Social Media and ICH Marketing

Page 1

Social Media and ICH Marketing Mohamed Badry Heritage Management Professional Founder of HeritageForAll Initiative


Social Media (SM) SM is online communications that use special techniques that involve participation, conversation, sharing, collaboration and linkage. (1) Social networking sites (Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, etc.); (2) Social news sites (Digg, Reddit, NewsVine, Kirtsy, BallHype, etc.); (3) Social bookmarking sites (Delicious, Magnolia, Diigo, etc.); (4) Social sharing sites (YouTube, Flickr, Vimeo, etc.); (5) Social events sites (Eventful, Meetup, and Upcoming); (6) Microblogging (Twitter); (7) Wikis (Wikipedia); (8) Blogs; (9) Forums and message boards. (Evans, 2010; Dominick, 2012; Khalid & Chowdhury, 2016) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

2


Google Trends: Heritage

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

3


Social Media

www.statista.com

Number of social media users worldwide from 2010 to 2021 (in billions) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

4


Social Media

www.statista.com

Gender distribution of Facebook users in selected EMEA countries as of November 2013 Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

5


Social Media

www.statista.com

Number of Facebook users in the Middle East and North Africa as of June 2012 (in millions) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

6


Social Media

www.statista.com

Usage penetration of Instagram in selected countries as of January 2019

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

7


Social Media (SM)

www.statista.com

Twitter penetration in selected Middle Eastern and North African countries as of March 2013 Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

8


Social Media Network & Cultural Awareness

What ideas come to mind when you hear “Intangible Cultural Heritage�?

https://youtu.be/UZS3dmOMXlQ Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

9


Social Media Network & Cultural Awareness ICH elements continuously evolve, from manifestation to manifestation, while being

transmitted from person to person and from generation to generation. The viability of ICH practices relies

on the ongoing transmission of the special knowledge and skills that are essential for their enactment or

https://youtu.be/8yx4bPlZaiE

embodiment. Sunday, 31 March, 2019

(UNESCO ICH: Transformation, n.d.) Social Media and ICH Marketing

10


Social Media Network & Cultural Awareness • SM will support citizens for heritage awareness and participation in shaping their cultural heritage and being shaped by it. • It will enable them to share their local knowledge and everyday experience with others. • It will facilitate a “continuing” process [Sustainability Factor] for creating, modifying and safeguarding heritage where citizens will be prosumers and maintainers of cultural activities. (Frangakis, 2018) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

11


Social Media & ICH Universal Value • UNESCO disseminates YouTube videos of all the elements on the representative list. • Individuals have been producing videos of the same practices safeguarded by UNESCO and uploading them to the site. • YouTube has become a means of conservation by realizing UNESCO’s

safeguarding measures of identification, documentation, and transmission within a non-formal educational medium. (Pietrobruno, 2012) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

12


Social Media & ICH Universal Value • The combination of UNESCO and user-generated ICH videos on YouTube is producing informal archives. (official heritage narratives through the crossreferencing and the co-presence of divergent visual representations) • As users continuously upload ICH videos recorded from actual events, their archiving has the potential to store ICH in ways that reflect its development in lived circumstances, capturing heritage as a process that adapts and changes to its environment. (Pietrobruno, 2012) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

13


Social Media & ICH Universal Value

https://youtu.be/ZXrn8vikZv0

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

https://youtu.be/Zo2Iez5dIQQ

Social Media and ICH Marketing

14


Social Media & ICH Universal Value Story-making initiatives have existed in more static forms online for some time, and involve asking members of the public to offer re-presentations of themselves, their communities, and their multiple heritages using SM as a filter. (Kidd, 2011) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

15


Social Media, ICH & Sustainability In terms of education, knowledge, information, tradition, cultural life, and communication, SM and ICH share a number of commonalities, and they both need a cooperative relationship. When SM operates as a communication tool, it has synergetic effects: • When SM helps us understand ICH, people can understand different cultures. • When SM educates people about ICH, it is a entertainment form. • Finding possible means of safeguarding ICH ultimately saves traditional values.

• When SM encourages people to appreciate ICH and participate in safeguarding ICH, it creates a greater sense of familiarity that can help eradicate cultural conflicts in the future. • Inheriting ICH values saves our identity and humanity. • SM helps us to discover the potential ICH that has as an agent in creating sustainable futures for the next generation. (Choi, 2016) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

16


ICH Tourism & Stakeholders

Community Residents

Social Community

In the development of ICH

Local Operator

tourism, INHERITORS are individual or community who

participate in ICH inheritance

National Management Chain

ICH Tourism

Tourist

“INHERITOR�

directly and make sure ICH can inherit. Government

Competitor

Staff

(Sautter & Leisen, 1999; Du Cros, 2011; Shi et. al. 2016) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

17


ICH Tourism & Stakeholders • Government is a main stakeholder, who to provide the Legislative Context & to manage the interrelationships between other ICH stakeholders. • Developers are the major investors in the development of ICH tourism; they explore the tourism value and the economic value of ICH tourism and have complicated commodity economic relationship with the inheritors. • Tourists are the demand of the ICH products; whether satisfy their demand or not determines the lifeblood of the ICH products. ICH can get publicity and be promoted through the spread effect of tourists. (Kurin, 2003; Bingham et. al., 2005; Vidal González 2008; Quan & Zeng, 2012; Shi et. al. 2016) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

18


ICH Tourism & Stakeholders • The popular audience can guide more people to join the protection and inheritance of ICH. • Social community, as the “ground” of the ICH inheritance; their interest appeal is based on improving the life quality to obtain the sense of pride and approval to own culture. • Experts, media & civil society. They have strong social responsibility; their

participation can be the backbone of the social supervision and contains the excessive business development possibilities. (Kurin, 2003; Bingham et. al., 2005; Vidal González 2008; Quan & Zeng, 2012; Shi et. al. 2016) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

19


Social Media Investment ICH is responding to a perceived demand for different forms of engagement, and exploring the possibilities that such

moments of engagement, however facilitated, represent for audience development, marketing, personalizing their offer,

and seeking to ‘prove’ their vitality, diversity and relevance (Kidd, 2011) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

20


Social Media and Marketing Balancing education and entertainment

Hear 10 %

Showcasing the best of living culture to users in an

attractive way involves providing a balance between education and entertainment. Participatory workshops in the visual, performing

Read 30 %

Visitor Remember

See 50%

or culinary arts are a useful way of providing profound cultural experiences in which hosts can

directly communicate their core values. Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

Do 90 %

(Du Cros, 2011) 21


Social Media: SWOT Analysis of ICH Product

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

22


Social Media: Market Segmentation 1.

Geographically (local users, short-distance users, long-distance users, and international users),

2.

Demographically (age, sex, family size,

family income, education, occupation, religion, race, and ethnicity), 3.

Psychographically (social class, lifestyle, and personality characteristics),

4.

Socio-economically

5.

Culturally

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

(Amer, 2015) Social Media and ICH Marketing

23


Social Media: ICH Marketing Mission ICH

Offer

Where

How

Stakeholderbased Posts

SM

To Whom (Amer, 2015)

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

24


Social Media and Heritage Branding •

a messaging process

•

the brand message must be simple, consistent and reinforced by experience catching the audience's eye and their imagination.

•

It requires name, term, sign, symbol, logo, slogans, taglines, design, advertising, public relations or a collection of these which enhance the recombination of pleasurable memorial experiences of the heritage

attraction and sell the site services. (Park, 2014; Renbarger, n.d.; The Manitoba Electrical Museum & Education Centre, 2014) Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

25


Social Media Investment • #intangibleculturalheritage • #Unite4Heritage • #makeheritagefun • #heritage4generations • #UNESCO_ICH • #bibliothecaalexandrina • #OCT17ICH

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

26


May 2017 GoUNESCOnference “International Conventions of Heritage Conservation”

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

27


September 2017 Field Trip to CULTNAT “Cultural Heritage Presentation & Technology” Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

28


Global Collaborations Program

Social Media and ICH Marketing

29


28 May 2018 Ownership & Ensuring Long-term Conservation By Ms. Juliana Strogan Portuguese World Heritage Professional – Norwegian UNESCO WHS “Rjukan-Notodden Industrial Heritage Site”


Brasília – How a Constructed Capital Changed a Whole Country’s Heritage by Gabriela Corrêa Senna Undergraduate student in the Faculty of Architecture and Urban Planning at Pitagoras, Brazil

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

31


BEYOND WILDLIFE: the Presentation of National Heritage Assets as Tourism Packages in Rwanda by David NKUSI Heritage Site Manager at Institute of National Museums of Rwanda/INMR

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

32


Museum Solves the Social Problems: a Case Study on Museum of Broken Relationships by Shaima Matar M.A. Candidate in Museum Studies, FTH, Helwan Uni.; Curator at NMEC, Egypt

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

33


Russian Experience in Heritage: Interaction with Memory, Values & Trauma by Evgeniya Kartashova M.A. Candidate in World Heritage Studies, BTU-Cottbus; Journalist, Russia

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

34


Contemporary Pedagogies and the Importance of Cultural Heritage by Ana Fernanda Facio MuĂąoz Museum Educator, Museum of Art, Mexico

Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

35


HeritageForAll Internship Program Call 2018 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Heritage/Museum Management Heritage Conservation Perspectives International Heritage Legislation Heritage Exhibitions Cultural Heritage, Museums, Sustainable Development Goal (UN SDG 11) & Investments 6. Heritage Sites, Museums & PublicPrivate Partnership 7. Urban Architectural Heritage & Curating the Heritage City 8. Heritage Marketing & Tourism 9. Museum Technology 10.Museum Education 11.Museum Architecture / Display Sunday, 31 March, 2019

Social Media and ICH Marketing

36


Thanks For All https://issuu.com/heritageforall https://youtu.be/bJEZbl3NkbQ

www.linkedin.com/in/HeritageForAll

www.facebook.com/HeritageForAll/ ​@heritage4all info.heritageforall@gmail.com