaturing any white on them. Michael Jordan would wear the shoes anyway, and each time he ste pped on the court with the Air Jordan 1, he would be f ined f ive thousand dollar s.

“THIS SERIES AIMS TO METAPHOR THE ART WORLD’S RECENT APPETITE FOR ART FAIR MARKETING AND ITS HYPE-BEASTIALITY TOWARDS THE NEW YOUTHFUL ABSTRACT PRODUCT. I REFER TO MY OIL PAINTINGS AS OBJECTS; THEY ARE SHRINK-WRAPPED FOR HANDLING, AND THEIR WANT & VALUE IS PRIME”.


With an over seas Asian limited release in 2011, this cr ossover between Nike Air Woven and Nike Air Footsca pe is a sought-after collectable in Ja pan. Designer Nate VanHook incor por ated an asymmetrical cr otchet-style woven aesthetic in white to contr ast the pony-hair and spotted leopard patter ning.

With a limited release in 1978 to Nike f amily and friends and a handf ul of celebrities, this night-lif estyle LDV-based shoe was designed for dance-floor competitive moves r ather than tr ack & f ield. Fashioning a silver metallic upper with a candy-a pple red glitter swoosh with a lamé-partic leembedded flat outsole. These f unkiest of kicks got many c lubber s past the velvet r opes of 54.

“Nike Dunk Low Pr o SB Pigeon” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

“Nike-Air-Footsca pe-Woven-Leopard” Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

“Nike Dunk Low Pr o SB Paris” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

Pr obably one of the most expensive Nike SB models on the market today, the Paris Dunks were limited to a release of only 202 pair s worldwide, with no two pair s exactly the same. Featuring artwork by the French anti-abstr act painter Ber n ard Buff et, each pair was unique due to the manner that Nike had to cut the canvases. The Ber n ard Buff et Nike Dunks are considered a r are and prized art-object in pr ominent sneaker collections.

“Nike Tailwind Studio 54 Night Tr ack” Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm Private Collection, New York

“ I DID CHOOSE NIKE FOR THESE OIL-ON-CANVAS PORTRAITS BECAUSE IT’S THE ULTIMATE SNEAKER BRAND FOR COLLECTING.”

“Nike Kobe 9 Elite Maestr o NOLA Gumbo “ Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

Paying tribute to the unique flavour s of New Orleans, Nike serves up the Kobe Gumbo’s combo of technical innovation and aesthetic flair. A br ass Swoosh salutes the jazz maestr os of NOLA, and the glo-in-the-dark outsole stays out all night. These Big Easy hitops were swung out for the 2014 NBA All-Star Game in N’awlins.

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10.5

Immortalizing Nike’s Limited- Brand Collaborations

Nike SB Dunk Low Piet Mondrian 2014, Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

In homage to the De Stijl neo-plastic painter, Nike SB released the limited-edition “Piet Mondrians” in late 2008. Appr opriating Mondrian ’s 1928 “Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue” colourway, and a ppr opriately on white canvas; these inspired Dunks were available thr ough only a f ew select dealer s and quickly became highly sought after by collector s.

YOU COMMISSIONED THE PAINTING PROCESS TO CHINESE ARTISTS... HOW WAS THE WORK EMBRACED BY THEM?

Similar to actual Nike product, the works were “Made In China”. I was editor and artdirector, had a studio manager and one dedicated artist-assistant based in China. This satellite production was efficient for the quantity required (over fifty paintings), but was also frustratingly laborious for the constant diligent overseeing of quality control via email—detailed instructions in simplified broken English text. Accuracy in colour was the most challenging due calibration and CMYK vs. RGB issues. The average turnaround was between 8 to ten weeks. The 10.5 project was well embraced by the studio there as Nike has always been a hugely popular brand in China.

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Olympic tr ack Coach and Nike co-founder Bill Bower man developed the nylon upper and cushion sole in the mid-60s, and debuted this revolution ar y lightweight r unning shoe in 1974 after abusing his wif e ’s waffle ir on in order to press r ubber into a sole that used less r ubber and f eatured dur able treads. The Nike Waffle Tr ainer, quickly became the best-selling tr aining shoe in America.

Before St. Patrick’s Day in 2012, Nike released the “Black and Tan” honoring Guinness Stout. Unfortun ately for Nike, The Royal Irish Constabular y Reserve Force (notorious for br utality and massacre during the 1920s Irish Inde pendence War s, inc luding the atr ocities of Bloody Sunday) were nick-n amed the “Black and Tans”. These Dunks sport a creamy swoosh, and insoles f eaturing an image of a pint of Ale.

“Nike Blazer Mid PRM VNTG QS Rainbow Var sity Red” Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm “Nike Waffle Tr ainer” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm Collection: Mark Parker, CEO Nike Inc, Beaverton, Oregon

Nike Dunk Low Premium SB Black and Tan” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

Pr oudly f eaturing an ostrich leather engorged Nike swoosh along with a premium suede upper and a vulcanized r ubber sole; this contempo update to the 1972 basketball shoe is one colorway selection (Var sity Red and Sail) fr om the “Rainbow” pack. “Nike Air Force 1 Low” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

WHAT EFFECT HAS THE SNEAKERHEAD SUBCULTURE IN THE FASHION AND ART WORLDS?

“Air Jordan 1 Retr o Jeter” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

The casual wear of sneakers outside the athletic world paved the way for a streetwear explosion, starting with coloured twill Lee jeans paired with Puma’s in the early 80’s, all the way to this century’s forever popularity of snap-back baseball caps. In this last decade, top fashion designers colab with sneaker brands to garner street cred. The Brooklyn Museum of Art recently mounted a major sneaker retrospective originally organized by Toronto’s Bata Shoe Museum.

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10.5

Immortalizing Nike’s Limited- Brand Collaborations

“Nike Lebr on 9 Cannon” 2014 Oil on canvas, shrink-wr a pped 15” x 15 inches 38cm x 38cm

Sporting a 180-Air Max unit, Hyperf use ventilation, Nike Zoom Air “team or ange” outsole and Flywire 3.0 technology, as well as the carbon f iber slate blue side panels and Nike Pr o-Combat style inner lining; the Nike Lebr on 9 “cannon” was inspired by the Miami Heat ’s pre-season tr aining camp at the militar y base in Fort Walton Beach in South Florida. Origin ally released in October 2011, this was the most popular of the 9 colourways off ered.

WHAT ARE THE REACTIONS AND PERCEPTIONS FROM PEOPLE WHO’VE SEEN YOUR SHOW?

The storefront installation attracted many passerbyers that would not normally frequent gallery exhibitions—most notably sneakerheads and leisure shoppers. Many swooned for their long-time favorites and some were even wearing recent releases that were also immortalized in portraiture on the shelves. Most non-artworld viewers choked when informed of the prices—as is the usual when non-art folk encounter art world values. As for actual artworld viewers, most could not fathom shrink-wrapping an oil painting, and for many the art fair poke was a discomfort. Mark Parker, the CEO of Nike Inc, bought three of the historical models for his own art collection. For more on this series and Alan Belcher’s work, visit www.balanelcher.com 39

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FOCUS

LIFELONGING...

TEXT BY RYAN PAYNE

CAPTURING OUR LIVES THROUGH OUR CELL PHONES RATHER THAN EXPERIENC ING THE PRESENT MOMENT SEEMS TO BE THE MAIN IRONY OF THIS MODERN WORLD. BUT HOW CAN WE BE THE MAIN SPECTATORS AND PROTAGONISTS OF OUR OWN MAIN ACTS? ONE COMPANY SEEMS TO HAVE THE ANSWER.

TODAY MORE SELFIE PHOTOS are taken in a day than the number of students who attend post secondary education in Canada.Which is to say that you are more likely to be in a selfie than University educated. And while that may trouble some, to others it means keep calm and selfie on. Why wouldn’t you want to have memories of your life? The idea of being able to capture photos digitally as opposed to on film was to create a way to document moments in a more cost effective (read cheap) way. So why not capture your memories in a picture so you can enjoy them later?

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Wearable technology has takand how they navigate—do they en the ability to capture our lives walk the same pattern? even further, creating lifelonging As an individual you can devices which a person can wear, go back and in 10 minutes see on their shirt, pants, jacket, wrist, your life that week: how often etc. The key feature being you no did you walk, check facebook, longer need to stop to take a phosit in front of a computer. Did The Narr ative c lip automatically ca ptures a to, and “interrupt the moment” to you capture that once in a lifephoto ever y 30 seconds and uploads it to a capture it, rather, the wearer can time moment? (or did you have per son al photo stream. It pr ovides a way to simply live their life and eventuto interrupt the moment to capdocument and record your per son al moments ally go back to find those ideal moture it?) without interr upting them or only ca pturing ments to add them to their edited However, with an accurate what you think you should ca pture. personal photo albums. account of your life comes negaAvailable at getn arr ative.com Such devices include the Narrative side effects; once you see tive clip, formerly called the Memoto, how much television or coma handly little clip you can attach puter time you spend in your anywhere. It automatically caplife...will you be able to watch or tures a photo every 30 seconds interact without feeling guilty? and uploads it to a personal image What about seeing memories stream. It provides a way to docuof ex boyfriends and your famment and record your personal moily being in or not in your life? ments without interrupting them or What are the drawbacks to aconly capturing what you think you tually remembering your life? should capture. Other lifelogging Aren’t we to remember the good devices include the now infamous and forget the bad? (as many GoPro camera (for all your extreme smart people are quoted saying.) moments); and the Autographer, Likewise, in talking with Emrich a smaller version of a handheld the point comes out, “everybody camera which hangs around your see’s the value in collecting inforneck video recording your life (as mation on their life, but nobody well as the audio you experience). wants their second job to be Kapture is a personal audio recordgoing through their own data.” ing wristband you can activate and At what point do we end up replayback— especially handy when placing, giving up interrupting wanting to capture a DJ set, or fashion Runway collection. the moment to capture it, with being at home rewatching Lifelogging apps exists for pets as well with Nikon creating moments in our life? Will Barry Wellman’s research—the a collar/Camera combo which takes photographs each time is man who proved being on facebook for a long period of a dog’s heart rate goes up. See a squirrel, photo, see a pillow, time led to depression—come to show that watching our nothing, see a pillow which looks delicious, photo! lifelogging videos produce the same effect? Likewise, from However, according to Wearable Technology expert Tom a big data perspective, will insurance companies start usEmrich, the best is yet to come, with glasses holding the larg- ing our lifelogging devices to alter how much we pay? (lots est amount of potential. Clips and other devices only capture of outdoor pictures show us running and getting exercise at the angle to which they are worn (lifelogging devices cur- compared to us sitting, often called as the new smoking.) rently capture at only the angle they are positioned). There- Could we no longer be able to sit at home but rather know fore, glasses—which blend into society unlike current Google our lifelog—if ever shared—will show how lazy we actually Glasses—will be able to capture what we see as we see it, a true are and therefore compel us to do more? (I vote to start bakreflection of our daily interactions. ing more!). With these devices comes their additional and future The future is a wild ride. Lifelogging holds so much pobenefits. As an example, if a patient has Alzheimer’s disease, tential. The ways in which it will be integrated into daily determining if his medication was taken is often a big chal- fashion is unknown, however, we can be certain there will lenge...imagine if you can go back and see? Or as a nurse, you be many innovations and progressions yet to come to fill could tell where your patients are located inside the hospital our days (and photo streams) with great memories.

At what point do we end up replacing and Giving up interrupting the moment to capture it, with being at home rewatching moments in our life?

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PAGES

E V E RY T H I N G H A S A S O L E BY PUTPUT

CELEBRATING THE LAUNC H OF THE STILL LIFE BY GESTALTEN, WE FEATURE THE WORK OF SWISS/DANISH DUO PUTPUT, WHO ARE PART OF A GENERATION OF YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHERS—AND STYLISTS—REIMAGINING THE ART OF CLASSIC STILL LIFE PHOTOGRAPHY.

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EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

The Work of Fabulous Duo Putput

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EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

The Work of Fabulous Duo Putput

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EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

The Work of Fabulous Duo Putput

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EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

The Work of Fabulous Duo Putput

EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE, was commissioned by luxur y footwear br and Bianco for their Spring/ Summer 2015 campaign. Riff ing off the r ubber soles and stiff heels of actual shoes, the duo organized and ordered diff erent objects to mimic the for m of stilettos, boots, galoshes, etc.

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EVERYTHING HAS A SOLE

The Work of Fabulous Duo Putput

To see more of their f abulous work go to putput.dk. For more sources of inspir ation, check out The Still Life: In Product Presentation and Editorial Design by GESTALTEN. A vailable at Amazon.com

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VIEWPOINT

THE HARD WORK OF

BEING OURSELVES TEXT BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ

The role of models in fashion goes far beyond the selling of clothes. They help us def ine what society deems “acceptable” in size, race, age, gender and sexual roles. We must remember that behind every model there is a booker and with him, a client—call it a fashion designer or a fashion publication—responsibles for “creating” and promoting beauty ideals that most of the times don’t include the majority of the world ’s population. And even though the call for size, age and gender diversity in the runway hasn’t accomplished as much as we ’d like it to, the gap in race is slowly closing, but not without questioning what diversity really means in the world of high fashion. At a time when most americans feel uncomfortable with racist arguments, ethnic models still face discrimination.Bethann Hardison, former model, model agent and campaigner for diversity in the fashion world, wrote an open letter in 2013 to the CFDA, the British Fashion Council, the Fédération Française de la Couture and to the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana, about the lack of diversity (and clear racism) reflected in the runway. Thanks to her on-going f ight to end discrimination, we were able to see (and present in these pages) more diverse models walking the SS16 shows. But, are these new crop of models representative of realistic beauty standards? Or they are just a mixed version of Caucasian ideals masked in a different skin colour...

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Binx Walton, USA Binx’s androgynous look has landed her campaigns for CÊline, Chanel, Coach and Balmain. She made her debut at the Marc Jacobs AW/2013 Show, for which she was exclusively booked.

Dylan Xue, China Despite the fact she is a relatively fresh new face on the modelling scene, we have already seen Dylan walking in fashion shows for Louis Vuitton, Acne, Loewe, Balenciaga, Prada, Coach, DKNY, Missoni and Dolce & Gabbana.

The problem with the lack of diversity in the fashion industry is that many of the key players do not recognise this for what it really is: racism.

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Mica Arganaraz, Argentina She was the f irst model to be featured solo in a Prada campaign since Sasha Pivovarova for the Autumn/Winter 2014 campaign, shot by Steven Meisel. She graced the November 2015 cover of Vogue Paris. She has walked for many hsows such as Balenciaga, Christian Dior, Haider Akerman and Louis Vuitton.


Some may argue that it’s “tough finding great models”, and that even though there is definitely more work and a greater demand for Caucasian girls, it’s also “tougher to find great ethnic models”...

Imaan Hammam, Netherlands From Moroccan and Egyptian descent, Imaan was discovered in Amsterdam’s Central Station by an agent back in 2010. Hammam has walked for many designers such as Prada, Jean Paul Gaultier, Balenciaga, Versace, Fendi, Proenza Schouler and Christian Dior.

Lineisy Montero, Dominican Republic Discovered at an amusement park in Santo Domingo, she walked her f irst ever runway show as an exclusive for Prada. Since then, she ’s walked for major designers such as Loewe, Céline, Balenciaga, Givenchy, and Louis Vuitton.

Wangy Xinyu, China Wangy is part of a new crop of more diverse models hitting the runways in 2015. In just her f irst season, she walked for Giambattista Valli, Alexander McQueen, Elie Saasb, Lanvin and Burberry among others.

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DIVERSITY

The Hard Work of Being Ourselves

What is the problem with ethnic beauty? Ashley Mears, former model, Assistant professor of Sociology at Boston University, and author of the book “Pricing Beauty: The making of a Fashion Model” published by UCPRESS, has offered invaluable sociological insight into the world of modeling.

“BEAUTY is desired because it is idealized and unattainable. Two criteria that are fundamentally incompatible with historical representations of non-white women. A really good ethnic model, is one who embodies an attempt to reconcile contradictory social categories. Is the perception that ETHNIC is automatically distanced from HIGH-END, and then relegated to the commercial realm. Editorial producers must search for a model of color who embodies an air of upper-class exclusivity and rarity, no easy feat given the entrenched construction of non-white ethnicity as VULGAR. This high-end ethnic look materializes in one of two ways, either with minimal or extreme marlers of racial difference...Mixed-race models are the pinnacle of this type of look a very SANITIZED ethnic image.”

G L O B A L P E R C E N TA G E O F M O D E L CA S T I N G S , 2 0 1 5 2% LATINA

7.4 % ASIAN .3% OTHER

82% WHITE 8 % BLACK 51

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.3% MIDDLE EASTERN


SPECIAL

\ik-’sen-trik\ adj 52

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a: deviating from an established or usual pattern or style b: deviating from conventional or accepted usage or conduct in odd or whimsical ways. Fashion Eccentric

An individual whose f earlessness in dressing

tr anscends trends and notions of good taste in equal measure, early embr acing the odd, the ugly or the weird, which often subsequently blooms into a f ull-blown f ashion trend... In today ’s cookie-cutter, kee ping-up-with-the-celebrities world, the f uture of f ashion is in the hands of the designer s—and creatives—who dare to dream outside the box and those br ave enough to wear their designs as only they see f it. We celebr ate some of the most important eccentrics the f ashion world has been fortun ate to have...

BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ ILLUSTRATED BY LAURA GULSHANI


FASHION STORY ECCENTRICS HED

CelebratingStory the Fashion Dek World

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Never fit a dress to the

Elsa Schiaparelli

Elsa Schiaparelli is probably best-known for her collaborations with surrealists like Salvador Dalí and Jean Cocteau. However these represent only a portion of her overall work and have overshadowed important contributions she did to the fashion industry. Through her designs, this italian designer tried to situate herself outside of the conventions­—temporal and gendered­—of modern life by making herself an icon of timelessness. “Schiap” as she was referred to by those close to her, was born in Rome in 1890 and spent her adult life living mainly in Paris, with a brief time spent in the United States. She took up design in 1925, when living in Paris as a divorced single mother; she was employed as a designer and stylist by a small couture house, which closed the following year. But aready acquainted with


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body, but train the body to fit the dress.

members of the fashion industry and the artistic avant-garde she began designing under her own name, premiering her first collection in 1927 and debuting the trompe l’oeil feature that would be imitated by many designers in years to come. Schiaparelli was one of the first designers to develop the wrap dress, taking inspiration from aprons to produce a design that would accommodate and flatter all female body types and was also one of the first designers to feature clothes with visible zippers. Elsa had no training in the technical skills of pattern making and clothing construction. Her method relied on both, impulse of the moment and serendipitous inspiration applied as the work progressed, but her complexity and out-of-the- box vision made her an enigmatic and defining designer of her time.


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FASHION ECCENTRICS

Celebrating the Fashion World

My philosophy of fashion is humour, jokes and games. I make my own rules.

Anna Piaggi Regarded as the grande dame of the fashion world Anna’s professional life was as a journalist and stylist mainly for Vogue Italia. She was born in Milan in 1931. In the 1950s, while working as a translator at a publishing house in Milan, she met the photographer Alfa Castaldi, whom she married in 1962. He was a contributor to Vogue Italia and introduced her to the world of fashion magazines. Anna Piaggi’s fame also rested on her status as muse to designers such as Karl Lagerfeld and the British milliner Stephen Jones, but mostly on her ability to upstage even the most daring of fashionistas. Anna Piaggi dressed to entertain: nothing—harlequin dresses, zebra trousers—was too daring for her to try. From 1980 to 1983 Anna Piaggi was editor-in-chief of Condé Nast’s style magazine Vanity. In 1988 Vogue Italia (which was on the lookout for someone adept at spotting the latest trends) hired her as a creative consultant. Her double-page spreads soon became the heart of the magazine—dramatic layouts which featured not just clothes and accessories, but also furniture, art, cakes, or whatever else took her fancy at the time. According to Manolo Blahnik (shoe designer and close friend of Anna): “Her pages are the reason to read Vogue. Every month is a shock.” In 2006, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London held an exhibition of her extensive wardrobe collection, including thousands of dresses and hundreds of pairs of shoes. Anna passed away in 2012, leaving behind a legacy of historical and avant garde exuberance and eclecticism.

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FASHION ECCENTRICS

Celebrating the Fashion World

Isabella Blow Probably best known for being the discoverer/promoter of fashion genius Alexander McQueen, Isabella Blow forged a life challenging the concept of “normalcy” by opposing the label of eccentric that was placed upon her. Born in 1958 in Cheshire, England to an impoverished aristocratic family, she lived a childhood full of dramatic events and tragedy (which would mark and define her depressive personality for the rest of her life), forcing her to move to London and work all kinds of jobs at a young age. In 1979, she moved to New York City to study at Columbia University. It is through school friends that she was soon connected to the world of art and fashion (Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat were some of the artists who would become close friends to her). After friend Bryan Ferry (Roxy Music’s) suggested for her to meet with Anna Wintour —who had recently been appointed the Creative Director of Vogue— Isabella was hired as her assistant. She worked at the magazine for many years (during which she also assited André Leon Talley). Blow was fondly remembered by Wintour for challenging social roles and pre-established concepts of what fashion should be by wearing the “most outrageous” outfits. In 1986, she made her way back to London to work at Tatler Magazine as Fashion Editor. Isabella’s unique approach to fashion and her innate instinct for spotting the most remarkable craft and talent, led her to discover, propel and promote the careers of many fashion stars such as milliner Philip Treacy, the late Alexander McQueen and supermodel Sophie Dahl. Isabella had battled depression for a long time, and after a series of life dissapointments (including a cancer diagnosis and her inability to “being properly recognized in a world she had influenced”), drove her to several attempts to commit suicide. In May 7, 2007, she passed away in the hospital after drinking large amounts of a powerful weedkiller. She was just 49 years old. Her extreme fashion sense will always be remembered by the detail, beauty and deep meaning it conveyed, all covered with a cloud of irony, humour, drama and enquiry. Her style was certainly a clear reflection of her unrestrained dark nature and extravangance, but most importantly, the essence of her most intimate self: a natural-born eccentric.

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FASHION ECCENTRICS

Celebrating the Fashion World

Leigh Bowery Australian costume designer, night-club promoter, performance artist and art himself, Leigh Bowery, truly deserves to be called an “icon”. Born to a very modest family, he arrived to London in 1981 carrying just a small suitcase and a sewing machine. But his larger-than-life dreams made Leigh become the pop icon that always bordered between the absurd and the outrageous, making provocation the main motto during his life. As the public face of Taboo­—the most important club in London during the mid 80’s­—Leigh explored transgendered concepts through his original approach to dressing. His creativity blossomed in an era where exclusivity was a primary factor in attendance at the clubs and where a strong division existed between the initial innovators and the crowds who later imitated them. As one of these initial innovators, he mastered the overall use of his body as both, subject and material for his art. For many gay men in the 1980’s, the arrival of this kind of scene, provided an opportunity to express their individuality (being the concept of androgyny the buzzword in many social circles). Leigh set a new standard for eccentricism pushing the boundaries of gender, creating a completely genderless body and making his own body a study of form, shape and freedom. Through his work, Leigh Bowery influenced a whole generation of artists, designers and musicians such as Boy George and John Galliano. His ethos still resonates in the Fashion world “Dress as though your life depends on it...or don’t bother”.

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There was one period when my favorite fabric was flesh. Human flesh. I didn’t wear any clothes for a while.


FASHION ECCENTRICS

Celebrating the Fashion World

John Galliano

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Considered as one of the most innovative and influential fashion designers from the early twenty-first century, John Galliano tops the list for fashion eccentricity and creativity. His work often shows surprising juxtapositions to create extravagant yet intricately tailored pieces of art. Born in Gibraltar in 1960, his family moved to London when he was just six years old. After graduating with first class honours from Saint Martin’s School of Art in 1988, he went on to produce very conceptual collections that rapidly secured him a cult following, but not the stable financial backing he needed to propel his career. In 1995 (after building a solid credibility in Paris), he was appointed the head designer of Givenchy, becoming the first British designer to lead a French couture house. A year later, Galliano moved to Christian Dior, where he produced most of his critically acclaimed work characterized for relentless streams of historical and ethnic appropriations combined highly theatrical fashion shows. In 2009, he received France’s Legion d’Honneur, awarded by French president Nicolas Sarkozy, for his contribution to the French fashion industry. In 2011, Galliano—no stranger to controversy—was suspended from his post at the fashion house after being acussed of making explicit racist and anti-Semitic remarks in public (in France, expressing anti-semitic ideas is illegal). After a creative “hiatus” that included rehab and big amounts of soul-searching, he’s made a big come back as the creative director of Maison Margiela, where he had to interpret the brand’s legacy as he saw fit. His eclectic approach, extensive couture experience, combined with his innovative construction techniques and deep cultural research are quickly redefining the image of the house, confirming once again why John is one of the brightest designers and innovators to have ever existed in the fashion industry.

You’re only as good as your last collection, which is an enormous pressure. 62

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The individual and v of GETTING DRESSE the body for the social wo ate, acceptable, respectab The ubiquitous nature of means by which bodies a MEANING and identity. in which individuals lear bodies and feel AT HO


very personal act ED is an act of preparing orld, making it approprible and DESIRABLE... f fashion is one of the are made social and given Fashion is the way rn to live in their OME in them...

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JOANNE ENTWISTLE

HERRINGBONE FASHION


LIKE A SECOND Reinterpreted layering that leaves little to the imagination PHOTOGRAPHY, TESS FEUILHADE FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA

SKIN...


PINK TARTAN Window Pane coat, Harlow Coated Leather skirt; VICTORIA’S SECRET Lace body-suit; Left: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul Large Zigzag Cocktail ring, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu br acelet. Right: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Mar ahani bangle, Glam & Soul The Kathmandu bangle, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart The Rebel bangle; GUILD EYEWEAR Hand Dr awn Cats n avy fr ames.

D

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TIGER OF SWEDEN Donn a Br oken Blue shirt, Nilak tr ouser s; Victoria’s Secret Laced halter ; THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul pendant, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul Large Zigzag Cocktail ring, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu br acelet, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Leather br acelet, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Unity Leather br acelet; ALDO Jessica Amy boots. BEAUTY NOTES: Face: Light Wonder Foundation in #3, #5; the Retouches Concealer in #3, Film Star Bronze and Glo w in Light to Medium; Cheek to Chic in Ecstasy. Eyes: Eyes to Mesmerise in Marie Antoinette; Luxury Palette, The Sophisticate, Rock’n’ Kohl in Ver uschka Mink, Bro w Lift in Br ooke S, Full Fat lashes. Lips: Lip Cheat in Iconic Nude, K.I.S.S.I.N.G in Bitch Perf ect. All, Charlotte Tilbur y. HAIR: Po wder Bluff and Lacque Couture, Ker astase.


LIKE A SECOND SKIN

This Season’s Reinterpreted Layering

TIGER OF SWEDEN Darcell shirt, Luser n a Silk handkerchief . 69

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LIKE A SECOND SKIN

This Season’s Reinterpreted Layering

TIGER OF SWEDEN Mar alis C coat; DIESEL C-Nabila tie. 70

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ALEXANDER WANG jump suit, available at THE BAY; DIESEL C-Min ax shirtl Left: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver, Rebel at Heart ring. Right:THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Zirconia in Mystical Black ring, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu Br acelet; ALDO Alicia Black Patent Leather boots.


LIKE A SECOND SKIN

This Season’s Reinterpreted Layering

BCBGMAXAZRIA Allexandria Faux-Leather dress; DIESEL C-Nabila shirt; TIGER OF SWEDEN Antonetto handkerchief; Left:THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring. Right:THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu bangle, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Mar ahani bangle, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart The Rebel bangle, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu br acelet.


BCBGMAXAZRIA Lor n a Faux-Leather Botton-Down jumpsuit, Studded belt; TIGER OF SWEDEN Leather boots, Antonetto handkerchief; THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Rebel Skull Link br acelet.

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LINE KNITWEAR Leather jacket; JOHN AND JENN Tevin Caviar turtleneck; ALDO Desarea boots. BEAUTY NOTES: Face: Light Wonder Foundation in #3, #5; the Retouches Concealer in #3, Film Star Bronze and Glo w in Light to Medium; Cheek to Chic in Love glow. Eyes: Eyes to Mesmerise in Bette; Luxury Palette, The Golden Goddess, Rock’n’ Kohl in Bedr oom Black, Bro w Lift in Br ooke S, Full Fat lashes. Lips: Lip Cheat in Pink Venus, K.I.S.S.I.N.G in Stoned Rose & Coachella Cor al. All, Charlotte Tilbur y. HAIR: Materialiste, Laque Couture and Volume in powder, Ker astase.

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LIKE A SECOND SKIN

This Season’s Reinterpreted Layering

DIESEL Black Gold L-Anbar Leather jacket; TIGER OF SWEDEN Jadee M t-shirt, In aluk Leather tr ouser s, Bardo Silk tie; Left: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Rebel Skull Link br acelet; Right: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu Br acelet.


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DIESEL Stay jacket; BCBGMAXAZRIA Leather Brim hat; VICTORIA’S SECRET Lace and Satin garter belt.


LIKE A SECOND SKIN

This Season’s Reinterpreted Layering

DIESEL M-Aspic-A Winter jacket; THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring. 78

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PINK TARTAN Fur stole; Left: THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Unity br acelet,Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Leather br acelet; Right:THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Mar ahani bangle, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart The Rebel bangle, Sterling Silver Glam & Soul The Kathmandu br acelet and bangle, Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Zirconia in Mystical Black ring.

Model, Ashtyn/ Sutherland Models; Hair and Makeup, Onn a Chan/ Push Man agement; Art Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


THE NEW FOR- MAL SIMPLIC ITY AND SOPHISTICATION ARE A MODERN MAN’S C HOICE.

PHOTOGRAPHY, VIRGILE REBOUL FASHION DIRECTION,80LUIS ZULAYHKA HERRINGBONE


TIGER OF SWEDEN Liaza jacket & tr ouser s; DIESEL C-Min ax shirt; ALDO Ber arien Patent Leather shoes.

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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TED BAKER Embossed Velvet blazer ; BEN SHERMAN Cashmere Blend Roll Neck jumper ; TIGER OF SWEDEN tr ouser s & handkerchief .

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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TIGER OF SWEDEN Jil suit and shoes;TED BAKER All Over Flor al polo shirt; GUILD EYEWEAR Herbst fr ames


GUILD EYEWEAR Herbst fr ames.


TIGER OF SWEDEN suit.


NEW WAVE Start with SHU UEMURA’s Wonder Worker Lea ve in Conditioner, all over. Blow-out or air dr y the hair until almost dr y; add SHU UEMURA Liquid Fabric Texturizing Spray (and f inish dr ying). Add SHU UEMURA’s Clay Definer Rough Molding Pomade to for m the curls.

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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TIGER OF SWEDEN Hoyt blazer, Herris tr ouser s; BEN SHERMAN Melton Covert Coat, End on End Long Sleeve shirt; EXPRESS Micr o Print shirt; H&M Tie; ALDO Ber arien Patent Leather shoes.

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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TIGER OF SWEDEN Evert tr ouser s & vest, Flor al Print scarf .


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ORIGINAL PENGUIN Eiff el Tower blazer ; TIGER OF SWEDEN Evert tr ouser s & shoes.


MODERN DANDY Apply small amounts of SHU UEMURA’s Shape Paste Sculpting Putty thr oughout the hair while damp. Smooth the hair down in small sections fr om bottom to top. Create a part off-center to achieve the look.


ORIGINAL PENGUIN Eiff el Tower blazer ; TIGER OF SWEDEN Evert tr ouser s & shoes.

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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BEN SHERMAN Harrington Jacket, Winter Paisley shirt; TED BAKER Wool waistcoat, Woven Windowpane scarf; TIGER OF SWEDEN tr ouser s & boots.

A Modern Man’s Choice

THE NEW FORMAL

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Gr ooming, Br odine Rochelle/Judy Inc.; Model, Matt P./Anita Norris Models; Art Direction, Beatriz Juarez. TIGER OF SWEDEN Pitch Leather jacket, tr ouser s; BEN SHERMAN The Window Pane T-shirt & Merino Cardigan knit.


A +

INDIV IDUA L IT Y N EVE R FE LT TH I S G O O D.

O U R TAKE ON AD D I TI ON E L L E ' S S EAS ONAL M U S T- H AVE S.

PHOTOGRAPHY, MIC HAEL KAI YOUNG FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA

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MIC HEL STUDIO Faux Leather Jogger Pant; L&L 100% Suede Moto jacket; L&L Long Sleeve Chenille sweater ; ADDITIONELLE Long Twist Tassel necklace.


A+, INDIVIDUALITY

Never Felt so Good

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BCBGMAXAZRIA Lor n a Faux-Leather Botton-Down jumpsuit, Studded belt; TIGER OF SWEDEN Leather boots, Antonetto

MIC HEL STUDIO Long Ponte coat, Faux Leather Jogger pant, Pleated blouse; SAM EDELMAN Petty Suede Ankle bootie; L&L Velvet Fringe scarf .


KATHERINE BARCLAY Houndstooth coat; MIC HEL STUDIO Sleeveless Faux Suede dress.


A+, INDIVIDUALITY

Never Felt so Good

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A+, INDIVIDUALITY

Never Felt so Good

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MIC HEL STUDIO Bouc lé coat, Emma Curvy BootLeg pant, Peasant with Lace blouse.

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A+, INDIVIDUALITY

Never Felt so Good

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L&L Long Sleeve Poet Blouse. Makeup & Hair, Br odine Rochelle/ Judy Inc.; Model, Meaghan Conr oy/ B&M Models.


WE❤ WiN TER! COLOURFUL AND CHEERFUL, THAT'S HOW WE LIKE OUR SEASONAL MUST-HAVES.


WE WINTER

Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

CALL IT SPRING Borin earrings, $11.99 callitspring.com

ACNE STUDIOS Elga Hair y Dusty Pink coat, $1900 acnestudios.com

TED BAKER Winba Nude Pink watch, $150 tedbaker.com

B aRE NECESSITIES TOMS Luisa Rose Tortoise sunglasses, $179 toms.ca

ACNE STUDIOS Adrian a Tur n Up Dusty Pink sneaker s, $600 acnestudios.com

MIC HAEL, Michael Kor s Leather Star char m, $38 michaelkor s.ca BCBGMAXAZRIA Deven Lucite Box c lutch, $89 bcbgmaxazria.com 109

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WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

GEOX New Igor boots geox.com

TIGER OF SWEDEN Silk Handkerchief , $59 tiger ofsweden.com

ACNE STUDIOS Casey Patch Grey Melange sweatshirt, $270 acnestudios.com

SILVeR LINING

TOMS James Grey Denim sunglasses, $219 toms.ca

TIGER OF SWEDEN Yngve 15 Grey Suede shoes, $209 tiger ofsweden.com THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul necklace, $119 thomassabo.com

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SWIMS Lace Loaf er shoes swims.com


WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

MULBERRY by Mungo & Maud 3cm Dog collar, $130 mulberr y.com CALL IT SPRING Doationg Bordeaux scarf , $24.99 callitspring.com

TED BAKER Maii Textured Leather Cr ossbody bag, $439 tedbaker.com

FINe WINE

ACNE STUDIOS Hover High Gr boots, $1100 acnestudios.com

MULBERRY Clemmie c lutch, $790 mulberr y.com

TIGER OF SWEDEN Stur a Silk tie, $119 tiger ofsweden.com

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BCBGMAXAZRIA Rhiley Cashmere Blend Knit beanie, $73 bcbgmaxazria.com


WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

GEOX U Gektor B Abx shoes geox.com

ACNE STUDIOS Peder Power Setter Green/ Night Blue tie, $160 acnestudios.com

MULBERRY Small Roxette in Mole Grey Shearling Price upon request mulberr y.com

GO GReEN CALL IT SPRING Dr audda Medium Green scarf , $16.98 callitspring.com

GEOX Blenda shoes geox.com

BCBGMAXAZRIA Teardr op Stone Statement earrings, $73 bcbgmaxazria.com BCBGMAXAZRIA Lulu Square Stone Box c lutch, $84 bcbgmaxazria.com 112

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WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

MULBERRY Abstr act Star Neckerchief , $150 mulberr y.com SWIMS Lisa Navy boots swims.com

TIGER OF SWEDEN Opales Tie pin, $55 tiger ofsweden.com

BLUeS HUES ACNE STUDIOS Mads Navy coat, $1950 acnestudios.com

TOMMY HILFIGER Navy gloves, $79 tommy.com

MIC HAEL, Michael Kor s Extr a-Large Pave Fur keychain, $58 michaelkor s.ca

BCBGMAXAZRIA Portia Ostrich Feather c lutch, $248 bcbgmaxazria.com


WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

TIGER OF SWEDEN Ylva Black Shine shoes, $229 tiger ofsweden.com TED BAKER Cascade Flor al Black luggage Available at BLACKBOOK TRAVELCO. blackbooktr avel.co

TIGER OF SWEDEN Moricino Black gloves, $149 tiger ofsweden.com

NOCTURNAL VIB eS TOMS Yvette Clear Black Tortoise sunglasses, $179 toms.ca

MIC HAEL KORS MENS Scott Leather-Trimmed Suede Duff el bag, $880 michaelkor s.ca ACNE STUDIOS Olav Box Black boots, $1400 acnestudios.com

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BCBGMAXAZRIA Envelope c lutch, $160 bcbgmaxazria.com


WE â?¤ WINTER Colourful and Cheerful Must-Haves

ACNE STUDIOS Striped Can ada Dark Grey Mel/Duffle Yellow scarf , $240 acnestudios.com

ACNE STUDIOS Markus Mustard Yellow coat, $950 acnestudios.com

MeLLOW YELLOW

SWIMS Dor a Yellow boots swims.com

TOMS Maverick 401 Honey Tortoise-Satin Gold sunglasses, $199 toms.ca

JENNY BIRD Neith necklace, $125 jennybird.com

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ECCO Haya Mini Cr ossbody bag, $260 ecco.com


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SNAPSHOT

BEST IN SHOW Stress, drama, fun and excitement; the real party is backstage. A sneakpeek at SS16’s colourful fashion’s behind-the-scenes.

Left: Fin alizing details before the show starts at Gareth Pugh’s. Above: Betsey Johnson ’s always encour aging poster s to her staff and models. 116

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STORY HED

BETSEY JOHNSON

Story Dek

BETSEY JOHNSON

Chanelling their inner Charlie ’s Angels at Phillip Lim’s.

ANNA SUI

DESIGUAL

THE BACKSTAGE PARTY IS ALWAYS FILLED WITH COLOURS, TEXTURES, FLOWER FAIRIES AND MULTILAYERED PRINTS.

117

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ONeS TO WaTCH FROM BOLD TO SLEEK, TIMEPIECES THAT BRING YOUR WRIST-GAME TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

EPILOGUE

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118


Fr om left to right: Kinley Pavé Gold-tone Watch, $390; Sawyer Silver-tone and Leather Watch, $390; Over size Br adshaw Silver-tone Watch, $300; Madelyn Pavé Rose Gold-tone and Leather Watch, $355. All MIC HAEL KORS.


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HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

Herringbone Magazine Issue 4  

A convergence point for fashion, style & consumer perceptions. This issue: Transgressing the boundaries of fashion.

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