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MILKWOOD ESTATE

The London, Chatham & Dover Railway and the Herne Hill Sorting Sidings In 1862, the London Chatham and Dover Railway (LCDR) built the line running parallel to Milkwood Road between Herne Hill in the south and the Elephant & Castle via Loughborough Junction to the north. The extension to Blackfriars was completed in 1864. The LCDR’s main lines eventually ran from Victoria and Blackfriars to Bromley South, the Medway towns, Faversham, Canterbury and Dover, with a lengthy extension from Faversham to Margate and Ramsgate.

London Chatham& Dover Railway Crest at Blackfriars

With the opening of the first Blackfriars railway bridge and the Snow Hill tunnel (now known as the Thameslink tunnel) to Farringdon in 1865, two more stations were opened at St Paul’s and Ludgate Hill. When the line was extended beyond St Pancras in 1868, the Great Northern Railway and the Midland Railway were able to transport coal from the North of England directly to south London. In 1871 coal depots were established at the Elephant & Castle, Walworth Road and Knight’s Hill (Rosendale Road). The Herne Hill sorting sidings first appear on the Ordnance Survey map of 1870. Milkwood and other nearby roads were yet to be laid out. The history of the sidings is entwined with the first Blackfriars Station, which was a terminus on the south side of the Thames and served both passengers and goods traffic. The sidings were originally designed as marshalling yards, laid out only to sort the LCDR goods trucks before they were loaded at Blackfriars. They were not intended to handle goods traffic. During the 19th century each railway company had its own goods depots close to the centre of London. Sorting sidings were usually located a few miles further out where land was cheaper. Other south London sorting sidings included Hither Green for the South Eastern Railway, Norwood for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway and Feltham for the London and South Western Railway. In 1885 a second Blackfriars railway bridge over the Thames and a new Blackfriars station on the north side were built, just for passengers. The south side Blackfriars Station was closed to passenger traffic and the whole site made over to freight working. Blackfriars was the only location in London where the LCDR could handle freight from the river traffic. It operated at two levels. Hydraulic hoists lowered the wagons from the brick viaduct down to street level and the riverside warehouses. However, the goods station was cramped for

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Profile for The Herne Hill Society

Milkwood Estate  

Milkwood Estate: The Story of a Lambeth Community Copyright © The Herne Hill Society 2009. Printed and Published for the Herne Hill Society...

Milkwood Estate  

Milkwood Estate: The Story of a Lambeth Community Copyright © The Herne Hill Society 2009. Printed and Published for the Herne Hill Society...

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