Page 1

Marlborough Town Guide 2013-14

THIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED WITH THE COMPLIMENTS OF MARLBOROUGH TOWN COUNCIL


1


2

AT ANDREWS IT’S ABOUT...

TRADITIONAL

VALUES

WE DON’T LET ANYONE ELSE TOUCH OUR MEAT, WE TAKE IT TO OUR ABATTOIR THEN BUTCHER AND BONE IN-HOUSE

A NDREWS Q UA LITY M EA TS

4 HIGH ST, MARLBOROUGH SN8 1AA 01672

519 915

Building Surveyors & Project Managers Residential, Commercial and Leisure Sector Specialists Working throughout the UK and proud to be based in Marlborough 2 Cedar House, The Parade, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1NY Tel: 01672 515591 Mobile: 07876 226531 Email: graham@savernake.net Website: www.savernake.net


3

St John’s Marlborough St John’s is an 11-18 Academy serving 270 square miles of Wiltshire and with 1,750 students. St John’s is a high performing school, ranked in the Top Ten per cent nationally - 21% of students achieve five or more A* and A grades at GCSE. St John’s is also one of the top UK state schools for International Baccalaureate Diploma results. Located at the heart of the Marlborough community, St John’s offers excellent facilities, events and educational opportunities to benefit everyone. • The Theatre on the Hill • Business and Community facilities for meetings & conferences • Indoor & Outdoor Sports facilities • Dance studio • Drama studios Facilities are used by a wide range of community groups, sports clubs, dance schools, businesses and other organisations, and are available to hire during evenings, weekends and school holidays. Adult Education at St John’s Language Courses at all levels ◆ IT Courses at all levels ◆ Creative Writing For more details see the Adult Education pages on the St John’s website

St John’s, Marlborough, SN8 4AX A member of Excalibur Academies Trust 01672 516156 techcoll@stjohns.wilts.sch.uk www.stjohns.wilts.sch.uk


WELCOME

5

WELCOME TO MARLBOROUGH

T

he thriving market town of Marlborough is set in the stunning scenery of the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. We have countryside within 10 minutes walk of the High Street, in almost any direction. Despite its perfect location, the town has remained unspoilt, retaining its historic charm as the Gateway to the West. Down land, stone circles and the ancient Savernake Forest are literally on our

doorstep; the River Kennet, a chalk stream that flows but yards from the town centre is the jewel in the crown. Marlborough is situated on the old Bath Road from London; the town became a favourite watering hole for both horses and travellers in the past, yet continues to retain its welcoming ways to visitors from all over the world. As Mayor, I am delighted to introduce the Marlborough Town Guide which we hope will prove

CONTENTS Welcome to Marlborough..................................................... 5 Acknowledgements and Copyright....................................... 5 The ancient town...............................................................6-7 Forest and downs................................................................11 Castle, coach and college....................................................13 Index of streets................................................................... 15 Street map of Marlborough............................................16-17 Schools................................................................................ 18 Taking time out................................................................... 18 Blue Plaque scheme............................................................ 19 Archeological feast............................................................. 21 Places to eat........................................................... 22, 29, 31 List of eating houses........................................................... 22 Community information.................................................25-26 Places of interest................................................................. 27 Market town.......................................................................27 The rhythm of Marlborough life.......................................... 28 A tour of the town's pubs..............................................29-31 Where to stay...................................................................... 31 Marlborough Town Council Council Offices, 5 High Street, Marlborough, Wilts SN8 1AA. T: 01672 512487 F: 01672 512116 E: townclerk@ marlboroughtowncouncil.gov.uk W: www.marlboroughtowncouncil.gov.uk

popular to residents and visitors alike. Our town clerk Derek Wolfe had been writing the guide when he suddenly and very sadly died in September 2012. The town council has hastily finished the work in his memory and hope he would have approved of the publication. With best wishes Councillor Edwina Fogg Town Mayor of Marlborough

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & COPYRIGHT We would like to take this opportunity to thank all those whose efforts have enabled us to publish this official guide of Marlborough. Special thanks to former Mayor, David Chandler, for his historical research and to the late Derek Wolfe, Town Clerk of Marlborough, for compiling much of the editorial. The publishers would like to thank all those who have chosen to advertise in these pages. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that information is correct at the time of going to print, neither Heritage Guides not Marlborough Town Council can accept any responsibility for errors or omissions. The content of this publication is protected by copyright and may not be reproduced, copied or transmitted in any form, in part or whole, without the prior written permission of copyright owners, which are Marlborough Town Council and its contributors in respect of text, Guy Loosmore and Heritage Guides in respect of the photographs and Heritage Guides in respect of the map and layout. The guide will be updated on the Town Council Website.

Heritage Guides 7 Romilly Road, Barry, Vale of Glamorgan CF62 6AZ T: 01446 405298 F: 01446 461792 E: info@heritage-guides.com W: www.heritage-guides.com


THE TOWN

6

Marlborough High Street viewed from Granham Hill with St Peter's Church marking the southwest end and St Mary's the northeast

THE ANCIENT TOWN T he town of Marlborough nestles in the Kennet Valley, surrounded by downland and forest and can trace its history back to Neolithic times. The area possesses some of the finest surviving Neolithic relics with both Avebury and Stonehenge being World Heritage Sites. (More about the archaeology on page 21) A mile to the east of the town lay the Roman settlement of

A view along one of the town's fine streets: Silverless Street

Cunetio, (now within the Parish of Mildenhall), at the crossing of the roads between Londinium (London) and Aquae Sulis (Bath) and Corinium (Cirencester) and Venta Belgarum (Winchester). Cunetio later became a planned, gridded town with walled defences. It was occupied for about 300 years until it was abandoned in the early 5th century. In 1978, the largest coin hoard from Roman Britain was

discovered there. This is now on display in the British Museum. At the time of the Norman Conquest, a motte and bailey castle was built in what are now the grounds of Marlborough College. It utilised a prehistoric mound (see page 21) which legend says is the burial place of Merlin, King Arthur’s magician. The tradition first appears in the Sixteenth Century and is reflected in the town’s motto: UBU NUNC SAPIENTIS OSSA MERLINI – ‘Where now are the bones of the wise Merlin?’ The Castle was a royal residence, handy for the hunting grounds of the Savernake Forest. This may have been the reason that King John gave the town its first charter in 1204. In the days before it established a permanent home, Parliament met wherever the King was in residence. In 1267, the Statutes of


ORIGINS

Marlborough were passed under Henry III. They deal with the rights of the citizen and are the oldest statute laws that have never been repealed. In the later Middle Ages, the castle fell into ruins as military technologies made such buildings outmoded and the royal family opted for more comfortable accommodation. The building became a kind of quarry, its stones providing a resource for the townspeople. It is said that the coping on the walls of the graveyard at St Peter’s Church came from the castle. The estate passed into the hands of the Seymour family, who were numbered amongst Henry VIII’s many in-laws. (See what happened next page 13) The town’s importance as a staging post on the road between London and Bristol ensured that it received a number of visits in the 1590s from the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, William Shakespeare’s acting

7

company. A performance in the courtyard of the White Hart Inn (Blue Plaque at Russell Square by the Marlborough & District Conservative Club) would be followed by one before the Mayor and his guests in the Guildhall. With the outbreak of Civil War in 1642, the townspeople were strongly for Parliament, while the Seymours held the Castle for the King, who dispatched a force under Lord Digby to take the town. When Digby demanded its surrender, A scene from a Civil War re-enactment in the High Street

the townspeople replied “The King’s Majesty, providing he were attended in Royal and not in war like wise, should be as welcome to that town as ever was Prince to People, but, as to delivering up the good Town of Marlborough to such a traitor as Lord Digby… they would sooner die.” What became known as ‘The Battle of Marlborough’ ensued, fought in the streets, alleys and even the churches of the town. After Digby captured and looted the town, he marched 120 prisoners through the snow in chains to Oxford.


8

Make life easier On the move Large range of mobility aids. Mobility scooters, hire services and stairlifts. At home Rise and recline furniture.

Free hearing healthcheck.

Footcare Cosyfeet shoes and slippers. Footcare appointments.

www.thehearingandmobilitystore.co.uk Find us on George Lane (opposite the doctor’s surgery)

Telephone 01672 511550


9

Showroom, The Old Ropeworks, 20 Kennet Place, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1NG WOOD BURNING AND MULTIFUEL STOVES FULL DESIGN AND CONSULTATION SERVICE FITTING AND CHIMNEY LINING SERVICE HETAS REGISTERED INSTALLERS FREE SURVEY

01672 516876

WWW.MARLBOROUGHSTOVES.CO.UK

ALAN ARCHER FENCING AND LAND MANAGEMENT SERVICES

• ALL TYPES OF FENCING - From Stock Fencing, Equestrian Post & Rails to Garden Fences - Bespoke Wooden Gates - Supply and erect Garden Sheds to your own specification • PADDOCK MAINTENANCE - Topping - Chain Harrowing - Fertilizing • GENERAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT - Mowing - Hedge Cutting - Hedge Planting Erection and maintenance of Stables - Erection and maintenance of Field Shelters • FULLY INSURED - All work carried out to the very highest standard • E-mail: alan.archer9@btinternet.com • Tel: 01672 540534 or 07801 239763


10 11

Mower servicing & repairs And all other types of garden machinery and tools

Individual - affordable - stylish

Peter Randall 07774 711729 peter@greenmachines.org.uk

Free collection and delivery in the local area

CLOTHES, BAGS, ACCESSORIES

• Ride-on mowers • Walk-behind mowers • Strimmers • Chainsaws • Hand tools Secondhand machines bought & sold Office: 1 Whittonditch Farm, Ramsbury, Marlborough SN8 2QA

Keep it Local - Keep it Green www.greenmachines.org.uk

A coffeeshop with books uniquely situated by the River Kennet in the heart of Marlborough...

3 KINGSBURY STREET, MARLBOROUGH 115 HIGH STREET, HUNGERFORD WWW.LUNA-CLOTHING.CO.UK

Marlborough

Podiatry Clinic 10 The Parade, Marlborough, SN8 1RY

Treatment of all foot problems

Routine and specialist care for children and adults OPEN Mon-Sat:

9.30am-5pm H HIG

ST

HILLIERS YARD

FIGGINS LANE E LAN RGE O E G

Mustard Seed, Hilliers Yard, Marlborough

T: 01672 511611

Christine MJ Stiles

DPodM, MChS, SRCh - HPC reg.

01672 514581 07910 525376 Bupa Registered Also at Marlborough Medical Practice


MARLBOROUGH IN CONTEXT

FOREST AND DOWNS Avebury: Winter Solstice

T

he historic town of Marlborough lies in the Kennet Valley, within the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. To the north and west are the high chalk hills of the Marlborough Downs rising to over 500 feet, with the Ridgeway, a long distance path, running close to the northern edge. On the scarp face of the Downs figures of White Horses have been cut into the hillside exposing the chalk rock. On the Downs there is evidence of human habitation from earliest times. Windmill Hill, near Avebury, is the largest known causewayed enclosure in England and dates from about 3,300 BC. The impressive Neolithic stone circle of Avebury of 2,700 BC predates Stonehenge by about 500 years. The 17th century antiquarians John Aubrey and William Stukeley are responsible for initiating modern study of the Avebury monument. The detailed plan of the position of the stones, drawn by Aubrey, has proved invaluable for later archaeologists, for it contained reference to many standing stones that would soon after be destroyed by local people. Many of the large stones at

Avebury, like those at Stonehenge, are very hard sandstone, called “Sarsens”. These Sarsen stones are found scattered over the Marlborough Downs and are locally known as “Grey Wethers”, as from a distance they looked like sheep; ‘Wethers’ being the Old English word for sheep. Fyfield Down is famous for its Grey Wethers and a walk to the Devil’s Den (Dolman) takes in beautiful countryside. Another impressive group of stones can be seen in Lockeridge Dene to the west of Marlborough. The AONB website www.northwessexdowns.org.uk has a new list of walks. The ten easy routes can be reached by bus from the North Wiltshire and Swindon area and take in spectacular landscapes. Close to Avebury is the West Kennett Long Barrow, signposted off the A4, and Silbury Hill clearly visible from the road; both of which are well worth a visit, although climbing Silbury Hill is not permitted. It continues to be a tantalizing mystery as it is not a burial mound like the many small round Bronze Age barrows in the Marlborough area, but is the largest earthwork in Europe. The Wansdyke is a long deep

11

linear earthwork to the west and south of Marlborough. A spectacular section at Walkers Hill, above the Vale of Pewsey, can be accessed by a short walk from the car park on the Lockeridge to Alton Barnes road. Today many visitors come in the summer to view the phenomena of “crop circles” which appear on farmland around Marlborough and regular updates are made on www.temporarytemples.co.uk Please always seek permission from landowners before accessing them and abide by the Crop Circle Code of Conduct. William the Conqueror made Savernake Forest a Royal Forest and it was much more extensive in those days, including West Woods to the west of Marlborough. The Royal Forest was administered by a series of hereditary Wardens, firstly by the Esturmys, with this Office passing by marriage to the Seymours. The Seymours lived at Wulfhall on the southern edge of the forest and it was the home of Jane Seymour, who in 1536 married Henry VIII. Jane died soon after giving birth to their son Edward, the future Edward VI. The present Wardens are the Brudenell-Bruce family who can trace their ancestry back to the Conquest. One of the oldest trees in the forest is the Big Bellied Oak beside A346, south of Marlborough and Cadley. There are many other old and named trees in Savernake; guides and books can be found locally in the High Street. Savernake Forest with its beech, oak, ash and chestnut trees makes a wonderful backdrop to the picnic, barbeque and camping sites which are popular with visitors throughout the year. To book a site ring 0845 130 8224 or go to www.campingintheforest.co.uk


12

The Polly Tearooms The perfect place to sit and relax...

If you have problems of any kind with your home computer, our aim is to provide you with a clear solution that gets you going again as soon as possible. We won’t blind you with technology or technobabble.

Morning coffee Lunches Afternoon teas Handmade cakes & chocolates

RE LAX •

N D

RE LAX •

N D

THE

Mobile: 07891 114758 Tel: 01672 520988

LLY TEARO PO

RF PE • THE

RF PE • THE

EC A TP T LACE TO SI

EC A TP T LACE TO SI

• Slow Computer • Networking • Wireless • Broadband • Printing • Upgrades • Training • Hardware • Software • Installation • Backup • Virus Protection • Security • Privacy • Reasonable Rates grahamc@kennetcomputersolutions.co.uk www.kennetcomputersolutions.co.uk

S OM

LLY TEARO PO

S OM

THE

Hot food served all day 26/27 High Street, Marlborough SN8 1LW 01672 512146 www.thepolly.com

It’s difficult to Google a PC repair service if you cannot actually get on the internet!

A proud member of 25: exchanging quality referrals & building long lasting business relationships


COLLEGE

13

CASTLE, COACH AND COLLEGE Marlborough College: grounds and "C" House

T

he Castle on the Mound had fallen into disrepair and stones from the building were now being used locally. (see pages 6 & 7) Around 1700, Charles Seymour, the 6th Duke of Somerset, built a splendid mansion in the Castle grounds as a hunting lodge, now “C” house of the College. Marlborough was becoming an important staging point on the fast coach route between London, Bath and Bristol. The Seymour mansion became the Castle Inn, one of the most famous in England. This trade virtually ceased with the coming of Brunel’s Great Western Railway in 1841 which went through Swindon and contributed much to Marlborough’s economic decline. The celebrated Castle Inn was obliged to close but was not empty for long. A group of enthusiasts for the

educational principles expounded by Dr Arnold of Rugby School, was looking for a place to establish a school based on his methods. They chose the Castle Inn. At this stage Marlborough College was founded as a school to educate the sons of the clergy and the first boys started in 1843. However the College did not have the endowments of the older public schools. Friction between staff and boys led to the “Great Rebellion” of October to December 1851 which involved the local militia. The problems overcome, the college went on to become one of the most famous public schools in the land. The school was put on a sound footing after 1855 by Dr Cotton who had served under Thomas Arnold. He instituted the House system with House Masters, Priory and Preshute Houses being among the first to be established. The

College went from strength to strength and achieved Dr Cotton’s aim of competing with the best English Public Schools such as Winchester and Rugby. The College was an all boys school until girls were admitted to the sixth form after 1968 and to the whole school after 1989. Old Marlburians have not only served as Mayor of the town but gained 13 VCs and one George Cross in the two World Wars. They suffered 750 deaths in action in WWI and 415 in WWII. Famous old Marlburians include Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, Princess Eugenie, grand-daughter of the Queen, notorious double agent Anthony Blunt, poet John Betjemen and William Morris, poet, artist and social reformer, to mention but a few. The full list is available, like everything else, on the web.


14

Robins Flowers by Julia Russett ICSF

Phone: 07977 059991 A first class local service that you can trust and depend upon

• 24/7 affordable airport transfers • Local and distance taxi service • All drivers CRB checked and licensed to drive both taxis and private hire vehicles.

Email: aldbournetaxis@hotmail.co.uk

Flowers for all occasions Order online at: www.robinsflowers.co.uk Mobile: 07969 311 153 Telephone: 01672 810 829 Email: florist@robinsflowers.co.uk


STREETS Locations refer to map on the centre pages.

Index of Streets

Alexandra Terrace........... 2d Alma Place.......................3c Angel Yard....................... 3d Aubrey Close................... 3a Avalon Court................... 3e Back Lane........................2c Barn Street...................... 2d Barnfield.......................... 3f Barrow Close................... 2e Bath Road....................... 3b Baywater......................... 1d Bergamot CLose.............. 4a Betjeman Road............... 3a Blenheim Road................ 4e Blowhorn Street.............. 2d Bridewell Street................3c Bridge Street................... 3a Cardigan Road.................2c Chandlers Yard.................2c Chantry Lane....................3c Cherry Orchard................ 3d Chiminag Close................2c Choppingknife Lane......... 3f Churchill Court................ 3d Clarendon Court.............. 2d Coldharbour Lane........... 2d College Fields.................. 3b Common, The...................2c Coombe End Court.......... 3e Coppers Corner............... 3e Cornerfields..................... 2e Cromwell Court................3c Cross Lane.......................2c Culvermead Close........... 3d Cunetio Gardens.............. 3f Dando Drive.................... 3a Davies Close.................... 3a Downs Lane............... off 3a Ducks Meadow............... 3d Edwards Meadow........... 3b Elcot Close....................... 3f

15

Elcot Lane....................... 3e Elcot Orchard................... 3f Elizabeth Close................ 3e Falkner Close................... 3b Farrar Drive..................... 3a Figgins Lane................3c/3d Five Alls Court................. 3d Five Stiles Road............... 3e Forest Dale Road.............. 3f Francklyn Acre..................1c Frees Avenue....................2c Gales Ground.................. 3e George Lane.................... 3d Glympton Court.............. 4e Golding Avenue.............. 3a Granham Close................4c Granham Hill....................4c Green, The....................... 2d Harley Court.................... 3d Hawkins Meadow........... 3b Hazel Close...................... 3f Herd Street.......................2c Hertford Court................. 4e Hertford Road................. 4e High Street.......................3c Hilliers Yard......................3c Homefields...................... 3e Homefields Close............ 3e Hughenden Yard...............3c Hughes Close.................. 3a Hyde Lane........................3c Ironmongers Yard.............2c Irving Way....................... 3b Isbury Road..................... 3d Jefferies Close................. 3b Kelham Gardens.............. 3d Kennet Mews.................. 3d Kennet Place................... 3d Kingsbury Square.............2c Kingsbury Street...............2c Kingsbury Terrace.............2c Laineys Close.................. 2d Laurel Drive...................... 3f Lawrence Acre................. 1d Leaf Close....................... 2d Leaze Road......................2c

London Road................... 3e Lower Prospect............... 2d Macklin Court..................3c Macniece Drive............... 3a Manton Close.................. 4a Manton Drove................. 4a Manton Hollow............... 3a Manton Road............. off 4a Merlin Court.....................2c Morris Road.................... 3a Neates Yard......................3c New Road....................... 2d Newby Acre.................... 1d North View Place............. 1d Old Lion Court..................3c Old Yard, The................... 3e Orchard Close................. 2d Orchard Road.................. 4d Oxford Street................... 2d Paddock, The....................2c Parade Mews, The........... 3d Parade, The...................... 2d Patten Alley..................... 2d Pelhams Court................. 3d Pewsey Road....................3c Pipers Piece..................... 2d Port Hill............................1c Poulton Crescent............. 2d Poulton Hill..................... 2d Preshute Lane................. 4b Priorsfield........................ 3e Prospect Place................. 2d Purlyn Acre...................... 1d Queens Way.................... 3e Rabley Wood View.......... 1d Rawlingswell Lane.......... 2d Reeds Corner................... 3e Reeds Ground................. 3e Riding School Yard...........3c River Park.........................3c Rogers Meadow.............. 1d Russell Square..................3c Saint Peters Place.............3c Salisbury Hill................... 4d Salisbury Road................ 3d Sassoon Walk.................. 3b

Savernake Court.............. 3d Savernake Crescent.......... 3f School Lane..................... 4a Shakespeare Drive........... 3b Silverless Street............... 2d Sorley Close.................... 3b St Davids Way..................2c St Johns Close..................2c St Lukes Court..................2c St Margarets Mead......... 3e St Martins....................... 2d Stanbrook Close......... off 4a Stonebridge Close........... 2e Stonebridge Lane............ 2e Stoneking Court.............. 3d Tennyson Close............... 3a Thoms, The...................... 1d Thomson Way.................. 3b Tin Pit.............................. 2d Town Mill........................ 3d Upper Church Fields........ 4d Upper Isbury................... 3d Van Diemens Close......... 3d Vespasian Road................ 3f Vicarage Close................ 2d Wagon Yard..................... 3d Wellington Place..............3c West Manton............. off 4a White Horse Road............ 3f Willow Close.................... 3f Woodstock Court............ 4e Wye Lane........................ 2d


16 a

b

A34 B4041

M4, SWINDON

ROCKLEY MANOR

MARLBOROUGH GOLF CLUB

CEMETERY MARLBOROUGH COMMON

M

NU

N

CHIM CLO

H

AD E RO

JO ST CR OS SL AN E

AD RO

IG RD

LA

N

CA

EET STR

AN

KINGSBURY S DAV KSQUARE W IN KINGSB TERRA THE PADDOCK CL

RY BU GS

2

CK BA

E

IY TOWN CY COUNCIL

TR EE T

HIG HS

ER R IV

K

RI VE R NH

MANTON

NN KE

GR A

MANTON CL

PRESHUTE L AN E

4

WANSDYKE PATH

COLLEGE PRESHUTE WHITE HORSE

A345 PEWSEY

GRANHAM HILL

B305

RO AD

LL

EET

ET

R H IG H S T

ET RE

MANTON D ROVE BERGAM OT CL

ST

T

MSTANBROOK ANTO CL N

JUBILEE FIELD

Y

HI

GE

WES

MA N T ON ROAD

SCHOOL LANE

COLLEGE

PA R

AM

OW

ID BR

MERLIN’S MOUNT

PE W SE

NHA MC L

CL

BATH ROAD

IE RS

WP ST PETER’S CHURCH

SPP

BRIDEWELL MC ST

COLLEGE

HI LL

FIG GI PRIORY N OLC S L GARDENS AN E

CL

COLLEGE

SHAKESPEARE DRIVE

CC

HY

ES

JEF

G

IRVING WAY

GRA

F

RD

D MEA

E LAN

FIELDS FE R I

WY

M SO N

E

AP RSY

NY

DE

R CL

N S MD

HY

K

AVE CLOSE NU E

OW

AL

A4

G

TH O

AVEBURY, CALNE

HUGHES CLOSE

IS RD RR MO TENNYSON

WK I

BETJEM A N

AUBREY CLOSE

DI N OL

DAVIES CLOSE

G

DAN D DR

HA

DRIVE

SASSOON SORLEY WALK E CLOSE CO L L

O

FA

N HOLL

NE NS LA DOW

3

RRAR

MACNIECE DRIVE

NE

RS

A

S RD WA

ED

BARTON PARK

RD

Z LEA

E

HE

ST LUKES COURT

AV E

THE CO MM O

FR EE S

CO U R T

LI ER

N

FRA

MARLBOROUGH RFC

© Copyright Heritage Guides 2012. No reproduction of this map is permitted without the prior approval of the publisher. The existence of a route on this map cannot be taken as evidence of a right of way.

MANTO

PORT HIL L

Theatre................... Town Hall............... Bus stop................. Children’s play area Cycle way (marked) Disabled access...... Footpath ................ Golf course............. Pub/inn .................. Main retail areas.... Other feature .........

CL

1

c

NS

Key to map symbols Car park ................. Leisure Centre........ Library.................... Museum................. Petrol station.......... Police station ......... Post Office.............. Public conveniences Recycling Point....... School .................... Superstore..............

LOWER CHURCH FIELDS

TH O


17 e

f Town centre AP=Alma Place CC=Cromwell Court CL=Chantry Lane CY=Chandlers Yard FAC=Five Alls Court HC=Harley Court HY=Hughenden Yard IY=Ironmongers Yard KM=Kennet Mews MC=Macklin Court NY=Neates Yard OC=Orchard Close OLC=Old Lion Court PA=Patten Alley PM=The Parade Mews RS=Russell Square RSY=Riding School Yard SPP=Saint Peters Place WL=Wye Lane WP=Wellington Place WY=Wagon Yard

S

R OG

RE

ER

OG

TE R

TIN T PI ILL

ER

ST

RE

ER

PEL AMS C

T

HOM

CHERR YO RC HA RD ORCH

CH UR CH

F

W

UP P

E F IELDS

W CL O

BAR

A M GA R

E T PL

NS

CH ER

A346 AD BL E N H E I M R O

HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING CENTRE

GLYMPTON HERTFORD COURT ROAD CT

A346

FORD HERT

MARLBOROUGH BUSINESS PARK SA

SAVERNAKE FOREST

LIS B U RY H ILL

CARAVAN PARK

VES P ASIAN HAZ E L C L CH O PP NE ING KNIFE LA

AD

RS E

CUNETIO GARDENS

FROXFIELD, HUNGERFORD BEDWYN

E AD S T IL E S R O

WOODSTOCK COURT

HITE HO

A4

HOMEFIELDS CLOSE

SF I E LD

WILLOW CLOSE ELCOT ORCHARD

RD

SAVERNAKE CRESCENT

AY SW

RY

PRIOR

ELIZABETH CLOSE

FI V

ME KS ADO

AD RO RY U B URY IS ISB PER UP CHARD ROAD OR HEATRE DS ON THE I EL HILL ST JOHN’S SCHOOL

ETS ME A D GAR MAR

EEN

D ROA

A

DU C

ST

L

COPPERS CORNER

QU

Y BUR

SL GIN FIG

VAN DIEMENS CLOSE

REC

OT C

LAUREL DRIVE

REEDS CORNER

MD

S SALI

SAVERNAKE COURT

AVALON COURT

S ED

END CT THE OLD YARD

S ARET ARG

YD

E AN EL G OR GE

ROAD RE DON GALES LONCOOMBE GROUND

EL C

H

COURT

STONEKING COURT CULVERMEAD CLOSE COOPERS MEADOW

S

52

K CHURCHILL

MILL

RO

ELCOT LANE

SE

WY

REC

ST M

D AR

NN KE TOWN

H EL

CORNERFIELDS

E IDG

CLO

L GE AN

FAC GDNS

HC

KM

STONEBRIDGE LANE

MARLBOROUGH TOWN FC

R EB

WL OC

ON ST

ST

WYE HOUSE GARDENS

DE

N BAR

T

XF NEOW R D TH EP A RA D E PM

Y

MARLBOROUGH

GREEN

DS OR

ET

WILD RIVER RESERVE AND MEADOW

ET

PA

ST ESS THE ERL

NN

GR D

ST

SILV

KE

IEL D

WP

RI V

RN HO OW

D

VI E

BARN F

BL

NH

TO LANSDOWN UL PL ALEXANDRA PO S TERRACE LEAF LOWER CL PROSPECT V ICA PROSPECT RAG INS E PL C SE ART M LO LARENDON ST RAWLINGSWELL COURT LANE

ST VID’S WAY BURY ACE

DA LE RD

R

LA L NE

ES T

RB

L OU R

FO R

HA

E PIP

LAIN E YS C S PI CE E

MILDENHALL, RAMSBURY

POULTON CRESCENT

LD

MINAG OSE

R IV

YWA

CO

NOR

PL

BA

LAWRENCE EW ACRE TH VI

SE

ACRE

E

AC LYN

PUR

ANCKLYN

D VIE W OO EY W ABL

CR YA

SWINDON TO MARLBOROUGH RAILWAY PATH

RO

MD NE WB ERS

R

W

46

THE THOM

d


EDUCATION & LEISURE

18

SCHOOLS

TAKING TIME OUT

he town of Marlborough has excellent schools for all ages. St Peter’s C.E.V.C. School is located in The Parade. Further information is available from: www.st-peters-jun.wilts.sch.uk It is a high-achieving school and declares that its pupils are confident and happy children, who enjoy learning. St Mary’s CE Infant School is located in George Lane, Marlborough. By visiting: www.stmarysmarlborough.org, you will be able to see how proud the school is of all its children and of their achievements, both in and beyond the classroom. Preshute Church of England Primary School in the village of Manton is a popular school, with just over 200 pupils. It caters for children aged 4 to 11 and has one class for every age group throughout the school, see www.preshute.wilts.sch.uk The Town’s secondary school, St. John’s, has just attained Academy status. Please see their advertisement within this guide or for further details: www.stjohns.wilts.sch.uk Another key educational establishment is Marlborough College, one of the UK’s leading public schools: www.marlboroughcollege.org (See page13). For 2-5yr olds there is the (privately run) College Fields Montessori Nursery School. Their boys and girls learn through play together, in one big bright school room and benefit from a lovely garden set in the grounds of Marlborough College. They can be contacted in term time on 01672 515486 from 9.00-15.30.

arlborough has clubs and societies catering for most sport across the age groups and includes a well-equipped Leisure Centre. There’s no excuse for not keeping fit here! Details can be found within “Community Information” on pages 25/6. Cyclists are frequent visitors to town and an unofficial cycle way has recently been designed in town, linking with Sustrans official network of cycle routes across the UK, see www.sustrans.org.uk or www.transitionmarlborough.org The Marlborough area is a walkers’ paradise; plan your own routes or find help from the many websites now available with downloadable walks (see also page 11). An old Railway Path going north from Marlborough links with a number of other rights of way along its route see www.friendsofthepath.org.uk For guided walks around town, follow David Chandlers' book, “Place Names of Marlborough”, available from White Horse Bookshop in the High Street, along with many other local publications. The River Kennet is accessible just a minute or two from the High Street. For a few weeks every year you may find cows in Coopers Meadow, which are part of a conservation grazing project (see map).

T

M

The town is steeped in history and the Merchant’s House (pictured left) in the High Street is now a museum. Built after the Great Fire of 1653 by Thomas Bayly, a silk merchant, it contains rare wall paintings and decorative features and is being lovingly restored by expert craftsmen. Behind the house is a 17th Century town garden, a hidden gem. It is an outstanding destination for anyone interested in fine old buildings. For details see www.merchantshouse.co.uk The ancient and beautiful church of St Peter’s Church at the west end of the High St, closed as a Parish Church in 1974 and now houses a café and craft shop. The church is most recognised for the ordination of (Cardinal) Thomas Wolsey as a priest in 1498. The tower, from which the view is spectacular, is quite a climb, but worth the effort; do not forget to take your camera with you. The interior of the church retains a peaceful, yet informal atmosphere and a visit should not be missed. See www.stpetersmarlborough.com for all details. Marlborough boasts a comprehensive range of places to eat and drink with many high quality independent outlets (see page 22, 29 & 31). There’s a wide range of shops featuring many unique characteristics and our extensive retail areas are marked on the map. Shhh ladies, don’t tell him there are over 20 fashion shops here….


BLUE PLAQUES

19

BLUE PLAQUE SCHEME The house on The Green where William Golding spent his early years

T

he plaque for Eglantine Jebb (1876-1928) is on the Library (formerly St Peter’s School) in the High Street, as founder of “Save the Children Fund” in 1919. She graduated from Oxford, trained as a teacher and spent her first few years teaching girls at St Peter’s School. This remarkable young lady, from a privileged background was anxious to teach in a poor working class area and was helped in this ambition by her Uncle James who was a master at the College. She scandalised her uncle by insisting on living on her meagre wages! The plaque for the Hancocks is on number 3 High Street. Thomas Hancock (1786-1865) invented the process to vulcanise rubber and Walter Hancock (1799-1852) invented a passenger steam coach. Natural rubber is a soft sticky substance with no uses, it is only through vulcanization that it can be used for vehicles tyres etc The plaque for author William Golding (1911-1993) is on the house in The Green where he spent his early years. He was a student

at Marlborough Grammar School where his father Alec was an inspirational teacher of science. The plaque for Cardinal Wolsey (1473-1540) is on St Peter’s Church where he was ordained a priest in 1498. He became a cardinal in 1515 and as well as his many high offices of church and state he was a candidate for the papacy in 1522 on the death of Leo X. The plaque for The Great Fire of Marlborough is on the shops at 41 to 47 High Street which in 1653 belonged to the tanner Francis Freeman. The fire started here and fanned by a south westerly wind spread to destroy 150 properties including St Mary’s Church. Such was the scale of the disaster that Cromwell launched one of the first ever national appeals for the relief of the town. St Mary’s Church was rebuilt and is unusual in that it looks more like a chapel meeting room, than the interior of a church, reflecting the period. During the fire, Dutch prisoners of war were in the town and the heroic efforts

made by them at rescuing people were recognized once more when the Dutch Ambassador was invited to the dedication of the plaque in 1997. The plaque for The Lord Chamberlain’s Men is in Russell Square (beside the Marlborough & District Conservative Club). A property in the vicinity was The White Hart Inn (destroyed in 1653) and was where Shakespeare’s company, The Lord Chamberlain’s Men, gave performances. The Plaque for Samuel Pepys commemorates his stay “at the Hart” in Marlborough on June 15th 1668, about which he wrote... “a pretty fair town for a street or two” giving mention to “their houses on one side having their pent-houses supported with pillars, which makes it a good walk”. Historians continue a discussion as to which White Hart he may have referred, but the Plaque can be found on 114 High St. The plaque for the Statutes of Marlborough 1267 is on the College gates, the site of the former Castle. Henry III had been married in the Castle and his last Parliament was held here in 1267 at which was passed “The Statutes of Marlborough”. The plaque for the Battle of Marlborough 1642 is on the Castle and Ball Hotel. The West Country was generally Royalist in its sympathies with the Seymour family at the castle supporting the king. The town was a strong supporter of Parliament, however, and was garrisoned with Parliamentary troops. The Royalists attacked the town on December 5th 1642 from the north, entering via the alleyways that lead into the High Street. The Mayor, along with many citizens, was taken to Oxford in chains.


20

For further information and to receive your copy of the latest Summer School brochure, please contact us at: MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE SUMMER SCHOOL MARLBOROUGH WILTSHIRE SN8 1PA TELEPHONE: 01672 892388 FAX: 01672 892476 EMAIL: ADMIN@MCSUMMERSCHOOL.ORG.UK www.mcsummerschool.org.uk Marlborough College is a Registered Charity No.309486 incorporated by Royal Charter to provide Education

TABLEWARE HIRE WITH A STYLISH CONTEMPORARY EDGE Perfect for...

• Birthdays • Weddings • Christenings • Dinner parties • Corporate events • Clubs & social functions

No washing up! Return dirty... The Foundry, Lottage Road, Aldbourne, Marlborough SN8 2EB 01672 541020 bite@biteevents.com www.biteevents.com


ARCHAEOLOGY

21

ARCHAEOLOGICAL FEAST

T

he landscape both in and around Marlborough is a rich archaeological feast which becomes more exciting with every new discovery. The very first evidence of people using the land on which Marlborough now lies stems from a few Palaeolithic hand axes from the site of the gasworks and from Granham Hill, ephemeral proof that hundreds of thousands of years ago people used this area as they followed migratory herds across the landscape. After the last ice age, which ended roughly 11,000 years ago, semi-nomadic Mesolithic huntergatherers began making temporary camps along the banks of the River Kennet, utilising the river as a routeway and for its natural resources. In doing so, they left large quantities of flint tools behind them; one such camp site is located just off London Road and another on Elcot Lane. A few thousand years later, during the Neolithic and Bronze age, people were living in more permanent settlements and evidence of early farming communities is still visible on the surrounding hillsides in the form of Neolithic Long Barrows and Bronze Age Round Barrows. A small community of late Neolithic/early Bronze Age people settled on the valley floor, now Ducks Meadow. A ditched trackway was discovered in the grounds of St. John’s School, possibly a routeway for taking their animals to graze up on the hillside, and where they would have probably tended their crops. Marlborough Mound, a 19 metre high chalk structure which is located in the grounds of the college, has recently been dated to the Neolithic period. The

The Mound in the grounds of the College and Silbury Hill, both dating from the Neolithic

radiocarbon date of 2,400 BC has effectively changed our perception of the Neolithic landscape of the area, making it likely that Marlborough was an important ritual landscape during these times. The mound was built at the same time as Silbury Hill, located approximately 8km west of Marlborough, some 4,400 years ago. In recent years the shape of Marlborough Mound has been obscured by tree and shrub growth, making it difficult to pick out, even from the top of St Peter’s Church tower. Such growth can also be damaging, but there is now a plan to carefully restore and cut back the unwanted growth. The mound, being within the grounds of Marlborough College, is not often accessible to the public. Frequent discoveries of brooches, coins and pottery found all over Marlborough are testament to the people of the Iron Age and there

are many, many finds left behind by the Romano-British people who lived here shortly afterwards, including a settlement with a cemetery at St. Margaret’s Mead and a Villa at Brown’s Farm. In addition, the famous ‘Cunetio Hoard’. (see pages 6&7) The Saxon period shows little evidence of occupation and archaeological finds are limited to a few coins and shards of pottery; there was however a Saxon burial located near Savernake Hospital.


EATING OUT

22

PLACES TO EAT

T

here is one thing you are unlikely to do in Marlborough - and that is go hungry or thirsty! You can eat your way around the world’s cuisine or stop off at a quintessentially English place - but we hope you’ll never be disappointed. Use the map to browse around the Eating Places and make your choice. If it’s one of those rare English Summer Days, you could always visit a takeaway, many of them are clustered around the Parade area and some of the cafes will do a take-out as well. You can then wander off to Cooper’s Meadow or Priory Gardens if you fancy a picnic by the River Kennet, or visit the rather elegant Wye House Gardens or even the tiny Plume of Feathers Lane Garden - just behind “Let’s Do Lunch” on the London Road. If the kids are with you - take a walk or drive to Salisbury Road Recreation Ground where there is some fantastic play equipment and Scoot and Skate Park. The edges of Marlborough offer different scenery in all directions – you will be spoilt for choice.

LIST OF EATING HOUSES NAME

ROAD

TEL

Appleby's (café)

Old Hughenden Yard

01672 515200

ASK (Italian)

High Street

01672 515797 Yes

Azuza (café)

Hughenden Yard

01672 513380

Barkers (café)

High Street

01672 516933

Blue Orchid (Thai) Kingsbury Street

01672 513353

Bow Belles Café

01672 519934

Coles Restaurant Kingsbury Street

01672 515004

Costa Coffee

High Street

01672 516302 Yes

The Food Gallery

High Street

01672 514069 Yes

Godot's Brasserie Kingsbury Street

01672 514776

Krumbz (café)

Kennet Place Riverside (from Jan 2013) London Road

01672 516333 Yes

Mercer's of Malrborough (café) Mustard Seed (café)

Hillier's Yard

01672 511377

Riverside, Hilliers Yard

01672 511611

Pagoda Peking

The Parade

01672 512886

Pino's (Italian)

New Road

01672 512969 Yes

Pizza Express

High Street

01672 519229

The Polly Tearooms Prezzo (Italian)

High Street

01672 512146

High Street

01672 511181 Yes

Raj (Indian)

Kingsbury Street

01672 515661

St Peter's Café

St Peter's Church, High St High Street

01672 515781 Yes

Let's Do Lunch (café)

Waitrose Café Mustard Seed Café,Riverside

High Street

DISABLED TOILET

01672 519011

01672 513337 Yes


23

MARLBOROUGH TOWN HALL

Our Town Hall is in the High Street and makes an impressive venue. The ground floor Court Room is used for exhibitions, fairs, sales and events. On the first floor, the breathtakingly beautiful Assembly Room is suitable for weddings, concerts, film shows, business conferences and more. There are bar facilities and a live music license. It is equipped with the latest state of the art technology which includes: • superb quality visual and sound systems • ability to present all forms of digital media • laptop linked presentation capability • lighting rails including spotlights to satisfy the most demanding theatre production • remote lighting desk controls • hearing loop Details and technical specifications are available from the office. There is full disabled access to the town hall, nearby parking is available and we are licensed for weddings. Please contact us to discuss the event you may be planning. E enquiries@marlboroughtowncouncil.gov.uk T 01672 512487


24

Complete range of specialist advice

l Self assessment l Business accounts l Management accounts l VAT, payroll and P11D l Cashflow forecasts l Bookkeeping l Tax planning l Start-ups l Audit FREE initial consultation

Call 01672 512163 126 High Street, Marlborough SN8 1LZ Also at: 17 Market Place, Devizes SN10 1BA

www.davidowen.co.uk Local family business Established 1959 Experienced CRB drivers Licenced by Wiltshire Council Any distance and any time by arrangement Contracts/accounts welcome

MARLBOROUGH TAXIS HARLEY TRAVEL

01672 512786 1-8 SEATS

ELM TREE PELHAM COURT MARLBOROUGH WILTS SN8 2AG annharley2@btconnect.com


marlboroughnewsonline.co.uk

25

COMMUNITY INFORMATION ARTS

• Kennet Valley Arts Trust (regular films) www.kvat.co.uk • Marlborough Literature Festival www.marlboroughlitfest.org • Marlborough Open Studios www.marlboroughopenstudios.com • Wiltshire Artists (annual exhibitions in St. Peter’s Church) auldart@hotmail.com • Guild of Wiltshire Artists (reg exhibitions St Peter’s Church) www.guildofwiltshireartists.com • Riverbank Writers riverbankwriters.wordpress.com BLIND • Marlborough & District Talking Newspaper Rodney Stone 01672 810218 BRIDGE • Marlborough Bridge Club Mr Wilson 01672 512861 • Bridge for All Mr. A. Hill 01672 514447 BUSINESS • Marlborough Chamber of Commerce www.chambernews.biz CITIZENS ADVICE BUREAU • CAB Marlborough 08443 752775 (from landline) 0300 456 8375 (from mobile) COMMUNITY COLLEGE • St John’s Academy Classes and activities held www.stjohns.wilts.sch.uk COMMUNITY & DAY CENTRES • New Road Centre (supports people with moderate disabilities) 01672 515841 • Jubilee Centre Drop-in Centre & Day Care for the over 60’s 01672 513087

• Coombe End Court Day Care for elderly people 01672 512075

LIONS • Marlborough & District Lions John Edmunds 01672 512650

COMMUNITY TRANSPORT • Kennet Community Transport Alexander Kirk Wilson 01672 513861

LOCAL ENVIRONMENT • Action for the River Kennet www.riverkennet.org

Marlborough & District Link Scheme • Transport for medical needs 01672 288007 DANCING • Just for fun line dancing Tessa Hicks 01672 520336

• Community Orchard (incl. Apple Day) towninanorchard@gmail.com • Friends of the Chiseldon & Marlborough Railway Path www.friendsofthepath.org.uk • Transition Marlborough www.transitionmarlborough.org

• Scottish Country Dancing Jennifer Parker 01672 515151

• Marlborough Climate Pledge (see Transition Marlborough above)

• Zumba www.zwithlau.blogspot.com

• Marlborough Communities Market www.marlboroughmarket.org.uk

DRAMA & THEATRE • Marlborough Theatre Club Rosemary Stevenson 01672 514117 • Marlborough Players Ian Philpott 01672 512302 EMBROIDERERS • The Embroiderers Guild, Marlborough & District www.marlboroughembroiderers.org EVENT INFORMATION • Marlborough Events List www.marlboroughboxoffice.co.uk GARDENING • Marlborough Gardening Association Tricia Hayllar 01672 512435 • Allotments Association Michelle Luck 01672 516176 HISTORY • Marlborough History Society Sarah Holden 01672 515370 LADIES GROUPS • Marlborough Women’s Institute Doreen Davis 01672 514177

MEN'S GROUPS • Marlborough & District Probus Club Michael Williams 01672 511928 • Marlborough Freemasons Secretary 01672 513316 MODEL FLYING CLUB • Model Flying Club Errol Cook 01672 861644 MUSEUMS • The Merchant’s House High Street www.themerchantshouse.co.uk MUSIC • Bellringers St Mary’s Dorothy Blythe (Tower Captain) 01672 512993 • Phoenix Brass Band David Watson 01672 515176 • Kennet Accordian Orchestra Nigel Pasby 01488 644670 • Kennet Valley Singers Janet Biggs 01672 513585


26

• Kennet Vale Brass Roy Coles 01672 564326 • Marlborough & District Concert Club Tom Massey 01672 516610 • Marlborough Choral Society, Ken Mortimer 01672 870765 • Marlborough Community Choir marlboroughcommunitychoir.org • Marlborough Concert Orchestra, Rob Napier 01672 512333 • Marlborough Jazz Festival www.marlboroughjazz.com • Folk Roots www.marlboroughfolk-roots.co.uk ROTARY • Marlborough & District Rotary Club www.marlboroughrotary.org.uk SPORT • Marlborough Sports Forum Caroline Maddocks 01672 564729 • Leisure Centre, Marlborough 01672 513161 Athletics • Marlborough & District Junior Athletics www.madja.co.uk Badminton • Kennet Badminton Club, Adult/ Junior Iain & Julie Tandy 01672 563783

marlboroughnewsonline.co.uk Fishing • Marlborough & District Angling Association www.mdaa.co.uk Golf • Marlborough Golf Club 01672 512147 Hockey • Marlborough Ladies & Mens Caroline Maddocks 01672 564 729 Rugby • Marlborough RFC Leila Nairne 01672 511250 Running • Marlborough Running Club marlboroughrunningclub.co.uk Swimming • Marlborough Penguins Amateur Swimming Club Alan Crook 01672 512757 Tennis • Marlborough Tennis Club Hilda Moore 01672 511963 Tai Chi • Marlborough Tai Chi Group Cyla Higley 01672 512807 Tae Kwon-Do • Francis School of Tae Kwon-Do (PUMA) 01793 850410

• Marlborough Committee for Cancer Research UK marlboroughcancerresearch.org

• UNIVERSITY OF THE THIRD AGE U3A Marlborough www.u3ainkennet.org.uk

• 1st Marlborough Brownies marl.brownies@btinternet.com

Football • Marlborough Town FC 01672 513340

VOLUNTARY, CAMPAIGN AND SUPPORT • Alzheimer’s Support in Marlborough Gaynor Mapp 07936 540096 • Friends of the Marlborough Telescope www.blackettobserver.org • Friends of Savernake Hospital & The Community Janet Louth 01672 513868 • Home-Start Kennet Bel Crompton 01672 569457 • Macular Disease Society for Marlborough 01672 810263

• Marlborough Youth FC Alan Eyles 01672 514676

• Marlborough Brandt Group 01672 861116

Bowls • Marlborough Bowls Club Angela Watts 01672 511335 Boxing • Marlborough Boxing Club Andy Nash 01672 516844 Cricket • Marlborough Cricket Club, Simon Wells 01672 511641

• Marlborough & District Dyslexia Association Susanne Harris 07729 452143 • Marlborough & District National Trust Association Jane Ebbutt 01672 540368 • Mencap (East Wilts) Ann Bathurst 01672 512041 • St Peter’s Church Trust www.stpetersmarlborough.com WILDLIFE & COUNTRYSIDE LINKS • www.wiltshire.gov.uk (Go to -> Community & Environment -> Wiltshire Countryside) • Wiltshire Wildlife Hospital 07850 778752 YOUNG PEOPLE’S ACTIVITIES • Air Training Corps 2293 (Marlborough) Squadron ATC www.marlboroughatc.co.uk • 2nd Marlborough Scouts Tina Fudge 01672 514376

• 1st Marlborough Guides dianeshepherd20@hotmail.com • Activites for under 5s Go to www.nct.org.uk • Corner House Children’s Centre 01672 513010 • Youth Development Centre 01672 512762 We apologise unconditionally for any omissions or incorrect information in this hastily pulled together list – please let us know and we’ll publish updates on our new town council website, as soon as it’s up and running. These are all very much Marlborough-based community organisations,; for further afield, or statutory information and businesses use other locally available publications.


OUT AND ABOUT

27

PLACES OF INTEREST MARKET TOWN Crofton

M

M

arlborough has some of the most significant and oldest features of English Heritage on its doorstep. Less than 7 miles away stands the Avebury Stone Circle, erected by ancient man more than 4,000 years ago. You reach Avebury by travelling west from Marlborough along the A4, passing the prehistoric Silbury Hill en route. From the stone circle, it is just a short stroll to Avebury Manor, which the National Trust: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/ avebury opens to the public during the tourist season, along with the 17th century thatched barn now housing much of the Alexander Keiller Museum. Just off the A303 and less than 20 miles from Marlborough, you come to Stonehenge, probably the most famous stone circle in the world. The purpose of this gigantic monument is still unknown, but it is a “must see” for anybody visiting Wiltshire and has its own spacious visitors centre next to the A342. Another ancient site worth visiting is the Uffington White Horse, a huge Bronze-age image etched into the Ridgeway escarpment. You can view it at close quarters, and take in spectacular views of the Oxfordshire countryside by walking across the downland from the nearby car park.

For those who prefer history connected with the built environment, particularly the industrial revolution, other local attractions include the Crofton Beam Engines: www.croftonbeamengines.org Wilton Windmill: www.wiltonwindmill.co.uk and the “Caen Hill Locks”. This famous flight of 20 canal locks is a spectacular feature of the Kennet and Avon Canal on the outskirts of our neighbouring market town, Devizes. For an insight into the social and cultural history of this area, you could visit Lacock Village, Buscot Park and Stourhead - all major National Trust destinations within an hour’s drive of Marlborough. For a grand day out, go south via the A338 to visit Salisbury and its beautiful Cathedral and Close; drive northwards to visit the university city of Oxford and discover its “dreaming spires”, or travel west along the A4 to Bath, a spa town famous for its historic Roman Baths and starring role in Jane Austen novels. On the way to Bath, the picturesque old town of BradfordUpon-Avon, home of the Moulton Bicycle Company, is a delightful place to break your journey.

arlborough became a market town in 1204 when the Charter was granted and it more than lives up to its title. Thriving street markets operate in the centre of the High Street every Wednesday and Saturday offering a huge range of wares. In addition, Marlborough Town Council and Transition Marlborough have recently launched a vibrant “Communities Market”, which takes place on the first Sunday of each month, trading from 11am to 4pm, except in winter, when 3pm is quite late enough. This market concentrates on local produce or services and encourages new businesses to get off the ground, with a constant eye on sustainability. Occasionally there is a visiting Continental Market, just to keep us on our toes. A Marlborough market


REGULAR EVENTS

28

THE RHYTHM OF MARLBOROUGH LIFE Regular events taking place in the town - please note all dates are subject to change, check local websites for the latest details. MONTH

APPROX DATE

EVENT

LOCATION

MARCH

3rd weekend

Science Fair

St. John’s Academy

APRIL

1st weekend

Spring Fair

Marlborough College

MAY

Varies

Heritage Open Day

JUNE

4th Sat

Manton Music Festival

Merchant's House, High Street Jubilee Field, Manton

Last Weekend

Barbury Horse Trials

Barbury Castle

1st, 2nd, 3rd weekends

Marlborough Open Studios

In and around the town

3rd Fri-Sun

Marlborough International Jazz Festival Venues throughout the town

JULYAUGUST

Over three weeks

Marlborough College Summer School

Marlborough College

AUGUST

Towards end of month

JULY

Gifford’s Circus

Marlborough Common

SEPTEMBER Last 4 days

Marlborough Literary Festival

Various venues in the town

OCTOBER

Mop Fairs

High Street

Apple Day

Venue to be decided

Civic Dinner

Town Hall

Xmas Lights Switch-On

High Street

Saturday before and after 11th of month 2nd Sun

NOVEMBER Last Thurs

A Heritage Open Day at the Merchant's House


PUBS

29

A TOUR OF THE TOWN'S PUBS

T

here are now twelve pubs in Marlborough, including one in Manton. All of these are of ancient origin, with maybe a change of name. Some have been modernised and rebuilt over the years, though many retain original features.

Pubs of the past

In the late 18th century almost forty were listed, but the coaching trade collapsed after the opening of the Great Western Railway through Swindon in 1841. Many of these former pubs live on through their names on local streets. For example The Angel at 8 High Street (1605 to 1865) gave its name to Angel Yard and The Plume of Feathers (1777 to 1806) gave its name to the lane off London Road. The Temperance Hotel (1890 to 1930) at 1 London Road has not left its name, but it is still possible to see the sign painted high up on the end of that building. Other sites of former pubs of interest include The Borough Arms at 15 The Parade (1848 to 1913), where the Arms of The Borough of Marlborough are high on the wall of what is now D&R’s shop. There were several White Hart Inns around the town over the centuries and Samuel Pepys stayed in one of them in comfort when he passed

through the town in 1668. It was at one of the White Harts at 114 to 116 High Street (1456 to 1653) that The Chamberlain’s Men, the company of William Shakespeare, are said to have performed. Alma House, now a private house in Alma Place, was the White Hart from 1679 to 1777 and the cellar still has the ramps for rolling down the barrels of beer. Seven pubs have closed since the Second World War: The Bell and Shoulder of Mutton at 44 Kingsbury Street (1780 to 1952) now a shop; The Duke of York at 50 St Martin’s (1826 to 1958) now flats for the elderly; Cross Keys at 26/27 The Parade (1904 to 1974) now offices; The Jolly Butcher at 15 High Street (1757 to 1985) now Maythers Card shop; The Ailesbury Arms at 6 High Street (1843 to 1986) now offices; Up the Garden Path, formerly the New Inn, in Manton High Street (1878 to 1998) is now a private house; The Five Alls at 13 London Road (1780 to 1999) is also private housing. The Five Alls had an interesting sign which explained the origin of its name: the Soldier who fights for all, the Priest who prays for all, the Lawyer who pleads for all, the King who rules all and finally John Bull who pays for them all!

Pubs of the present

Today’s pubs offer a wide range of food and drink to serve all tastes and pockets and are listed in order of antiquity. Some of them also have accommodation (see Where to Stay page 31) The Green Dragon (since 1650) is a Wadworths of Devizes pub and serves that brewery’s famous 6X beer. It has a fine interior with original features and a garden. The Roebuck (since 1739) is a Fuller’s pub and serves that brewery’s excellent draft ales. It has plentiful parking and a garden. This is the pub from where the Fullers Dray leaves every year, that heralds the opening of the Marlborough International Jazz Festival. The Royal Oak (since 1743) has been extensively refurbished. Its name was changed, fortunately for only a brief time, to The Rat and Carrot in the 1990’s. The Sun Inn (since 1751) has one of the finest original interiors for a Marlborough pub, has a Bistro, open fires and pretty multi-level garden. The Castle and Ball (since 1764 and known as The Antelope from 1745 to 1763) is now the town’s only hotel and was extensively refurbished early in 2012. The Bear (since 1950 and known as The Bear and Castle


30

The Crown

The Parade, Marlborough Traditional English pub Charming beer garden real ales ...and a reputation for food

Manton, Marlborough SN8 4HW Tel: 01672 512352

Opening Hours : 9am-11pm Friday & Saturday: open ’til 1am • Your warm, friendly, local pub on the High Street • Selection of good home cooked food • Best pub garden in Marlborough • Real ales • 5 fantastic new ensuite B&B bedrooms 13 High Street, Marlborough SN8 1AA Tel: 01672 514847

• Superb Sunday lunches • Al fresco dining • Lunchtime bar meals • Evening à la carte • Fresh fish & seafood specialists • Accommodation • Private car park Tel: 01672 511344

• 18th century inn • Great food and drink • Brakspear’s ales • Luxury en-suite accommodation The Barleycorn Inn, Collingbourne Kingston, Marlborough, Wilts SN8 3SD

Tel: 01264 850368

Email: barleycorninn@hotmail.co.uk


PUBS / ACCOMMODATION from 1757 to 1949) is an Arkells pub; the brewery, which is based in Swindon, is known for its excellent 3B ale. It has live music at the weekends and screens major sporting events. The Crown (since 1914 and known as The Crown and Anchor from 1832 to 1913) has been recently refurbished. This hostelry is renowned for the variety of its fish dishes. The Lamb (since 1833) is the second Wadworth pub in the town which means it also serves the well known 6X Beer, as well as the lesser known Henry’s IPA and stronger seasonal ales. With a traditional interior and garden, the ambience is that of an old coaching inn. The Queen’s Head (since 1838, known as The Queen Caroline from 1822 to 1838 and The King’s Head from 1782 to 1822). A Punch Tavern, in St Martin’s just off The Green. A lively and friendly local with a beer garden and occasional live music. The Wellington (since 1845) is an Enterprise Inn which was extensively refurbished some years ago and has a courtyard garden. Coles Restaurant (since 1995 and known as The Cricketers from 1876 to 1994) was refurbished before it reopened in 1995 and is now one of the town’s leading restaurants. Other hostelries in the town centre which incorporate enthusiastically supported restaurants are Godot's and Pino's which appear in the list of Eating Places (page 22) The Outside Chance (since 2008, previously known as The Oddfellows from 1878) is the only pub in Manton and as its name suggests, has links with the world of racing. It’s a walkable distance for the energetic, along a footpath from Marlborough.

31

WHERE TO STAY

M

arlborough provides good-standard hotel and bed and breakfast accommodation and the following are all in the town centre although by no means a definitive list; The Bear Hotel, located on the corner of The Parade and High Street, directly opposite the Town Hall, has eight very reasonably priced rooms, all of which are located upstairs. Further down The Parade, about 100 metres away from the centre of the town, The Lamb Inn (7 upstairs rooms) and The Crown Inn (4 upstairs rooms) are very old next-door neighbours, each offering plenty of character and a good food menu. On the south side of the High Street, about 150 metres from the Town Hall, you find The Green Dragon (5 upstairs rooms) which features a mural depicting King John, King Henry VIII and other historical figures with Marlborough connections. Further along the south side of the High Street, The Merlin Hotel offers 10 upstairs rooms. On the north side, visitors have the choice of the Sun Inn on the

corner of Hyde Lane and High Street (5 upstairs rooms); popular with those visiting the college, it has a Bistro and open fires. The Castle & Ball Hotel, (37 rooms), a large former coaching inn, has recently been refurbished. As well as hotel-style accommodation, the Castle & Ball offers comfortable surroundings and a welcoming atmosphere. Accommodation just out of town, that includes easy access for those with mobility problems are; Poulton Grange (which has ramps giving access to its 5 cabins) and Teal Cottage (2 rooms, ramped entrance). In Ogbourne St. George; The Inn With The Well (4 rooms ground floor and 2 access for wheelchair users), Parklands Hotel (2 ground floor rooms) & The Sanctuary (3 rooms, ground floor rooms). This is not a definitive list and you can find further details of registered accommodation on www.visitwiltshire.co.uk and a more extensive list marlboroughwiltshire.co.uk and many establishments have their own websites.


32

Visit us to view one of the largest selections of flooring & fabrics in the South West. Also suppliers of furniture and much, much more! D&R FURNISHERS 14-18 The Parade | Marlborough | Wilts | SN8 1NE Tel. 01672 513491 (Furnishings) 01672 513492 (Flooring) Open Mon-Fri 8.15am − 5.00pm CLOSED WEEKENDS

ST MARTINS • MARLBOROUGH

TEL: 01672 516844

A warm welcome awaits you at this friendly traditional pub

LARGE COURTYARD FIND US ON FACEBOOK

POOL • DARTS • LIVE MUSIC MOST FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS

Say it with tea towels...

...or aprons, or bags, or cards. The Radical Tea Towel Company

For a radical approach to present giving, visit:

www.radicalteatowel.com


FOR BOOKINGS AND AVAILABILITY CALL: 01672 520 230 OR EMAIL: THEBELL@THEBELLRAMSBURY.COM

WWW.THEBELLRAMSBURY.COM

G-SHOCK WELDERS incorporating IRONSMITHS OF DISTINCTION wrought ironwork

BUILDING STEEL SUPPLIER PORTAL FRAMES, BEAMS, COLUMNS, etc. Mobile welding/fabrication & full workshop facilities 19 Cherry Orchard, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 4AR

Tel/Fax: 01672 512736 or 07971 283620

9 LUXURIOUSLY APPOINTED ENSUITE ROOMS


The Official Marlborough Town Guide 2013-14  

The official guide to living, visiting and working in Marlborough, Wiltshire

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you