Herringbone Magazine Premiere Issue

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PREMIÈRE ISSUE

WINTER 13/14

HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

ALANA ZIMMER

UNCOVERS HER PERSONAL STYLE MEN IN THE MIRROR WHY HAVE MEN SO EAGERLY EMBRACED FASHION? #TRENDREPORT OUR VIRTUAL FORECAST FOR SS/14



EDITORS’ NOTE

WELCOME TO

HERRINGBONE WE LOVE COFFEE SHOPS. They are great places to scrutinize people’s outfits, chat about life and sometimes find paths toward unexpected adventures. It was a nice summer morning at one of Toronto’s quaint coffee shops that we found our adventure. While mulling over life and work, we came to the realization that, much like ourselves, we both knew many artists within the industry who have a lot of things to say. We are both interested in consumer culture and the consumer’s perception of fashion itself. Having backgrounds in the fashion industry and the fashion editorial world, a publication seemed to fit both of our interests and our creative needs. It was out of this discussion that Herringbone came to life. With such a potential roster of artists to work on the magazine, the ideas for stories began to flow. We started to talk about our new venture with other industry professionals and before we knew it, many talented artists agreed to be on-board. From humble beginnings, Herringbone started to take shape. Soon after, a string of fortunate events led to even more exciting ones. We had the great opportunity to work with our cover girl, Alana Zimmer and her management, who trusted the project from the start. Before we knew it, that random conversation from the coffee shop in the summer of 2013 turned into a real publication with all of our ideas brought to fruition. We cannot thank the contributors enough for all their hard work and it is because of them that we are so proud to present the première issue of Herringbone. We hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

LUIS ZULAYHKA

BEATRIZ JUAREZ

FASHION DIRECTOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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OUR COVER

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Cover girl Alan a Zimmer (Push Man agement) wear s a Madigan Dr a ped Fr ont coat,TED BAKER; Suspender Har ness waist belt, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Michaela Mar abou-f eather skirt, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring, Thomas Sabo. Photogr a phy, Andrew Soule; Hair, Dat Tr an (Push Man agement); Makeup Onn a Chan (Push Man agement); Fashion Direction, Luis Zulayhka; Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.

CO-FOUNDERS Luis Zulayhka

Fashion Director lzulayhka@herringbonemagazine.com

Beatriz Juarez

Creative Director bjuarez@herringbonemagazine.com

ART DIRECTOR

Corissa Bagan

cbagan@herringbonemagazine.com

Copy Editing & Proofreading

Cr aig Mar shall, Kevin McGowan

General Inquiries

info@herringbonemagazine.com

Our Address

156 Augusta Ave., Kensington Market, Tor onto, ON. M5T 2L4


CONTENTS PREMIÈRE ISSUE WINTER 13/14

IN EVERY ISSUE 3 Editor’s note

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6 Contributors 8 PROFILE The Handsome Girl 16 VIEWPOINT The Tight Rope of Fashion 20 PROFILE Dream Maker 28 MONOCLE A Kaleidoscopic Duality 34 FOCUS Men in the Mirror 38 PICKS Fashion News 42 PICKS The Notable Object 108 EPILOGUE Fashion is a State of Mind

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FASHION 50 OUR COVER STORY 56 The Perfect Cover 68 Retrospective 78 Metrópolis 90 Atélier 102 Fashion Trend Report

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CONTRIBUTORS

Our amazing creatives

Canadian fashion & beauty photographer Andrew Soule has spent the last 13 years in Milan. He divides his time working in photography and film-making crossing over disciplines to create his own style and sensibility. Shooting in Europe for various high fashion and advertising clients his work can also be seen in editorial magazines such as Italian Elle, Vogue Australia, Velvet, MOOD, Surface, The Sunday Times and Flare. Andrew recently has moved back to Toronto to embark and explore the next chapter of his photographic career. He shot our wonderful cover and cover story with supermodel Alana Zimmer (p. 50). We truly enjoyed his professionalism,and his amazing eye for everything beautiful.

Ben Barry is an

Assistant Professor of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the School of Fashion, Ryerson University. His research explores how men experience and enact masculinities through fashion as well as the power of fashion to include and empower diverse men. Ben shared the findings of his research with Herringbone in “Men in the Mirror” (p. 34), and opened a new perspective on the relationship between fashion and male consumers. Ben holds an Honors Bachelor of Arts in Women’s and Gender Studies from the University of Toronto and a PhD in Management from the University of Cambridge. His first book, Why Women Buy Fashion: Models, Advertising and Aspiration (Bloomsbury)— will be out in 2015.

Entrepreneur and business consultant Ryan Payne, says his life is a constant happy string of blessings, meeting the right person at the right time. He researches online engagement at Ryerson University. His focus is how to encourage users to stay on a corporate website for longer periods of time. Recently he spoke about his research at the International Conference of Marketing and Consumer Behaviour in Porto, Portugal. In his article “The Tight Rope of Fashion” (p. 16), Ryan addresses his time with Miuccia Prada and her thoughts on young designer’s struggle to balance creativity with the industry’s expectations.

International fashion and beauty photographer, Michael Kai Young, splits his time between Toronto and New York City. As an ever-evolving artist, his work shows influence from his additional experience as an art director, set & prop designer and from his talented peers and collaborators. He embarked with us in the early conceptualization of Herringbone’s fashion stories in “The Perfect Cover (p. 56) and “Metrópolis” (p. 78).

Dat Tran’s earliest

exposure to the hair industry was at his mother’s salon when he was a teenager. He later rediscovered his own unique passion for hair and opened up a hair salon of his own in 2010, appropriately named Dat Salon. He also immersed himself in the freelance hair industry and is now considered a go-to professional for hairstyling. His assignments now include fashion and beauty shoots, as well as music videos. Dat is another great contributor who embarked with us from the get-go. He styled our cover with Alana Zimmer (p. 50) as well as our story “Men in the Mirror” (p. 34).

Toronto-based, spanish photographer and journalist Inma Varandela tries to combine sensual and feminine moods with playful serenity and energy. She loves shooting narrative fashion stories and making up personal scripts in her mind. She’s worked for fashion brands such as Diesel, Bershka and Converse. Her work has been published in numerous magazines such as Nylon, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue and Vice. Her great eye for fashion narrative is now gracing our pages. She shot our profile on fashion brand Beaufille, “The Handsome Girl” (p. 8), as well as our feature “Men in the Mirror” (p. 34). She flew to New York City to document Fashion Week and street style in “ Fashion is a State of Mind” (p. 108).

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CONTRIBUTORS

Our amazing creatives

Toronto native photographer Andy Lee is a Fine Arts graduate from York University. With an eye for capturing striking and bold images, his passion for photography and fashion has taken him around the world. Inspired by classic Hollywood cinema, Andy aims to photograph a sense of timelessness and alluring beauty. He brought his playful expertise to our fashion stories “Retrospective” (p. 68) and “Atélier” (p. 90).

Benjamin Edward

is a model and an illustrator who likes to share how he sees the world. Colours are brighter, highlights are sharper, and unfortunate occurrences always have a positive twist. Illustration allows him to share his outlook on life and make the everyday extraordinary. He magically illustrated our feature “Atélier” (p. 90).

Makeup Artist Onna Chan was born into a family of artists;her grandparents were Chinese Opera Performers and her Aunt owned a Beauty Spa, where Onna got her first taste of beauty at the age of four. Her precise hand and a love of colour steered her towards the makeup profession even while majoring in art and design in college. Whether her asignment is print, advertising, editorial, a music video, or a television interview in HD Onna seamlessly adjusts her technique to the individual and is an experienced team player. She makes every woman look and feel beautiful in their own skin. We were lucky to have her talent gracing our pages in our cover story (p. 50) and “Metrópolis” (p. 78)

Writer Kamal Musharbash has worked in the fashion industry for over ten years and is easily inspired by researching and exploring new designers. His passion for writing stems from traveling and reading books in multiple languages. From Dubai to Paris, New York to Toronto, Kamal’s appreciation for the metropolitan lifestyle easily translates to his interest for writing. Kamal keeps himself busy by working for luxury fashion houses and contributing to magazines such as Trend Hunter and Herringbone. For this issue, he interviewed super-model Alana Zimmer (p. 50), and brought us some of his discoveries in the retail arena in “Style News” (p. 38).

Toronto-based, canadian makeup artist Rachel Smith

describes what she does as an unique form of painting, on a three dimensional canvas that changes every time. She is a graduate of Humber College Business of Fashion program in Toronto. Rachel believes that inspiration can be found anywhere: rifling through magazines or simply walking down the aisles at the grocery store. Rachel brought her expertise to our pages in “The Perfect Cover” (p. 56).

Italian makeup artist GianLuca Orienti moved from Florence to Toronto in 2003. Being the protegé of famous celebrity makeup artist Gil Cagné and working in fashion shows in Milan, Rome and Florence, made it easy for him to continue his amazing career here in Canada. Ever since, he’s worked for numerous Canadian Fashion magazines and newspapers, commercial advertising as well as television. Having a natural eye for beauty and an original vision, he brings something unique to all his assignments. He has worked with many celebrities and supermodels such as Feist, Sarah Polley, Karen Kain, Coco Rocha, Yasmine Warsame, among many others. He’s also worked for makeup lines such as Chanel, Dior, Guerlain, Burberry, and YSL Beauté. GianLuca enjoys teaching a new generation of artists at Complections College of Makeup Art & Design. We were fortunate to work with him in “Men in the Mirror” (p. 34), “Retrospective (p. 68) and “Atelier” (p. 90).

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STORY HED

Story Dek

PROFILE

The

HANDSOME GIRL INSIDE THE BEAUFILLE STUDIO

INTERVIEW, CORISSA BAGAN 8 HERRINGBONE PHOTOGRAPHY, INMA VARANDELA


STORY HED

Story Dek

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STORY HED

Story Dek

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THE HANDSOME GIRL

Inside the Beaufille studio

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Beauf ille Spring/Summer 2014

hloé and Parris Gordon create clothing and jewellery, respectively, for their line Beaufille. They are classically trained to pay attention to every part of the garment production process with an eye for quality and detail and the skills to create by hand. After showing their Spring/Summer 2014 collection in Toronto, they welcomed us into their studio and spoke with us about how their process, their signature techniques, and the nature of craft labour in the fashion industry. Where did your interest in fashion come from, and how did you learn the skills to do what you do? CHLOÉ: Our mother has always been very into art and fashion. She made clothes for herself and Parris and I as we grew up, and instead of going on walks to the park when we were younger we would go to Holt Renfrew and the shops on Bloor. There was always so much art in our lives. We’ve always been very visually stimulated. I’d always taken Art but never really knew how it would become anything. When I was seventeen I went to do Costume Studies at Dalhousie. After learning how to sew there and through my mom, I realized that I didn’t just want to make stuff for the theatre. I had ideas. So I ended up going to Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, where Parris went as well. I majored in Textiles and minored in Fashion so my training is in creating fabrics. In a sense, the sewing part isn’t the biggest part of fashion design; it’s more what you can do with fabric. I learned how to create textiles from scratch, how to dye print, weave, crochet,

knit, any type of handwork, really. This is why our pieces are so detail oriented. We think about creating a textile, and interesting ways of putting something together and decorating it. PARRIS: I did jewellery design and metalsmithing at NSCAD, which involved everything from learning how to build jewellery from a flat piece of metal, to carving wax, to enamelling. All construction was from scratch. CHLOÉ: Our training is very much rooted in the classical way of making things, so almost everything is by hand, from scratch, and you’re trained to do every step. That has really helped us as designers because we pay attention to every part of the process. Can you walk us through your creative process? P: We start coming up with inspiration midway through the collection that we’re working on finishing. At that point, we’ve gotten all our ideas out about one thing so we’re naturally thinking about the next. I know that Chloé and I are supposed to be doing this right now because we never get to the end of the season and think, ‘oh shit, what are we going to do next?’ We always know and are so eager to start. We’ll discuss one inspiration and what we can contrast it with, other elements we can bring in, fabric stories, and ways to use hardware and manipulate things.

THERE WAS ALWAYS SO MUCH ART IN OUR LIVES. WE’VE ALWAYS BEEN VERY VISUALLY STIMULATED.

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THE HANDSOME GIRL

Inside the Beaufille studio

We go to the library and research our subjects of inspiration, and we talk to our mother who brings more ideas to the plate. We get direction for the prints, hardware and clothing first of all. Then we focus on creating the garments and the jewellery collection. We finish samples, we shoot them and then we say goodbye to them until fashion week. Is there one part of your process that is particularly important or close to heart? P: I think actually creating the samples is the most close to heart because you’re becoming better at what you are actually trained in. Chloe and I get better at creating with every collection. She gets better at pattern drafting, manipulating fabrics and brainstorming different ways of putting them together, whereas I get better at actually making jewellery or setting stones or working with 3-D programs on the computer. C: I would say the part when you finish all the preliminary work and actually start to make the physical piece is when my attention is undivided. Because you’re taking so much in for the weeks or months when you’re trying to design and put things together, it’s easy to get distracted and swayed. For me it’s hard to properly translate things from my head into actual things, so when that happens it’s very exciting. But I also really love the preliminary stages. They each have a special place. Do you become attached to your pieces as you make them? C: Yeah, you feel like it’s your child and if someone insults it you’re like, ‘back off.’ P: Especially the pieces that were the hardest in the collection. To see those finished basically brings tears to your eyes. Because you’re like, ‘this was the biggest bitch to make ever, and I finished it and it’s here,’ and it becomes everyone’s favourite piece. How important is function to your designs? P: Jewellery has to be wearable, but functional jewellery is a whole different category. For our collection with Little Doe, we made a ring that you can put your cigarette into and it just smokes. Some rings have a little hinge locket, and we did a ring that’s a guitar slider. Jewellery definitely has a place to be functional but in terms of the bare minimum of the word, every ring can be put on. There are some pieces that a certain person with a certain style would never touch, and then there are some pieces that anyone would wear. People need to wear it and people have to buy it so it’s more practicality that we have to consider every day than function. We really had to tone ourselves down from what we wanted to do straight out of school though because our school’s so conceptual. They basically say do the craziest thing you possibly can, so it’s more of a competition of technique and idea. C: There will be details on a garment that are purely decorative and not functional, but our bottom line is wearability, now more than ever. When we started, it was more

about the piece itself than whether someone could wake up everyday and throw it on. We were stuck in the mindset that everything had to display our skill set and what we could do as artists. Now it’s more about the business of fashion. Do you have signature construction techniques? P: The most defining thing for the jewellery is that everything looks antiqued. We don’t use a high mirror finish that you see in a lot of fine jewellery. Everything is blackened and then repolished or matted on top of that to look like it’s an antique piece of jewellery. C: The look of the clothing is always a bit oversized. The silhouette is pretty recognizable. I love to combine structured outerwear with flowing undergarments. But for the most part, it’s integrating the hardware into the garments themselves, breathing new life into classic pieces. What does the word ‘craft’ mean to you? P: It’s the basis of our practice. We consider what we do a craft, especially since we make things with our hands rather than pass off sketches to other people.

I THINK IN SOCIETY IN GENERAL, CONSUMERS ARE SMARTER AND ASKING WAY MORE QUESTIONS THAN THEY EVER HAVE.

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Runway Shots: Michael Ho.

Beauf ille Fall/Winter 2013


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STORY HED

Story Dek

Images fr om their inspir ation al mood board

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THE HANDSOME GIRL

Inside the Beaufille studio

Do you think craft labour is becoming more or less significant, or valued, in the fashion industry? P: I think a resurgence is happening. We’ve gone through a huge fast fashion phase and people are noticing their shirts disintegrating in the wash or changing shape, and their jewellery tarnishing, changing colours and turning their fingers green. I think people are getting sick of it. It will take time to transition, but more people are becoming interested in investing in something that might be more expensive, but will last the test of time. C: People want to know what they’re putting their money into. I think in society in general, consumers are smarter and asking more questions than they ever have. What would you say are the greatest signifiers of quality in a garment? C: Fabric for sure, and whether the threads are clipped. So many companies that mass manufacture miss so many threads, especially on buttonholes. And fit. Also that it doesn’t look like someone else, that you’re buying into an original thought and idea. Do you think production should be more transparent? C: Definitely. I think people love to see a factory setting. Any movie I see where you get a look inside a designer’s studio makes me like that designer more. P: We went to a great knitting factory in Bolivia one season and their kit came with a CD that showed all the workers. You met everyone in the studio and saw every single woman that’s hand knitting your sweaters. It was a huge selling point. C: Huge. They had a daycare and could bring their children to work, for example. It definitely swayed our vote. We worked with that knitwear company because it felt like we were making a difference somewhere. Do you feel like the attention you put into the construction process and the quality of your garments gets enough attention from the fashion industry? Are people interested in hearing about how you create and the knowledge you have of how to do that? P: I think people who know our story and people who have an eye for that, which is more of a rare person that you’d like to think, are impressed. But it’s the media who are more interested in those stories than it is the buyers because buyers want to know if a garment is going to sell or not, based on other items that have sold in their store. But there are the buyers and consumers out there who find the story to be a selling feature. They’re looking for products with thought, effort, and a from-scratch mentality. It’s just not as prevalent as you’d want it to be in this industry. How do you think that could change? P: It has to be a brand that people follow and want enough for them to really care. You have to really care about a label’s lifestyle and mentality. If someone found out that Prada was hand making these links and riveting them between clothing they’d think it was a fantastic and revolutionary thing. C: It’s also especially hard in North America because schools that teach the

traditional way of making things are a bit of a dying breed. It’s more about what machines and man power can do for you as opposed to how you can do something on your own from basically nothing. But there’s something to be said for actually understanding what that machine is doing. It allows you to think beyond what it’s capable of. That hand element is out there but I think unless you’re knowledgable, people have a hard time getting it. I think buyers also have to take a stand to invest in this kind of work because they are the ones that finance designers in a sense, so they have more power than you know. I find that a lot of buyers all buy the same product. There are designers doing things in a more thoughtful, art-based way, and then there’s the mass produced brands. Buyers could have a huge swing in shops being diversified. How does being a designer effect how you purchase clothing? P: All of us here hardly buy anything anymore because we know how everything is made. If I’m going to buy things, it’s probably going to be vintage. C: Or it’s going to be an inspiring piece that has made me think about something. Then I need to buy it to examine it and live in it. P: What we do buy, aside from the plain white tee or a pair of jeans, we’ve spent a lot of money on, it’s the one or two things we’ve bought that year, and it’s very inspiring. C: I typically will only buy things that I don’t make, and that’s denim and shoes. All my jewellery is either made by Parris or jeweller friends of mine and the same goes for clothing. How can people start appreciating good design? P:People should be really conscious about inspecting the insides of garments. I think the majority will relate to the story of a piece of clothing disintegrating after a year of wearing it. You might spend more in the beginning but you end up spending less in the long run. C: As a designer , it can be frustrating to see everyone buy a copy or imitation of something. I always buy a design from the designer. It might take me awhile to save up for it but I think it’s worth it. It’s really important to give credit where it’s due, and you also have a bit of a better experience with the piece. Research what you buy and know about what you’re wearing. It’s important to support the idea makers and the people that are inspiring the rest of the industry.

IT’S IMPORTANT TO SUPPORT THE IDEA MAKERS AND THE PEOPLE THAT ARE INSPIRING THE REST OF THE INDUSTRY.

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VIEW POINT

THE TIGHT ROPE OF FASHION

Balancing commercialization with creation

TEXT, RYAN PAYNE PHOTOGRAPHY, BEATRIZ JUAREZ

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THE TIGHT ROPE OF FASHION

I

n a rare opportunity a few years back, I got the chance to hear Miuccia Prada talk about creativity in design; she politely commented, “There is a form of repression in the world; everybody wants to keep you serious and reasonable. There is never space for dreams of the realization of big ideas.” Her words, always wellcrafted, have rung in my head for ages. I couldn’t understand how a woman who uses peacock feathers and pays for a certain type of grass to feed her own breed of goats for cashmere could talk about restraint. However, after attending over 50 fashion shows in the span of three weeks and watching the progression of a few young designers over the years, I realized that what she was talking about was the creative journey and progression these design artists embark upon in fashion circles today. At first, these new designers start out with such inspiration, but with limited funding, they create a few remarkable pieces, leading the audience to believe the next show will be even better. John Galliano is a classic example: his first collection in 1984 titled Les Incroyables, was purchased in its en-

“IMAGINE HOW HARD IT IS TO SEE DESIGNERS SEDUCED INTO PRODUCING SIMPLE CREATIONS...”

Balancing commercialization with creation

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tirety by Browns. Yet, in his glory days as creative director at Dior, Galliano only produced these unique designs for the runway, and then sold basics, t-shirts, cocktail dresses, watered down versions of his elaborate creations for the democratized masses. And this is the repression Ms. Prada talks about, to consistently watch these designers be pulled into producing basic items (or commercialized versions of their designs) to pay the bills, appease investors (by appealing to a wider audience range) or deliver sound bite fashion outfits for the press in the fashion industry circus (garments which tend to be overly treated, and overly designed). It seems harmless, everybody needs to eat, until you realize these designers are performing on a tight rope between designing fashions or creating costumes and producing commercialized, mass-appealing apparel. The difference between them in my definition is apparel can simply be bought and worn; is clothing to cover the body. The ending might be the same for each of these definitions but the journey in each is significantly different. Fashion lives in this space between right and wrong, where the entertainment and excitement of reflecting and understanding designs is presented through clothing. So you can imagine how hard it is to see designers seduced into producing simple creations. Then, a few years later with their innovation and the brand’s mythology washed away in basic, sellable apparel, these designers are at a loss for their lack of press, which leaves them easily forgotten with the next young big designer’s arrival, starting the cycle again. Few seem to balance this line of commercial with fashionable. A personal favourite is the Montréalbased brand Rudsak. With a constant eye for flare, their jackets can go from looking like chic notions of a medical uniform to a feathery look of dyed fur upon leather, with symmetrical Mac trenches and peacoats sliced in between. It is rare to see such fashion forward creations from a Canadian brand. Perhaps it has something to do with their business being focused on leather goods with apparel, an emergence from their


HOWCAN WE CHANGE PERSPECTIVES ABOUT THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF FASHION IN ORDER TO HELP YOUNG DESIGNERS SURVIVE AND BECOME ESTABLISHED NAMES IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY?

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THE TIGHT ROPE OF FASHION

Some images fr om Thomas Bálint ’s SS14 collection.

luggage collections. Other examples that bridge the gap between commercial and fashion are Thomas Bálint, with his somber all-black collection, and Sid Neigum’s innovative creations, both playing with proportion and drapery, Rei Kawakubo would be proud. How can we change perspectives about the commercialization of fashion in order to help young designers survive and become established names in the fashion industry? It is at times heartbreaking to see these visionaries constrained into producing their brand’s signature items repetitively. Amplified at large established houses, the technical designer, (or team of them) usually fresh out of school, changes a few details to adjust to today’s average body shape and reproduce the same collections repetitively (with a few new injections and spins off of the original), trapped by the brand’s standards and signature methods, leaving the designers to do interviews and create only a fraction of their potential. An example is to look at some of the fashion houses where the designer decides to leave, while the house still produces clothing under his name. Jil Sander has left her self-named house publicly a few times, citing herself feeling too constricted and forced

“FEW DESIGNERS SEEM TO BALANCE THIS LINE OF COMMERCIAL WITH FASHIONABLE...”

Balancing commercialization with creation

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into designing within a brand box. Her key investors (keen to mint money with the Sander’s name), propel the label with unknown designers and almost encase the brand in a glass bubble, constantly for the admiration of others; however, to never change or mix with society, only view it and react. Each time the fashion press comment upon Sander’s return to her label, jackets fit that much better and colours are that much more accurate with the seasons. There is a reason why it is her name on the door. The mythology of fashion being more than just clothing is lost in this retailing reality of the industry being truly about selling clothing. Stefano Pilati, former creative director at Yves St. Laurent (now Saint Laurent), once commented he had to give the impression that there is a balance between what the firm represents and what is happening in the world and how he picks up on the zeitgeist. Which is fashion? A commentary on society at the time, or a consumer’s belief in the authenticity of the brand, specially, when new designers must replicate the old designer’s signature items just with a touch up. Same house, new paint. Yes, it is cheaper to market an established house showcasing a new designer ascribed with the old designer’s meanings, than establish a new name and identity. These brand signatures, standards and requirements seem to be stultifying the creative industry. Why don’t we let these new stars breathe on their own? Yes, some will not survive, but some might grow to places never known to exist, if we just release and support them. It is a tight-rope walk for all. Do not think I believe it to be easy. Though I have to wonder why some designers balance the tight rope dance of being a designer so gracefully, like performers at the circus, while others make me cringe watching, hoping they just survive, let alone thrive. The few tight-rope walkers I’ve met (not wanting to list their names), said being in their art form is a crazy ambition to take on. The challenge followed by an intense level of concentration. To knowingly abandon what is practical and good business practice in order to create and perform. To ban the word impossible and free fall without a parachute into what awaits. To the visionary designers today, I look forward to seeing you and what you have crafted at the next shows, but take heed, it seems only those who risk going too far reach the kingdom of design heaven.


Flo wers, 2012. Patter n design for Swedish f ashion br and Minimarket.

PROFILE

DREAM MAKER INTERVIEW, BEATRIZ JUAREZ


DREAM MAKER

Inside the magic world of Olaf Hajek

BERLIN-BASED, INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED ARTIST AND ILLUSTRATOR OLAF HAJEK was born in Rendsburg, Germany, but raised in Holland before attending art school. He registered at the Fachhochschule in Düsseldorf to study graphic design, but switched to illustration when he realized he did not want to spend his career in front of a computer. Good choice. Ever since, Hajek has dedicated his life to creating fantastic worlds where anything is possible,making use of folk culture, mythology, religion, history, and geographical elements to explore the opposition between imagination and reality within our culture. Part of his success comes from the wide range of themes and focal points he uses in his work creating worlds that could indeed exist in our dreams. Drawing on popular celebrities, fairytale motifs, heroic acts, mythology, folklore, and juxtaposing these themes with common ideas and objects, he brings new interpretations, and proves why he is a master illustrator, a maker of dreams. His clients range from big corporations such as Apple, Macy’s, Bloomberg Inc, The Ritz Carlton, Nike, and Barney’s, to publishing companies such as ELLE, Spiegel, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Gourmet Magazine, Time Magazine, Stern, Architectural Digest, The Wall Street Journal,Taschen Books and Playboy. His work as a painter has been exhibited in several countries and has 2 monographs published by Gestalten, Flowerhead (2009) and Marie Antoinette (2012). We had the pleasure to take a glimpse at his fabulous world.

INSIDE THE MAGIC WORLD OF OLAF HAJEK

You’ve had a long-standing relationship with the fashion industry, how do you stay current in a world inundated by digital imagery? I wouldn’t call myself just a fashion illustrator. I build up my own personal style and I try to develop a personal, individual imagery. I was always inspired and touched by the imperfection of beauty and the power of simplicity. That’s why I love

WE ARE LIVING IN A WORLD WHERE WE LOOK FOR SUSTAINABILITY AND WE ARE AWARE OF OUR ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY. FASHION IS OF COURSE REFLECTING ON THIS MOVEMENT TOO.

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DREAM MAKER

Inside the magic world of Olaf Hajek

Top and bottom: Part of “Fashion Heads” Series, 2011. Center, cover for Taschen ’s Paris tr avel guide.

of the collection. I did a pattern for the swedish brand MINIMARKET for example. I just did a painting for an italian brand to represent the new collection and I see that even bigger brands like Prada using illustration on their new creation. There’s a trend to cooperate between fashion designers and illustrators and artists. I guess the consumer is more interested in this cultural interaction. Fashion and art is a powerful combination. Have you ever considered using different materials? I work with a variety of them, mostly acrylic and gouache, but enjoy working with pencils and paper as well. For me the materials are very important; I also work a lot on wood and try to create an idea of an already used background and patina. Who are some fashion illustrators you admire and why? My all time favorite is René Gruau, because of his amazing elegant work, which still looks modern as ever and will never go out of style. But I was really surprised and inspired by the fashion illustration of the amazing artist Grayson Perry. I love that outsider look on fashion. What do you think about the actual role traditional illustration has in the fashion world? I believe in the powerful partnership of illustration/art and fashion to create a contemporary vision of our creative world. In terms of fashion, who would you like to work for? I just finished a nice assignment for a luxury retailer in Istanbul and might do a big campaign for a fashion mall in Korea. But of course it would be wonderful to work together with a high fashion brand. I really love the collaboration of Prada and Jeanna Detallante. I would love to see my paintings that prominent on a new collection.

so much African and South American folk art and Indian miniatures. I guess this unique idea of my work helps to be seen in this digital world. Recently, there’s been a resurgence in traditional techniques in illustration, especially in fashion apparel, why do you think this is happening? I was always working as a painter and worked in an analog way. For me, this trend is no surprise. In a world of digital imagery there is a deep desire for the real, the individual and the haptic. We are living in a world where we look for sustainability and we are aware of our environmental responsibility. Fashion is of course reflecting on this movement too. In illustration, the digital tool is getting more and more defined, but a lot of the digital illustration is not very distinguishable. I guess there is a trend for a new generation of illustrators to use more traditional techniques again and enjoy the experience of material and craft. How can fashion illustration in traditional media be used effectively to help fashion apparel companies to connect with consumers? How do you make a consumer connect to your work? Fashion illustration is used more and more for the creation

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Fashion-animals, painting for the Exhibition “Folklore� at Galler y Johanssen, Berlin, 2006.


DREAM MAKER

Inside the magic world of Olaf Hajek

Givenchy Couture, J’N’C Magazine, Ger many, 2008

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DREAM MAKER

Inside the magic world of Olaf Hajek

Delacr oix Couture, J’N’C Magazine, Ger many, 2008

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DREAM MAKER

Inside the magic world of Olaf Hajek

Dr aft for italian br and Kristina Ti, 2013

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Cage, fr om his galler y show “still life” at AJL Art Berlin, 2013 (80x100cm, acr ylic on wood)


MONOCLE


A KALEIDOSCOPIC DUALITY

Joao Paulo Guedes is shouting from the inside out.

INTERVIEW, BEATRIZ JUAREZ

BORN IN BRAZIL, JOAO PAULO GUEDES

always knew he wanted to be a fashion designer but he needed to come to Toronto in order to follow that dream. In Brazil, after completing a degree in marketing and advertising, he was a partner in an ad agency. Since graduating from George Brown College from the Fashion Techniques and Design program, Joao Paulo has created his first all menswear collection, as well as interning under Dennis Merrotto in order to learn more about the fashion world. Currently, Joao Paulo is working on his textile and print inspired second collection. He recently returned from India where he worked and developed his skills as a men’s fashion designer in cooperation with the clothing company Nikhil & Shantanu. We had the pleasure to sit with him and analyze his complex design process. When did you know fashion was in the cards for you as a career? I thought I was meant to go into business so I got degree in marketing and advertising in Brazil but leaned more towards

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A KALEIDOSCOPIC DUALITY

Joao Paulo Guedes is shouting from the inside out

“I LEARNED TO TRUST MY TASTE, STYLE AND TALENT”

Some pieces fr om Joao Paulo’s f ir st collection. The designer in his studio. graphic design. I used to have my own Ad agency with a partner a while ago, but I have always loved fashion. During that time something was missing in my life and decided to move to Toronto. Opened my eyes to so much! Diverse cultures, people, food, styles, fashion. Went back to school to follow my dream. I could barely sew before but I learned lots and learned fast! Going to India proved I had talent and could do this as a career. Why did you choose to focus on men apparel instead of women’s? In school, everything is focused on women’s design. I loved doing it and produced garments I am still proud of. Everyone told me to focus on women because that’s where the money is. But it is not what I think. I have to say “do what you love and makes you happy and do not let people make decisions for you”. I think we need more menswear designers in Toronto and we need more fun clothes for men, not only suits and dress shirts. Once I started my first collection and got such a positive response I know I made the right decision. I can make great fitting pants, shirts, jackets, coats and so on. It’s exciting to make great men’s clothes that men can wear and still be comfortable and fashionable! How did you become interested in textiles and then specifically in linings? I had a great opportunity to work for one of the top contemporary labels in India this summer. Whenever I was

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HIS DESIGN PROCESS

“It takes a team of skilled people to r un a business. Under standing the business model of c lothing design and manuf acturing is good to know for a new designer. It ’s one thing to have great ideas and designs; it ’s another, under standing what I need to do to pr oduce them. I am working with a colleague in India to hopef ully work on designs together to pr oduce and manuf acture in both India and Can ada. This is a global market. Take advice and inspir ation fr om anywhere. Tr ust your ideas. I also sketched a lot. In 2 days I did 30 or more sketches for the designer. With lots of options you can create the best gar ment. I also love to take images, photos, architecture and manipulate it with technology. The contr ast of n ature and beauty with technology and architecture is now inspiring me in my design.”

Some of Joao Paulo’s impressive lining designs.


A KALEIDOSCOPIC DUALITY

Joao Paulo Guedes is shouting from the inside out

fabric shopping I was drawn to prints, color and detailed fabric. In India I saw teams hand sewing fabrics with intense detail and was blown away. Working on suits I never knew that underneath were these intensely intricate linings with patterns inspired by other images. When traveling in India I was so inspired by the temples and through computer manipulation was able to make these kaleidoscopic patterns. What is a lining for you? It is art hidden under the outfit! Linings are something that only the wearer knows what it looks like and the people intimate enough to be around them. There is something about that secret that is inspiring. There is something magical, and secretive about showing off the interior of an outfit and having patterns and designs there, even if the exterior is just a basic jacket. Even in simplistic designs, there can still be an element of fun and wonder underneath. What are the best perks of what you do? Obviously, I get to wear the designs I create! What better perk could you have than that. I’ve also had the great opportunity to meet amazing people and learn from them and also travel to places I never expected. How India changed your perspective about your own design process? On a personal level, going to India was exciting!!! While I did make the big leap from Brazil to Canada 5 years ago, taking this trip to India was a whole new adventure. Immersing myself into this culture was amazing. I never held back from going places, seeing things, shopping in markets, and especially eating the food! I never got sick of the food! Professionally, I learned after finishing school and in India, I learned to trust my taste, style and talent. I also learned to not be afraid of giving my opinion, even to the owner of the company

Some pieces fr om Joao Paulo’s f ir st collection. The designer in his studio.

that I was working for. During my time in India, I was sent to Mumbai to coordinate an amazing fashion photo shoot. I got to work designing restaurant uniforms for a famous English chef. I was able to coordinate a print ad for Vogue India. I created linings for suits, coats and jackets and also sketched designs daily. I also worked with clients to produce their product in a short amount of time. In Canada you have months to produce a collection, in India you have days! Work fast! In the few months there I learned an intense amount. I was offered to work and stay in India, something I really thought about before coming back to Canada to work on my own designs. How do you see your fashion sense evolving? I’m just starting out and already I have been able to go to India and work for Nikhil and Shantalu, intern for Dennis Merrotto, create my own men’s collection, do photo shoots, create my own fabrics, and now I am moving on to my second collection! Ideally I want to market myself and sell my designs globally. I would love

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to have designs that I can sell in Canada, India and Brazil. And I’ve been told I do very good women’s design as well, but that is further down the line. For now I want to make my contemporary, wearable men’s designs. Tell us a bit more about your exploration in textiles, what is it that you love and don’t love so much about the techniques and processes? I love creating and manipulating my designs. Finding amazing fabric. Colours, patterns. When creating patterns, it’s hard to be happy. I can always find a way to make it better

“IT’S HARD TO BE HAPPY WHEN CREATING PATTERNS. I CAN ALWAYS FIND A AWAY TO MAKE IT BETTER, SO IT’S HARD TO STOP.”

so it’s hard to stop. When the textile doesn’t turn out as expected. I can be very critical of my own work. What infuences your work and your life. Food of all kinds, multi-culturalism (I’m a Brazilian-Canadian who loves to travel), architecture (when I am traveling the first thing I am drawn to are the buildings and structure around me) and photography as it is my favorite medium. My partner says I take pictures of everything and have to instagram it. I can manipulate photos into my design. I also listen to my inner voice. I’ve learned to focus on what I want—for better or worse!

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FOCUS

Model, Marinus (Want Man agement); Gr ooming, GianLuca Orienti (TRESemmĂŠ Hair/judyinc.com); Hair, Dat Tr an (Push Man agement).


men

IN THE MIRROR... WHY HAVE MEN SO EAGERLY EMBRACED FASHION?

MEN DRESS FOR COMFORT, NOT STYLE. Men rarely notice clothes. Women dress men. Only gay men are interested in fashion. These set of stereotypes pervade our understanding of men and fashion. As a guy who has always been interested in fashion, I have experienced these attitudes firsthand. My enthusiasm for clothing, particularly as a teenager, was often met with uneasy comments from my friends. Why was I interested in “girls’ stuff”? Was I gay?. The assumption was that it was strange—and certainly suspect of a man’s sexuality—to be interested in fashion. Despite the persistent questions, my fascination with fashion has only grown. I recently completed a PhD at Cambridge University where I spent five years studying women’s fashion consumption. While the experiences of women were different from my own, their stories caused me to question my own relationship with fashion. As an academic—I am now a professor in the School of Fashion at Ryerson University—my first instinct was to turn to research to glean the answers to my questions. To my surprise, few scholars had previously asked men about their consumption of fashion. I shouldn’t have been surprised. The stigma that an interest in fashion calls one’s masculinity into question pervades all areas of our culture, research included. Yet, today’s men are actively engaged with clothing. The $240 billion dollar menswear market is outpacing the growth of the traditionally dominant women’s market by almost double. While sales of most fashion brands declined during the recent recession, men’s luxury brands and retailers reported healthy sales figures and even plans for expansions. TEXT BY DR. BEN BARRY. PHOTOGRAPHY, INMA VARANDELA.

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MEN IN THE MIRROR

Why have men so eagerly embraced fashion?

MEN FELT SELF-CONSCIOUS WHEN THEY COULD NOT FIND CLOTHING TO FIT THEIR BODY TYPE The boom in menswear, along with my personal zeal for the topic, propelled me to explore the unchartered waters of men’s attitudes towards fashion. I sought to understand the reasons underlying men’s consumption of clothing by conducting dozens of interviews with Canadian men. They ranged from 20-to-75 years of age, belonged to diverse racial groups, and were equally segmented by sexual orientation. My results suggest that men are unraveling the stereotypes. To them, fashion is a source of self-expression, empowerment and pleasure. But as men relish in these positive experiences, they also encounter grimmer ones: the insidious effects of being constantly conscious of their appearance and crossing gender codes. The first question I wanted to answer was who were these elusive male fashion consumers. It became immediately apparent in my interviews that they crossed generations, sexualities and other demographics; the average guy was educated, thoughtful and critical about fashion. Men knew the difference between barrel and French cuffs, the current width of lapels and never to match their tie and pocket square. They also noticed other men’s clothing and they didn’t appreciate when men dressed for comfort over style. One man chastised how abysmally most men dress: “These guys are dressed like these massive eight-year-olds … If you stopped them and asked them, they’d say, I want to be comfortable. You can be comfortable in a suit, more comfortable than in your pyjamas.” Not only were men knowledgeable about fashion but also about its power to project their sense of self to the world. They used fashion to define new life chapters, attract romantic partners, align themselves with cliques of people, and communicate their originality. One man explained that he selected clothing to distinguish himself: “When I wear something that’s been fitted, that’s even just been marginally tailored, I stand out against people who bought clothes that have not even been hemmed.” In expressing their individuality and identity, men played with cuts, colours and patterns. One man explained how his colourful jacket choice reflected his personality: “My orange jacket is quite intentional because men at 75 don’t usually wear these bright colours. I feel that I’m vibrant; my jacket is not only in fashion but it also reflects my intellectual curiosity.” When deciding what to wear, men selected outfits to control how they were perceived. One man credited his fashion choices with helping his relatives receive better medical care: “I spent a lot of time in hospitals taking care of aging relatives … I’ve learned that in a hospital, if you’re wearing a suit and tie, your relative will get better care, period.” Men also chose clothing to challenge negative perceptions that others might have of them due to their youth or disability. One man, who uses a wheelchair, explained how fashion allowed him to defy people’s stereotypes: “People look at disability and don’t necessarily see competence as their first perception. Dressing the part of competence through my conservative style is very useful for elevating us to a more equal level.”

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Men also had fun engaging with fashion. Experimenting with clothing provided an escape for a surgeon in my study: “Fashion gives me an escape in my social life to be a bit more daring and quite different from my dayto-day work clothes—scrubs and all”. Other men relished the social connections that fashion facilitated. Speaking about his tailor, one man said: “I like the social interaction that I have with my tailor, the men in the shop, and the men who come by the shop. It becomes a social club.” Fashion is also a source of intellectual stimulation. Men enjoyed learning about the history of brands, the quality of fabrics and craftsmanship. One man spoke about engaging with fashion with the same verve as having just read a great book, “Fashion feeds my desire for lore, and learning about production, learning where things are made.” Why have men so eagerly embraced fashion? Researchers have provided a host of reasons—from increased equality for women to consumerism in postindustrial society. The men in my study, however, spoke about the Internet as a gateway to fashion knowledge and confidence. One man revealed how virtual reality gave him the courage to explore fashion in physical reality: “Fashion can be seen as foppish or feminine, and so I was apprehensive to show too much interest. But four years ago I found an online discussion board on men’s fashion. I started talking to other guys about it… I eventually started continuing those conversations in real life.” Since virtual reality exists as a realm separate from physical reality, it


MEN IN THE MIRROR

Why have men so eagerly embraced fashion?

provides an anonymous space for men to engage with fashion without publically jeopardizing their masculinity. Once they discovered that they were not alone in their love of fashion, these men came out as fashion connoisseurs. Yet becoming a fashion enthusiast has been accompanied by anxiety. Men felt self-conscious when they could not find clothing to fit their body shape. One man spoke about the lack of options available for larger men: “The very few brands that cater towards larger sizes have the least fashionable clothing. It is very frustrating.” A shorter man similarly spoke about the difficultly finding proportional clothing: “As a guy who’s 5’4, who’s skinny-fat, it’s hard to find clothes, because most clothes are for skyscrapers.” Aging also produces stress when men choose clothing. One man would not wear certain styles due to his age: “Here’s the thing about retro; if you’re in your 40s, it looks like something from your closet that you wore in the 80s or your hand me

“WHEN I WEAR SOMETHING THAT’S BEEN FITTED, THAT’S EVEN JUST BEEN MARGINALLY TAILORED, I STAND OUT AGAINST PEOPLE WHO BOUGHT CLOTHES THAT HAVE NOT EVEN BEEN HEMMED.”

“Some guys are dressed like these massive eight-yearolds …If you stopped them and asked them, they ’d say, I want to be comfortable. You can be comfortable in a suit, more comfortable than in your pyjamas.”

down. No matter how hard you try, it doesn’t become retro; on an older man it becomes old clothing.” Some men also felt uneasy when clothing pushed, rather than nudged, traditional gender codes. Clothes that diverged from men’s sartorial traditions were seen to undercut their role as breadwinners and stewards of power and authority. Other men felt constrained by what they saw as a narrow concept of masculinity promoted in fashion. To them, most men’s clothing marginalized, if not excluded, femininity and flamboyance. Discouraged by the lack of diversity in men’s fashion options, one man lamented: “It’s always like here are shorts in 20 different colours, but the length is just above the knee. They aren’t willing to acknowledge the different types of men in the world; some men like shorter shorts.” Although men’s interest in fashion might suggest that they have chiseled away some of the pillars of traditional masculinity, the intersection of masculinity and fashion was a persistent source of stress. Like the men in my research, I am no longer alone in my love of fashion; my friends are now as equally interested. Our suits, coloured chinos or shorts cut high on the thigh express our personalities and bring us joy. Yet fashion’s toxic lining could overtake these positive experiences. It is up to us to confront our struggles, and those of other men. Doing so is a challenge. Just as fashion has been dissociated from men, so too has body image and anxiety. The platform to engage with these delicate topics, however, is fashion itself. The power of fashion to bring us together in virtual and physical reality, while also providing a mode of self-expression, can enable us to explore issues that challenge our gendered identities and our broader cultural codes. The process will likely produce discomfort and unease, as masculinity is deeply seeded, but the outcome may open-up a panorama of possibilities for all of us to embrace the diverse ways of being men.

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PICKS

STYLE NEWS

An collection of this season’s must-haves

TEXT BY KAMAL MUSHARBASH

Win one pair of your own customized Joker’s Closet SS14 collection shoes; We have 3 pair s! Your size, your design, your own style! To f ind out about the r ules, follow us on Instagr am and Facebook. 38

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The saying goes “try walking a mile in her shoes”; however, what if her shoes were one of a kind and self-customized? This is the aim for Toronto-based brand Joker’s Closet. In a mere seven months, Ashley Ebner has catapulted her collaborative and creative brand to a buzzworthy footwear company. With fashionable ties such as Bonnie Brooks and Robin Kay, Ebner merged her love of footwear design with a renewed sense of business to create the ever-changing label. Joker’s Closet’s quirkiness dons its name after the Joker card, “where in certain games, it can become what it wants to be; thus giving its consumers the power to customize” [that perfect pair of shoes], says Ebner. Joker’s Closet currently features six seasonal silhouettes accompanied by complementary colours with endless possibilities. In a world where customization reigns, Ebner stays ahead by evolving the brand season by season. In a short time, Ebner has created an even balance of luxury and eccentricity all to generate reaction. It is a mix of “fashion evolution and trend, with no boundaries. We are not offering a service, it is an experience.” This venture has caught the eye of several media outlets­— from Vogue Spain to Women’s Wear Daily and Korean designer Lie Sang Bong. Ebner kicked into high gear this fall by collaborating with Lie Sang Bong for Paris and Seoul Fashion Week. A dozen combinations of silhouettes and materials have been created to complement the designer’s collection and have gained positive response from critics. The brand is evolving daily and is constantly changing not only its demographic, but also its offer. Talks of venturing into the men’s category are in the works. “It’s a natural transition,” explains Ebner, with a strong potential of branching into accessories. There are many projects ahead for the Canadian entrepreneur, but like any smart businesswoman, she will take it one step at a time —best shoe forward, of course.

Photogr a phy: Mario Miotti.

SOLE SISTER


STYLE NEWS

A collection of this season’s must-haves

Left: The Cicer o Grey Wool; The Sardo Classic Mid Red; The Southport Br own Leather.

A NEW FACE FOR MEN’S FASHION

NOT YOUR FATHER’S JEANS

IN A MAN’S WORLD Luigi Sardo kick-started a fashionable

venture for the urban gentleman by designing canvas and leather sneakers. Designer Marcus Lacaria, founder of the brand, combines his Italian heritage and international inspirations. creating day-to-night sneakers, mixing fashionable ease and a colourful palette. Following the instant successes of the Sardo Classic high-top sneaker, several new designs such as The Cicero and The Southport were added, expanding the line and securing its name in the footwear industry. After receiving rave reviews, the line further increased its offerings by expanding to handbags, umbrellas, colourful striped socks and necklaces. Visit luigisardo.com

If there is one constant item in almost every person’s wardrobe, it would be their favourite pair of denim pants. Parke New York, an American-based denim brand has enlightened us with its quality. By adding just a little stretch, these made-to-order pants are available in slim and regular cuts to suit all shapes and styles. The company began on kickstarter.com where its budget goal was surpassed due to its innovative and high-tech tailoring methods. Parke’s Premium Active Denim line is manufactured with long-lasting high performance and comfort in mind. Eliminating the extra cost of retail markups, your new favourite pair of denim pants is available in both indigo and black, exclusively at parke.myshopify.com

Above: Sardo Classic Jer ser y; The Cicer o on Navy Leather.

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It seems as though Tom Ford has not only secured his name in rejuvenating Gucci and the former Yves Saint Laurent, but now his latest aim is to rejuvenate men’s skin. Launched in November of 2013, this line is quite similar to the designer’s own daily routine. Fully equipped with eight products, ranging from a hydrating lip balm, purifying face cleanser, bronzing gel and of course, that infamous concealer. Men are left to question whether or not the collection is more of a cosmetic line, rather than a skin care regime. However, should you be the type of gentleman with attention to detail as precise as Tom Ford himself, then this should make your skin jump with joy. Ford’s Intensive Purifying Mud Mask is unique in its own trait. Once applied, the mud reacts to the skin and changes colour once completed. Follow up with the Oil Free Daily Moisturizer and your daily skin routine will never be the same. Tom Ford for Men is available at select Holt Renfrew locations and tomford.com Left to right: Oil Free Daily Moisturizer (50ml); Purifying Face Cleanser (150ml); Skin Revitalizing Concentr ate (30ml).


STYLE NEWS

A collection of this season’s must-haves

PICK ME UP! Your best accessor y may also be your most necessar y.

Mackage has become iconic in the

Named after the Ghurka soldiers in the Himalayas, this nostalgic brand had made its way into the luxury markets with fashionable and practical creations. Marley Hodgson founded Ghurka in the 1970s after visiting an antiquities auction of the soldiers’ leather gear. Inspired by the heritage and durability of the leather, the label was born for the sole reason of producing lifelong handbags for men. Decades later, these Americanmade leather goods easily entice the customer with a modern repertoire and undeniable imprint in the leather industry. Ghurka caters to a variety of niches, ranging from business briefcases, casual messengers and totes, and exclusive watchcases for the collector at heart. Each day brings on a new journey, and one should not be left behind without the perfect handbag companion.

“A woman’s handbag has forever been her most personal accessory,” is emblazoned across Edie Parker’s website. This statement could not be anymore true, hence gathering a solid following over bespoke clutches. Designed with the 1950s and 60s socialites in mind, these acrylic clutches emanate a retro feel fully equipped with clean lines and uncompromising quality. Whether you decide to have your name cursively written on the clutch or a simple word that best describes you, rest assured you would be carrying a one of a kind piece custom made for you. Created and designed in the United States, Edie Parker captivates the truest sense of femininity, gem-flaked across these box clutches portraying you in your most elegant. Visit edie-parker.com.

Fr om top to bottom: Khaki Twill Handbag C HARLIE II No. 595; Vintage Chestnut Leather Suitcase KILBURN II No. 156; Khaki Twill/Lambswool REVERSIBLE TOTE No. 241. For more info visit ghurka.com 40

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industry for its remarkable outerwear designs. Beginning with staple jackets that lead to asymmetrical cuts, furtrimmed bombers, down-filled winter coats and children’s wear. After staking its claim in the fashion industry and gathering quite a celebrity following, designers Eran Elfassy and Elisa Dahan featured their latest collection in leather pieces and introduced to us their line of handbags. Available in autumn of 2013, the collection is a direct indication of the quality and mastery of Mackage’s evolution. The collection includes the essential handle bag, cross-body messengers and snakeskin embossed backpacks in several rich colours. These handbags evoke an attitude perfect for the urban jungle; accented with metallic corners, pops of colour and intricate turn-lock closures. Mackage had become one of the most talked about shows during Toronto Fashion Week and continues to climb its way up the fashion ladder. These famed jackets and handbags are available in time for the holidays at their flagship boutique in Soho in New York City, and mackage.com

A sneak-peek of the SS14 collection. Fr om top to bottom: Cody Cr ossbody Pur se in Poppy; Lela Clutch in Sand; Loryn small bucket bag in White and Sage shopper in Color block.


STYLE NEWS

A collection of this season’s must-haves

HAVE APP, WILL TRAVEL If you were to backtrack ten years, what would be the sole item you could not live without? Now pull yourself back to 2013 and what seems to be the discrepancy? Our daily lives have become so technologically reliable, we are often left wondering how we have ever lived without them —iPhones specifically. This world of customization has infiltrated itself not only in our coffees and clothing, but also in our phones. It comes with no surprise that brands such as L’Wren Scott and Louis Vuitton customized phone applications that relate to our daily routines. L’Wren Scott’s L’App is a user friendly application which includes pictures of the designers travels, found advertisements and the latest collaboration with Banana Republic. Louis Vuitton’s Amble is for the traveler at heart. Track your journeys with an integrated map, create your own tours, and share them with your friends instantly. This “iPhonization” of the world currently reigns with designers such as Thakoon and fashion muse Blake Lively. With applications such as Brushes to correct sketches and create designs to Project 365 where you could document your days, one photo at a time. With that said, one can only wonder what other applications are out there?

Fashion Forward: We absolutely love this iPhone 5S, available in 16, 32 and 64GB. Visit a pple.com

EXPAND YOUR HORIZONS...LOCALLY One of Toronto’s most popular shopping experiences happens to take place in Yorkville. Those in the know, or those getting to know the up and coming designers and their fabulous collections can find their spots in Yorkville’s treasured boutiques. RAC Boutique opened its doors to the public in 2010, by Faith Orfus and Glenna Weddle, and thus far have raised fashion’s brow. By securing its name, RAC provides its clients the latest and greatest in cuts and fabrics, and also carries labels exclusively sold at their Cumerland Street location. Brands such as Sass & Bide, Rodebjer, and Anglomania are only a handful of the numerous exciting and established designers found in their ever-changing inventory. By maintaining key permanent brands at store level, RAC also gives opportunity to newer brands by constantly researching and exploring new designers to diversify not only its identity, but also its discerning clientele. RAC prides itself by securing a following of repeat clients and receiving feedback of their current inventory to ensure client satisfaction and a positive insight of their business. For the client interested in a unique shopping environment, RAC also offers private shopping services to elevate the standard and maintain its luxurious image. The team at RAC are the key players in finding The Bazaar; “a four-day shopping collaboration between select Toronto retailers,” explains Weddle. Partnering up with LAB Consignment, GotStyle, and Rita Liefhebber to name a few, RAC keep itself busy by giving back to the community. And The Bazaar is only the beginning. In October of 2012, RAC took on another assignment by bringing in the first citywide Fashion’s Night Out. By sitting on the committee, they have created one of the biggest fashion events in Toronto, gathering a good following of 1500 people. If you are eagerly awaiting something new and unique to add to your wardrobe, be sure to stop by RAC Boutique on 124 Cumberland Street in Yorkville.

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PICKS

O O O O

T H E NO TA B L E O B J E C T

BY LUIS ZULAYHKA

A fine composition of shapes, palettes, textures and scents.

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SHAPES OF DECORUM 1. Swarovski by Shourouk Golden brooch, $160; 2. Swarovski Vona brooch, $140

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THE NOTABLE OBJECT

A fine composition of shapes, palettes, textures and scents.

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T R E A S U R E - T R OV E F I G U R E S 1. David Yurman Willow Open Five- Row bracelet with diamonds, $4,800; 2. BCBGMAXAZRIA Floral ring, $28; 3. Swarovski Louise Nude bangle, $280; 4. Tifanny & Co. Ziegfeld black spinel ring with diamonds in sterling silver, $1,650; 5. Swarovski Verseau necklace, $865; 6. Thomas Sabo Sterling Silver Glam & Soul “love knot” ring, $198.

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BOLD SPECTRUM 1. Swarovski by Shourouk Green brooch, $160; 2. Dean Davidson Spectrum collar in Black Onyx, $425; 3. THOMAS SABO Sterling Silver Glam & Soul “feather” ring, $274; 4. Tiffany & Co. Emerald-cut emerald ring with diamonds in 18k gold and platinum, $236,500; 5. Thomas Sabo Sterling Silver Glam & Soul bangle bracelets (sold separately) Gold/ Rose Gold, $409 each, Silver $274 each; 6. Tiffany & Co. Atlas® bangles (from top), 18 karat rose gold with diamonds $9,900; 18 karat gold $6,400; 18 karat white gold with diamonds $9,900; 18 karat rose gold $6,400.


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I N T R I CAT E G A M E 1. Milly Feather clutch, $395; 2. Milly Pink Water Snake clutch,$325; 3. kate spade Saturday Mini A satchel in Electric Blue, $165.00; 4. Mulberry Willow tote in Taupe Silky Classic Calf with Nickel, $2,700; 5. kate spade New York miss pennys emmanuelle clutch, $298; 6. kate spade New York 2 park avenue beau bag, $498; 7. M2MALLETIER Amor Fati leather shoulder bag in Mandarina, $1,696; 8. Swarovski Nirvana Star bag, $650. 46

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THE NOTABLE OBJECT

A fine composition of shapes, palettes, textures and scents.

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C H R O M AT I C E S S E N C E 1. Marc Jacobs Honey eau de parfum, $105 (100ml); 2. Ana Sui La Vie De Boheme eau de toilette, $88 (75ml); 3. Roses de Chloé eau de toilette, $85 (50ml); $105 (75ml); 4. Reem Acra eau de parfum, $135 (90ml); 5. Balenciaga L’Eau Rose eau de toilette, $128 (75ml); 6. Madly Kenzo eau de toilette, $92 (80ml); 7. Vera Wang Be Jeweled eau de parfum, $75 (50ml); 8. Roberto Cavalli Nero Assoluto eau de parfum, $107 (75ml); 9. Kenzo Amour eau de parfum, $119 (100ml); 10. Fan di Fendi Eau Fraiche, $94 (75ml); 11. Michael Kors Glam Jasmine eau de parfum, $105.00 (100ml).


“FASHION IS A SECRET LANGUAGE KNOWN TO ALL DIFFERENT PEOPLE. IT AFFECTS US ON MANY LEVELS, AND EVEN PEOPLE WHO THINK THEY’RE NOT INTO FASHION OR REJECT FASHION, ARE THEN BEING INFORMED JUST IN THE CASE OF REJECTING IT. THE FACT THAT THEY HAD TO REACT AGAINST IT WAS A CONSCIOUS DECISION...” —Louise Wilson, OBE, head of the MA Fashion Design program, Central Saint Martins, London, UK.


HERRINGBONE FASHION


Homegrown beauty turned style-setter, muse and icon.

ALANA PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDREW SOULE INTERVIEW, KAMAL MUSHARBASH FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA

CANADIAN MODEL ALANA ZIMMER has walked the runways of designers such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Marc Jacobs, to becoming the face of cosmetic lines and featured in multiple fashion videos—all in a day’s work. For the past few years, this Kitchener, Ontario native has travelled the world and experienced international wonders that one could only dream about, and donned haute couture creations that dazzle and inspire. Alana’s portfolio features vibrant editorials, religious iconography, incredible makeup and accessories, portraying the endless personalities continues on p. 54

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Madigan Dr a ped Fr ont coat,TED BAKER; Michaela Mar abou-f eather skirt, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart ring, Thomas Sabo.


Chance argyle knit f ur crewneck, OPENING CEREMONY (The Bay and thebay.com); Kaleidoscope Beetle Print skirt, MCQ by Alexander McQueen (The Bay and thebay.com); Première long sleeve shirt, Maison Martin Margiela (maisonmartinmargiela.com).


Cikoria black ca pe, RODEBJER (r acboutique. com); Langley Anzia zebr a stripe shirt-dress, TED BAKER; Runway Kendr a sweater, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Cashmere lined zip-off gloves, Imoni (r acboutique. com); Ares quilted over the knee boots, Brian Atwood (DAVIDS and davidsfootwear.com).

“I’M ALWAYS PART OF SOMEONE ELSE’S CREATIVE PROCESS SO I DON’T ALWAYS GET TO C HOOSE HOW I WANT TO TRANSFORM MYSELF”


ALANA

Home grown beauty turned style-setter, muse and icon.

she can effortlessly convey. Her porcelain skin and genuine smile only enhance her approachable attitude. Her urban lifestyle and electric personality gives fans a sensible way to relate. With her nonstop schedule, Alana maintains her relationships with friends and family—showcasing her level-headedness and consistent balance of work and personal life. From home away from home, inspirations, street style and shopping, we explore the life of Alana Zimmer as she gives us an insight into her daily adventures.

Is there a sense of Canadian pride when you are traveling the world? Absolutely. Internationally, people really love Canadians. I’ve never met a person who has said they didn’t like Canada. People are always fond of it or say that they’re wishing to see it someday. This is a great thing to be proud of! How important is it, and how do you stay in touch with your family and friends in Canada? I find it super important to keep in touch with my family and friends. The internet makes it so easy to stay in touch wherever you are in the world. I send them a lot of pictures and videos when I’m somewhere new. It makes them feel like they’re travelling too which they love. How has travelling the world influenced your personal style? I think it affects my wardrobe more than my style. I love buying clothes or accessories wherever I am. It’s nice because I remember my trips whenever I’m wearing them. This makes it so hard to ever get rid of anything though! Out of all the cities you have visited, which city inspires your style the most? Paris is one, definitely. Everyone is so put together but very casually chic. London is also inspiring. People aren’t afraid to be different which I love. They all have incredible hairstyles and dyed hair colours that make them stand out. I just got back from Kenya too and was really inspired. Women were so confident about their bodies and covered themselves in colours which I found so beautiful. How would you say your fashion sense has changed over the years? I think my taste has changed a lot more than my personal fashion sense. I was always pretty minimal with my style even growing up. I was never into flashy clothes and I’m still kind of the same. My taste has changed a lot though because I’ve seen how things get made. I know how much time gets put into making a dress because I’ve seen one being made from nothing. Before a dress was just a dress to me. I wasn’t able to tell the quality. How do you cope with such a demanding career? I try to enjoy it. Life is short and at the end of the day I have a pretty cool job. It can be stressful but so can any other line of work. When it gets to be too much I try to go away for the weekend or do something else to take my mind off of it. I always come back appreciating it more. Do you feel there is a separate standard for male models versus female models? I think in a way it’s easier for women. Most of us are used to wearing make up, having our hair done, or wearing

high heels. I can’t say the same for all men! What would your ideal day off consist of? If I were in NYC I would likely make myself breakfast in the morning and have it in my tiny garden, maybe with a friend or my boyfriend. Then I’d maybe go to yoga, pilates or my trainer in my neighborhood. I might go to a gallery or exhibition in the city (there are so many new ones to see constantly). And at the end of the day have dinner and drinks with friends. We have a huge group so we are always having 12-person dinners. It’s a lot of planning in a busy city! What is your favourite holiday? I want to say Christmas and I probably should, as my family will be reading this, but I actually really love Halloween. I’m always part of someone else’s creative process so I don’t always get to choose how I want to transform myself. On Halloween I get to go nuts and be whatever I want! This year I was Marilyn Manson, which was so fun. What is your favourite store in New York to shop? I love this boutique called “No. 6” they have great vintage and also make a lot of their own pieces. For jewellery, I like “Cat Bird” in Williamsburg. For gifts my favourite is “Love Adorned”. We heard through the grapevine you are a rocker at heart. Does your musical taste play an integral role in your style? Growing up my dad listened to rock music. I think you always kind of end up being interested in what your parents listened to. Whether you want to or not! I wouldn’t say I dress like a rocker but I totally appreciate that period in music and fashion. It changed a lot in the way we dress today. I can’t say I don’t love a good leather jacket though. If you were not modeling, what would have been the ideal Alana career? I have absolutely no idea because I kind of believe that everything happens for a reason.

“I think my taste has changed a lot, more than my per son al f ashion sense. I was never into flashy c lothes, I’m still kind of the same...”


“MY TASTE HAS C HANGED A LOT BECAUSE I’VE SEEN HOW THINGS GET MADE”

Diamond Print bomber, Être Cécile (The Bay and thebay.com); Asymetrical f aux-pony hair skirt, 10 CROSBY DEREK LAM (The Bay and thebay. com); Aria Textured Block leggings, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Fine-knit merino wool turtleneck sweater, Pr oenza Schouler ; Sterling Silver Rebel at Heart Pendant “Fleur-de-lis”, Thomas Sabo; Winter Veil Pull-On hat, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Austin boot; 10 CROSBY DEREK LAM. Model, Alan a Zimmer (Push Man agement); Makeup, Onn a Chan (Push Man agement) for MAKE UP FOR EVER; Hair, Dat Tr an (Push Man agement); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


Checked bunny coat, FRENC H CONNECTION; neoprene skirt, Lucian Matis; cotton sweater, MINKPINK; lamb skin leather and cashmere gloves, Quill & Tine; Elizabeth br ogue shoes, Dr. Martens.


THE PERFECT COVER A layered masterplan to embrace the unapologetic winter.

PHOTOGRAPHY, MIC HAEL KAI YOUNG FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA

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Wool blend coat, Lucian Matis; Zip-knit snood, maddex f aux-leather leather legging, BCBGMAXAZRIA.



THE PERFECT COVER

A layered masterplan to embrace the unapologetic winter

Cre pe overcoat, houndstooth pleat skirt, Pink Tartan; green sleeve cable sweater, over sized textured popover scarves, LOFT; gr ay wool blend sweater, MINKPINK.


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THE PERFECT COVER

A layered masterplan to embrace the unapologetic winter

Treated wool Chantilly coat, Beauf ille; wool blend top, Lucian Matis; f aux-leather pleated skirt , BCBGMAXAZRIA; wide knit scarf , ZARA.


Wool blend sweater, MINKPINK; wool and f ur top, Lucian Matis.


THE PERFECT COVER

A layered masterplan to embrace the unapologetic winter

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Coat with large la pel, Zar a; cr opped top, MINKPINK; wool blend and f ur skirt, Lucian Matis; belt, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Elizabeth br ogue shoes, Dr. Martens.


Gr ay wool blend sweater, MINKPINK; Optic Gin a Lambswool Jumper, FRENC H CONNECTION; city girl coat, FOREVER 21; knit scarf , ZARA. Model, Jovan a Z (B&M Models); makeup and hair, Rachel Elizabeth Smith (PUSH Man agement ); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


Coat, Pink Tartan.


R E T RO S P E C T I V E Fashion looks back and moves forward.

PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY LEE FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA

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Coat, Dr. Martens; Tr ompe L’Oeil shirt, Pink Tartan; tr ouser s, FRENC H CONNECTION.


RETROSPECTIVE

Fashion looks back and moves forward

Jacket, BCBGMAXAZRIA; Feathered Fringe blouse, ANN TAYLOR; Mosaic Jacquard pants, LOFT; Pascal 8 Eye Pewter Patent boots, Dr. Martens.

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RETROSPECTIVE

Fashion looks back and moves forward

Fur sleeve coat, patent over coat, Pink Tartan; Sasha Ponte legging, BCBGMAXAZRIA.

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Flor al-Stone ear cuff , BCBGMAXAZRIA


RETROSPECTIVE

Fashion looks back and moves forward

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RETROSPECTIVE

Fashion looks back and moves forward

Sequin skirt, top, Pink Tartan; hat, American Apparel.

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Baseball sweater, Whitney Eve; Metallic turtleneck, Pink Tartan; Gold Open skirt, Andrew Majtenyi; Black Quilted skirt, MINKPINK; leggings, American Apparel; Abby slip-on shoes, Dr. Martens’ Hair & Makeup, GianLuca Orienti (TRESemmé Hair/ judyinc.com); model, Gaby (Plutino Models); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


METRÓPOLIS IN A CITY WHERE THE STREETS SEEM THE SAME, AN UNEXPECTED ENCOUNTER WITH YOUR OWN STYLE CAN SET THE TONE OF THE NEXT CONVERSATION.

PHOTOGRAPHY, MIC HAEL KAI YOUNG FASHION DIRECTION, LUIS ZULAYHKA


STORY HED

Story Dek

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Plectr um quilted blazer, BEN SHERMAN; Patter n Liber ation Tipping scarf , FRENC H CONNECTION.


Double-breasted wool coat, Muskoka Dr y Goods; notch suit jacket, Donder print shirt, FRENC H CONNECTION; two-tone knit scarf , H&M.


METRĂ“POLIS

An unexpected encounter with your own style

Left, For mal Melton Tailored coat, BEN SHERMAN; long sleeve paisley shirt, cable knit sweater, Penguin. Right, Wool herringbone blazer, Pin Point Cord shirt, Cable Crew Neck Jumper, East End Cordur oy Tr ouser s, BEN SHERMAN.

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METRĂ“POLIS

An unexpected encounter with your own style

Wool Melton Duffle coat, Ja panese Selvedge Raw denim, BEN SHERMAN; Barr acks Herringbone Line shirt, FRENC H CONNECTION; loop scarf , H&M.

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Shawl collar Cable jumper, Laundered Melange Grid Check shirt, BEN SHERMAN; ‘Chief ’ Down Parka, MUSKOKA DRY GOODS.


Plectr um Courdur oy 70’s blouson, Plectr um Duck & Down gilet, Slim Chinos, BEN SHERMAN; Uni Br oad shirt; FRENC H CONNECTION.


METRÓPOLIS

An unexpected encounter with your own style

’21 Club’ Town coat, ‘Port Sever n ’ Fair Isle Crew sweater ; MUSKOKA DRY GOODS; leather gloves, FRENC H CONNECTION.

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METRÓPOLIS

An unexpected encounter with your own style

Left, ‘Chief ’ Down Parka, MUSKOKA DRY GOODS; EC1 Chinos, Laundered Gingham Check shirt, BEN SHERMAN; Right, Chester v-neck sweater, Penguin; Two-tone scarf , H&M; 649 SUPREMA sunglasses, Per sol.


Shawl collar Cable jumper, Laundered Melange Grid Check shirt, The Dingley Dr y Rub jeans, Br uno Suede Chelsea boots, BEN SHERMAN; ‘Chief ’ Down Parka Ma ple Gold, ‘Muskoka’ Large Duffle bag, MUSKOKA DRY GOODS.


METRĂ“POLIS

An unexpected encounter with your own style

Plectr um Roll Neck jumper ; Plectr um Quilted blazer, Wool Melton Cr ombie coat, BEN SHERMAN; Patter n Liber ation Tipping scarf , FRENC H CONNECTION.

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For mal Melton Tailored coat, L .Wool Fedor a hat, FRENC H CONNECTION; The Paisley shirt, knit sweater, Penguin. Gr ooming,Onn a Chan (Push Man agement) for MAKE UP FOR EVER; Models, Taylor Gannon (Lang Models), Marinus (Want Man agement), Conor S. (Elite Model Man agement); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


ATÉLIER A closer look into this season’s masterpieces.

ILLUSTRATION, BENJAMIN EDWARD PHOTOGRAPHY, ANDY LEE TEXT, LUIS ZULAYHKA

CLASSICAL REINVENTION

Raf Simons brings his own sensibility to couture and gives the voice back to the brand’s female following by letting individualism and freedom reign over this collection. Amidst Simons’ hauntingly beautiful, yet chaotic collection, the designer pays homage to Mr. Dior by reintroducing 2 classic dresses that the fashion icon himself designed. Simons’ collection gives the liberty of choosing the pieces individually for what they represent and for the role each piece could play when worn. This collection showcases a dynamic and chaotic composition of interchangeable pieces, all preserving the true essence of the brand.

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ATÉLIER

A closer look into this season's masterpieces

SCULPTURAL ELEGANCE Inspired by the Florentine Renaissance, and staying true to his motto “Excess is my success”, Roberto Cavalli presents a collection full of bold and decadent pieces.

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ATÉLIER

A closer look into this season's masterpieces

REGAL SIMPLICITY Luxurious and vast silhouettes with draped details were prominent in Saab’s collection. His inspiration channels the scrumptious and tempting jewels of a crown and the constructivism of his gowns are reminiscent of the columns of royal monuments and sites. Saab’s time-honoured signature embroidery and beadwork, prevailed along the collection, a combination that never fails on the runway.

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ATÉLIER

A closer look into this season's masterpieces

SEDUCTIVE ENCOUNTERS The traces of vintage de la Renta were evident in his latest collection by bringing back the elaborate toile prints, renaissance embroidery and weaving. Constructivism on jackets and gowns prevailed, and balanced the intricate beauty of the needlework. De la Renta opted for two main palettes for this collection, a monochromatic almost muted scale and a more vibrant with rich pigments. Nearly 50 years as a standalone designer, De la Renta’s touch has managed to remain timeless.

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ATÉLIER

A closer look into this season's masterpieces

ROMANTIC APPROACH The mastercraft behind the collection presented by the consecrated duo takes us back to the magical era of Romanticism. Marchesa opted for a maximalist approach, characteristic of the eighteenth-century. Voluminous skirts, princess-like gowns, equestrian jackets, silk, satin and sheer fabrics paraded down the runway with the unique whimsical flare that the brand is know for.

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ATÉLIER

A closer look into this season's masterpieces

SENSUAL AND OPULENT Plunging necklines, short draping skirts, tuxedo jackets and provocative slits. Alexandre Vauthiere understands women's silhouettes by introducing body-hugging fabrics and fine tailoring in monochromatic palettes. His eye for bold yet hyper feminine designs have made industry insiders around the world turn their heads towards his collections.

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Hair & Makeup, GianLuca Orienti (TRESemmĂŠ Hair/ judyinc.com); model, Fred (Plutino Models); Creative Direction, Beatriz Juarez.


#altuzarra

SS14 TREND REPORT

AT THE TAP OF A KEY, INSPIRATION IS JUST A LIKE OR A FOLLOWER AWAY...

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#peterpilotto

#roksandaillincic

#ralphlauren

BOLD #COLOUR A parade of spring’s most vibrant and rich colours. Ruby red, electric blue, contrasting yellow and saturated orange. This trend is all about solid bold. #fendi #celine #novis

#DKNY #victoriabeckham

#ralphlauren #m2malletier

#preen

#salvatoreferragamo

IRIDESCENT #METALLICS #Dior

Resembling candy wrappers, foil and glistening metals, designers set out for the collections to gleam on their own.

#lanvin

#lanvin

#altuzarra

#lanvin

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#reemacra


#celine #10crosby #emiliopucci

#julius

#BLACKANDWHITE VISION The timeless monochromatic trend has secured a spot on the runway and in our closets for at least two consecutive springs. To keep the hype and maintain the contrast, designers gave it a spin by incorporating different textures, layering and Haute Couture applications.

#ART ATTACK

#isaarfen

#prabalgurung

Wearable masterpieces make a strong comeback for spring 2014. Abstract, religious, surrealistic, impressionist (even Pop-Art), all kinds of artistic expression will be seen on garments and accessories next season. Pick your art and frame it.

#erdem

#verawang

#edun

#gilesdeacon

#narcisorodriguez

#givenchy

#carolinaherrera #erdem

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#andrewgn


#SS14 TREND REPORT

At the tap of a key, inspiration is just a like or a follower away

#salvatoreferragamo #therow #akris

#michaelkors

#burberryprorsum

#SAFARI TRAIL From retro to modern takes, designers took the thrill of the expedition onto the runway. Some opted for a retro approach, while others were inspired by the asphalt jungle. Animal print, leather, lightweight linen and crisp cotton were some of the main staples for this season.

#jimmychoo

#zimmermann

#akris

HAPPY #PASTELS

#dsquared2

A rainbow full of blissful shades. From soft blushed pinks, lilacs and yellows to subdued minty-greens and baby blues, this spring palette reminded us of our last visit to La DurĂŠe.

#hermès

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#SS14 TREND REPORT

At the tap of a key, inspiration is just a like or a follower away #adidas #victoriabeckham

#philliplim

#SPORTY CHIC Designers transformed familiar athletic silhouettes into functional luxury garments. Cropped tops, bomber jackets and crisp tennis-like skirts were brought up a notch for the runway by being paired with statement accessories, from structured handbags to visors and sunglasses.

#tommyhilfiger

#victoriabeckham

#alexanderwang

#TEXTIT PLEASE A visual representation of today’s digital world. Words in bold fonts, logos, blunt statements and even glow-in-the-dark messages; any conversation starter will take over garments and accessories for spring 2014. If you preach freedom of speech and are not afraid of drawing attention to yourself, this is definitely your trend.

#alexanderwang

#christopherkane #topshop

#kenzo #jeremyscott

#alexanderwang

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#undercover

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#christopherkane #sophiawebster

POWERFUL #FLORALS #moniquelhuillier

#etro #bcbgmaxazria

This season’s floral formula was altered from a premature blossom to a full bloom. Several collections opted for flourishing psychedelic petals, while others payed homage to Victorian rosebuds. One thing is definite, florals keep coming back every season in difference shapes, sizes and colours.

#pinktartan

#donnakaran

#naeemkhan #michalekors

DOWN TO #EARTHY Subdued and grounded, this trend reconnects us to the core and gives us a break from the loud and bold. Deep greens, soft hues of brown, terracotta and delicate grey variations dominate the colour palettes.

#hermès

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EPILOGUE

FASHION IS A STATE OF MIND PHOTOGRAPHY BY INMA VARANDELA

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"IF THERE IS ONE RULE FOR DRESSING, FOR FASHION, IT'S PRETTY MUC H THE SAME RULE AS FOR EVERYTHING ELSE IN LIFE: DON'T GO AGAINST YOURSELF, DON'T GO AGAINST YOUR OWN NATURE. IT'S ONLY GOING TO SHOW." – DIANE VON FURSTENBERG


HERRINGBONE FASHION STYLE

INFO@HERRINGBONEMAGAZINE.COM