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SECOND ISSUE

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE EXPANDING THE MALE IDEAL

HOW DID OUR REFLECTION BECOME OUR ENEMY? •WE LOVE SUMMER! IT'S ALL ABOUT COLOUR •TIME TO EDIT SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY STARTS IN YOUR CLOSET •CROSSING THE LINE OUR FAVOURITE TRANSEASONAL LOOKS


HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

A C O N V E RG E N C E P O I N T F O R FA S H I O N, S T Y L E & C O N S U M E R P E RC E P T I O N S . FOLLOW US FACEBOOK.COM/HERRINGBONEMAGAZINE

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EDITORS NOTE The release of the f ir st issue br ought with it a series of satisf actor y news, compliments and as expected... more work. At HERRINGBONE we remain committed to change consumer's perce ptions about diver sity, inc lusivity and sustain ability thr ough creative work. Our core continues to be the r oster of talented contributor s: fr om academics and designer s, to artists and ever y single reader who believes in social and cultur al responsibility. To ever yone who made this second issue possible, we thank you for your collabor ative spirit. To our reader s, we thank you immensely for your support and enthusiasm. We pre pared this new set of stories hoping they'll bring new insights as well as inspir ation. We continue to work towards the expansion and global placement of our publication. We would love to hear fr om you, dr op us a line at info@herringbonemagazine.com

ENJOY THE READ!

LUIS ZULAYHKA

BEATRIZ JUAREZ

FASHION DIRECTOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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OUR COVER

Model, Leonid (Elite Model Management, Toronto) wears a Parachute print long-sleeve shirt, Plectrum by Ben Sherman. Photography, Michael Kai Young; Hair & Makeup, GianLuca Orienti (TRESemmĂŠ Hair/judyinc. com); Fashion Direction, Luis Zulayhka; Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.

CO-FOUNDERS Luis Zulayhka

Fashion Director lzulayhka@herringbonemagazine.com

Beatriz Juarez

Creative Director bjuarez@herringbonemagazine.com www.beatrizjuarezdesign.com

ART DIRECTOR

Corissa Bagan

cbagan@herringbonemagazine.com

Copy Editing & Proofreading Kevin McGowan

General Inquiries

info@herringbonemagazine.com

Our Address

156 Augusta Ave., Kensington Market, Tor onto, ON. M5T 2L4


TABLE OF CONTENTS IN EVERY ISSUE 3 EDITOR’S NOTE 6 CONTRIBUTORS 8 PROFILE STEVEN TAI 14

VIEWPOINT FASHION'S NEW POWER CLICK

18 26 32 34

PROFILE MARIO WAGNER MONOCLE ENRICO NAGEL

VIEW POINT THE SOUND OF SEAMS

VIEW POINT SOME NOTES ON NEWNESS

36 40 52

PROFILE ANDREJ PEJIC

FOCUS RIVAL REFLECTION

VIEW POINT THE CASE FOR FEWER

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(AND BETTER) CLOTHES

PICKS ESSENTIAL LANDSCAPES

60 PREVIEW THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME 110 EPILOGUE FASHION'S FLIGHT OF WHIMSY 112 STOCKISTS

FASHION UNCONVENTIONAL PERCEPTIONS CROSSING THE LINE

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76

78 MODEL CITIZEN 86 SCREEN TEST 88 WE LOVE SUMMER! 98 SHARP FOCUS

FACES BEHIND THE SIDEWALKS

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CONTRIBUTORS

Our amazing creatives

For our second issue, fashion and beauty photographer, Michael Kai Young, helped Herringbone to conceptualize and create our cover story. Working with Michael is such a treat. His eye for sophistication and fashion aesthetic bring magic to our pages. Check out his work in “Unconventional Perceptions” (p. 64).

Ben Barry (@DrBen Barry) and Daniel Drak (@DanielDrak) collaboratively conduct action research and produce creative projects that advance men’s diversity in fashion. We collaborated with them to create the editorial “Rival Reflection” (p. 40). Ben Barry is an Assistant Professor of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the School of Fashion, Ryerson University. He holds a PhD in Management from Judge Business School, University of Cambridge. Daniel Drak is a Master’s candidate at Parsons School of Design, The New School University. He holds an Hons Bachelor of Design from Ryerson University. Ben and Daniel divide their time between Toronto and New York City.

Fashion photographer Andy Lee, captured the striking images in our feature “Rival Reflection” (p. 40) and “Screen Test” (p. 88). His resourcefulness and thoughtful approach permeates every step of his creative process. Inspired by classic Hollywood cinema, Andy aims to photograph a sense of timelessness and alluring beauty in all his assignments.

We had the pleasure to work with Italian makeup artist GianLuca Orienti again. With an original vision and a natural eye for beauty, he brings something unique to all his assignments (besides his great sense of humour). Gianluca has worked with many celebrities and supermodels such as Feist, Sarah Polley, Karen Kain, Coco Rocha, Yasmine Warsame, among many others as well as international brands such as Chanel, Dior, Guerlain, and Burberry. GianLuca also teaches a new generation of artists at Complections College of Makeup Art & Design. You can see his work in our cover story “Unconventional Perceptions” (p. 64) and “Rival Reflection” (p. 40).

Working with model and illustrator Benjamin Edward is always a treat. His perception about the world and his enthusiastic personality makes even the most intricate assignment seems like a creative retreat. For Ben, colours are brighter, highlights are sharper and unfortunate occurrences always have a positive twist. He delighted us with his magic talents in “Essential Landscapes” (p. 55).

Corissa Bagan is our contributing Art Director in another time zone. With experience working in magazines in Toronto and Amsterdam, she has moved to Berlin to pursue creative goals and to build up an arsenal of stories to tell. Corissa has designed and produced a variety of independent and commercial fashion magazines for print and digital landscapes. She is now collecting content for Herringbone in Europe between trips to the market and barbeques in the park with friends. Check out her “Faces behind the sidewalks” story (p. 106).

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CONTRIBUTORS

Our amazing creatives

Demi Kandylis is an artist/technologist who enjoys designing experiences on both on and off-screen and continues to explores ways to bridge the two worlds. He has studied technical mathematics and software development in Austria, attended Vancouver Film School and received a Master’s degree in design from OCAD University. In 2002 he founded SplitElement Inc., a multifaceted experiential design studio based in Toronto, Canada. He’s been a great support to Herringbone since day one and this issue was no exception. His support and guidance made our “Screen Test” (p. 88) story a reality.Demi strives to create meaningful user experiences that are easy to use and beautifully executed.

Illustrator and fashion writer Laura Gulshani dreams of one day moving from her hometown of Mississauga, Ontario to one of the cultural and artistic capitals of the world. Majoring in Fashion Communications at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, she holds a profound love for all things art and design related, as well as a healthy addiction to paint, the Business of Fashion, and anything inspired by Henri Matisse. Laura’s incredible talent as an illustrator landed her a spot on our second issue. You can check out her work in “Fashion’s Flight of Whimsy” (p. 110).

Jane + Jane is a team of twin fashion photographers based in Toronto, Ontario. Their unorthodox working style and their sense of elegance, playfulness and adventure made working on “Sharp Focus” (p.78) a fun and rewarding experience. They have a very collaborative approach, and want every part of their work not to be great, but perfect. Fashion people, beware, for this team, nothing is impossible.

Ryan Payne has recently returned from speaking in Auckland New Zealand about online fashion videos and how to create digital engagement. Using optometric and biometric tools to track how people respond to fashion videos with Google glasses, fMRI machines and a host of other tools, Ryan is piecing together the puzzle of how our bodies react when viewing the newest fashions dancing across the screen. In this issue, Ryan explores digital addiction, dopamine surging and the current state of online engagement in “Fashion’s New Power Click” (p. 14) and the art of music in fashion shows in “The Sound of Seams” (p. 32). Ryan is writing a travel book and consults with fashion brands emerging to the international market.

Now a regular in our team of contributors, makeup artist Onna Chan keeps inspiring us with her work; Whether her asignment is print, advertising, editorial, a music video, or a television interview in HD, Onna seamlessly adjusts her technique to the individual and is an experienced team player. She makes every woman look and feel beautiful in their own skin. You can check Onna’s work in “Sharp Focus” (p. 78)

Growing up, Kevin McGowan wanted nothing more than to become a copy editor. Now, his childhood dream has come true...just kidding! Editing may be an intricate and labour intensive assignment, but it is necessary to make a publication shine. Kevin is thrilled to get the chance to help Herringbone secure it’s place in the industry. Not being from a fashion background at all, the opportunity to work on a fashion publication has truly opened his eyes to its many, many, many facets. Here’s to working on more issues in the future and helping others open their eyes to the interesting subject of fashion and consumer perceptions.

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STEVEN TAI

Weaving Fashion’s Future Landscapes

PROFILE


STEVEN

A T Weaving fashion’s future landscapes.

I INTERVIEW BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ

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STEVEN TAI

Weaving Fashion’s Future Landscapes

C

anadian-born, London-based design sensation Steven Tai is a storyteller; ever since winning the Chloé Award at the Hyéres Festival in 2012, and after successful artistic collaborations, he has set to question fashion narratives in favour of a more experimental and experiential language, challenging marketability and wearability. We had the pleasure to interview Steven and talk about the lessons learned and wisdom earned.

Designer Steven Tai

Steven, when did you know you wanted to be a designer? Actually, it happened quite late in my life, when I finished my first bachelor at UBC. I just finished my degree in Commerce and I realized that I was interested in doing something more creative. At the same time, my friend introduced me to Central Saint Martins and style.com. At that time, it really blew my mind because it allowed such easy access to the world of fashion and its ability to create a fantastical world really captured me. What is your most cherished fashion memory from childhood? I am not sure if this is a “fashion” memory but I remember growing up in high school and I felt like clothing really gave people confidence. It also gave a sense of community and identity which as a teenager it was definitely something I craved. I suppose this was to me, my earliest memory of paying attention to clothes and its functions beyond utilitarian purposes. What is the most valuable lessons learned from Central Saint Martins. Keep your skin thick, take the criticism, and be a mastermind at problem solving. What are your main cultural influences? I think it’s a real melting pot of modern pop culture, Japanese manga, vintage Parisian fashion and my nerdy personality. Tell us about your design process? It often starts with an intensive textile research via experimentations and textile agencies. Once we have an idea of the mood and feelings I want to set for the collection, we start developing the story and the proportions for the season. From there, it is a back and forth between textiles and pattern cutting. Where do you typically find inspiration for your materials and how long do you allow for research? We look everywhere really. It’s lucky that I get to travel so much because it keeps me engaged in my surroundings and I get to explore odd places for material inspirations. For the textile research, it can take up to 2 months before I decide on our final technique. You’ve gained experience at Stella McCartney, Viktor & Rolf, Hussein Chalayan among others, what are the best lessons you’ve learned? Get it done quick and don’t ask too many unnecessary questions. You love to experiment with textiles and procedures, how do you balance “wearability”when conceptualizing a collection? I think a lot of the consideration for wearability involves keeping the shape simple. Also, there is a lot of research into garment constructions and finishings so that at the end of the process we have a fully function and practical garment. There is a strong narrative and thematic conception in your work. Can you tell us a bit about the stories behind them? I love storytelling. I believe each collection is a way to tell a story or an idea. I enjoy reviewing the collections because it allows me to relive the feelings and beliefs that I was in at that time.

“I LOVE STORYTELLING. I BELIEVE EACH COLLECTION IS A WAY TO TELL A STORY OR AN IDEA.”

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For SS14, Steven looked at computer glitches and the new interest of using them as art. “It was really interesting to see the a ppreciation of mechanical err or s and its popularisation. Fr om there we went explored pixelation art and inter preted with textiles we developed in square motifs that echoed pixels. We combined the square laser cut pieces with silk screening techniques to create textiles with diff erent de pths�, Steven explains.

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Playing with diff erent textures, printing techniques and surf aces to create diff erent lansca pes are Steven Tai’s sign ature. His work is a f uturistic and playf ul vision, a fr agmented world come together in one piece. Here his AW13 collection.


STEVEN TAI

Weaving Fashion’s Future Landscapes

What does the word “craft” mean to you? Traditionally, I believe ‘craft’ can be thought of as homemade and perhaps a bit substandard. With technological development and with the trend of reverting back to the appreciation of artisanal work, I believe there can be a higher level of quality in crafted work. This is something we try to achieve whenever we create a textile in-house. We want to make sure we can create something on our own but bring the standard of this home ‘craft’ to a new level of quality. Do you think craft is becoming more or less significant in the fashion industry? I believe the importance of craft is more significant than ever. There is a spontaneity in craft that sometimes just can’t be achieved when working with textile mills. I feel that many London designers take inspiration from this DIY approach. How do you balance experimental work with marketability? Are there tensions between the innovative and commercial aspects of your work? Always. That is something we are still figuring out! I have learned a lot over the seasons and I have started appreciating the challenge of taking an experimental idea to a marketable state. It is definitely a learning process and that is why it keep this intriguing. Tell us what is your approach when collaborating with other talented artists such as Lily Kamper and Lola Dupré? We always enjoy collaborations with other artists/designers. It gives us a chance to do something beyond our usual designs and allow us to join our ideas together. With Lily Kamper, we were able to take her beautiful jewellery and modify it as the hardware for a backpack we designed for SS14. With Lola Dupré, we sent her an image we took of the Eden Project and she collaged it into many square pieces that echoed our SS14 pixelation theme. We then also worked on a capsule jumper collection where we selected some of our favourite Lola collages and worked on each print to create a reinterpretation of her artwork in various jumpers. What are your opinions about sustainability and how do you integrate it as common practice? Does the concept have a place in your development process? Growing up in Vancouver definitely had a strong influence on how I think. It is a very eco-conscious city and therefore it is always on the forefront of my mind when we work. It is definitely something we thrive to achieve, from the selection of materials to our daily operation. With whom have you had the most memorable knowledge exchange in your history as a designer and what was it? I would say working with the design duo at BLESS. Desiree Heiss and Ines Kaag were really open for interns to have a creative voice in the environment and I think in terms of creative exchange, I felt like that was where I got to really stretch my knowledge. What are the most powerful lessons you’ve learned outside school? You have to keep going. If you stop, everything else stops. How can we harness the power that clothing exerts in ways that alter our daily actions to even change society if possible? I think clothing can give confidence to its wearer. Although, I am not sure if it can change society directly... If you have to choose only one way you would like to move forward, what would it be? To make sure the entire team will always have fun while working together.

“THERE IS SPONTANEITY IN CRAFT THAT SOMETIMES JUST CAN’T BE ACHIEVED WHEN WORKING WITH TEXTILE MILLS.”

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FASHION’S NEW

Power Click

VIEW POINT

FASHION’S NEW

POWER CLICK FOCUS!

We dare you to read this whole article without clicking away. (We believe in you!) TEXT BY RYAN PAYNE


FASHION’S NEW

Power Click

2.6 SECONDS. That is how long it takes a nontech savvy millennial to consider using a form of technology to solve a problem, according to a study through Yale University. That is approximately the same amount of time it takes for 10 babies around the world to be born, a Porsche Spyder 918 to go from 0 to 62MPH and the average person to blink twice. To phrase this differently: it is shorter than the time you have been reading this article. These statistics for speed pale in comparison to those who instantly, even before thinking it seems, grab their phone to solve a problem at .34 seconds. This is what I call “digitally addicted”. Saying the world is online and addicted to technology is trite. Where once only business tycoons had cell phones, not owning one today comes across as a statement or an anomaly. In Canada, it recently emerged that 25% of kids in grade 4 have cell phones. Mobile devices are our alarm clocks, our weather reports when we dress in the morning, our navigation when planning trips and our connection to family and friends in the next room or around the world. Cell phones have become a part of the body and extension of the self. It is no surprise that fashion and retail companies are working to be online and part of our digital lives, integrating—and providing—what we use daily, with a branded polish and crafted aesthetic. Yet, as a retailer, creating an online experience that is unique and engaging is becoming increasingly challenging. There is a flood of online content. With a cellphone and a bit of creativity anybody today can create an online brand, with an engaging social media campaign. These days, the line between professional and amateur seems blurred by those who change and those who don’t. In the Fall/Winter 2014 Burberry show, the brand used roughly 20 iPhone 5s to film the entire event. Right in the middle of the pit of the best professional photographers in the world were two cellphones on a board streaming the entire event internationally for all Burberry stores and customers to watch live. This speaks volumes to where the world of Burberry is heading: towards mobile engagement. Further, as models walked down the runway, you could click and buy items (forget about waiting for photos to be uploaded to the company’s website). This places a demand on fashion brands to no longer just take a good photograph, but rather as is trending in campaigns today: to use storytelling through access to exclusive people, locations and backstage events in order to keep the aspirational quality of brands alive. You can see backstage at a Dolce & Gabbana show almost anywhere, but only with their in-house


FASHION’S NEW

Power Click

publication Swide can you learn Italian gestures from the male models prepping to walk the catwalk. With this need to connect and engage, simple photos are becoming a dying breed. Following the path of the newspaper and radio to the six o’clock news, online photography is being replaced with online videos. With multiple senses stimulated, watching videos has become more captivating for a daily commute or even just for sitting and cocooning in front of a computer. However, this new level of engagement with video lowers the intellectual threshold to create content by allowing actions and sights (the medium moreso than the message) to create the experience. This is a passive recreation compared to viewing photographs, which is mentally demanding. Active engagement is required to process photographs and to think about what is being visually presented. Written poems of the past are videos that only a few million people have discovered. Twitter and Vine present even shorter content and a much larger audience. Forget the grammar, the sentence structure and sadly the concise speech 140 character’s demands; now you get six seconds to ramble.

In his research, Wilson discovered that the chemical pathways used while surfing the web for pornography (or looking over the latest Steven Tai collection), are the same pathways and chemicals used by our natural cavemen hunter/gather primal states. While clicking through websites, each new image brings a surge— super or slight—of dopamine, the chemical which causes happiness and relief in the body. Each new discovery delivers the happy feeling we enjoy when we accomplishing something. However, we also set our body up to require new stimuli to cause the same or a bigger surge in order for us to feel that happy kick again. Dopamine is also the same chemical cocaine reacts upon inside the body, causing a relieving and euphoric state. Whether at a fashion show or in a relationship, you have other senses stimulated: smell, touch, taste, and sound provide new discoveries, while online, these are all muted and the sense of sight is heightened, requiring more input to keep us content. You can see where this is headed: sitting stationary in front of a computer, just clicking, our body is focused upon discovering the next image, as that is where the only sense of stimulus comes from. Over time, the dopamine surges from discovering more images result in the formation of the binge chemical Delta FosB, which is how cravings in the body are formed. Delta FosB is the same chemical found in those addicted to eating, smoking, gambling and drinking. It acts upon the body’s synapses to create misfiring neurons which trigger clenching and irritation. Click click click, each firing of dopamine provides a temporary relief, causing neural pathways to form and over time create these pathways semi-permanently, preprogramming us to click and search for things. At times, people are so hungry for stimulus they don’t even consider what they are immersed with as they try to appease their bodies’ “curiosity”. Our willpower is eroded away through this self neuro-programming. Our body is on a dopamine rollercoaster, needing more stimulus to be engaged, giving in to more mental stimulation, temporarily relieving our curiosity and permanently affecting the way we think over time. Mentally working through a problem—similar to the dentist—can be painful, yet it is required for long term health (I suggest you put down the cellphone calculator next time you need to calculate a 30% discount and the cost after tax). This brings us to another equally important subject. With a multitude of images (with each photo being edited to perfection and videos being more engaging than ever), does each swish of the finger and click on a video clip reinforce issues of unachievable

FA S H I O N A N D P O R N O G R A P H Y Both fashion and pornographic images are designed to be highly engaging and, often, to create aspiration on the part of the viewer through portraying an unachievable ideal. It is no surprise that, in 2000, a study by Eric Koukounas and Ray Over showed that men were uninterested in pictures of nude women after the third or fourth time seeing them, fashion or pornographic. Any set of images would cause boredom after awhile. However, a follow up study by Gary Wilson (the host of the website www.yourbrainonporn. com), found another reason as to why online fashion images and videos are becoming flipped through repetitively and at such an incessant rate.

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FASHION’S NEW

body ideals at a deeper level or faster rate than before? Videos, which captivate people’s imaginations with sound and motion, now project for its viewers the “ideal” model body in a new engaging method that is too consuming to look away from, no matter the consequence. Bringing this back to online engagement with fashion videos, have you Googled one since the start of this article? It has been over two minutes, so it is likely that a millennial will have multitasked or switched focus at least once by now. In the early days of fashion videos, inspirational music with a model shot at different angles was the common look. In 2011 everybody from Versace and Pringle of Scotland to magazines like Dazed were creating these stylized videos. Through exploratory and inspirational avant-garde films, each brand attempted to personify themselves. However, over a few seasons, it was realized that these videos were not being thought of as fashion films. This was due (at the beginning) to rapid distribution of these fashion films through sharing sites such as YouTube. By using sharing sites, fashion films became intermixed between other art films, mentally grouping and therefore being viewed (or judged) by audiences the same way as regular films. It is for this reason that fashion brands, over the past three years, are beginning to use their websites as platforms for their content. The opening pages of a brand have become a “decompression zone”, separating their site from the web and from the user’s life. The popular films of the past have reemerged as the introduction to an experience, and are not expected to be the entire experience. Brands are creating custom experiences for users. Burberry’s online website experience, Burberry World, customizes the experience and the user’s navigation based upon past viewing history of the consumer. If the last time you were online you shopped

OUR WILLPOWER IS ERODED AWAY THROUGH THIS SELF NEURO-PROGRAMMING.

Power Click

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for a trench-coat, browsed their Art of the Trench image gallery and/or rendered a 3D trench-coat in their online lab, the next time you launch their website, a trench-coat will be on the front page, hovering for a few extra seconds before the next garment is showcased. Inside Burberry garments, RFD tags are sewn to help connect with the store’s CRM technology and enhance the store experience. No longer is a store static, but the walls show products that match what you are wearing; “sales associates” know your name, size and past shopping history and suggest items you may be interested in. Consumers are no longer segmented by demographics or psycho-graphics; today, retailers target behavioural shopping tribes. Mobile apps for our phones are a way to personalize the experience—a device that beeps and flashes to create some excitement for every consumer—at the custom level without forcing people to carry a clip or pager, like a device to be tracked. But, just as it happened with the integration of speed and imagery that created online “fashion addicts”, will the in-store experience with a mobile shopping app provide a rapid interaction as well as captivate our attention? On the one side, we can foresee the growth of flagship stores trying to create experiences that can overload our senses. However, trying to construct every store internationally to be full of shiny objects and experiences would be too costly. Over time, will we see stores pull out of local malls while only big flagships exist? I wonder if, as we are running around with our eyes glued to our cellphones and our fingers swiping to the next image as we “walk” through a store, does this remove the greatest asset of a retail experience, its people? How will people be utilized in the future? And as the online fashion worlds develop, will it integrate or infuriate our lives? Will I have to listen to this year’s hit boy-band at length because they partnered with my favourite jean company? Will every store become the same while personalities of the world are drafted in corporate boardrooms, with only those who risk their retail jobs actually able to show personality? At what point will we lose our chance to be a person of free will and become just a different selection of the options put before us? Only time will tell what happens to online addictions; men are having pornfree months to readjust their minds, and maybe fashionistas will follow suit. Pornography led and propelled the development of the camera (and of circulating magazines). Who knows, it might lead to digital addiction rehabilitation too. I am clicking online to find the answer. @Ryanpaynetweets


PROFILE

MARIO WAGNER: THE ART OF JUXTAPOSITION INTERVIEW BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ


MARIO WAGNER

Illustr ation created for Cosmopolitan Magazine, on women losing their intuition.

The Art of Juxtaposition

Piece for the “Space//For m”exhibition in Portland at Breeze Block Galler y. Pa per collage and acr ylic color on wood.

MARIO WAGNER IS NOT NEW TO THE ART WORLD, he is one of the most respected artists in contemporary collage today. Using canvas, acrylic and old magazines, he transports us to an orderly, new dimension inside an already fabricated, chaotic world. With an amazing list of clients (from Vogue, Esquire, Men’s Health, Der Spiegel, Le Monde to Adidas, Mercedes Benz and Absolut Vodka) he stretches the lines where immediacy and imagination collide. His work has an elegance and sincerity that doesn’t require much of an explanation. A mix of hipnotic digital abstraction and reality.

How did the artist and illustrator come about? This will sound a bit cliché but I think becoming an artist is nothing you choose; it chooses you. I spent many years working very hard both in the studio drawing and painting and on the computer honing my design skills. I still recall my teacher in high school trying to discourage me from going to university to study art. Sometimes I wonder if that same teacher has seen my illustrations or the Absolut campaign including the commercial I was featured in which aired on German television. I grew up in a small town and did not feel supported as an artist or designer. It wasn’t until I was at university that I really felt part of a community of like-minded creative people. Some artists find going to art school a boring challenge; some others think it necessary. I went to school in Aachen, Germany­— just near the border of Belgium and the Netherlands. I actually enjoyed going to art school. It was also a chance for me to get out into the world and be amongst people with the same interests. I used my study time to experiment and work a lot. I had a chance to be as creative as possible because there were not many deadlines in the classic sense (and no clients). I think you value those times even more after you leave school and start working. I had established a very strong work ethic for myself

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Illustr ation created for Vogue Italy/Casa Vogue

“I’M RARELY SATISFIED WITH WHAT I CREATE. I LOVE SEEING IT COME TOGETHER, BUT AFTER I’M DONE WITH IT I LOSE INTEREST IN THE WORK ITSELF.”

when I was studying. I still try to keep a little time to myself to experiment and try to develop new ideas. I am actually considering a MFA program in the near future. I would like to challenge myself and see where my limits are now and overcome those. There is always one assignment that helps you break into the industry... The art director of an innovative German music magazine at the time called SPEX approached me me at my diploma show to do some illustrations for them. So I ended up doing a cover illustration on Sigur Ros and afterwards was introduced to the band, that was really a highlight! Thats was my foot in the door of the illustration/ design industry. After that initial exposure magazines started contacting me and things started to roll. Why collage? In art school, I worked with pencil creating drawings that were dark and fantastical. I did long picture stories in black and white and simply tired of it after a while. I finished a 400-page story and decided to move on after that. I wanted to work in a more straight-forward fashion with colours and not a story over many pages anymore. I am also very impatient at times so working on one discrete image versus a story was very satisfying. I always loved DADA and 20

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MARIO WAGNER

The Art of Juxtaposition

Mario has created a series of scarves based on his aesthetic and a series inspired by glitches. “The glitch is def initely art and f ashion, which to me, are c loser together than f ashion and illustr ation. I like to r andomly deconstr uct something and create something beautif ul in the pr ocess”.

russian artists like Rodchenko. I admired the simplicity of Bauhaus design, so I was attracted to collage as a medium when I was still at university. At first I bought a bunch of old books and magazines and gave it a try. That was about 14 years ago. Nowadays you see mixed-media digital collage combined with bright colours everywhere. It’s crazy how it took off in the last few years. I keep thinking I will tire of collage but theres always a way to reinterpret things. Is it a natural process for an artist to keep evolving... I’m rarely satisfied with what I create. I love the process of creating and seeing it come together but after I’m done with it I lose interest in the work itself. I don’t have a problem at all with selling it or even painting over pieces. I do it all the time.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

A sample of the multiple silk scarves Mario has created. The experimentation with new meanings and materials exemplif ies the ver satility and strength of his work.


MARIO WAGNER

The Art of Juxtaposition

How does everything come together in your brilliant mind? It depends on whether its a job for a client or just for myself. For clients, there is always a more-or-less strict corset that I have to fit my work in somehow; which is a lot of fun and challenging at the same time. For my own work I set the parameters and that gives you, of course, more freedom but sometimes also too many possibilities. But in general I get creative when I’m bored. It’s fun for me to see things come together and to develop. In my own work its poses a particular challenge because you have to decide when its done or not and I often need to rely on a gut instinct. Mario Wagner’s art philosophy...Work hard, experiment, allow the subconscious mind to communicate and translate that into something visually compelling. Trying different materials and surfaces—as you did with a beautiful series of scarves—is that a natural step in your evolution as an artist... I’ve been always fascinated by Hermès scarves, not necessarily the mo-

“THIS WILL SOUND A BIT CLICHÉ, BUT I THINK BECOMING AN ARTIST IS NOTHING YOU CHOOSE; IT CHOOSES YOU”.

Collage created for ART.COM’s pop-up shop tif—some of them are just too old-fashioned for my taste—but I love the vibrant colors. Since I can’t expect a call by the artistic directors of the house anytime soon, I decided to do my own design and get them printed. And yes, It was also the ongoing interest in new projects, different materials. Unfortunately time and the cost of materials prevent me from bringing many of my grander schemes into fruition. Do you have an specific criteria when you create them? I played around with designs a couple of years ago. I put them aside for a while, but it was nagging me all the time. One day, I walked by a Hermès shop window and I thought I should give it a shot. I’m still working with repeat patterns and strange scenes as the focal points while toying with the way the fabric moves. I am still in the expe rimental phase. Your perfect day is... I like to get up early, have a relaxed breakfast with my wife and our dog, go for a run, later for a bike ride or to the city, browse around, let the day simply go by and discover new things, go to a local museum, share good food with friends. To me it is important to be in the moment. I feel as a generation we are living too much in the future or in the past.

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MARIO WAGNER

The Art of Juxtaposition

A sequence created for Mario’s latest show at Hashimoto Contempor ar y in San Fr ancisco. He got inspired by the simple and slow things we do ever yday. Although meditative and calming, it shows the meaningless re ps we experience in our lif etime. You can check the animated ver sion at http://www.mario-wagner.com/HASHIMOTO-CONTEMPORARY

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Fr om the Secret Garden series.

MONOCLE

ENRICO NAGEL:

THE MADNESS

OF PHOTOS


ENRICO NAGEL AND I MET BACK IN 2010. I was living in Berlin at the time. He would come to my apartment to collect my monthly rent. He was always an elusive and somber character, conversation was not easy. One day, I decided to knock on his apartment door for a random domestic inquiry. Little did I know I was living beneath an artist. That first peek at his apartment was really eye-opening. His kitchen floor was completely covered with magazine clippings and tons of images were scattered all over the place. Surreal characters started taking shape among the chaos of this textured and colourful landscape that contrasted with the sobriety of his old and dark furniture. When Enrico is asked what made him choose art as a career path he answers plainly that he never consciously decided to ‘become’ an artist; “It just happened” he says. Even as a child he was the top of his art class in school; he even showed a lot of interest in making collages back then. After finishing school, he decided he wanted to do an apprenticeship as a model maker, but couldn’t find a placement in Germany, making his first job—at the age of 16— in a gallery in Berlin. This job introduced Enrico to Berlin’s art world at a really exciting time; he was exposed to new and conceptual work when the city was starting to emerge as an art world hub. This influenced the choices that would define his career. Before doing collages (his most influencial and defining technique), he did a lot of painting, drawing and photography. With the latter, he creTEXT BY BEATRIZ JUAREZ ated little installations, creating in a way “three-dimensional collages”, which will become a signature in his actual work. Enrico describes working with collage as a great way of playing with composition and meaning. His work has a sense of anonymity, almost a “science-fiction” quality and aesthetic. His main focus is on the subject’s body, leaving the backgrounds as merely contextual elements. Because he doesn’t like his subjects to be recognizable in his work, Enrico tends to alter the heads of the figures he uses. Morphing these characters by giving them odd objects as heads, is a signature of his pieces. The important aspect in this process is that they still have a natural look, “like an organism, just not one we are familiar with” he explains.

SYNTHESIS 27

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STORY HED

Story Dek

“When I start working, I’ ll take some time to f igure out which questions are most urgent to me, both visually and conce ptually. That def ines the focus of each new series”.

Fr om the Secret Garden series.

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ENRICO NAGEL

The Madness of Photosynthesis

A piece fr om the Russian Stories series.

In order to keep evolving as an artist, he gets inspiration from science fiction movies and old storybooks from flea markets. Sometimes images from his dreams will translate into his work. His creative space is described by him as a “Collage-Factory”. He sits at a long table and works on several pieces at the time. This gives him the right headspace to express himself and helps him figure out endless compositions and eventually pick the ones that feel right. The main objective, is to create something beautiful, a narrative in which colours and shapes create the right amount of excitement. His creative process is to multitask. Working on several projects at a time allows him to work in series, and sometimes this will have him working on 5 to 10 pieces at once. He describes his process in a simple way: “I play around with composition, shape and meaning. Some days I like making brutal stuff, other days I just want to cut out flowers. It depends on my mood”. Fashion is a current theme in his work; when asked about this synergy he says “ I think my work often feeds off the idea of fashion in the sense that it is all about surface, about attraction, desire, dreams, youth, beauty and something slightly sinister—fashion will always be important to my work”.

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Illustr ation for Harpers Bazaar magazine.

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ENRICO NAGEL

The Madness of Photosynthesis

A portr ait of the artist.

An hypnotic image fr om his Spectral series.

When asked about his art philosophy and how he determines the character in his series, he explains there is always a thread running through his work. “When I start working, I’ll take some time to figure out which questions are most urgent to me, both visually and conceptually. That defines the focus of each new series”. He collects images that he wants to work with in advance. Sometimes, struck by an image, will find some lead to other ones. If something really holds his attention, it is a good indication of the conceptual area he needs to explore. Needless to say, he collects a lot of images, making him a little bit of an “archivist”. Enrico has a very deep connection with his city. When asked about it’s influence in his work he says it flatly: “Mein Herz für schlägt Berlin” (My heart beats for Berlin). This city is always on the move. Born and raised in this city, he still finds it to be an amazing place full of creativity and inspiration. And I couldn’t agree more, after all, who has the luxury to get such an amazing artist knocking on your door to collect the monthly rent?

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THE SOUND OF SEAMS

Thoughts from the DJ Booth

VIEW POINT

THOUGHTS FROM THE DJ BOOTH

D N U S O S M e A th E S f o AFTER EACH FASHION SEASON, one of the more prominent markers of a

TEXT BY RYAN PAYNE

show’s success among insiders becomes how many people are wondering what song was playing to the collection. In a world where everybody has access to a photograph of the show, experiencing it through music becomes the new marker of status. It was Karl Lagerfeld who once said that fashion and music are the same and it is a testament to how close the two industries have become. As a designer and creator, being remembered either by the clothing you designed or the music you played in the show means you have created a memorable moment. As keeping people’s attention becomes progressively more difficult, creating an unforgettable experience without extra gimmicks becomes a greater accomplishment. This is nothing new. The sound of music to a fashion show has always been a significant part of the spectacle. As early as the 1910s, artists and couturiers collaborated to the point where the boundary between the worlds of music and fashion was creatively blurred. Lady Duff Gordon, known by her fashion pseudonym Lucile, is credited for being the first designer to incorporate music into her fashion show in 1904. How does this necessary process of collaboration between designers and musical artists take place? As stated by professional sound designer Rene Arsenaul in an interview with The Business of Fashion, “In a movie, you have someone who can push the plot along verbally. But [in fashion], music and clothes are your whole plot”. Arsenault has worked on soundtracks for Tom Ford since his time at Gucci. Depending on the designer, “the journey to fashion soundtracks like these begins anywhere from two months to a few days before the show,” adds Michel Gaubert (sound designer for Chanel and other fashion houses). The initial inspiration for a soundtrack often ranges from moodboards to clothing samples. “Sometimes it’ll be a musical reference, sometimes it’ll be a film reference, or I’ll have been shown [something] more abstract, like art or sculpture”. There are other less orthodox methods as well. Producers in London talk about collaborations and mutually reaching out to each other (which in the PR world is code for not telling). In New York, houses often ask interns to source music from the atelier staff’s playlists, while friends at Versace talk about how the hit by Atlanta rap trio Migos (Offset, Quavo and Takeoff) with Medusa became too big not to use.

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THE SOUND OF SEAMS

Thoughts from the DJ Booth

NOTABLE TRACKS FROM THIS YEAR ON THE RUNWAY: “The key is to find the musical cornerstone of the collection — that one piece that really exemplifies and speaks for the designer,” Arsenault mentions. “That’s the piece that either opens the show, closes the show, or is the main theme of the show. Once we have that, then it’s about approaching it like a soundtrack and varying the theme a little bit. Not introducing anything that’s so drastically different from what we’ve already agreed upon, but maybe something that takes it down, takes it a little bit to the left, a little bit to the right. You want to start with a statement that typifies what the designer is trying to say. When the first girl walks out, it’s got to be pretty obvious. The job is to make everything flow together and DKNY: sound like a styled soundtrack.” Pa pa Roach vs Rihann a, In Canada, Ryan Martel, also known as DJ Ryan Playground, is helping shape Rude Boy Resort runway moments for designers such as Travis Taddeo. She sets out to create an RICK OWENS: experience that changes how people view the event. “People expect just another Richelle, Circular Motions show of moody music and models,” said Martel, which she can claim with author2025; The Funk Out, ity. She produced music for roughly half of this past World MasterCard Fashion Big Dick (Will Bailey Remix); week in Toronto including major shows, all while travelling for her Canadian tour Christeene, Fix My Dick circuit. “Dark and edgy” are words she often hears from many designers, yet she says she “tries to see inside their vision and create something that captures your JEREMY SCOTT: attention and makes you feel something.” The Beastie Boys, Girls Martel has a blast working with Canadian designers because they understand that songs need to have “steps and hooks to hold people in the moment,” and they BAND OF OUTSIDERS: Fion a Apple, Hot Knife allow her to source music that she likes, rather than attempting to control the full process as Burberry does with their all-British lineups including Tom Odell and TRAVIS TADDEO: Paloma Faith. Inspiration for her tracks often comes from people she works with, Ryan Playgr ound, Matinee such as Mr. Carmack, Jacuzzi, The Ninety’s, So Yu Koi, and from drinking bubble tea. “I love bubble tea!” she confessed. “What’s not to love?” If that’s what gets her creative juices flowing, more power to the fruit and tapioca! According to the executive producer of the Shows, Paola Fullerton, a coordinated message is key. “Match the music with the collection. If a collection doesn’t have a strong look to it, you need to go happy so people can enjoy what they are experiencing, at least.” Music plays a significant role in consumer behaviour. “THE KEY IS TO Marketers and designers know that music is an effective FIND THE MUSICAL tool in the process of consumerism. There have been multiple instances where performing artists have created CORNERSTONE OF music specifically and exclusively for the use of a fashion show. This happens when the fashion and marketing THE COLLECTION mandate of the brand and the show become very specific. — THAT ONE PIECE And, of course, there is the live perfomance. Some of the hundreds of examples include St. Vincent performing at THAT REALLY Amex Unstaged Diane Von Furstenberg Fashion Show EXEMPLIFIES AND 2014, and in 2013, Karl Lagerfeld invited Chromatics to provide the live soundtrack for the runway show for his SPEAKS FOR Spring/Summer 2013 Chanel collection in Paris. And let THE DESIGNER.” us not forget when Bebel Gilberto sang “Another Brick in The Wall” by Pink Floyd at the Carlos Miele Spring/Summer 2010 collection in New York City. The collaboration of music and fashion has become an intricate game. Fashion industry leaders are tapping into the emotive powers of music to lure us all: editors, buyers and consumers. To fall in love with their brands and collections one sound bit at a time and that, is music to their ears.

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VIEW POINT THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT WAYS IN WHIC H ONE CAN USE THE TERM “NEW”: FIRST, AS THE FRESH OR NEWLY CREATED; SECOND, AS THE IMPROVED OR INNOVATIVE; THE THIRD, AS THE UNFAMILIAR OR NOVEL, FASHION STRIVES FOR ALL THREE...

“FASHION IS ABOUT GOING AHEAD, NOT ABOUT MEMORY.” — KARL LAGERFELD

SOME NOTES ON NEWNESS (OR THE #1 PRINCIPLE IN FASHION). R

ON ISTENCE AS IT S N I L A I N S O FA R ENTR N C O I A H S S I A F E T. T H E R I S O N LY R A N S I E N L I T Y. F A S H I O N T E N B E S O R I G I NA S SVEND ION IS T O F F A S H N T H U N T F O R O R WA R D S .— L A R E R U T A THE N VING FO C O N S TA E OF MO T I O N, A L A B V A O P N A N C I IS ADICAL

The principle that fuels our industry, also rips it apart. How can we change the perceptions of “newness” in fashion and still be fresh, responsible and socially involved?

“IF WE ACCEPT THAT THE PACE OF FASHION TODAY WAS PART OF THE PROBLEM BEHIND THE DECLINE OF JOHN GALLIANO, THE DEMISE OF ALEXANDER MCQUEEN AND THE CAUSE OF OTHER WELL-KNOWN REHAB CLEANUPS, NONSTOP SHOWS SEEM A HIGH PRICE TO PAY FOR THE ENDLESS “NEWNESS” DEMANDED OF FASHION NOW.”

— ­ SUZIE MENKES

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“PART OF FASHION IS NEWNESS. IT’S GOT TO BE A NEW COMBINATION OF ELEMENTS THAT’S SHOCKING, STUNNING AND BEAUTIFUL ALL AT THE SAME TIME.

“CREATION TAKES THINGS FORWARD. WITHOUT ANYTHING NEW THERE IS NO PROGRESS. CREATION EQUALS NEW” —REI KAWAKUBO

BUT IT DOESN’T HAVE ANY EMOTION.” -TOM FORD

RENEWING: CAN WE CREATE A SET

THE PERCEPTION OF NEWNESS IS AN IMPORTANT PART OF THE CONSUMPTION EXPERIENCE BECAUSE IT CREATES SHORT-TERM VALUE. THREE FACTORS CREATE THE PERCEPTION OF NEWNESS: SITUATIONAL PRODUCT INVOLVEMENT, A SENSE THAT THE PRODUCT IS PRISTINE, AND PHYSICAL POSSESSION. —AIMEE DINNIN

OF NEW SOCIETAL VALUES TOWARDS RENEWING RESOURCES? THE POWER OF THE NEW LIES IN UNCOVERING THE POTENTIAL OF ALREADY EXISTING RESOURCES. NEWNESS CAN BE RENEWABLE. —KATE FLETCHER

“A FASHION OBJECT DOES NOT NEED ANY PARTICULAR QUALITIES APART FROM BEING NEW. THE PRINCIPLE OF FASHION IS TO CREATE AN EVER-INCREASING VELOCITY, TO MAKE AN OBJECT SUPERFLUOUS AS FAST AS POSSIBLE, TO LET THE NEW ONE HAVE A CHANCE”.-L.S.

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CAN THE CONCEPTS OF FRESHNESS, IMPROVEMENT AND NOVELTY BE INTEGRATED IN OUR FASHION PRODUCTION CYCLES TO RE-CREATE NEWNESS? CAN WE WORK TOWARDS C HANGING OUR OWN PERCEPTIONS ON RENEWABLE MATERIALS AS THEY’LL STRIKE CONSUMERS AS NOVELTIES? LET’S CONSIDER THAT “OLD” MAY STILL BE UNFAMILIAR TO THE PERSON ENCOUNTERING THE RENEWED PRODUCT....


PROFILE

ANDREJ

J

PE IC BENDING METAL O U R C O N V E R SAT I O N W I T H P E J I C A B O U T H E R J E W E L L E RY C O L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H SA M H . S N Y D E R A N D P O L I NA G U R TOVAYA I N S U P P O R T O F L G B T YO U T H .

TEXT BY LUIS ZULAYKHA


All the pieces have been created thr ough a multi-ste p pr ocess: fr om conce ption, to design, printing, molding, casting, polishing, packaging and f inishing, each piece is handled by between 10-20 people.

OW DID THE IDEA FOR THIS COLLABORATION COME TO BE? Sam H. Snyder and his wife, Polina, are both jewellery designers and specialize in 3D printing in New York. We have been friends for quite some time. One day they suggested we do a collaboration. At the same time, I’d been playing with the idea of doing some charity work. So I said, why not? I love jewellery, their aesthetic is very close to mine and I believed that my unique style could give some direction to the project.

Opposite page: Sterling Silver necklace.This page fr om top to bottom: Sterling Silver ring, earcuff and br acelet by Andrej Pejic x Sam H. Snyder.

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ANDREJ PEJIC

Bending Metal

In what way do you identify yourself with Sam H. Snyder’s aesthetic? His is very clean, very modern. I think it’s going in the direction that fashion is headed to. It’s not too feminine and not too masculine, which is the kind of jewellery I like; big, strong and bold. Why did you decide to go for a Bauhaus style and design? Do you believe in the Bauhaus principle of function over form? How does this principle relate to your personal sense of style and your creative process involved in this collection? The whole style of this collection was to be free and not follow rules, but to use the rules to define form. I find it interesting the way designers break the rules of geometry. In a way that reflects the way I am as a person and in my career, it was important for me to be part of this innovative style. Function over form or form over function? I think it should be a mix. The utility of fashion is just as important as its aesthetics, especially in this era when women and men are so active and both do the same kind of jobs. Fashion needs to reflect that. I believe the younger generation wants something less elaborate or intricate; they are going for something more simple, real, yet beautiful and glamorous. What’s the inspiration behind this first collection? Creating something modern and different that defies traditional rules. Are there any other sources of inspiration in this collection? The reflective element of the materials themselves, and the bold, eye-catching minimalist approach. Pieces that are a reflection of ones personality (in this case, mine). How involved were you through the process? Pretty much so. Every piece had to be approved by me. Not being a designer of course set limits on the hands-on aspect (sketching, drafting, molding), however I was present through the whole process. I learned about the production, marketing and promotion side involved. During the initial phase of your creative process, did you have a collection in mind that would appeal

Sterling Silver br acelet and earcuff by Andrej Pejic x Sam H. Snyder.

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ANDREJ PEJIC

Bending Metal

to all genders? I thought about anyone who is not afraid of being bold, or being themselves. As you know, I’m a huge fan of power dressing as portrayed in the image of a strong 21st-century career woman. It is all about what the pieces bring with them; like confidence for example. It is also about not being afraid to stand out. This collection is not just limited to women. There are pieces that aren’t as feminine that could totally appeal to men. I can see this line on all cool kids on the streets. Do you consider the pieces in this collection to be a portrayal of your characteristic sense of individuality? Yes, I’ve always been a fan of combining and balancing masculine and feminine; balance between something soft and something rough. I’ve always been a huge fan of rock and roll but always find myself balancing with feminine aesthetics. I believe all these elements strike the card that reads me, and all the pieces in this collaboration are me or say something about me, especially because every piece is engraved with my signature. Tell us about the mandate of the collection, its mission and the cause it supports. It was very important to me to find a cause that I relate to, but at the same time, a cause that perhaps a lot of people don’t know about, or an issue that seems to be forgotten. It might seem that I’ve chosen a very nice cause but in the bigger picture we are talking about this particular issue on an epidemic level. You know, 40% of the homeless youth is LGBT. The LGBT youth are 8 times more likely to be homeless, and if they are homeless, 8 times more likely to attempt to commit suicide than non-LGBT youth. As you may or may not know, 80% of those LGBT kids are kicked out from their homes. My sympathy to this cause comes from growing up with a solid support system. I grew up with a mother who supported and loved her children, and who wasn’t always a modern woman. She is traditional, but also loves her children so much that nothing in the world could change that. So I never really understood how other parents would kick their children out for coming out to them. Having the heart to do that is something I really can’t comprehend. At the same time, you turn around and you say “that’s the world”. After being invited on a walk through the Ali Forney Center in New York and seeing what they do, it just reassured that helping the LGBT youth felt right. Also living in New York most of the time made it easier to connect with the cause and the institution. What do you think about the terms “inclusivity” and “diversity” in relation to the fashion industry? I definitely think the fashion industry needs to open up by being more democratic and less elitist. In order to sell, we don’t need to necessarily isolate ourselves. Do you believe in the power of fashion to propel social change? I think fashion has the same power as other art forms; it can’t change society on its own, but it can bring awareness to certain issues, help the way young people see things and change attitudes. In what other ways can designers, models, photographers and other members of the creative sector contribute to change? I believe it is everyone’s responsibility to contribute or to give something back to the world. Whether you are in fashion or not, it is important to be socially conscious, to see what’s happening outside, and not to keep the focus exclusively in your industry or your own world. Create a sense of awareness, and always aim for balance. Are there any other areas/industries that you would like to or have considered to venture in? We are working on other ideas but at this moment I’m completely devoted to this line and the charity I am supporting. I don’t think I’ll ever go purely into design, but I will always try to keep doing interesting things that follow my own aesthetic (like this line), or things I consider to be missing in the market place that should be available. What was the most prominent learning experience in taking part in this venture? It was very different from modeling, where you are given instructions to follow—whether by your agents, your management team or the photographer on set—and at times you might think modeling isn’t easy. I learned from everyone, in every aspect of the design process, the PR, marketing, etc. I even learned how to put an event together. I learned how to be a business woman!

FASHION HAS THE SAME POWER AS OTHER ART FORMS; IT CAN’T CHANGE SOCIETY ON ITS OWN, BUT IT CAN BRING AWARENESS TO CERTAIN ISSUES AND CHANGE ATTITUDES.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

FOCUS

AMANDEEP SINGH GILL, 23 Artist 40

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R I VA L R EFL EC T ION: E X PA N DI NG T H E M A L E I DE A L TEXT AND CREATIVE DIRECTION, BEN BARRY & DANIEL DRAK PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY LEE

HOW DID OUR REFLECTION BECOME OUR ENEMY? In a culture where our reflection is everywhere and our image seems to count for so much, it is impossible to escape our reflection’s grasp on our life. Everywhere we went, our reflections taunted us, reminding us of how we looked and regularly bringing on anxiety. Whether it was a reminder of our scars, the loss of our hair or the shape of our bodies, our reflections reminded us that we looked different.

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GURJIWAN DHANJAL, 23 Student


RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

KEVIN VON APPEN, 52 Science museum pr of ession al

Different from whom? Different from the reflection that we saw in every fashion image where we sought style inspiration to fuel our creativity and self-expression. Where we sought freedom we encountered oppression, as the male models that were staring back at us all seemed to tell us that we never looked good enough. Like the majority of men, we do not look like most fashion models—who are between 6’0 and 6’2 in height and 16-25 years old, primarily Caucasian and able-bodied. The body size of these models has dramatically decreased over the past two decades. In the 1990s, designers such as Giorgio Armani, Calvin Klein and Gianni Versace cast male models with washboard abs, massive chests and inflated shoulders. But the appointment of Hedi Slimane as designer for Dior Homme in 2000 introduced a skinny male silhouette into fashion. The sample size for male models decreased from an Italian suit size 50 in the 1990s to a size 46 today. The Rootstein male mannequin, the fashion industry’s standard, has shrunk from a 42-inch chest and 33-inch waist in 1967 to a 35-inch chest and 27-inch waist in 2010.

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RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

WHERE WE SOUGHT FREEDOM WE ENCOUNTERED OPRESSION, AS THE MALE MODELS THAT WERE STARING BACK AT US ALL SEEMED TO TELL US WE NEVER LOOKED GOOD ENOUGH.

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ALKARIM JADAVJI, 28 Designer


EDWARD FURLANI, 31 Chef

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RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

Although many fashion brands feature the slender ideal, muscular male models have not been eliminated; a binary of the male beauty has been created. Models who are featured in most high fashion images, such as for Prada, often possess a slender body whereas men that advertise more commercial fashion brands, such as Tommy Hilfiger, represent a buff body. The result is that men are caught in a double bind: They are pressured to achieve a hypermuscular aesthetic as well as a hyperthin one when they look to fashion. Researchers, health care providers and activists have all sought to understand and combat the predominance of negative body image. Despite their tremendously effective efforts, men have overwhelmingly been forgotten from their studies, initiatives and campaigns. Many reasons can explain why this has been the case but the predominant argument is that men simply do not suffer from concerns of body image. We know this to be untrue. Whether men seek to mimic the hyper-muscular body or the new, slender ideal, we see them attempting to achieve these extremes in much the same way that women have long strived to mirror similarly idealized looks. This is the result of living in a culture where perfectly photo-shopped, unattainable bodies are uniformly projected in the countless images that surround us—a culture that increasingly only values people for their physical forms. Men now experience the negative consequences that have long haunted women. Obsessive visits to the gym, strict dietary restrictions and hours spent managing our appearance before we let others see us are all behaviours that we perform in an effort to achieve an ideal—behaviours that amplify our stress and anxiety because ideals are not based in reality. Ideals are unattainable. Traditionally, however, gender norms have prevented men from openly and candidly talking about their body image anxieties. Boys and young men are told to ‘man up’ because ‘real men’ don’t show or share emotion. Concerns of vanity have been regarded

WE CAN ONLY IMAGINE THE IMPLICATIONS THAT YEARS OF ASSAULTS FROM THE MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE CAN HAVE ON MEN AS THEY MOVE THROUGH CRITICAL LIFE STAGES. as effeminate and emasculating. Men have had to seek to achieve these rigid body ideals while masking any apparent desire to achieve them. Since men suffer in silence from body image concerns, official statistics don’t tell their story. Fifteen percent of patients in Canada and 10% of patients in the United States with eating disorders are male. Yet the numbers of men who suffer from eating disorders—in addition to variety of other body image concerns such as hair, height and musculature anxieties—are far higher. Underreporting and improper diagnosis frequently occur as body image has traditionally and exclusively been linked to women. But new research suggests that men as young as 6 years old now begin to experience body image anxiety. We can only imagine the implications that years of assaults from the media and popular culture can have on men as they move through critical life stages. A majority of men, of all ages and backgrounds, are left suffering from the dissonance between what they look like and what fashion tells them to look like. We have both felt and continue to feel this dissonance regularly and often in isolation. It was time for us to give voice and shed light on our struggles and those of other men. Since fashion is the source of so much of men’s body anxiety, it is also a vehicle to change it. We wanted to use the power of fashion to promote a new way of seeing men in fashion images that would ultimately help men see themselves in a new way. We could endlessly critique fashion and its negative influence on men’s body image, but doing so fails to recognize that fashion can be a positive influence on how we feel. Rather than amplifying the problem, we seek to promote solutions. In collaboration with the Herringbone team and photographer Andy Lee, we invited eight men to participate in a fashion shoot. Individually, each man reflected his own uniqueness; together they reflected the panorama of men’s diversity. None of the men were professional models; most of them had never participated in a shoot before. Unlike a typical fashion shoot, we didn’t have stylists pull the latest trends or hairstylists highlight grooming styles. Instead, we asked the men to bring an outfit that made them feel confident and groom themselves to reflect their own style. Our shoot wasn’t selling a specific fashion trend; it was selling the idea that all men are worthy of being in fashion. How do you feel when you look at these images? Our hope is that by seeing a diversity of male models, men can begin to appreciate their differences. Research suggests that men crave these changes in men’s fashion. In The Adonis Complex, the authors reveal that 89 percent of men want male models in magazines to represent more diverse and realistic body types. Research to be published in the September 2014 issue of Critical Studies in Men’s Fashion indicates business stands to benefit from expanding the male ideal: featuring diverse male models in fashion images enable men to imagine themselves in the clothing and feel valued by the brand. Imagine a fashion magazine that paid tribute to your interest in fashion with the models reflecting the same people who occupied the subway car with you that morning. Our shoot is a first step in an effort to re-imagine how men’s diversity could be celebrated in fashion, with the aim of inspiring others to use their voices and creativity to do the same. Whether you include more diverse male models in your fashion shoots or shows, use social media to tell your favourite menswear brands to use more diversity or engage other men in a dialogue about body image, we have an opportunity to empower each other and challenge our visual culture. But this call and ultimate change will only occur by working together because we all stand to benefit from seeing our reflection as our friend.

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RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

RYAN G. HINDS,34 Perfor mer and writer

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RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

KAMAL AL-SOLAYLEE, 49 Pr of essor and author

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RIVAL REFLECTION

Expanding the Male Ideal

“OUR HOPE IS THAT BY SEEING A DIVERSITY OF MALE MODELS, MEN CAN BEGIN TO APPRECIATE THEIR DIFFERENCES.”

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CLEAR SKY, 34 Welder and mar athon r unner


VIEW POINT

THE CASE FOR FEWER (AND BETTER) CLOTHES TEXT AND ILLUSTRATION, BEATRIZ JUAREZ

IT’S BEEN MORE THAN A YEAR SINCE I DECIDED TO CHANGE the way I perceive and consume fashion. Becoming responsible for my own actions is a complex learning process. It takes time. After living a life devoted to fashion (in and out of work), I came to realize that having a closet full of fancy clothes left me with an overwhelming sense of indifference. Opening the doors of my dresser made me feel ashamed. I could dispose of any of these garments at any moment (regardless of how much I payed for them). For way too long, I was the person who threw away a lot of her clothes after only six months (or would send them to a GoodWill centre for self-indulgent reasons); I got accustomed to think that better clothes will always come next season. It was in one of those visits to my local GoodWill center that I overheard an employee asking how could they sort and

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recycle all the clothing that was getting “dumped” in their bins and how could they get in touch with “someone” to give these clothes a new life. “it’s such a waste you know? to sell them for a dollar” he said. This made me think how we, consumers, have very little understanding of the concept of sustainability in clothing; how aware are we that if something is good—meaning our clothes—we could build on it, instead of disposing of it. Many people give used clothes to charity (just like I have done in the past), but only those items which are deemed to be fit to be sold for reuse. There is very little awareness of recycling fabrics. Charity shops and doorstep collections are often seen as the most convenient ways to dispose of our old and unwanted clothes. But when reusing seems inconvenient, clothes are more likely to be thrown away. Designers and producers have been slow to create a system that eases recycling; recyclers have been slow to ask for changes to be made to upstream production processes that would make recycling easier and profitable. As consumers, have we thought how the choices we make every day can take on a different social meaning? The things we wear affect others, environmentally, economically and socially. That simple. How can we start shifting attitudes towards our shopping habits and the way we buy and dispose of clothes? What makes us stop and think before we buy? I know fashion is obsolescence. I know fashion is change. But it should also be flexible and responsive. How can we make sure our actions have social meaning? Maybe through communication, debate and action. And where do we start this conversation? Maybe by analizing the design process and critiquing consumer attitudes. Design is more than just creating a nice product. Design involves responsibility. A designer should not only focus on the aesthetics and style of the garments; even though focusing on a comfortable fit is a key element, there are specific decisions such as materials (and their waste), fabrics complexity, life-cycles and eco foot-print that become part of the formula for a successful and socially responsible collection. A designer is also responsible for considering the consumer’s demands for fitting, ease of use, how convenient it is to care for the clothes (laundry, dry cleaning) and their disposal. In terms of the design itself, how can a designer design garments with little to no waste without compromising their signature silhouettes. Is that even possible? Changing the silhouettes or shape of a garment is perhaps the most challenging thought, since it represents the boundaries within fashion designers work and defines their collections; but is also a great window for growth to a better and wiser fashion consumption cycle.

DESIGN IS MORE THAN JUST CREATING A NICE PRODUCT. DESIGN INVOLVES RESPONSIBILITY.

THE CASE FOR FEWER (AND BETTER) CLOTHES

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We can make the designer and the wearer, both reponsible for adopting a new attitude towards changing silhouettes that imply almost no waste when the clothes are produced, as well as consider the several life cycles these garments can have so our recycling methods improve. We can get the designer and the consumer to become more actively responsive to each other. Successful fashion businesses will find creative ways to keep customers loyal and anticipating demand to avoid waste. It represents a challenge for designers to consider all these factors when there is little awareness from a government legislation standpoint and a lack of universal standards on public policy about sustainability in clothing. Is also challenging when not all consumers are aware of it. Consumers attitudes become a big part of the puzzle too. As everything in life, getting to the consumer and being able to shift their attitudes implies education. Consumers are concerned with three factors: cost, quality and value (sometimes not in this order). And we know the fashion industry is dependent on consumption. The way fashion is consumed is through pleasing and engaging consumers by creating ingenious communication campaigns with very targeted branding. But one of the problems with some of these commercial strategies is the way they promote celebrity culture and how this has fuelled the desire for novelty, speeding up fashion consumption beyond limits. Consumers tend to rely on the seemingly harmless and “inspiring” opinion of the fashion press without thinking that most of their content is biased by public relations purposes (and not precisely the sustainable, responsible kind). We should try to spread the actions of sustainability between people at ground level, between local neighbours and on social media platforms. Let’s think of the immense influence of fashion bloggers. At the core of their activity lies immediacy. Through personalized narratives, bloggers offer a way of spreading information and knowledge. Why can’t we start creating awareness at this basic ­—and popular— level? We could start by spreading the issues and conflicts of good practice. How are our communities participating in making our fashion consumption process a better one? How is government legislation addressing the issue of sustainability? Do we have universal standards for these practices? If not, what can we do to start a conversation about them? How can we design for local cultures to avoid waste at a global level? And most importantly, how can we know how much is enough? In a culture that suggests “more is better”, how can we stop for a moment and reflect on how our material values are affecting the world we live in? Are we mere consumers living our material lives or engaged citizens on a mission to improve our own societies? How can we be enablers of action and change? Maybe it is time to look at our own closets for the answer.


ESSEN TIAL LAND SCAPES INTERPRETING SENSORIAL NARRATIVES ILLUSTRATED BY BENJAMIN EDWARD

Smell is our most primitive of senses. These fragrances will be sure to evoke some romantic memories... (or at least suggest your next adventure).


S SEE BY C HLOE TOP NOTES: APPLE, JASMINE HEART NOTES: WATER HYAC INTH BASE NOTE: VETIVER


ESSENTIAL LANDSCAPES

Interpreting Sensorial Narratives

ROSABOTANICA BY BALENC IAGA TOP NOTES: PEPPER, C ITRUS, FIG LEAVES HEART NOTES: ROSE, HYAC INTH, CARDAMOM BASE NOTES: WHITE WOOD, AMBER

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ESSENTIAL LANDSCAPES

Interpreting Sensorial Narratives

DAISY MARC JACOBS DELIGHT TOP NOTES: APPLE, QUINCE FLOWER, FREESIA HEART NOTES: IRIS, GARDENIA, PEONY BASE NOTES: MUSK, CEDARWOOD, SANDALWOOD

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ESSENTIAL LANDSCAPES

Interpreting Sensorial Narratives

CK ONE RED EDITION TOP NOTE: WATERMELON HEART NOTE: FLORAL BASE NOTE: MUSKS

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BOTTEGA VENETA, ESSENCE AROMATIQUE TOP NOTES: ITALIAN BERGAMOT, CORIANDER HEART NOTES: TURKISH ROSE, PATC HOULI BASE NOTE: SANDALWOOD

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PREVIEW

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: Dalia blue heels, Acne Studios; silver-tone cr ystal-detail br ooch, MIC HAEL KORS; Black and white tweed and f abric lace-up short boot, C HANEL; Serenity ring, Nelle Han Jewelr y; Alice street Adrian a handbag, kate spade ny; Rubino leather gloves, Tiger of Sweden; white SPAZZOLATO BLANC HE riding boot; Velocite black jacket, Acne Studios; Carrie metal sandals, SOPHIA WEBSTER; Salsa Deluxe in Yatching blue; silver-tone slim Camille watch, MIC HAEL KORS; half-circ le backpack in steel, kate spade SATURDAY.


THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

Our Transeasonal Favourites

THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: DB twill trench Navy, Ben Sher man; FREJA 26mm stainless steel case, stainless steel and leather band watch, SKAGEN; black and white smooth french calf Br ompton mini briefcase, MIC HAEL KORS; br own suede backpack, Michael Kor s; Buzz bangle, Swar ovski; Autumn Ivor y boot, HUGO Women ’s collection by HUGO BOSS; silver leather bag in the for m of a milk brick, C HANEL; Madison Ave. Collection CALDER Coat, kate spade ny; Tessie c lutch cr oc stripe suede in Midnight Blue, MULBERRY; Steanio shoe, HUGO Man; gr ay water sn ake Rommy bag, BOSS Woman.


HERRINGBONE FASHION


UNCONVENTIONAL PERCEPTIONS PRINTS, PATTERNS AND COLOUR TRACE THE LINES OF A NEW SENSE OF FORMAL .

PHOTOGRAPHY, MIC HAEL KAI YOUNG FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA


J-BLANC HE jacket, P-GERTY short pants, DIESEL; Shelta Slub shirt, FRENC H CONNECTION.


JUPIPPI jacket, DIESEL BLACK GOLD; P-GERTY short pants, DIESEL; Print BD shirt, Dr. Martens; Skulls and Roses square scarf , Dr. Martens; GRYPHON sandal, Dr. Martens.


Par achute Print long-sleeve shirt, Plectr um by Ben Sher man.


Par achute Parka jacket, Crew Knit the Angled jumper, The Cut and Sew long-sleeve shirt, Plectr um by Ben Sher man; WAIKEE-SHORT short pants, DIESEL; BERNARDETTE sandals, Dr. Martens.


J-EVE jacket, DIESEL; Black Embossed t-shirt, TOPMAN.


Vintage Flor al Print blazer and short, origin al Penguin; Blue Bur nout Jogger s, TOPMAN;The Core Collection Br ogue shoes, Dr. Martens.


Par achute Print long-sleeve shirts and Shirting scarf , Plectr um by Ben Sher man.


White long-sleeve shirt, P-GERTY short pants, DIESEL; AGGY sandals, Dr. Martens.


S-ERLWI shirt, white longsleeve shirt, PAMPY pants, DIESEL; Hair & Makeup, GianLuca Orienti (TRESemmĂŠ Hair/judyinc.com); Model, Leonid (Elite Model Man agement, Tor onto); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


Burberr y Pr or sum

PORTS 1961

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76 JONATHAN SIMKHAI

PINK TARTAN Chloé

Burberr y Pr or sum

Acne Studios

BCBG MAXAZRIA

BUNDLE UP

CROSSING THE LINE

PERIODICAL YET ESSENTIAL —

OUR FAVOURITE TRANSEASONAL LOOKS. Tiger of Sweden


SPORTIFY

BOSS Woman

DEREK LAM

Tiger of Sweden

BCBG MAXAZRIA

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77 © 2014 Dan Lecca

Calvin Klein Collection

Alexander Wang

Alexander Wang

PINK TARTAN

Acne Studios

FEMININE TOUCHES Chloé

Calvin Klein Collection

HUGO Woman

MILD COMFORT

B OY ' S C LUB


SHARP FOCUS A bold and graphic sense of style yet soft around the edges...

PHOTOGRAPHY, JANE + JANE FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA


SHARP FOCUS

A Bold and Graphic Sense of Style

Flor al placement print tee top, TOPSHOP; SASHA PONTE legging bottoms, BCBGMAXAZRIA; NEBULA JACKET parka, DIESEL.

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SHARP FOCUS

A Bold and Graphic Sense of Style

Printed Back zip-dress and Blackberr y lace pencil skirt, ZARA; c lear plastic MAC r aincoat, TOPSHOP.

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SHARP FOCUS

A Bold and Graphic Sense of Style

RUNWAY HAYDEN dress, BCBGMAXAZRIA.

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STORY HED

Story Dek

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Sporty rib cr op tee, TOPSHOP; CODIE SKORT shorts, BCBGMAXAZRIA.


SHARP FOCUS

A Bold and Graphic Sense of Style

Air Knit Tee v-neck, PINK TARTAN; Black Ginham Tube skirt and Lazer Cut Satin skirt, TOPSHOP.

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Fennella cr opped tank top BCBGMAXAZRIA; Model, Logan at SPOT6 Man agement; Makeup and Hair, Onn a Chan at PUSH Man agement; Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


PROFILE

MODEL CITIZEN GRACING DOZENS OF DESIGNER'S RUNWAYS AND MAGAZINES INTERNATIONALLY, LOGAN PATTERSON TELLS US HOW SHE KEEPS HER FOCUS. TEXT BY LUIS ZULAYKHA What was your first reaction to being scouted? I think one of my first reactions was something like, ‘Is this really happening right now?’ I had been curious about modelling for a while and had created an inspiration board of magazine cutouts. I even told my sister the day of, or the day before, that I wanted to be scouted. So I was kind of shocked when it actually happened. What made you decide to say yes to modelling? After being scouted, I was still in high school, so I waited until I was done, and found a great mother agent in Toronto, Cynthia Cully at Spot 6 Management. I decided to go to university for my first year, and found it was hard to focus on both. I think the decision maker was when I realized that I had a great opportunity in front of me, and school would always be there. Did you have any particular expectations when you started modelling? I expected to start working right away. I then realized that there was work to be done; I spent a long time doing test shoots and working on my portfolio, as well as learning to walk on the runway. It was fun and I enjoyed it but I definitely didn’t see that coming. Has your idea of modelling changed at all? It has definitely changed. Before, all I saw was the end product in magazines. Then when I started working, I realized how much time and detail is put into everything. It also hit me very quickly that this is a very competitive industry­, and if you do not stand out, there are plenty of other models that are lining up to take your place. What has been the reaction from people your age when they know you are a model? I went to a small Christian high school in a small town; modelling was something that was foreign to a lot of my friends. I only told my closest friends when I started, and even then, I was nervous of what they would think of it. Most of my friends never treated me differently, and I’m so happy for that. There were a few girls who automatically decided I had an eating disorder—that was tough. Now, when I come

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home and see my friends, we catch up and we’re able to go back to how it was, which I’m so thankful for. Do you believe the title “model” influences the way society perceives and treats you? I believe there is a negative stereotype that people associate with modelling, largely due to the fact that most of society doesn’t understand the industry. I don’t know how society perceives me, but I definitely feel like people assume you’re not very smart, can’t be taken seriously, or don’t have goals. I don’t like being associated with the label ‘model’It’s what I do, but it’s not who I am. As a model, what is your mission? This is actually a question I’ve been asking myself for a while. One of the first things that hit me was how unfulfilled I felt after I had reached some of my goals. I’m asking myself, ‘Now what?’ My mission is to live every day fully, stay close to what matters, and hopefully figure out what my mission is. I don’t know where modelling will take me; I hope that it can be used as a platform for reaching a large audience on something that I’m passionate about. Do you think fashion can serve as a tool towards the formation of an individual’s character and selfesteem? I think fashion can be a great tool for people to experiment with what they like and to have fun with it. Fashion can be whatever you want it to be, and if you want, it can be an empowering form of self-expression, as well as teach you independence, and strengthen your character. Do you consider modelling could open doors for you in any way for the future? Modeling has already opened my eyes to so many opportunities. It’s allowed me to see so much of the world and it’s made me realize how connected the world is. I don’t know what the future holds, but I hope that by putting myself out there and always staying open, I am lead to somewhere that I feel happy and fulfilled.

Left to right: At the Thakoon Panichgul, Pink Tartan and Marc Jacobs shows. Bottom: Ver a Wang.

FASHION CAN BE WHATEVER YOU WANT IT TO BE, AND IF YOU WANT, IT CAN BE AN EMPOWERING FORM OF SELF-EXPRESSION, AS WELL AS TEACH YOU INDEPENDENCE, AND STRENGTHEN YOUR CHARACTER.

What do you consider to be your most important milestone as a model? I think the biggest milestone was when I signed with my mother agency and with my agency in New York. I’ve been so blessed with the people who are working behind the scenes towards my career. They have been nothing but supportive—and I have them to thank for my successes so far. Do you think that the industry and working as a model have influenced you in any way? The industry has definitely influenced me. When travelling, I spend a lot of time by myself, away from family, which I am not used to at all. This forced me to learn to listen to my own voice and make decisions for myself. I didn’t really know who I was when I started—I’m still working on it­—but being by myself so much gave me a lot of time to think about what really matters to me. I’ve also learned to let things go, to go with the flow, and trust in my journey. What would you tell the Logan that first stepped on a runway 3 years ago? I would remind myself to be thankful for every experience, and to keep family close. And to not lose sight of what’s important to me.

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SCREEN TEST B A S I C P I E C E S T A K E A N E W M E A N I N G U N D E R T H E R I G H T L I G H T.

PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY LEE FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA


Tr avis white jacket, Mackage; white Tur nmill Slim Leg denim, BEN SHERMAN.


SCREEN TEST

Basic Pieces Take a New Meaning

Onsea Printed blazer, Ted Baker ; white tur nmill Slim Leg denim, BEN SHERMAN.


Statrek cotton blazer ; Jacguard white shirt; Thebosa stripe spot shirt, TED BAKER; EC1 chino, BEN SHERMAN.

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Over the head smock jacket, geometric knit print long sleeve shirt, EC1 Chino, BEN SHERMAN.


SCREEN TEST

Basic Pieces Take a New Meaning

Br andon n avy trench coat, Mackage; Soho-f it jet black shirt, EC1 Chino, BEN SHERMAN.

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Tr avis white jacket, Mackage; combined f aux leather t-shirt, ZARA; white tur nmill slim leg denim, BEN SHERMAN. Model, Daniel L (Elite Model Man agement); Gr ooming, Onn a Chan (Push Man agement); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


WE LOVE SU MMER! A summary of colourful must-haves to play with this season. 98

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STORY HED

Story Dek

! SUGAR RUSH Pink and or ange plexiglass c lutch bag, C HANEL. 99

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WE LOVE SUMMER!

A summary of colourful must-haves

A WALK IN THE PARK Left to right: Madison Square Park, Centr al Park West and Centr al Park South , Bond No. 9 New York

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STORY HED

Story Dek

WHEN THE CAT IS AWAY... Karl, Ann a, Tom and Rei come out and play. MADMAUS COLLECTION by Christopher Lee Sauvé.


WE LOVE SUMMER!

A summary of colourful must-haves

OP-ART One wor ship lavender & gold and Pr aise maker in turquoise & gold (with pouch), Karen Walker Eyewear 102

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KICK UP YOUR HEELS! Miyu gold sandal, Acne Studios.


WE LOVE SUMMER!

A summary of colourful must-haves

ON OUR WAY TO EMERALD CITY Monr oe place flor al Halle tote bag , kate spade new york

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STORY HED

Story Dek

GOOD GOLLY MISS MOLLY! Multicoloured resin square br acelet, C HANEL

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SCHUMACHER Dorothee Schumacher is one of the most iconic designers in Germany, particularly when it comes to dressing women. This ladylike collection was full of beautiful and wearable pieces with a perfect summer palette of shades of white with pops of colour. www.dorothee-schumacher.com

FACES behind the

SIDEWALKS CA P T U R I N G T H E F L AVO U R OF BERLIN’S STREETS TEXT BY CORISSA BAGAN

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FACES BEHIND THE SIDEWALKS

Capturing the Flavour of Berlin’s Streets

ACHTLAND The layering of silk and cotton garments in this collection by designers Oliver Lühr and Thomas Bentz proved you can’t go wrong with the mix of sheer white fabrics and sporty pieces this summer. www.achtland.net

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FACES BEHIND THE SIDEWALKS

Capturing the Flavour of Berlin’s Streets

UMASAN

Designed by twins Anja and Sandra Umann, Umasan is a vegan high fashion line that defies industry standards and timelines. With the use of sophisticated Japanese cutting techniques, black fabric manages to feel light as air in this sustainable and timeless collection made for both men and women. www.umasan-world.com

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FACES BEHIND THE SIDEWALKS

Capturing the Flavour of Berlin’s Streets

LALA BERLIN Designed by Leyla Piedayesh, Lala Berlin synchronizes the cool vibes of the city with undeniable elegance and wearability. The prints and unique fabric treatments in this collection are truly covetable. Don’t be afraid to mix up patterns and to have a few monsters in your closet this season. www.lalaberlin.com

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EPILOGUE

FASHION’S FLIGHT OF WHIMSY ILLUSTRATION, LAURA GULSHANI One of the most inspiring collections from the Paris SS14 shows was presented by Hussein Chalayan. His ticker-tape dresses were playful, with loose woven strips of colour appearing under beautifully folded drapping. Chalayan has always been known by his transformative pieces, and this collection was no exception. He designed jackets that could be worn as dresses, delicate and subtle overlays to sit on top of equally soft layers. Translucent umbrellas added a touch of whimsy and freshness, and the shoes add a very colourful and structured softness, making the show a very fluid experience...showers included. —BEATRIZ JUAREZ

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STOCKISTS AC HTLAND achtland.net Acne Studios acnestudios.com ALEXANDER WANG alexanderwang.com BCBGMAXAZRIA bcbg.com BEN SHERMAN bensher man.com Bond No 9 New York bondno9.com and thebay.com BURBERRY burberr y.com Calvin Klein Collection calvinklein.com C HANEL chanel.com Chloé chloe.com C HRISTOPHER LEE SAUVÉ christopherleesauve.com DEREK LAM 10 CROSBY dereklam.com/10cr osby Diesel diesel.com Dr. Martens dr martenscan ada.ca French Connection can ada.frenchconnection.com HUGO BOSS hugoboss.com JONATHAN SIMKHAI jon athansimkhai.com KAREN WALKER EYEWEAR karenwalker.com kate spade new york katespade.com KATE SPADE SATURDAY saturday.com lala Berlin lalaberlin.com Mackage mackage.com MIC HAEL KORS michaelkor s.com Nelle Han Jewelr y nellehan.com Origin al Penguin origin alpenguin.com PINK TARTAN pinktartan.com PORTS 1961 ports1961.com Sam H Snyder samhsnyder.com SC HUMAC HER dor othee-schumacher.com SOPHIA WEBSTER sophiawebster.co.uk SWAROVSKI swar ovski.com Ted Baker tedbaker.com Tiger of Sweden tiger ofsweden.com TOPMAN topman.com TOPSHOP topshop.com WATC H IT! watchit.ca ZARA zar a.com/ca/

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

Herringbone Magazine Issue 2  
Herringbone Magazine Issue 2  

A convergence point for fashion, style & consumer perceptions. This issue: Expanding the Male Ideal.